Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pam Brewers Parents Issbe Statement

By HARVEY ALPER
Alligator Staff Writer
Pam me Brewers parents, Mr. and**
Mrs. Robert Brewer, released a statement
to the press Friday explaining their actions
in withdrawing Pamela from UF. In it
they said their actions resulted from pres pressure
sure pressure exerted by the University.
The statement reads in part: We
read in todays Washington Evening Star
that the withdrawal of our daughter Pamela
from the UF was not the result of pres pressures
sures pressures having been exerted. That is not

The Florida Alligator

Vol c 59, No n 124

Maxfield Quits
UF For Kansas,
Cites Restrictions

By JUSTINE HARTMEN
Alligator Staff Writer
The owner of the most mammoth
mustache in town and a Rolls
Royce connaisseur to boot, Dr.
John Maxfield, chairman of mathe mathematics
matics mathematics at UF for the past seven
years, is departing for greener
pastures.
tember Maxfield
will be chairman
of mathematics
at Kansas State
University, wh whtoral
toral whtoral program.
Student
Drowns
At Spring
A UF student John C. Turner
drowned while scuba diving at
Manatee Springs late Sunday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon.
Turner, a GAR, got tanlged in a
rope approximately 60-feet under
the water. His roommate and di diving
ving diving buddy Dennis McDonough,
SAR, fought valiently trying to un untangle
tangle untangle Turner from the rope.
Neither diver had a knife and
within a few minutes both were
out of air. McDonough managed
to make the surface and got help
from Vanda Driessche, an Air
Force enlisted man.
But by the time Driessche got
back down to aid Turner he was
dead.
No other divers were at the
spring this late in the afternoon.
Turners body was brought to
the surface at 5:30 p.m. and pro pronounced
nounced pronounced dead by Dr. Kenneth Wise
of Bronson, Florida at 6:10 p.m.
Army Band
Plays Tonight
The United States Army Band
will strike up a concert tonight
at 8:15 for UF Students at Uni University
versity University Auditorium.
The concert is sponsored by
UFs military department and the
Department of Music.
The band will play spirited
marches and popular tunes.

so.
. . we believed from our conver conversation
sation conversation with Mr. Goldin and Dean Hale
that the only choice was withdrawl or
expul son. Had we not been so convinced
we would have taken no action.
The statement, signed by Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Brewer, also noted other cir circumstances
cumstances circumstances of Pammes withdrawl from
the University. The Brewers indicated
that Selig Goldin, Pammes attorney, with withdrew
drew withdrew from the case, and so informed
Pammes parents, when a second picture
of her posing in the nude appeared in

Why is he leaving? I like to
build mathematics departments,
responded Maxfield, and it will
be much easier to build a first
quality math department at Kansas
State than it is here.
The structure of the state gov government
ernment government and that invention of the
devil- -the line-item budget are
at fault, according to Maxfield.
'UF is bound up with so many
restrictions it cant operate. he
commented.
The budget at UF is a thick
book with salary and promotion
rates already established for the
next several years. Any changes
require the approval of the leg legislature
islature legislature and the governor.
In Kansas, said Maxfield,
the legislature believes that the
Board of Regents knows what its
doing, and the Board believes that
the university knows what its doing.
They keep a check on funds,
of course, but they dont watch
everything down to the molecular
level. This business of attaching
a man to every dollar to follow
it through all channels is ridicu ridiculous.
lous. ridiculous.
The budget directives at Kansas
State fills one and a half pages.
In my opinion, he continued,
we have built a reasonably good
math department at UF with extra extraordinarily
ordinarily extraordinarily hard work and very good
luck. With the same amount of
work, I will build a much better
one at Kansas.

Study Shows Grade Breakdown

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Staff Writer
With final exams less than a month off,
many UF students are becoming concerned
over prospects for final grades.
According to a recent study undertaken
by the Office of Academic Services, chances
for a good grade may depend greatly upon
the generosity of the college the student
is enrolled in.
The study was a compiling of grade dis distributions
tributions distributions of all University of Florida col colleges,
leges, colleges, schools, and under-graduate courses
except the College of Medicine. The sta statistics
tistics statistics extended over the fall trimester,
1966-67, and were based on enrollment in
courses given for that period.
The results of the study show that the
most As given out in any college were
in the College of Engineering. Os those
students enrolled in an Engineering course

University of Florida, Gainesville

gift 9* 1 w IHfl p|

ORANGE AND BLUE BEAUTIES
-The winners of the Orange and
Blue week princess contest were;
(left to right) Linda Spencer, Del-

Riker Dispells Twin
Tower Kitchen Rumors

Director of Housing Dr. Harold C. Riker told
the Alligator Sunday afternoon rumors claiming
up to eight persons will be forced to share one
kitchen in the new twin tower dorms are un unfounded.
founded. unfounded.
Each suite, Riker said, has a kitchen kitchenette.
ette. kitchenette.
Riker noted that a suite consists of two bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, each housing two students, a study kit kitchen,
chen, kitchen, and bath. The housing director said kit kitchens
chens kitchens will be equipped with range, oven, re refrigerator,
frigerator, refrigerator, sink, garbage disposal and kitchen
cabinets.
"There will also be some extra kitchen facil facilities
ities facilities on the main floor, Riker said.
The twin towers will be air-conditioned and

the latest edition of the off-campus Charl Charlatan
atan Charlatan magazine.
Goldin apparently told the Brewers he
had believed no further nude photos of
Pam me would be published. When the se second
cond second picture appeared he decided to quit.
The statement also indicated that Dean
of Student Affairs Lester Hale informed
the Brewers by phone that Pam me was
in scholastic difficulty and therefore was
in double-jeopardy of being expelled from
the UF.
Hale, the statement notes, indicated to
the Brewers that their daughter would

GO EDUCATION FOR AS

last tri-mester, 32.81% received an A.
The College of Education placed second
with 28.29% of its students receiving an A.
Health Related Professions passed out 26.07%
As in the final grading, the third largest
total on campus.
At the other extreme, the Colleges of
Pharmacy and Law distributed the least
number of As. They gave only 7.88 and
8.61% respectively.
The colleges most prone to failing stu students
dents students as evidenced from the study are the
Colleges of Law, 6.77%, and Forestry, 5.81%.
At the same time, the College of Edu Education
cation Education only gave failing marks to .56%
of its enrollment.
Those schools that walked the middle of
the road in grading last trimester were
the Colleges of Law and Pharmacy, and the
University College.
Law students earned a grade of C

probably have been expelled from the UF
because of her grades and her second
alleged conduct violation some time soon.
The dean indicated the withdrawal was
in their daughters best interests. He
also agreed to keep University news
releases on the situation as brief as
possible.
The statement also indicates the Brew Brewers
ers Brewers decided to withdraw their daughter
before she was informed of the situation.
After the action had been taken Pam me
protested to her parents. It was too late.

Monday, March 27, 1967

ta Delta Delta; Judy Silver (win (winnerj'
nerj' (winnerj' Kappa Delta and Judy Nes Nesler,
ler, Nesler, Alpha Delta Pi.

have wall-to-wall carpeting.
Suites will be furnished with telephones.
Linen service will be proveded on the same
basis now employed in other dorms.
In each of the twin towers a small television
room will be located on the main floor. In addition
the main floor will house coin laundry facilities
in both building.
Rooms will also be set aside in the buildings
for meeting rooms.
A commons building will be part of the
twin-towers complex. It will house a social room,
large television room and study library.
The Department of Student Health will operate*
a satellite infirmary at the tower dorms.

