Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
TTie Florida Alligator

Vol. 59. No. 114

Crime War May Bag Public Officials

By GENE NAIL
Editorial Assistant
The Governors War on Crime may turn out to be
more of an anathema to state politicians than has
been indicated thus far by their meek squeals and
' crys of anguish.
Gov. Claude Kirks surprising election as the first
GOP gevernor in 96 years put the fear of God and
the Republican Party in hearts of many state Demo Democrats
crats Democrats and many state officeholders in general.
Though the private-financing aspect of the War On
Crime has been the topic of most criticism for the
crime-routing venture, it is doubtless not the core
of most objections to the War.
The use of a private agencyor one outside normal

'Souped-Up Charge
Dismissed By Court

By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Editorial Editor
You wouldnt expect something as in insignificant
significant insignificant as a bowl of soup to create
a large Incident on campus.
But thats exactly what happened last
Thursday.
The unbelievable sequence of events
Policeman Said
'Just Delivering'
A Message
By JUDY REDFERN
Alligator Staff Writer
A policeman entering a frat party and
shining his flashlight around the refresh refreshment
ment refreshment area may just be delivering a
message according to the Gainesville
Police Department.
The Alligator received a report that
a patrolman entered a UF fraternity
party Saturday night, shined his light on
the refreshment area, and asked the group
to quiet down.
When asked if the policeman were check checking
ing checking for illegal alcoholic beverages or a
complaint of disturbing the peace, Lt.
W. L. Beach of the Gainesville Police
Department said the department had no
record of such a check.
We sometimes deliver messages from
fraternity or sorority members families,*
Beacn said. This is not part of the
record.
Beach told the Alligator the force would
have a record of the incident if they were
checking on anything serious.
An officer of the fraternity said a police policeman
man policeman entered the party Saturday night
and asked the group to make less noise.
The officer said one of the neighbors
called and complained, the fraternity
member said.
wnen told that the fraternity had con confirmed
firmed confirmed the report, Beach said It happens
all the timewe always get complaints
about the noise. \
A policeman checking on a loud party
doesnt check anything else at the jx rty,
according to the lieutenant.
The fraternities are usually very nice
and co-operative when we ask them to make
less noise, Beach said.

started when Student Body President Char Charles
les Charles Shepherd and friends Mike Garcia
and Clyde Taylor entered Wolfies Res Restaurant
taurant Restaurant for an innocent mid-afternoon
snack.
It ended with Honor Court proceedings
and charges against Shepherd that were
dropped just four hours after filing.
In between, there was a lot of action.
Shepherd and Co. entered the restau restaurant
rant restaurant at approximately 2:30 after their
plans to fly to Tallahassee had been can canceled
celed canceled due to foul weather. As they sat
down, the president informed Garcia that
he didnt have any money and asked if
he would pay for the order.
Garcia agreed to go the bill and Shep Shepherd
herd Shepherd then ordered one bowl of matzoh
ball soup -- apparently without kreplach --
and a cup of coffee, the bill for which
totaled 52 cents. As he ordered, the
President asked the waitress to add his
items onto Garcias check.
While they were eating, the trio noticed
the presence of two law students Al Allen
len Allen Dickey and John Forbes in the booth
next to their table.
Dickey and Forbes are both political
enemies of Shepherd and have been ir
direct conflict with him on certain i.<
sues in the past year.
Dickey was the man who attempted
to enjoin the Legislative Council last
summer during the hassle over the bloc
seating which Shepherd supported. Forbes
has been in more recent conflict re recently
cently recently battling with Shepherd over the ap appointment
pointment appointment of a secretary of married stu student
dent student affairs.
(SEE HONOR PAGE 5 )

j /jj w'J
ivt hi p<-a. V' V k "fWMmSiSiis-

University of Florida, Gainesville

[ INTERPRETIVE |
government channels shows the governors distrust
for many of the public office holders with whom he
has to work.
The War On Crime can change all that.
If results thus far are to be any indication, the
governor Intends to sweep the state clean of cor corruption
ruption corruption in public offices.
As War On Crime Director George Wackenhut so
aptly put it:
He (Kirk) said he wants me to investigate or organized
ganized organized crime AND THE CORRUPTION THAT PER PERMITS
MITS PERMITS IT TO EXIST.
Though the Wackenhut Agency refuses to discuss

40
li W JsSm RPBV?jtF

ALL OVER -- An Atlas
E booster was one of many
displays shown at the
annual UF Engineering

Forum Scheduled Today;
Reitz Set To Speak

UF President J. Wayne Reitz will ad address
dress address UF students on any aspect of the
University including student rights at
4 this afternoon in the University Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium.
Student Body President Charles Shep Shepherd
herd Shepherd said Reitz would present his address
and answer questions from the floor.
Shepherd will moderate the forum.
The forum has originated out of the
recent students' rights controversy
brought to the fore earlier this trimes trimester
ter trimester when UF coed Pam me Brewer posed
nude in an off-campus magazine.
At the insistence of campus demon demonstrators,
strators, demonstrators, Reitz agreed to hold a forum

French Leftists Surging

PARIS (UPI) President Charles de
Gaulle's fifth republic alliance was
locked in a photo-finish battle with re resurgent
surgent resurgent leftists for control of the new
French parliament late Sunday night.
Official Ministry of Interior tabulations
showed that the combined opposition and
Gaullist candidates had each won 240 seats,
with 480 of the 486 National Assembly
seats decided in Sunday's runoff elections.
Only six seats remained to be decided.
Premier Georges Pompidou said, how however,
ever, however, the Gaullist alliance saw no serious
risk of a parliamentary defeat. He said
that even if the fifth republic forces
failed to win an absolute majority of 2A'

any cases under investigation, press reports have
tied the agencys record-checkers into these acti activities:
vities: activities:
Manatee County Sheriff J. Kenneth Gross is
being investigated on charges of misconduct.
Board of Regents member Woodrow Darden was
indicted by a grand jury on charges of grand larceny larcenyfollowing
following larcenyfollowing a report that Kirk sought his resignation.
Dixie County Commissioners are facing possible
suspension by Kirk for refusing to testify before a
state attorney they refused because of the involve involvement
ment involvement of Wackenhut investigators.
The Wackenhut Agency has revealed it is presently
investigating three sh#riffs in South Florida.
The governor has also suspended Jefferson County
sheriff j. B. Thomas following a grand jyry probe,
(SEE CRIME * PAGE 9)

Fair Saturday and Sunday.
Twenty thousand people
saw the Frontiers of To Tomorrow*
morrow* Tomorrow* show.

to answer questions on the student con conduct
duct conduct code and students rights at UF.
Originally, the format of the program"
was intended to be a telethon. However,
it was decided that this would be a.rather
sterile approach and its cost to the pro program
gram program sponsor, Student Government, was
prohibitive.
The commission concluded its study
nearly two weeks ago, but the Student
Affairs Committee has yet to take sub substantial
stantial substantial action on the proposals.
It is expected that Reitz will be quer queried
ied queried concerning the actions of the Student
Affairs Committee.

seats in the 486-seat national assembly,
six or seven Democratic Center deputies
could be counted on to vote with De Gaulle.
The official tabulation for 480 of the
486 National Assembly seats gave the
Gaullists 240, Leftist Federation 116,
Democratic Center 30, Communists 72,
and all others 22.
De Gaulles foreign and defense mini ministers
sters ministers and two other cabinet members were
defeated.
It was clear that the Gaullists would)
fail to win by the overwhelming majority
they had hoped for before the second
decisive round of Frances parliamentary
elections next Sunday.

Monday, March 13, 1967



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 13, 1967

Power Failure Hits Campus,
Blackout Lasts Twelve Hours

For the third time this trimester, the UF
campus was left In the dark by a power failure.
Graham and Hume areas suffered a blackout
for almost twelve hours Saturday. Residents had
been informed that the electrical failure would
be taken care of by 7 a.m. Saturday
one hour after the original failure occured.
At 11:30 p.m., the residents who remained
in the dorms were still living by candle light.
TTie previous two electrical failures on campus
were caused by a short In the main line caused

Coeds Hold Election
For WSA Officers
Polls for the Women Student Association elections will be open
today until 6:00 p.m.
Coeds on campus should vote in their residence hall area while
girls living in sorority houses are to vote at the Zeta house.
Off-campus residents should vote at Normal Hall or in front of
the library. Both ID's must be shown before a girl can vote.
The slate includes the following candidates: President; Kathy
Hays, Kathy Richardson; Vice President; Mary Jo Holland, Susan
Froemke, Carol Freedman; Treasurer; Linda Tawler, Janie Wan Wanless;
less; Wanless; Recording Secretary; Kris Demster, Susie Wright; Corres Corresponding
ponding Corresponding Secretary; Harriet Halperin, Sara Kutz; Senior Representa Representative;
tive; Representative; Judy Rosenberger, Kathy Moore; Junior Representative; Joan
Schaffel, Jo Ann Langworthy, Carol Keen, Sara Abtaker; Fresh-
SOph Representative; Marti Cochran, Val Schnelling, Francis Spota
Peggy Refranz, Joyce Wice, Jan Dickens.
^ mmmrn^ _
GATOR
W TRIPLE
I /Os TREAT
BARNEY
/ FRENCH FRIES
* LARGE DRINK
59<
BIG BARNEY, famous with college students from coast to coast,
is the RED BARNS popular double-deck hamburger sandwich.
Big Barney is big in every way. Its made with two grilled patties
of beef, a slice of creamy, melted cheese, zesty pickle, crisp
lettuce. SDecial savorv sau op. .all on a double-decker bun.
MONDAY (AFTER 4) ALL DAY TUESDAY
TIED BARN
2029 N.W. 13th St. Across from Goinesvillc High School
Ttoo Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advert advertisements
isements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever
possible
I 7 he .^ lorl <1 A,U * or wUI not conrtd r Adjustments of payment for any advertisement
I ! V n ** P * r pWc l ,rrors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Ad Advertising
vertising Advertising Manager within 0) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida All Into r
will not be responsible for more than one Incorrect lr^
to run several times. Notice* for correction must be given before next Insertion.
I THE FIX) HI DA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University at
Florida and Is published five times weekly except durti* May, June, and July when
It is published aemt- weekly. Only editorials represent the official opinions of their authors
to T nortd Alligator, Florida Union Building. University
of Florida, Gainesville, fla JZCOI. The Alligator is .ntered as second claa* matter