46.41% of the time. Students in Pharmacy
and the University College received the aver average
age average grade in 45.55 and 45.35% of all cases.
The least number of Cs were given in
the College of Education, but Education
awarded a B in 47.91% of its final course
totals *to balance the middle of the scale.
Fewest Bs were earned in the Univer University
sity University College than any other school, followed
by Forestry and Law.
A grade of D was most frequently seen
in College of Forestry and University Col College
lege College courses. Education and Health Related
Professions gave out the least number of
Ds to their students.
The study seems to indicate that the
surest courses to receive an A in are
the General Education courses in the Col College
lege College of Education. Last tri, 81.25% of the
total enrollment in these courses were given
an A.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 27, 1967

Contraceptive
Turns Eyes Red
WASHINGTON UPI Early re research
search research on an oral contraceptive
for men produced a pill that turn turned
ed turned the users eyeballs pink if
he drank any alcoholic beverages,
Dr. James L. Goddard, the food
and drug commissioner, said Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday.
Sort of an advertisement, you
might say, that the individual was
taking an oral contraceptive and
thus it wouldnt be acceptable in
itself, Goddard said on a tele television
vision television program Issues and Ans Answers-ABC
wers-ABC Answers-ABC
Research is continuing, he said.
Speech
On Sex
Wanted
Four UF students requested a
permit Thursday from the Free
Speech DivisionOffice of Student
Affairs to allow them to sell
literature advocating sexual
freedom under the First Amend Amendment
ment Amendment beginning March 28, 1967,
or sooner, if possible.
The literature the four students
are requesting to sell is: Love,
Intercourse, Eros Free and
Campus Sexual Freedom State Statement
ment Statement of Position.
The four students petitioning for
permission are Randy Sides, Ken
J. Sides, Joel Starkey and Ron
Arons.
The four give their address as
Post Office Box 12488, Gainesville.
UF Student.
Grants
Available
Twenty student stipends of $250
each are available during the up upcoming
coming upcoming spring trimester at the
University of Florida for outstand outstanding
ing outstanding students in education and the
social sciences interested in edu educational
cational educational research.
Each student will be assigned
an individual project under super supervision
vision supervision of a faculty member in the
behavior sciences and will earn
15 credit hours.
Interested students may contact
Dr. Robert Jester, co-director
or Dr. Gordon at Ext. 2073 or
Ext. 2179. Application blanks are
available in Room 290 of Norman
Hall.

Roast Beef On
Meat Sauce &
' Spaghetti
I'SflL
Bl3W.Univ.Avt.
MwjMMjl 1/2 Block West of Fla. Theatre
jpMBSMiAifliH A SHORT WALK FROM CAMPUS
mmmmmam
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advert advertisements
isements advertisements and to revise oi turn away cop) which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GtARANTLKP, though desired position will be g'.ven whenever
possible
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is fiver, to the Ad Advertising
vertising Advertising Manager within (I) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator
will not In- responsible for more than one incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several tunes. Notices Tor correction must l>e given l>efore t>ext insertion.
Till HOMIIA Al l IGATtlit is ihe official student newspaper of the University of
y lortda and Is published five times weekly ex. ept during May, June, and July when
It is published semi-weekly. Only editorials represent the official opinions of their authors.
Address correspondence to The 1 lortda Alligator, Florida l nlun Building, Lnlverstt)
of Morlda, Gainesville, ni, 32',0i. The Alligator Is entered as second class matter
at the l lilted states Post Office at Gainesville.

BY we have mo clue as \ holv' N6ECXE hnj AAV
_ HTO WHO STOLE VOUR STACK AS OF NOON
Batman \ ,soit J ioday
A and I COULD HAVE OEEM J
ROBIN I ANYBODY' A 193.796,H1S JOT
TAKEN ITTT |T |SNJ, T THAT'&ir
jack 9AD X
T BENNY /TaP. v
N A#

Kirk Wants Republican Win

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. UPI- Gov.
Claude Kirks No. 1 goal in Tues Tuesdays
days Tuesdays balloting for 128 seats in
the reapportioned state legislature
is to pick up enough Republican
votes to block Democrats from
passing bills over his veto.

Allied Intelligence
Hits Soviet Spies

TURIN, Italy (UPI) ltalian
counter-intelligence sources said
Sunday the smashing of a spy ring
in Turin put allied security agents
on the track of a vast Soviet
espionage network strecthingfrom
northern Europe to the Mediter Mediterranean
ranean Mediterranean and perhaps to the United
States.
As a result of the arrests of
Italian parachutist Giorgio Rinaldi
and his alleged fellow-agents, the
sources said new investigations
are underway into Soviet spying in
Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands,
Austria and America.
It had been reported earlier that
the Soviet spy network extended
into Spain, France, Greece, Cy Cyprus
prus Cyprus and Morocco.
Austrian counterspies told
Italian authorities that a spy sus suspect
pect suspect arrested in Vienna Wednesday
received data from Soviet agents
in Norway, Belgium and Holland.
He is believed also to have acted
as a channel to eastern Europe
for the Rinaldi group.
Investigators in the United States
and Italy were reported seeking
Yearbook Delay
Student Publications announced
late Sunday evening that the 1967
Seminoles will not be distributed
this week as previously announc announced.
ed. announced.
The new Yearbooks will be hand handed
ed handed out Monday, April 3 at the in information
formation information booth across from the
Hub.

Accomplishment of the goal, in incidentally,
cidentally, incidentally, would give Florida the
first two-party legislature in the
South.
All Kirk needs for victory is
to hold on to the 37 seats al already
ready already held by Republican sena-

a mysterious visitor of the Rin Rinaldispossibly
aldispossibly Rinaldispossibly a Soviet spy
courierwho frequently traveled
to America.
Since Rinaldi, his wife and theiF
chauffeur Armando Girard were
arrested March 15, there have been
a number of arrests in Greece and
Cyprus.
Red Jets
Battle U.S.
Fighters
SAIGON UPp'-U. S. Air Force
pilots shot down a Communist MIG
jet interceptor Sunday as they at attacked
tacked attacked targets on the outskirts of
the North Vietnamese capital of
Hanoi, U.S. spokesmen reported
Monday.
The Communist plane was one
of at least nine that challenged
American raiders.
The U. S. command said the
supersonic dogfight erupted when
U. S. Air Force F4C Phantom
jets and FlO5 Thu kerchiefs stre streaked
aked streaked into the Hanoi area to hit
the Sontay army supply area 23
miles west of the Communist ca capital.
pital. capital.

"CttfrCala" |U "C*k" art rtgitltrri ^
nam Now
4 j. / S \
| j there's a
Hi \\ double-date.
?
§
> I
i/uVifi iii t
Coca-Cola adds extra fun to datingsingle or double. Thats because Coke has
the taste you never get tired 0f... always refreshing. Thats why things go better JIMS!}
with Coke... after Coke... after Coke.
o"t.d . *~r of Th. co. Coi. Company s Florida Coca-Cola Bottling Company Daytona Beach,

iK WE W\rHAUT-TLELUCK

tors and representatives and add
20.
He has concentrated on Senate
races because all he needs to
sustain vetoes of pet bills there
is six in addition to the 11 seats
presently held by the GOP.
In the larger House, Republi Republicans
cans Republicans need a total of 40 votes,
or 14 added to the present 26.
UF Jazz
Concert
Tuesday
A popular jazz concert will be
given by the UF Percussion En Ensemble
semble Ensemble Tuesday March 28 at 8:15
p.m. in University Auditorium.
James P. Hale from the Depart Department
ment Department of Music will direct the En Ensemble
semble Ensemble which has instruments
ranging from tympani and temple
blocks to marimba and vibes.
Also appearing with the En Ensemble
semble Ensemble will be the Gator Variety
Band and Second Variety Band.
Admission is free.
XEROX COPIES
1-19 lOp each
20 & up 9p each
Complete Printing Service
1 Day Rubber Stamp Service
Florida
#7l-2577
SO3 SW 2nd Aw.

Graduate
Library
Open Now
Tired of studyi.i,; in the same
old, drab places?
The new graduate library is now
open.
According to library offlcals
students can take advantage of the
new facilities from 9 a.m. to 10
p.m. each week day.
It is completely modernized and
offers students a quiet atmosphere
in which to study.
Director of the Library Stanley
West said Sunday the library is
paying any student $1 per hour
to help move books.
Students interested in working
can sign up in the Graduate Re Research
search Research Library
Fidelity l l.He Insurance
THE COLLEGE LIFE
INSURANCE CO.
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The Only Company that sells
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living at M
student rates A
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Will be distributed
Monday,Tuesday & Wednesday
April 3,4 & 5
at the Information Booth
0
(earlier information was in error)
i


Optima
same location for 20 years
J. David WoodManaqinq Optician o##*""*"**" # "^ 6 ****
Howard PowersRegistered
i Stanley JeffOptician
Hk Noncv WriqhtFrame Stylist
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I J Phone; 376-3516

Ivan Mellowing?