by the grounding of a power cable. Authorities
were not available for comment on the latest
blackout.
According to one Graham area resident, things
went pretty smoothly, though not many persons
remained In the dorms.
The biggest complaint against the inconvenience
cited by girl residents was the problem of applying
make -up in the dark.
There were rumors of a panty raid, but nothing
ever happened, said one Graham co-ed. I guess
were all used to It by now.

I LITTLE LEAGUE, BAS.EBALL, I
SOFTBALL, fRACK
EQUIPMENT
NOW ALL AT SPECIAL PRICES I
Shop Early While Stock Is Complete I
Wide Selection of Models to Choose From
LiTTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
. DIiC'JS '. SHOT VAULTING I
JIMMIE HUGHES SPORTING GOODS
F orida S SP rtin9 G dS **.*
3 w u ;;; er,ity Av - 372-8212 I
Offstreet Parking In Rear Os Store I
A

bEa NUrSeRy
1214 1/2 NW 4th St
, 376-0917
5 age groups, infant thragh
kindergarten Glasses.
^kwisiilldlng
fGATOR ADS SELL 1 \

Harpist To Play
Gralnne Yeats, a distinguished I
harpist and singer, and Michael I
Yeats, an Irish senator and famous I
music critic, will visit the UF I
t campus this Tuesday and Wednes- I
) day. I
Free student tickets are avail- I
able at Florida Union. Faculty j
tickets cost one dollar and general I
public admission Is two dollars, j

I GRADUATING? I
I
Get Your I
Commencement Announcements
now |
seniors graduating in April
may purchase commencement
announcements from
Campus Bookstore

I FOR A FREE |
I DEMONSTRATION I
* IB
I of the latest
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DESK COMPUTER!
| KISERS OFFICE I
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I Only 1475.00, too
I Grand Total I
I DESK I
IcALCULATORsI
M ,t *v- S
| only $785.00 I



£ |R!Sli Sfl! I
f S over G so% QUIK-SAVE
1 STARTING TODAY* where you save I
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QUANTITIES LIMITED PAPERBACKS-MAGAZINES-PHOTO FINISHERS I
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TOOTHPASTE 95{ L,ST J I
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$1.39 VALUE # # V
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I HAIR SPRAY $3.35 TOTAL | IjH I
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I Purse Size Spray (SI.OO VALUE) I
JUST WONDERFUL
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mini-can 2.5 oz. WOULD YOU BELIEVE? j
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I QUIK-SAVE gt ct vbpox^
I 9 West Universiw Ave I R /vvnv R 1 '
I l\' Downtown And |j E p g
/ §Ct?Xa 1620 W. University Ave. |j E coupontooa inru Mar. 27, 1967 |
M 1966. Reductions Or Enlargements |
s p Not included In Coupon Offer. |
I TfiS Ki [r 1 laflWfa&asylimit
I |WR Carolyn I GAINESVILLE'S lowest prices
I Sfi! Plaza ON F|LM developing
|> F ONE DAY SERVICE
I s* mi rr_

NEW $2.00 LIST 1
GO-GO-LIGHT I
Hair Lightner SI .19
by BRECK I
For That Summer-blond Look All Year I

Monday, March 13, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

High School
Students See
'College Life )
By JOE TORCHLA.
Alligator Staff Writer
The younger generation** hit the UF campus Friday and
Saturday when a host of Florida high school students came
here for the inter-Florida high school basketball tournament
and it didn*t go unnoticed by UF students.
This, along with the Engineers Fair, gave UF and its
students a chance to show off.
High schools go home was a chant coming from the third
floor of a mens dormitory Friday afternoon but the high
school students passing below ignored it. They came, they
saw, they stayed and some conquered as they took trophies
home with them.
But while they were here, the students had a glimpse at
college life they visited greek houses, explored UFs
campus and passively observed UF students going about their
daily routine.
, Some were impressed; some were not some may even
have decided then that they want UFtobe their Alma Mater.
But one fact seems to be obvious; they appeared to enjoy
themselves.
UF students on their way to the library or class saw these
high-schoolers cheering and rallying as they passed In cars
after their team* had won.
One UF student remarked: Its so easy to pick them out.*
This remark was made rather contemptuously, but a note
of envy could be detected.
Several members of the older generation* were also found
on campus this past weekend at the Engineers Fair.
My son, the engineer** seemed to characterize the proud
expressions on the faces of several parents as they gazed
with wonder at the marvels of scientific and technological
advancement.
Os course there werent just Mom mas and Papas** at the
fair but obvious extremes in age could be detected.
The high school students who ylsited the expressed
glances of awe and amazement at the possibilities the future
holds; the parents and grandparents seemed to look hollow
and proud at the same time hollow because of all they have
missed and didnt understand, and proud because their off offsprings
springs offsprings have the opportunity they didnt.
Yes, this was a good weekend for visitors at UF but
they went unnoticed by many UF students who were busy
planning and working toward a future goal. .
The goal their parents didnt have a chance to achieve
(or conceive), and the goal their high school brothers and
sisters will one day also achieve.
UF Professors Discuss
Vietnam War Tonight