NEW YORK UPI) Can
it be that Ivan is mellowing?
A wine import and export
tirm (Sandeman Brothers) re reports
ports reports that for the first time
since the Russian revolution it
is shipping its sherries and
ports to the U.S.S.R.

f BROKERS FOR OVER 200
T MUTUAL FUNDS
International Securities r orp.
1000 Riverside Ave C ALL 372-1022
JocKsonyillc
(Gainesville residence)

Florida Industry Says
State Is Going To Boom

Disney World and the Cross Flo Florida
rida Florida Barge Canal will produce
staggering growth in tourism and
industry for Florida in the near
future, four industrial experts"
predicted Thursday night.
The experts," panelists during
an Industry in Florida" discus discussion
sion discussion at the University of Florida,
painted a rosy picture for the UF

graduate planning to invest his
future in Florida.
Participating in the Florida Un Union
ion Union Forums committee-sponsored
panel were Benton Lewis of Tam Tampa,
pa, Tampa, vice president of sales, Flo Florida
rida Florida Steel Corporation, and indus industrial
trial industrial development chairman for the
Florida State Chamber of Com Commerce;
merce; Commerce; Ty Tarby of Jacksonville,
director of real estate and devel development,
opment, development, Food Fair Inc.; William
Van Gelder, Tallahassee, manager
of the Industrial Development De Department
partment Department of the Florida Develop Development
ment Development Commission, and R. S. Bos Bostick,
tick, Bostick, Miami, director of power
sales, Florida Power & Light Co.
Disney World, said Van Gelder,
will have a tremendous impact
on Florida. It will change the en entire
tire entire concept of state architecture,
compel engineers to use new and
different materials, influence le legislation
gislation legislation and affect every city and
town in the state.
Thirty million people will visit
Florida as tourists each year be because
cause because of Disney World.
Growth in Florida is so rapid
that 25,000 jobs a year must be
created in order to meet the po population
pulation population demands. But new and
expanding industries are being es established,
tablished, established, many of a sophisticated
nature.
And last year, 398 new plants
were established and 155 expanded,
providing 33,223 new jobs. Next
year, more than 40,000 new jobs
will be created in Florida, the
Industrial Commission official
predicted.
Van Gelder said the Florida
Industrial Commissionplanstoask
the Legislature to enact legislation
permitting the sale of bonds to

Daytona, Lauderdale
Police Cant Sleep
By HARVEY ALPER
Alligator Staff Writer
Police in Daytona Beach and Fort Lauderdale told the Alligator
Sunday afternoon they arent sleeping much because of the large
numbers of students frequenting their ocean beaches.
Officer Doran of the Fort Lauderdale Police said men in his
department have been working very long shiftsdouble shifts
from 16 to 20 hours.
In Daytona Beacn police were so busy they really couldnt
say if the state and national press has been giving them fair treat treatment.
ment. treatment. Officers there are working 12 to 14 hour shifts.
Weve had only one small disturbance. It has been very quiet
this yearvery good Id attribute this to the beer ban,Officer
Beil of the Daytona Beach Police Department reported.
Beil said that Daytona Police were enforcing a ban against
drinking on the ocean beach. Similar rules are also being enforced
in Fort Lauderdale.
The Daytona Beach policeman said that a peak crowd of 75,000
students was at Daytona Sunday.
The weather for the Easter week-end of surf, suds and sex was
good. In Daytona the water was approximately 65 degrees and the
sky sunny and clear. Temperatures reached about 80 degrees.
But it was the student spirit that apparently made the week-end
melee fantastic. In Daytona one motel room, containing two single
beds, was found accommodating 15 sleepy young men. They slept
on the floor, in chairs, and even in the bath-tub.
However, Fort Lauderdale police noted the crowd there was not
composed entirely of students. Police said that there were quite
a few others in the crowd such as mechanics and truck drivers.
Arrest figures, for UF students and others, were not available.
Police said such a backlog of arrests had built up and that figures
might not be available for more than three weeks.
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Monday, March 27, 1967, The Florida Alligator, ]

assist industries in relocating
here.
But Lewis, representing the
Chamber view, challenged the wis wisdom
dom wisdom of doing this, stressing that
bringing industries into Florida
under a tax umbrella is not
a good policy. He said the Cham Chamber
ber Chamber opposes assisting new in industries
dustries industries in this manner at the ex expense
pense expense of tax money from existing
industries. A healthy business cli climate
mate climate is the best inducement to
new industry, Lewis insisted.
In response to a question, Le Lewis
wis Lewis said he favors the policy of
holding the line on taxes where
possible, but not at the expense
of our educational system. Refer Referring
ring Referring to Gov. Claude Kirks pledge
to let new industries take up the
slack, Lewis pointed out that new
industries also need roads and
additional services which cost
money, too.
International
Committee
Sets Up UN
A model United Nations will be
conducted at UF next in Feb.,
1968, the Union Board Interna International
tional International Committee announced Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday. \
All major Southern and Eastern
seaboard universities will be asked
to send delegations said BradCul BradCulverhouse,
verhouse, BradCulverhouse, Publicity Chairman.
An organization meeting will be
held this Wednesday March 29 by
the International Committee. All
interested individuals are invited
to attend the meeting at 8 p.m.
in room 208 of the Florida Union.

Page 3



Page 4

1, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 27, 1967

11 %
The Florida Alligator
'A h On
EDDIE SEARS 808 MEN AKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR 808 BECK
Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecessanly reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff Is the editorial In the left
column.
Voslohs Plan
One of the most misunderstood pro proposals
posals proposals ever to come down from the
Unions third floor is that now-contro now-controversial
versial now-controversial legislative something-or-other
called The Vosloh Plan.
Written and named by Legislative Coun Council
cil Council member Dave Vosloh, the proposal
orginally called for a $lO tuition hike
to provide for new and greatly-enlarged
recreational, athletic, student health and
parking facilities on campus. It now asks
for the first $lO of any hike which is,
in effect, the same thing.
The misunderstanding began almost im immediately
mediately immediately after Vosloh announced his
plan and decided to present it to Leg Legislative
islative Legislative Council. The first time the Coun Council
cil Council saw it, it wasnt sure if it was voting
on a bill or not, since the heading on the
proposal called it the Vosloh Plan.
So Council voted it down.
Before the next meeting, Vosloh made
a few minor changes, supposedly to clear
up the confusion.
First, he changed the heading from
plan to resolution. Then he left
out the specifics on how the monies for
parking and student health would be spent,
leaving one to the parking study to de decide
cide decide and eliminating the satellite clinics
proposal from the other.
So the Vosloh Resoultion, which was
passed by Council, is more generalized
and not at all the same thing as the
original Vosloh Plan.
The resoultion, however, asks for the
same allocation as the plan did--$l for
recreational facilities (Camp Wauburg,
etc.), $5 for the new coliseum and ad adjacent
jacent adjacent indoor swimming pool, $2 for
parking, $1.50 for student health and
50 cents for special reserves to make
up any deficits in bond-sinkihg for the
other four.
The Council passed the resoultion in
principle, since it obviously has no power
over a tuition hike, Student Body Presi President
dent President Charles Shepherd has rapped it, say saying
ing saying the Council "decision is not repre representative
sentative representative of Student Government.
We think both points of view have merit.
No one can argue with Council members
that the things the Vosloh Resoultion would
bring to campus arent needed. And Shep Shepherd
herd Shepherd is right in saying Council doesnt
represent all of Student Government, since
the Executive branch is a definite force
which must be acknowledged.
So it is not the plan itself, but the
politics which will deal with its initiation,
that have turned us against it.
In considering any tuition hike, the Leg Leglature
lature Leglature will look at the overall picture.
It will consider the facts and decide
if there is a definite need for itr-and,
if so, how many students would be un unduly
duly unduly penalized by a hike. Its not like likely
ly likely that an increase for more campus
features would even be considerd.

GUEST EDITORIAL
Hale Walks A Tightrope

EDITORS NOTE: This editorial
was written by journalism senior
Cynthia Tuns tall for a class as assignment.
signment. assignment. It received wide acclaim
in the School of Journalism and
we thought its point of view worth
expressing.)
By CYNTHIA TUNSTALL
Dean of Student Affairs Lester
L. Hale is a man walking a tight tightrope.
rope. tightrope.
At one end of the rope congre congregate
gate congregate students bearded, sandle sandlewearing,
wearing, sandlewearing, placard carrying and
scruffy. They jiggle the rope with
dialectic malevolence and cheer
while Hale sways over the void.
A group of stolid middle-aged
businessmen stand at the other
end, prodding the rope with spe speculative
culative speculative toes. As Hale gyrates,
sweating and smiling, they add addup
up addup his slips and misses with mana managerial
gerial managerial acuity.
Boor Dean Hale, a man of doubt doubtless
less doubtless achievement and glowing ge generalities,
neralities, generalities, is caught in the middle.
A man committed to the defense
of order, integrity and faith, Hale
surely feels he is confronted
with anarchy, complicity and athe atheism.
ism. atheism.

Our Man Hoppe

London, En Route To Moscow--
I have launched a modest cam campaign
paign campaign to achieve Statehood for Eng England.
land. England. I do feel we made a re regrettable
grettable regrettable mistake in granting our
British cousins their independence
back in 1776 and I say they should
now be readmitted to the Union.
I realize, of course, that such
a proposal will meet stiff oppos opposition
ition opposition in Congress. And we might
as well face up to the key ques question
tion question thats bound to be asked:
Are these natives ready for
Statehood?
I say yes. Oh, I realize they
would create a severe drain on
our economy. I know about the
almost impenetrable language bar barrier.
rier. barrier. And I have seen at first
hand how they stubbornly cling to
their quaint and unreasonable tri tribal
bal tribal customs.
But theyve shown pluck. Since
In dependence theyve come a long
way, all on their own. Pulled them themselves
selves themselves up by their own bootstraps,
so to speak. For example, in most
areas of England today, one can
safely drink the water.
f
Its true that England offers nei neither
ther neither the natural resources of Alas Alaska
ka Alaska nor the beguiling climate of
Hawaii. But with massive injec injections
tions injections of Federal aid and the in infusion
fusion infusion of teams from such agen agencies
cies agencies as VISTA and the Teachers
Corps, Im sure that within our
lifetimes England would become a
State we could all be proud of.
Naturally, once Id sold myself
on the proposal, I popped around
to my friend, Commander Homer
T. Petty-Bone, 0.8.E., D.M.V.,
1.L.W.U., (cq) to break the good
news. I found him seated in front
of his primitive gas heater sip sipping
ping sipping a luke-warm whiskey and
water. (Really, we must teach them
first off how to make ice).
Now dont get your hopes up

When ACCENT 67 came to cam campus,
pus, campus, the brainchild of now Stu Student
dent Student Body President Charles Shep Shepherd,
herd, Shepherd, Hale authored a gentle, al almost
most almost naive essay for a special
edition of the Florida Alumnus,
devoted entirely to the ACCENT
program.
The theme of ACCENT 67 was
the responsibility of dissent, and
featured such outstanding prota protagonists
gonists protagonists of individualism as Richard
Nixon, James Farmer of the Con Congress
gress Congress of Racial Equality fame and
National Review publisher William
Rusher.
Hale wrote his article,ln De Defense
fense Defense of Order, Integrity and Fai Faith,
th, Faith, in December, long before the
nude-coed snapshot in the off offcampuz
campuz offcampuz magazine Charlatan made
national news.
His philosophy of dessent was
inadequate then and is even more
so nowwith activist students led
by such a man as Dr. Marshall
Jones, UF professor and veteran
rights fighter.
Hale, while suggesting that dis dissent,
sent, dissent, if really needed, should be
orderly, strongly emphasizes
that irresponsible dissent can
only provide a youthquake that

Bv Arthur Hoppe

prematurely, Commander, I be began
gan began cautiously, but don't you feel
Englands ready to become the 51st
American State?
I cant tell you how his face
lit up. Mostly in reds and pur purples.
ples. purples. We bloody damn well are,
he said emphatically.
Os course, I added hastily in
an attempt to point the gloomier
aspects, youd have to accept
money from Washington, but
theres nothing really demeaning
about that. Really.
Garrumph! he said.
And youd have to give up your
independent foreign policy. For
example, you couldnt oppose us
in Vietnam.
Arrghh! he said.
And youd have to let us de deploy
ploy deploy missile bases around your Is Island,
land, Island, making you a likely target
in the event of nuclear war.
Garrumph-arrghh! he said.
But, I said, turning to the
bright said, think of the pride
of being part of a great, driving
nation. Think of the thrill of show showing
ing showing the flag around the world,
fighting wars in foreign climes,
shouldering the White mans bur burden.
den. burden. Doesnt it make your heart
leap up?
Well, I shant report the Com Commanders
manders Commanders answer. Not in this fam family
ily family newspaper. But perhaps we
should grant them a period of
territorial status, like Guam or
Puerto Rico, before admitting them
to full Statehood.
The problem, and I hate to say
this, seems one of apathy. We
must instill in them a sense of
duty, a desire to control the des destinies
tinies destinies of far-flung millions, to im impose
pose impose a Pax Americana and to build
an economic Empire on which the
sun never sets.
Its odd they should show such
little interest. After all,whyknock
it if you havent tried it?

brings with it useless destruction
of values and the toppling 0 f so social
cial social structures upon which society
rests.
In stressing orderly dissent.
Hale is obviously attempting, in
some small way, to halt the tide
of some unspecified revolution
which will bring with it the use useless
less useless destruction of values and top toppling
pling toppling of social structures...
How ill-at-ease he would have
been if confronted by a hard harddrinking,
drinking, harddrinking, rabble-rousing Patrick
Henry, screaming into history to
Give me liberty, or give me
death!
Even though a leader in a ci citadel
tadel citadel of learning, Hale has for forgotten
gotten forgotten that social structures fall
because they have become rigid
and uncompromising. Unable to fit
the needs unique to a new ge generation,
neration, generation, societies are destroyed
because they have become unsless.
Hale is faced with the demise
of a social structurethe old
university, the university of in
loco parentis. The UF adminis administration
tration administration can no longer be in the
place of parents to 18,000 stu students.
dents. students.
Hales cry of defense for in integrity,
tegrity, integrity, order and faith, is the
age-old plea dont distrub the sta status
tus status quo.
Now Lester L. Hale is an af affable
fable affable manhes agreeable and in intelligent.
telligent. intelligent. But hes not even giving
contour plowing a chance...hes
been using the same old methods
for years now, and been getting
pretty good resultsbut like it
or not, its time for modern me methods.
thods. methods.
Hale isnt dealing with children
anymore. Todays students are not
going to be told what to do.
They think for themselves.
They were rocked in the cradle
to the beat of the Korean war
and raised to the haunting protest
songs of Peter, Paul and Mary.
The youngest were only 14-years 14-yearsold
old 14-yearsold when Kennedy was murdered
in the streets of Dallas. Most
of them probably saw Jack Ruby
play assasins assasin on nation nationwide
wide nationwide television.
Theyre not like any other ge generation.
neration. generation. Theyve never known a
night sky without a watchful man manmade
made manmade satellite. They have never
known a world without the threat
of nuclear war.
This is why Lester L. Hale is
walking a tight-ropeone which
spans two generations, neither un understanding
derstanding understanding the other. Somewhere
along the line men in his position
must provide the balance of under understanding.
standing. understanding.
If Hale wants to defend inte integrity,
grity, integrity, faith and order, he must re realize
alize realize that this shaggy, scruffy ge generation
neration generation has integrity. They de demand
mand demand justice, to the crossed t
and the dotted i. They have be become
come become the watchdogs of freedom.
They have faith in themselves,
and doubt their fathers the men
of the generation of concentration
Camps, Ku Klux Klan, Hiroshima
and Nagasaki.
Its up to the Dean Hales to
translate this new dissent into an
order that the older society can
understand.
Its s a difficult task and we hope
he can do it.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| for sale
STUDENT SPECIALS Admiral
or Philco air conditioner. Cost
plus 10%; over 300 satisfied stu students.
dents. students. Sudden Service Fuel Oil
Co. 376-4404. 907 S.W. 3rd St.
(A- 112-ts-c).
FOR SALE CHANNEL MASTER
TV Antenna with 40 ft. mast; rotor.
SSO. Phone 372-0307.(A-122-st-c).
2 almost new European Touring-
Racing bicycles, 10 speed $45
each. Phone 378-5668. (A-120-
st-P)
Honda 150 cc; 1965 model/$275.
Call 372-9364. Ask for John Clar Clarke.
ke. Clarke. (A- 120-st-P)
Moving, will sell living, dining,
desk, bar, refrigerator, buffet,
lamp, etc. Call: after 4:30 p.m.
and weekends 376-4082 (A-121-5t-
C)
- jimi
Roberts stereo tape recorder for
sale. Call Andy at 378-4693. (A (A---121-3t-P)
--121-3t-P) (A---121-3t-P)
mmm MMiiiima mn% g-i lirarunnmeT
Boat, motor and trailer for sale.
Complete rig $425 16 ft. fiberglass
fishing rig with 25 horse power
Johnson motor. 378-1895. (-/T-119-
st-C)
19 Motorola TV consolette, wal walnut
nut walnut finish. 6 yrs. old, fine con condition.
dition. condition. Slimline model. Excellent
PC. furniture $75. Call 372-6725.
(A- 121-st-P)
12 String guitar, $45 or best offer.
Call 378-5108. (A-123-st-c)
1964 Suzuki motorcycle. Excellent
running condition. $125, call Jerry
378-5405. (A- 123-3 t-P)
for rent
(
TO SUBLEASE: Modern 1 bed bedroom
room bedroom apt., air-conditioned, wall
to wall carpet, swimming pool,
tennis courts, special summer ra rates.
tes. rates. 378-3713. (B-120-st-C)
Sub-lease 2 bedroom, Frederick
Apt. for summer. Furnished, air airconditioned,
conditioned, airconditioned, pool. $l5O/mo. Apt.
#BO 378-6808 (B-120-st-C)
- - i. ..i m n n-.ooking
-.ooking n-.ooking for low cost, comfortable
living within one block of campus?
Try THE COOPERATIVE LIVING
ORGANIZATION for either the
summer or fall. Room, 3 meals
per day, good study conditions,
for S6O per month. Inquire 117
N.W. 15th Street or Call: 376-
6203. (B-121-TF-C)
nu i tii. w mm/ .w -m -w ir- t
ITS BACK ON THE MARKET
AGAIN! 2 bedroom apartment a available
vailable available for summer and beyond.
100 yards behind Norman Hall.
Spacious, furnished, kitchen and
FREE dart board. You can have
it for last days of April. Call
372-7676 or 378-6183. (B-121-3t-
NC)
Two bedroom house, S7O per
month. Call 376-6671 (B-123-3t-C)