Three UF professors will dis discuss
cuss discuss the morality, legality,
economics and politics of the war
in Vietnam at 8 tonight in McCarty
Auditorium.
Dr. David R. Kurtzman, asst,
professor of philosophy, Joel Rab Rabinovitz,
inovitz, Rabinovitz, assist, professor of law
and Keith R. Legg, asst, profes professor
sor professor of political science will make
|Fia3^Jnior^3rLii^nsuraiSK
HI
TSSff

.MONDAY NIGHT SPECIAL
JHHHHpPSppHjj
W wd fwA Baked Chicken
m served with
**'* W Potatoes or Kice
//CAFETERIA I
LfekZTyjZijl 313 W. Uni*. Aw*. 7
HMjilpASHl 1/2 Block West of Fla. Theatre
iCBSlIlftMiH A SHORT WALK FROM CAMPUS

up the panel which is sponsored
by the Gainesville SDS and pre presented
sented presented on campus by the Student
Peace Union.
The panel will discuss such
questions as: Does Nuremberg ap apply?
ply? apply? Is the U.S. violating the U.N.
charter? Is morality an issue?
Can there be free election? If
x the war is wrong, what should you
I do? Is there a reasonable chance
l for peace soon?
| Kurtzman will speak on morality
I as a pertinent issue of the war;
F Rabinovitz will discuss the poli polir
r polir tical issues concerning the United
E States' presence in Vietnam.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 13, 1967

Graham Student Robbed,
Carpet Mystery Unsolved

Police investigators are pres presently
ently presently inquiring into the report of a
Graham Area student who reported
the theft of $l2O from his room
last weekend.
The student told police that he
had cashed a check for $l2O and
had placed the money in a dresser
drawer. He and his room mate then
left the room and locked the door.
When they returned, they found
that the blinds had been pushed to
one side and that a screen had
been removed from a window,
which was over a ledge. They found
that the money was gone at this
time.
Members of the department said
that a complete report would be
available upon the completion of
their investigation.
No additional information

Scholars Elected
To Phi Beta Kappa
£====£ v "N
Thirty-four outstanding scholars at UF have been elected to member membership
ship membership in Phi Beta Kappa, national honorary fraternity.
Included among new members, to tie inducted at the annual Phi
Beta Kappa banquet March 31 at the University's Faculty Club, are
26 seniors graduating in April, seven who graduated in December,
and a 1942 graduate, chosen for alumni membership.
Twelve other students previously elected also will be inducted.
For the first time, a student from the College of Architecture and
Fine Arts has been elected to the Universitys Phi Beta Kappa
chapter. She is Mrs. Sally Rowell Curtis.
Mrs. Curtis, who graduated in December, was chosen to receive
the 1967 Phi Beta Kappa Creative Achievement Award.
Recipient of the alumnus membership is Lucius D. Battle, 3200
Garfield St., NW, Washington, D.C.
Membership in Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's oldest Greek letter
fraternity, requires that students be in the upper 15 per cent of their
class with courses primarily in liberal arts and sciences.
Other new members are: Cynthia L. Smith, William Ernest Cable,
Ellen Kay Ashdown, Edward Thomas McLaughlin, Leonard Deane r,.
Christy F. Harris, Joseph David Langlois, Richard B. Mathews,
Richard Grant Painter, Natalie Zadoff, Patricia Marie Slade, Mary
Violet Hough, Margaret A. Lee, Donald Songer, Kenneth G. Zaleski,
Martin Lee Krovetz, Douglas D. Noble, Eddie Jeff Blackwell,Frank
Wallace Averill, Martin Alan Meyers, Robert Paul Nelson, Sharon
Rae Pschorr, Norris W. Hoffman, Charles Gordon Long, Richard
Rogers Jones, Gary Eugene Ragan and John David Powell.
Brothers Donald and Ronald Eppert, Kathryn Martin, and Rodney
Plotnik.

Candy Bars
Removed
The recent fervor over the
spoiled Chunkle candy bars has
resulted in their removal from
campus.
The bars were picked up last
Monday from the Campus Shop
and Bookstore by Eli Witt Co.,
of Tampa, distributors of the
candy. The campus store received
credit for the bars.
According to Sam Getzen, di director
rector director of the Campus Shop, the
candy will be sold again on campus
as soon as the situation is remed remedied.
ied. remedied. Their continued sale will
depend upon student acceptance of
the bars when they return for
sale.
NEW 1967
Air Conditioned
Volkswagen
$1997
miller brown
motors
4222 NW 13th ST.

is available in the theft of SISOO
worth of carpeting from the new
Florida Union reported on Feb. 21.
Residents of Diamond Village
reported last Saturday that a stray
dog had bitten *wo children of
Village residents. Campus police
were asked to remove the dog,
which was removed from a play playground
ground playground enclosure and taken to the
city pound to be observed for two
weeks.
Several small accidents were
reported to the campus police
over the weekend, none causing
major damage or injury. A desk
sergeant handling accident re reports
ports reports estimated that total damage
for the four accidents reported
amounted to about S4OO.
Excavation, tearing up of side sidewalks,
walks, sidewalks, and laying of pipe provide
discomfort to students who are

I Next Time Out, Get A I
I BASKETBALL I
SPECIAL I
I \ / \ M I THIS WEEkTsPEOAL I I
I i 221 11
I V 'W': I
jjf J 'jf l

on their way to class, and the
ending of construction and the lay laying
ing laying of new sidewalks after the
laying of pipe provide an equal
amount of discomfort to the work workmen.
men. workmen.
A construction foreman reported
to police department members that
students had written names and
fraternity and sorority letters in
the freshly-laid sidewalks before
the concrete hardened. He said that
his inspector had said he would
not accept the work with writing
displayed on it and would ask to
have it removed and replaced with
fresh sections of sidewalk.
So if inspectors have their way,
away of preserving notes of per personal
sonal personal history will disappear, be because
cause because they are now insisting on
plain, simple sidewalks un undecorated
decorated undecorated by the notes of UF
students.

SAINT PATRICK S
DAY
SPECIAL
10%
DISCOUNT
ON REGULAR
PRICE MERCHANDISE
ji|r (mitlis
fMCN S shop shop-919
-919 shop-919 W.. University Ave.
NEXT TO RECORD BAR
919 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
l

UF Traffic Study
Resumes Tuesday

A concentrated 12-hour study of
traffic and parking conditions on
the UF campus will be conducted
Tuesday.
Fourteen checkpoint stations,
located at various entrances to
the campus, will be manned by
student survey teams from 6:30
a.m. until 6:30 p.m.
License plate numbers on in incoming
coming incoming and outgoing vehicles and
times of their arrival and depart departure
ure departure will be tabulated to reflect
a typical 12-hour traffic volume.
A less detailed study will be
performed either Wednesday or
Friday next week to determine
marked changes because of dif different
ferent different class schedules on a Tues Tuesday-Thursday
day-Thursday Tuesday-Thursday basis compared to
Monday- Wednesday- F riday.
Periodic surveys of various
campus parking lots also will be

The Obsolete
Anchor.
Most of us cant even remember,
seeing an anchor.
Theyve lost their meaning in an air age.
An age when men seek to be mobile
and free to move as rapidly as possible.
Dont be left out of the thrilling
Age of Aviation. Learn to fly.
Its a skill and an excitement youll
treasure for the rest of your life.
So learn while youre young.
You can afford to.
You cant afford not to.
>CASSELS-IN-THE-AIR
GAINESVILLE AIRPORT WALDO RO AD

taken to attain percentage of ca-l
pacity totals throughout-the day]
University officials noted
motorists will be detained J
long enough to have their car'
license tags checked.
Study in
Guadalajara. Mexico
The Guadalajara Summer School, a
fully accredited University of Arizona
program, conducted in cooperation
with professors from Stanford Uni University,
versity, University, University of California, and
Guadalajara, will offer July 3 to Au August
gust August 12, art, folklore, geography, his history,
tory, history, language and literature courses.
Tuition, board and room is $290.
Write Prof. Juan B. Rael, PO. Box
7227, Stanford, California 94305.



Monday, March 13, 1967, The Florida Alligator.

Honor Court Dismisses'Souped-Up Charge

When we got up to leave/* Shepherd
said, I assumed the waitress had added
my soup and coffee onto Garcias ticket.
Taylor needed 17 cents to pay his bill
since he only had a dollar. Garcia gave
it to him.
When the waitress went back to the
table, she noticed a check still there
one for 52 cents. As she walked past
the booth where Forbes and Dickey were
sitting, the waitress was stopped.
The two in the booth told me they were
friends of that fellow who left his check/ *
the waitress said. They said they'd pay
for it and then have him pay them back."
Evidently, what happened al although
though although Shepherd himself went back Sat Saturday
urday Saturday morning and apparently paid the
bill again.
Dickey then called the Honor Court
office and informed persons there of

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what had happened. Soon afterward, he
went in person to the office and filed
charges against Shepherd for "theft of
one bowl of soup and one cup of coffee
at a total value of 52 cents."
Forbes left Dickey before be went to
the Honcr Court and was apparently never
again in actual involvement with the case.
I knew Dickey had called the Honor
Court about it," Forbes said. I don't
know if he went over there or not. I
neara aoout some trouble secerning' the
incident later, but I cifics." .specifics."
The charges were typed oy Jim Grab Grabtree,
tree, Grabtree, assistant attorney general es Honor
Court. TTie named defendant was Ro Robert
bert Robert C. Shepherd."
Not long afterward Dave Cox. aim of
the HCs two attorneys geuenu, returned
from of all places Shepherd's of office,
fice, office, where he had been discussing foot football
ball football bloc seating with the president.