Fffyyyyfl

| for rent |
Air-conditioned, furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, 2 blocks from campus, avail available
able available for summer. Up to four people,
will discuss rent. Call 378-5933.
(B-121-3t-P)
UNIVERSITY GARDENS Apart Apartment
ment Apartment for sub-lease. Two
Lease just for summer, or con continue
tinue continue in fall if you like. Call 378-
6248. (B-122-st-p).
AIR CONDITIONED modern trail trailer,
er, trailer, one bedroom, full size bath,
large kitchen, living room with
study table. Patio and awning.
Student couple only. $66 monthly.
372-2914. (B- 122-2 t-c).
NSUB-LEASE MAY 1- Aug. 31,
] two bedroom duplex, central a/c,
* perfect for 3, $125/mo. One block
from Norman, 1003 S.W. 6th Ave.
372-7167r(8-122-3t-p).
THREE BEDROOM, two bath un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished house for rent. $125/mo.
Available June 1. 4004 S.W. 20th
Street, Phone 376-3733. (B-122-
st-c).
WHERES HOME this summer or
fall? WANT: Good food? Com Companionship?
panionship? Companionship? Inexpensive living?
Clear study environment? Got TV
too. Try Georgia Seagle Hall. Call
376-2476 or 372-6736. (B-122-
3t-c).
TWO LARGE air conditioned bed bedrooms,
rooms, bedrooms, private bath with shower.
4 blocks from University. Can see
after 5 p.m. or call 376-0374.
518 N.W. 15th Street. (B-122-4t (B-122-4tc).
c). (B-122-4tc).
NICE QUIET, TWO ROOM SUITE
with adjoining bath for lady, 21
years or older. Lights, hot and
cold water, linens furnished. Pri Private
vate Private entrance. 311 N.W. 15th Ter Terrace.
race. Terrace. 376-2072. (B- 122-2 t-c).
TWO BEDROOM Furnished student
apartments near campus. Low
summer rates. Call Mrs. Jones,
376-5636 or A1 Jones, 378-5682.
(B-122-10t-c).
Solve your parking & transporta transportation
tion transportation problem this summer. Live
only one block from campus in
the cool luxury of La Fontana
Highrise Apartments. Adjacent to
University post office. Accomo Accomodates
dates Accomodates as many as 4 occupants.
Sundeck and bar-b-que grills on
the roof for your enjoyment. 376-
7534 or 372-3576. or see Apt.
506. (Bll-10tc)
rr. r- ~.rr 'V r- v ~ r rqggyagWJ'-n
Blue Grass Apts. Spacious one
bedroom air conditioned apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Private enclosed patio. 1824
N. W. 9th St. Quiet Area. A bar bargain
gain bargain S9O/mo. 376-7534 or 372-
3576 (B-118-10t-c)
Why live in a traffic jam? Walk
to classes and be relieved of your
parking problem. Fully furnished,
spacious, one bedroom apartment,
air-conditioned, gas heat, fully
equipped kitchen including washing
machine. Call: 372-3357 or 376-
2818. (B-121-10t-C)

Monday, March 27, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

for rent
May apts. Extra large 2 bedroom
apartment. 1 block from Tigert.
Air conditioned for summer com comfort
fort comfort slls/mo 372-4692 or 376-
7534. (B-118-10t-c)
Taking applicants to rentforSpring
and fall term. Three bedroom,
2 bath furnished apartment. Air Airconditioned
conditioned Airconditioned 1103 S.W. Second Ave.,
376-2892 or 376-9889. (B-120-
st-C)
Available for summer terms --
one and two bedroom furnished
apartments. Near University. $55
to SIOO/mo. including some uti utilities.
lities. utilities. Phone 376-3442. (B-120-
st-C)
-i - *-** '. MU'
La Fontana Apartment, available
for summer; air-conditioned, one
block from campus, reduced rate.
Behind University Post Office, Apt.
205, or call 378-6565. (B-123-
st-P)
UM .. 1. .i > 1..HU4. J'
Available for summer, two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, air-conditioned
pool, furnished. $126/mo. Seconds
from campus. Prefer graduate stu students.
dents. students. Phone 378-3446. (B-123-
3t-C)
%I ir i .' .n\.
One bedroom loft apartment. Air Airconditioned,
conditioned, Airconditioned, heat, washing mach machine,
ine, machine, three blocks from campus.
See at 1824 NW 3rd Place, Apt.
40 or call 372-2786. (B-123-3t-P)
*4%. t a 'Mi: i t ti v* t i rm
Clean, modern, air-conditioned
furnished apartment. Available
from April 1, S9O per month.
Call 372-5841. (B-128-st-C)
Mm. t 4 < C a. t. t f f I
One bedroom air-conditioned a apartment.
partment. apartment. Close to campus. $95
per month. Available April 20,
378-4332. (B-123-2t-C)
*. j i> i < i it <4at mx+M*d'
Large one bedroom apartment,
close to campus and town. Avail Available
able Available April 20 and on, SBO per
month. 372-7973. (B-123-3t-C)
wanted
RIDERS WANTED to Chicago and
points on route. Leaving during
Trimester break. Call 378-4684
after 5 p.m. (C-122-st-c).
WANTED Female roommates
wanted: One going A & B Term,
other A Term only. Off-campus
apartment. Rent: $38.75. Call: 378-
5878. (C 119 st c).
TWO FEMALE Room mates wanted
to share a Landmark Apartment
for the summer. Call after 5 p.m.
378-3851. (C-122- 3t-p).
TWO MALE ROOMMATES to share
huge house. Air-conditioned. Ste Stereo,
reo, Stereo, telephone. Close to campus.
1/2 block to Gatorland, Minit Mar Market,
ket, Market, etc. $31.25 month. Call Jerry
378-5405. (C-123-st-P)
M IN THE HELL
M THERE IS
It LEFT for men 1 ) & I
I URSULA '.£ IA 10:5 J
I ANDRESS VAS f
1 Die p^tk;
K CIMIMA
tiaiu 1