Rusk Avoids Answering
Stalina Visa Question

Page 5

WASHINGTON UPI _Secretary
of State Dean Rusk said Sunday
that U.S. discussions of the de defection
fection defection of Svetlana Stalin, never
reached the question of according
her political sanctuary in the
United States.
Rusk the first high U.S.
official to comment on the de defection,
fection, defection, avoided questioning on
whether Svetlana had been granted

The charges were presented to him by
Crabtree, who smilingly answered Coxs
questions to the effect that the defendant
is not a law student and you don't know
him."
Not realizing that Robert C. Shepherd
was in reality the student body president
(Cox claims he thought his first name
started with a J"), Cox signed the char charges.
ges. charges. Crabtree, apparently finding the si situation
tuation situation humorous at this point, sat back
and said nothing.
Shepherd was then Informed of the
charge by Hank Murphy, an Honor Court
defense counseler who had elected to de defend
fend defend the pre"' " if Shepherd so desired.
t* *. .... sime, Shepherd said,
that tu k:.e problem concerning
the soup.
I couldn't believe it at first," Shep Shepherd
herd Shepherd said. But I soon began to see that
it might not be so funny."
Soon thereafter, Cox and the other HC

a visa to the United States and
whether asylum was offered.
We did not actually get to
the question of whether she T>e
accorded political asylum in this
country," Rusk said in a televised
interview, Issues and Answers-
ABC.
She is a private citizen of another
country, in Switzerland, and I do not
think it is up to me to complicate
her life by any comment I might
make today."
Svetlana, 41, remained in hiding
in Bern, Switzerland, Sunday where
she has been kept under tight
security wraps since the Swiss
government agreed to take her on a
temporary basis.
Informed sources said Svetlana
asked the United States for asylum
and was promised it while she
was in New Delhi last week.
She was flown to Rome by aU.S.
foreign service officer and was in
American custody until her arrival
in Switzerland.
Indian Prime Minister Indira
Gandhi would say Sunday only that
she met Svetlana "very briefly"
last week.
Diplomatic sources said the
United States was anxious to
avoid" having Svetlana granted
asylum here. They said political
repercussions would harm U.S.-
Soviet relationships.
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attorney general, Jim Panico, came to
Shepherds office and talked things over.
Murphy asked them for a nolle prosequi prosequiwhich
which prosequiwhich would have dropped all the charges.
The two didnt grant it at the time, but
did so after a Cox investigation later that
evening. The nolle prosequi ruling elltn-
inates any chance of a charge recall. <
4
Cox said the charges were dropped for
two reasons: (1) the whole thing appeared
to be a mistake, and (2) the Honor Court i
doesnt handle such cases.
Cox said any action against parties
involved would pend on further Investi Investigation
gation Investigation the Honor Court plans to hold.
When reached Sunday, Dickey would
make no comment on the incident.
As member of the Honor Court staff/'
Dickey said, I don't feel it is incumbent
on me to make a comment at this time."
Shepherd had no further comment Sun Sunday
day Sunday other than to say that it was a
nasty thing to do."

Chinas
Revolt
Ended
. HONG KONG (UPI) -- The Chi Chinese
nese Chinese Communist party has order ordered
ed ordered a halt to chairman Mao Tse
Tungs cultural revolution"
among the peasant masses in the
countryside, Peking Radio re reported
ported reported Monday.
The order of the central com committee
mittee committee of the Chinese Communist
party was disclosed in an edi editorial
torial editorial of the party organ, the Pek Peking
ing Peking Peoples Daily, the monitored
broadcast said.
It marked a sudden slowdown in
purge of reactionary" of officials,
ficials, officials, which has been highlighted
by militant student Red Guards
who carried Mao's directives
to fanatical extremes.
The editorial was entitled do
not struggle to seize power in pro production
duction production brigades and production
teams during the busy period of
spring cultivation."
The production brigades" and
teams are the basic structures of
the agricultural and farm collec collectives
tives collectives in Red China. The party
apparently was attempting to
insure food supplies, fearful that
any severe shortages would un uni
i uni dermine, more than anything else,
Mao's cultural revolution."
Strides by workers protesting
the Red Army's takeover of Can Canton
ton Canton have caused acute food short shortages
ages shortages in south Chinas biggest city,
it was reported Sunday.
The Peoples Daily editorial said
the party had warned that spring
cultivation is of vital importance
to the years agricultural produc production."
tion." production."
It said the cultivation was also
Important to the cultural revo revolution"
lution" revolution" and to the consolidation
of the dictatorship of the prole proletariat."
tariat." proletariat."
Political observers in Hong Kong
said the directive slowing up the
purge in the countryside could take
all the momentum out of Mao's
cultural revolution" and even eventually
tually eventually bring it to a complete stand standstill
still standstill



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 13,1967

The Florida Alligator
jA ojWjj. It Chu Rmm. PCimTiwTuitt.'
t
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR 808 BECK
Editorial Editor Soorts Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecessanly reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is the editorial in the left
column.
Ivory Tower
Two structures stand tall against the
sky.
They are UFs newest and most mod modern
ern modern dormitory--Twin Towers--and while
they stand tall today, when it comes time
to rent them they may look very
small indeed.
This isnt Because of the facilities,
which are excellent, but because of the
ridiculous rent which is being asked.
$155 per quarter is a lot of money
to ask for any dorm room--even one
which is set up like a regular apart apartment,
ment, apartment, such as the rooms in Twin To Towers
wers Towers are.
We cant see too many upper division
and graduate students wanting to pay
that much to live in a dorm when they
can live on SW 16th Avenue for virtually
the same money.
Wouldnt you feel silly living in a
dormitory with your own refrigerator
and not be able to keep what you want
in it?
We can just see it now. Okay every everybody,
body, everybody, icebox check!! 7
Quick Joe. Ditch the beer.
We suggest that UFs Housing Divi Division
sion Division take a long hard look at the rent it
is asking for Twin Towers.
Director Harold Riker may want the
dorms to pay for themselves but thats
pretty hard to do when you dont have
many people living in them.
We want Twin Towers to be a model
for other dormitories, but if Housing
doesnt scale down its rent, Twin To Towers
wers Towers may become the Ivory Tower of
a bureaucratic dream.
Thank You, Perry
Amidst all the furor over increases
in tuition and dormitory rates and what
have you, its good to see that at least
one institution on the UF campus remains
constant.
Were talking about Perry Moores 25
cent game Coke.
It stands out like an oasis in a desert,
like a breath of spring, line a. .
, We could go on and on in praise of
the game Coke. We could defend it
against charges that the Coke syrup is
added as an afterthought, that most of it
is ice.
But thats not necessary. It surely
must have been hard for Perry Moore
not to raise the price of that lovely
liquid refresher in the face of mounting
inflation. But he withstood the pressures
of our spiraling economy and has held
fast on the price. For this, he deserves
the thanks of the studerit body.
Thank you, Perry Moore,

MUST BE REDEFINED
Tenure Problem Exists At UF

L-. -
By JUSTINE HARTMArr^
Alligator Columnist'
A tenure problem exists at the University of
Florida.
Tenure at UF, and about one-third of the major
universities in the U.S., has been permitted to be become
come become an effective instrument of job security which
ensures the maintenance of a mediocre, non noncompetitive
competitive noncompetitive faculty.
The problem revolves around the need to define
the purpose of tenure in a modern context. The
tenure system, which guarantees a professor one
years notice before he can be dismissed and pre prevents
vents prevents his dismissal for any reason other than
moral turpitude, was instituted in most universities
in the 1920s during a period when academicians
were under attack for being controversial.
Any professor that held unorthodox views
such as an economics professor who advocated big
government spending conflicting with political eco economists
nomists economists of the 1920 s was fired. Originally,
tenure was designed to protect professors who voiced
opinions on controversial issues.
However, now tenure ensures mediocrity of the
staff by preventing a selective winnowing of the
faculty according to its total professorial com competence
petence competence and performance. A professor can be
granted tenure after he has been here for three
years on recommendations of the chairman of his
department and its senior members.
If, three years after a man has been given tenure,
he does not appear to be competent by national
standards, there is no way to get rid of him. This
is the tragedy of the present tenure system as
operated at UF and other universities.
In only a handful of instances has competence
clearly been the critieria for dismissal of a faculty
member at UF. I cant understand why incom incompetence
petence incompetence has so rarely been grounds, said one UF
professor, when Ive met a number of incompe incompetents
tents incompetents in the profession.
Theoretically, a department chairman is supposed
to review the qualifications and productivity of his
staffs every six or seven years, but this has become
mere formality.