Page 5

wanted
Returning female student teacher,
needs a room March 31 to April
23. Will share all expenses. Call
378-5170 after 5 p.m. (C-123-
lt-C)
O U iWV > -
FRENCH QUARTER Apartment 89.
One or two roommates needed for
A, B, term. Call Joe or Kirk
378-5409. (C-123-3t-P'i
help wanted
Help wanted male or female,Store
Manager experienced or we will t
train. Two openings at present in |
the discount health and beauty aid
and phonograph field. Must be (
bondable and have excellent re-
ferences. Phone Mrs. DE Yott, j
376-2533 for appointment. (E-120-
lOt-C) I
HELP WANTEDEXPERIENCED
Dental Assistant 378-2555. (E- j
119 st c). I
a
Circulation Manager for the Flo Florida
rida Florida Alligator for summer tri trimester.
mester. trimester. Must have Ist and 2nd
periods open. Apply Room 9, Flo Florida
rida Florida Union. (E-121-tf-nc)
Spend this summer in the Sierra i
Nevadas at HARRAIPS. 100 sum- j
mer openings for U of F men and
women, 21 and over. Varied po positions
sitions positions with on the job training.
On campus Interviews April 5
& 6. Sign up NOW and check job
and salary details in Room 309
Florida Union. See HARRAHS big
as starting Fridays. (E-123-4t-C)
ADVERTISING SALESMAN, male
or female, to service local ac accounts
counts accounts for the ALLIGATOR. Must
be available for work both sum mer
terms and fall quarter. No experi experience
ence experience necessary, but some know knowledge
ledge knowledge of advertising would be help helpful.
ful. helpful. Apply in person Room 9 Flo Florida
rida Florida Union. (E-123-tf-nc)
situations
wanted
Ironing done. 10£ & 15£ a piece.
Call: 376-2052 Also babysitting by
hour, day, or week. (F-123-3t-C)
WaWiR mfiVilawl
SMidHiaswow ]
WMY j
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x BUSTeR KEATON
I 1 "A FUNNV THING I
B HAPPENED ~m
ON THE WAV

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HU COl ON b, O.Lu.. UNITED ARTISTS

autos
Antique 1941 Oldsmobile 6 cyl.
sedan, model 96, custom cruiser.
Beautiful original interior. Car all
original Ext. 2122, Room 106 or
376-4467. SSOO (G-119-3t-c)
1959 THUNDERBIRD, 353 cu. in.,
Interceptor V-8, power steering,
power brakes, power windows, po power
wer power seat, radio and heater, auto automatic
matic automatic transmission. Graduating
this April, must sell. 378-5944
after 5 p.m. (G-122-st-c).
"CLASSIFIEDS"
Continued On Page 6
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Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

Monday, March 27
Mensa: Daily luncheons, table on west side of Main
Cafeteria, 11 -1 p.m.
ASME Meeting: Mr. Steve Melvin, Development
of Nickel-Cadmium Batteries, 273 E&I, 7 p.m.
Forums Committee, 123 Union, 7 p.m.
Union Board: Dance Lessons, Union Social room,
7:15 p.m.
Pi Mu Epsilon: film, Topology, Walker Aud.,
7: 30 p.m. Everyone invited
American Society of Civil Engineers: Professor By Byron
ron Byron Prugh, De-Watering of a Missle Base in
the South Pacific, 217 Eng., 7:30 p.m.
ROTC & Music Dept.: Army Field Band, Univ. Aud.,
8 p.m.
Real Estate Club: meeting, *2lB Union, 7:30 p.m.
Elections

CLASSIFIEDS

autos
1964 Chevy, 4 door, excellent tires,
interior, mechanically. Private
owner, financing available, asking
$895. Call 372-3561 weekdays. (G (G---123-3t-C)
--123-3t-C) (G---123-3t-C)
$75. 1958 Hillman, Needs
minor work. Phone 376-1373 after
6 p.m. (G-123-3t-C)
*SB Hillman for sale $125. Call
372-4896 after 5:30 (G-119-st-P)
Dearest J.S.F. Thanks for the Au Autograph.
tograph. Autograph. O.R.G.Y. (J-123-It- P)
FOR SALE or trade 1960 TR3
Triumph in good condition would
trade for late model Comet or
Falcon stationwagen. Call: 376-
2345 after 6 p.m. (G-121-st-C)
1960 CHEVROLET V-8, 2 door
hardtop, good tires, good condi condition.
tion. condition. Original owner. Call: 372-
8201 after 6 p.m. and on week weekends.
ends. weekends. (G-121-st-c).
55 CHEVROLET in good condi condition,
tion, condition, seat belts, and new battery
$165.00. Call: 376-8519. (G-122-
3t-c).
1957 Chevrolet $225. Reliable
transportation. Excellent body
good rubber. 376-9835. (G-121-5t-
P)
1966 COMET STATION WAGON,
air conditioned, VB, power steer steering.
ing. steering. Some warranty left. Beautiful
car. $2,245. 378-4809. (G-122-
st-c).
1961 CORVAIR 4 doors, auto automatic,
matic, automatic, radio. Good condition. In Information
formation Information 277-9 Corry Village
after 5 p.m. (G-122-4t-p).

10. NEED A DIFFERENT CAR? P*
JK\i V CONTACT MRS. LOUISE HINTON TREASURER # Auto Loans M
On "U GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION specialty I
\ \ Serving Uof F Employees Since 1935 a' >r^y| l
PROGRAM OF
' ss Ml I THRIFT, CREDIT,

autos
1957 Goliath Station Wagon, Built
by Borg. Front wheel drive, rack
and pinion steering. Leather up upholstery,
holstery, upholstery, radio and heater, good
tires, 23 to 27 mpg, $l5O for
quick sale. 372-5648 (G-118-st-C)
1961 Chevy Impala, two door hard hardtop.
top. hardtop. V-8 automatic, white wall
tires, new battery, white with red
and white interior, excellent con condition.
dition. condition. See it first and then make
reasonable offer. 378-3972. (G (G---'B-10t-c)
--'B-10t-c) (G---'B-10t-c)
real estate
House for sale. 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
large fenced in yard, low interest
FHA payment. Ideal neighborhood.
376-9038.(1-117- lOt-C)
lost-found
I HAVE NO CLOTHES to keep
warm up north. If you found my
black lined trench coat in Me Medical
dical Medical Center, please return to hos hospital
pital hospital library, at least keys in
pocket. REWARD. Badly needed.
(L- 121-3 t-P)
Navy Blue Blazer taken from Uni University
versity University Avenue Laundromat onSa onSaturday.
turday. onSaturday. Belongs to fiance, Must
return. REWARD, no questions
asked. 372-3043. (L-121-3t-C)
LOST MORTAR BOARD pin
between Peabody and Norman. J.
E.K., 66 on back. REWARD. Call
378-5892. (L-122-3t-p).

BLUB BULLETIN

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, March 28
c>
Hillel Foundation: Mr. Tooch and Mr. Elizer Grum Grumwald,
wald, Grumwald, will speak to students interested in living
in Israel, at the Center, 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday Evening Supper Club: Presbyterian Student
Center, 6:30 p.m. Non-denominational, Everyone
single and over 21 invited.
Union Board Recreation Committee: Campus Bridge
Tournament, Union Social Room, 7 p.m.
Pi Sigma Epsilon: group meeting, 208 Union, 7 p.m.
Union Board: Bridge Lessons, 215 Union, 7 p.m.
Baptist Student Center: discussion of No Exit,
by Jean-Paul Sarte, at the Center, 7:15 p.m.
Music Dept.: 17th Annual Jazz Concert, Univ. Aud.,
8;15 p.tn. - >
Murphree Area Council, 218 Union, 8:30 p.m.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAM:Spanish reading know knowledge
ledge knowledge examination and all functional examinations will
be given Saturday, April 1, Anderson Hall, Room
18, 10-12 a.m.
STUDENT FINANCIAL AID: Interview for student
financial aid will be held in Building E, Room 124,
for the following: applicants who filed between Nov.
1, 1966, and Feb. 28, 1967, for aids including Econo Economic
mic Economic Opportunity Grants, National Defense Loans,
Guaranteed Bank Loans, United Student Aid Fund
Loans, Florida Scholarship Loans, University of Flo Florida
rida Florida Long-Term Loans and Employment, either De Departmental
partmental Departmental or the College Work Study Program.
Students whose last names begin with: (A-B) re report
port report Monday, March 27; (C) report Tuesday, March
28; (D-E-F) report Wednesday, March 29;(H) re-

personal
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
summary program features Lan Language
guage Language Houses with total enviorn enviornment.
ment. enviornment. Regular housing available
also. Information 1441 Broadway,
Boulder, Colorado 30302. (J-122-
6t-c).
I, YVONNE DURELL, can show you
how to have fun and make money
too with Viviane Woodward Cos Cosmetics.
metics. Cosmetics. Phone after 5 p.m. 376-
0374. (J- 122-6 t-c).
services
EUROPE $325 ($295 if 50 student
quota is reached) Round Trip. Pan l
Am jet, New York to London, leave
June 26, return Sept. 12. Open to
all Florida Students, faculty and
their families. Call Sam 378-5848.
(M-122- 3t-c).

Administrative Notices

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

Page 6

Wednesday, March 29
Fla. Speleological Society: meeting, 212 Union, 7 p.m.
Phi Sigma Sigma: Lecture, 116 Union, 7 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club: meeting, 121 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Veterans Club: group meeting, Union Aud., 7:3U
p.m.
Latin American Colloquium, 215 Union, 8 p.m.
Music Dept. & Gville Philharmonic: Concert, Marie
Henderson, cellist, Univ. Aud., 8:15 p.m.
FLORIDA "tINION BOX OFFICE: Tickets now on sale
for Glenn Yarbrough and the Bach Aria Group.

port Thursday, March 30; (G) report Friday morn morning,
ing, morning, March 31; (I-J-K) report Monday, April 3;
(L) report Tuesday, April 4; (M) report Wednes Wednesday,
day, Wednesday, April 5; (N-O-P) report Thursday, April 6;
(Q-R) report Friday morning, April 7; (S) report
Monday, April 10; (T-U-V-X-Y-Z) report Tuesday,
April 11; and (W) report Wednesday, April 12. The
1 scholarship portions of the applications have been for forwarded
warded forwarded to members of the Student Financial Aid Com Committee
mittee Committee of the colleges indicated for next September
provided the applications were complete and last tr'
mesters average was above 3.00. The applications
will be evaluated and returned to the Student Fin Financial
ancial Financial Aid Office. The College Committee members
are as follows: AgricultureProf. E.L. Fouts; Ar Architecture
chitecture Architecture & Fine ArtsAssistant Dean Joseph J.
Sabatella; Arts & SciencesDr. A. C. Morris;
Business AdministrationAssistant Dean G. R.Sims;
EducationProf. J. H. Moorman; EngineeringDean
E. W. Jacunski; ForestryProf. P. W. Frazer;
Health Related Professions--Assistant Dean O. B.
Thomason; Journalism & CommunicationsDirector
Rae O. Weimer; NursingMiss Jennet M. Wilson;
PharmacyMr. C. S. Haupt; Physical Education-
Prof. B. K. Stevens, and University CollegeProf.
P. D. Stryker.

General Notices
NOTICE TO STUDENTS REGISTERING FORSPRING
TRIMESTER: To avoid standing in line to pay fees
you may deposit fee payments in the "drop pro provided
vided provided next to the entrance to the Student Depository
at the east end of the Student Service Center at j
any time except at late registration. Be sure to
complete theFEE CARD and the CERTIFICATE OF
REGISTRATION and enclose them with your check
or money order in the self-addressed envelope pro provided
vided provided in your registration packet. (NO CASH PLEASE).
Your validated CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRATION
will be mailed to the address you print on the Certi Certificate.
ficate. Certificate. If you pay fees or register on the first day
of classes, you must pay at a teller's window and
be subject to the late fee of $25.00.
STATE NURSING SCHOLARSHIP LOAN HOLDERS:
Scholarship funds are now available for the Winter
Trimester, 1966-67, Scholarship Section, Student Ser Service
vice Service Center.

The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 27, 1967



UFs John Morton Stars
As 9 Relay Records Fall

By 808 PADECKY
Assistant Sports Editor
The mark in any good track meet is not in
the stars that compete, but the records that are
broken.
Saturdays 24th Annual Florida Relays had just
that, nine records broken and the stars to go
with them.
The biggest star was the biggest man, UFs
own John Morton who was voted the top college
athlete of the meet. Morton, who of late has been
tossing the discus and shot put at a record recordpace,
pace, recordpace, did it again Saturday.
Morton, a 6-5, 235-pound giant sophomore from
Miami Edision, hurled the discus a record 187-
8 1/2, his best in organized competition. Mor Morton
ton Morton has done over 189 in practice.
In the shot, Morton put the steel sphere 55-
10 1/2, although not his best, good enough for
first place.
With the two first places Morton had his name
inscribed on the Kearney-Raybun Memorial Trophy.
It was only the first time since 1953 that a UF
trackster had ever won this award.
But Morton was the only bright spot in a meet
dominated by the University of Tennessee.
The Vols Richmond Flowers, another sopho sophomore
more sophomore sensation, took the high hurdles easily,
breaking the meet record in the process. In the
prelims, Flowers, son of the Attorney General
of Alabama, was clocked in 13.6, one second
better than the 1966 mark.
Flowers also had his speed figured into another
meet record for the Vols, this time in the 440
relay. The team of Carrol Thrift, Russ Whit Whitneack,
neack, Whitneack, Garry Wagner and Flowers set a record
40.6 pace. TTie sprint medley relay also went
in record time to Tennessee, this on in 3:18.9.
Larry Kelly replaced Flowers as anchor on the
record medley relay quartet.
Stocky George Moschis finished up the bundle
of firsts for UT in the javelin. Moschis heaved

alt m
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RUNNERS TAKE VOUR MARK Ants view
of the start of the University 100 yard dash.
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A FLOWER(S) BLOOMS Tennessees Rich Richmond
mond Richmond turning in a 13,6 hurdle time.

it 244-3, six inches better than the standard
set last year.
Besides Morton, UF had little to look for forward
ward forward to except Tennessee and Southern Illinois
Oscar Moore. Moore ran a 8:49.5 two-mile and
anchored the distance medley relay win.
Florida coach Jimmy Carnes had big hopes for
high jumper Frank Saier, who leaped 6-10 1/2
just this week in a meet against Tennessee and
Southern Illinois. But Saier could only nab a
second place tie with Southern Illinois. Ray Brown
won it at 6-8.
In the Freshman and Junior College Class how however,
ever, however, Florida showed the way. The Gator fresh freshmen
men freshmen took five of the 10 first places. Mike Flan Flannagan,
nagan, Flannagan, with a leap of 14-6, took the pole vault.
Jim Chapman garnered the discus with a toss
of 163-4. Ron Jourdan high jumped 6-8, just as
high as the University Class winner, to take his
speciality. And Jim Devenny rounded out the Gator
frosh winners with a 14.4 time in the high hurd hurdles.
les. hurdles.
Fred Goodman of Miami Jackson was namei
the top performer in the High School Class for
his efforts in the high jump, mile relay and the
triple jump.
Goodman took the high jump with a spring of
6-8, ran third on the record setting 3:20.8 mile
relay and placed second in the triple jump.
Goodmans outstanding performances oversha overshadowed
dowed overshadowed Chip Kells effo*:s in the shot put. Kell,
from Avondale, Ga., set a relay record of 62-
8 1/2, living up to his reputation as one of the
best prep shot putters in the nation.
There was one other class besides the three
mentioned, the Open Class, with one event the
3,000 meter steeplechase. This Olympic event
allowed some of the track stars to cool off a
bit for the runner must leap over 28 hurdles
and seven water jumps.
Cliff Clark of Harding took the event in 9:19,
4.9 seconds better than runner-up Ed Stenberg
of Duke.

Results
High Hurdles 1. Flowers
(Tenn.); 2. Elliot (Cornell); 3.
Neisweinder (Tenn.). Flowers set
record in preliminaries with: 13.6.
440 Intermediate Hurdlesl.
Adkins (Ala.); 2. Hager (UF); 3.
Kelly (FSU). :52.1. Ties Relays
record.
2 Mile Riml. Moore (So.
111.); 2. Storey (Tenn.); 3. Hos Hosford
ford Hosford (UF); 8:49.5.
100 Dashl. Rovere (E. Tenn.
St.) 2. Milton (Fla. A&M); 3. Vaughn
(Ga. Tech). :9.6.
Sprint Medley Relayl. Ten Tennessee
nessee Tennessee (Wagner, Thrift, White Whiterock,
rock, Whiterock, Kelly); 2. Alabama; 3. Clem Clemson.
son. Clemson. 3:18.9. Relays record.
2 Mile Relay 1. Fordham
(Fath, Groark, Hernon, May); 2.
Tennessee; 3. Florida. 7:24.6.
Relays record.
Distance Medley Relay 1.
Southern Illinois (Ackman, Mc-
Kenzie, Ducksburg, Moore); 2.
North Carolina; 3. Southwestern
Louisiana. 9:49.9. Relays record.
400 Relay 1. Tennessee
(Thrift, Whitenak, Wagner, Flow Flowwers);
wers); Flowwers); 2. Florida A&M ; 3. Ala Alabama.
bama. Alabama. :40.6. Relays record.
Mile Relayl. North Carolina
State (Tricter, Prather, Sicoli,
England); 2. Tennessee; 3. Clem Clemson.
son. Clemson. 3:10.4. Relays record.
Shot Putl. Morton (UF); 2.
Eisner (Kent State); 3. Benz (Cem (Cemson).
son). (Cemson). 55-10 1/2.
Discus 1. Morton (UF); 2.
Swarts (SC); 3. Hall (Louisiana
Tech); 3. Socha (Maryland). 187-
8 1/2. Relays record.
Javelinl. Moschis (Tenn.); 2.
Dull (Maryland); 3. Donalson (Ma (Maryland).
ryland). (Maryland). 244-3. Relays record.
Hgh Jump 1. Brown (Fla.
A&M); 2. (Tie) Saier (UF) and
Benson (So. 111.). 6-8 Relays re record.
cord. record.
Triple Jumpl. Thomas (Fla.
A&M); 2. Hll (Yale); 3. Rock Rockwell
well Rockwell (Penn State). 49-11.
Pole Vault 1. Christopher
(Auburn); 2. Carr (Georgia); 3.
Owens (Tenn.). 15-9

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hard Gebbhard (r) to C.J. Fowlkes in two-mile relay.
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RELAYS MOST VALUABLE -UF weightman
John Morton muscles prize.

Monday, March 27, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

t, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 27, 1967

Two Larrys..
Smith, Rentz
Pace Orange

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Sports Writer
Two Larrys, one named Rentz
and the other Smith, powered the
Orange team to a 25-14 triumph
over the Blue in the Dollars for
Scholars spring football game Sat Saturday
urday Saturday night at Florida Field.
Rentz connected on 15 of 20 tos tosses
ses tosses for 184 yards. He pitched touch touchdown
down touchdown tosses of 18 yards to Jim
Yarbrough and r$ yards to end
Nelson Davis.
Smith bulled his way to 184
rushing yards on 20 carries. The
power-packed tailback tallied two
scores on runs of seven and 34
yards. Smith also burst free for
a 60-yard gallop in the opening
quarter to set up the first Orange
touchdown.
Sophomore signal-caller Jackie
Eckdahl furnished the Blue scoring
with touchdown passes of nine
yards to Bill Gaisford and 45
yards to Jack Coons. Both tallies
came in the second quarter. In
all, the southpaw quarterback com completed
pleted completed 13 of 24 tosses for 129
yards.
The Orange opened the nights
scoring on a 99-yard drive in
nine plays. Highlighted by Smiths
60-yard scamper off left tackle,
the Orange scored when Smith
blasted over left guard from the
seven yard line.
Eckdahl put the Blue in the scor scoring
ing scoring column in the second quarter
as he sparked a 73-yard drive.
On the fourth play of the series,
Eckdahl raced 42 yards around
right end to set up a Blue first
down on the Orange 23 yard line.
UF Netters
Crush Tide
The UF tennis team rolled to
its 10th consecutive win and its
eighth shutout in 10 starts with
a merciless 9-0 thrashing of the
Alabama Crimson Tide Saturday.
The Gators did not lose a set
in the last of a grueling five fiveday
day fiveday series that pitted them against
some of the top tennis teams in
the South.
Coach Bill Potters crew had
previously chilled rugged Georgia
Tech Friday, with a 7 1/2 -1 1/2
beating.
Coach Bill Potter praised his
team for its play against Alabama.
They looked pretty good Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, Potter said, although its
kind of hard to tell after playing
five matches in a row.
The Gators resume their sche schedule
dule schedule Tuesday with a home match
against Atlantic Coast Conference
power Clemson, host Amherst Col College
lege College Wednesday, and travel to At Atlanta
lanta Atlanta Friday for a rematch with
the Engineers.
Saturdays results:
SINGLESArmi Neely (Fla.)
defeated Jim Heacock 6-2, 6-3.
Jaimie Pressly (Fla.) d. Tommy
Kendall 6-3,6-4. Greg HUley (Fla.)
D. Wally Swanson 7-5, 6-1. Steve
Beeland (Fla.) d. Walter Reynolds
6-0, 6-0. Hank Veno (Fla.) d. Les
Jacobs 6-4, 6-2. Lee Steele (Fla.)
d. Frank Ward 6-0, 6-0.
DOUBLESNeeIy and Beeland
(Fla.) d. Heacock and Kendall 6-4,
6-2. Pressly and Hilley (Fla.)
d. Swanson and Jacobs 6-3, 6-0.
Veno and Steele (Fla.) d. Rey Reynolds
nolds Reynolds and Ward 6-1,6-0.

Two plays later, the lefty quarter quarterback
back quarterback rolled to the right and hit
Gaisford in the corner of the end
zone for the score.
Paced by Rentzs passing and
Smiths running the Orange bounc bounced
ed bounced back to regain the lead. Rentz
hit Yarbrough who made an over overthe-shoulder
the-shoulder overthe-shoulder grab for the score.
The lead see-sawed again when
Eckdahl combined with Coons on
a pass and run play covering 45
yards. At halftime, the Blue led
14-13.
In the second half, the Orange
defense stymied the Blue attack
while the Orange offense tallied
a touchdown in each of the last
two quarters.
Rentz hit Davis in the third quar quarter
ter quarter for the Orange go-ahead touch touchdown.
down. touchdown. Smith slanted off left tackle
in the fourth stanza and darted
into the end zone untouched for
the final score of the night.
The Gators have two more work workouts
outs workouts slated for this Wednesday
and Friday. The final spring game,
the Orange and Blue contest, will
get underway at 2 p.m. this Sat Saturday.
urday. Saturday.
UF's Withrow
Stops Tulane
Jack Withrow won his second
game in five years for the UF
baseball team Saturday as the Ga Gators
tors Gators downed Tuland 4-1 and swept
a two-game series from the vis visitors.
itors. visitors.
Withrow allowed two hits and one
unearned run through the first
four innings. After that he pitched
no-hit ball and allowed only three
men on base.
Tlie Gators extended their re record
cord record to 13-2 with the win, and their
victory string to five games.
Florida scored two runs in its
half of the third and made them
hold up for the rest of the con contest.
test. contest. Tulane managed its single tal tally
ly tally in the fourth.
Joe Berkeris opened the third
for the Gators with a walk off
starter Bobby Duhon and was forc forced
ed forced at second on a hard shot to
the pitcher by Withrow.
Richard Trapp walked and both
he and Withrow scored on Dave
Hodges triple to right-center.
Mike Ovca walked but the Gators
left two on base as Skip Lujack
struck out and Dan Cushman
grounded out.
UF meets North Carolina this
afternoon at 3 in the first of a
two-game series at Perry Field.
Melynk Leads
Florida To Title
Steve Melnyk led the UF golf
team to a first place in the 11th
annual University of Miami Invi Invitational
tational Invitational Tournament Saturday at
Miami.
Melnyk fired a 2-under par 69
Saturday for a four-round total
of 281 and a first place in the
individual competition.
Melnyk won the individual title
by six strokes.
Richard Spears tied Georgias
Pete Davison for second at 287
each. Don Sayet and John Sale
finished fourth and fifth with 289
and 290 respectively.
Florida led the team competition
with a total of 1,148, followed
by Georgia 1,168, Georgia Tech
1,181, and Miami with 1,182.

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