OUR MAN HOPPE
A Hemline We Can Stand On

By ARTHUR HOPPE
Young ladies have taken to wear wearing
ing wearing shorter skirts to school. This
has created some mild reaction
around the country, such as sus suspensions,
pensions, suspensions, expulsions, court suits
and emergency school board meet meetings.
ings. meetings.
Most school boards have faced
the crisis gamely by passing rules
that a young lady's skirt must be
no higher than, say, 3.63 centi centimeters
meters centimeters above the upper edge of the
patella while standing at parade
rest.
The reason invariably given is
that hemlines more than, say, 3.63
centimeters above the knee dis distract
tract distract other students from their
studies."
Distract! That's a euphemism.
All too vividly I remember how
it was in my day. Os course, in
my day skirts were a little longer,
say about 3.63 centimeters below
the knee. You can imagine how it
was that unforgettable morning
when Miss Flossie Pettlbone
showed up in microbiology 1-A
wearing a skirt clearly only 3.62
centimeters below her knee.
* *
I and several other straight-A
students were gathered at the time
around the little cyclotron we'd
jnade in shop, doing our best to
unlock the secrets of the atom,
Heavenly days! cried Bill,
suddenly turning pale and clutch clutching
ing clutching his throat. And with that he
collapsed unconscious to the floor.
Careful, gang, I said coolly,
fiddling with the dials of our cy cyclotron,
clotron, cyclotron, we may have unlocked a
poisonous secret.
No, gasped Al, pointing behind
me. It's Flossie's sk-sk-skirt.
And with a shudder he hid his face
to the wall.
Just as we turned, as ill-luck

would have it, Miss Pettibone
flounced into her seat. It was
George, always a steady man in
an emergency, who saw it.
I saw it, he said in a zombie zombielike
like zombielike voice, his eyes glassy, the
chords standing out on his neck.
Saw what, George? we be beseeched
seeched beseeched him as we slapped his
cheeks and chafed his wrists. Tell
us, man.
Her, George said, knee.
We stood there stunned. It was
little Edwin, an unwordly child, who
broke the silence. Whats a
knee? he said.
I struggled for my mortal soul.
I lost. George, I said, licking
my lips, what did it look like?
Well, said George, regaining
control with a tremendous effort,
it was sort of round and kind of
knobby and it was (here he paused
for effect) dimpled!

Florida Alligator Staff
NICK TATRO JIM WfflTE NICK ARROYO
Editorial Assistant Assistant Managing Editor Photo Editor
STEFANIE JARIUS JO ANN LANGWORTHY GENE NAIL
Society Editor General Assignment Editorial Assistant
Editor
STAFF MEMBERS Harvey Alper, Bill Douthat, Elaine
Fuller, Kathie Keim, Bob Padecky, Judy Redfern, Frank.
Shepherd, Lori Steele, Joe Torchia, Harold Kennedy,
Justine Hartman, Eunice Tall Richie Tidwell
LAB ASSISTANTS Diana Folsom, Peggy Sneider, Andrew
Haslett Jr., Robert Blount, Joan Allen, Eddie Gutten Guttenmachei,
machei, Guttenmachei, Dick Blakely, Bob Menaker, Dave Reddick, David
Weiss, Karen Eng, John Ellsworth, Diann Devine*

There are several problems involved in weeding
out the staff. The only way the administration can
convey to a tenured faculty member that it does not
consider him professional material is one of indi indirection
rection indirection stalling his promotion.
Furthermore, when the administration does try to
break tenure or encourage a man to move on, it
is apt to bungle into a problem of academic freedom.
In this case, the AAUP which guarantees the aca academic
demic academic rights of professors, becomes involved.
The gruesome fact remains, however, that a sub substantial
stantial substantial number of superannuated, non-productive
senior professors are merely filling slots at this
university.
At several institutions in the country, especially
Ivy League colleges, the procedure is to review
a man's tenure when he comes up for a promotion.
His publications are inspected. His department
makes inquiries with colleagues at other institu institutions
tions institutions to get estimates of the professor's scholarly
capacity. This inquiry prevents any geographical
bias from creeping into the decision.
Many professors, howler, are reluctant to have
their competence reviewed. Do they fail to realize
that it is examined every time they expose a publi publication
cation publication to the critical minds of their colleagues?
Trial by institution seems minor in comparison.
An associate professor is paid to devote one onefourth
fourth onefourth of his time to research. If he had no publi publications,
cations, publications, then he is not professionally on the ball.
Not mere competence, but degree of competence
should be the criteria for hiring and firing at the
university level. Incompetence should not be toler tolerated
ated tolerated under any conditions.
Incompetence is being tolerated at UF because of
the antiquated system of tenure. Due to the extreme
shortage of competent men in the profession, the
university is reluctant to let faculty members go,
regardless of their professional quality or lack
thereof. Known evils are preferred to an empty
space or the necessity in dabbling in the national
(SEE TENURE ' PAGE 7)

Dimpled? Aaaggghhh!" some someone
one someone screamed in the confusion.
Chairs were overturned, the atom
smasher smashed. Nor will I ever
forget the shrieks of our Principal,
poor Miss Heffelwaite, when the
Boys' Forensic Society discovered
her hiding in the broom closet.
* *
Since then, of course, it has been
steadily down hill for us once onceproud
proud onceproud youth. From voyeurism it
is but a step to opium addiction
and felonious mopery. Yet still
hemlines creep upward.
How odd it is, I sometimes think
in my degraded dreams, that every
time an embattled school board
yields a centimeter, young ladies
demand an inch.
Fight on, embattled school
boards," I can only croak en encouragingly,
couragingly, encouragingly, the end is not yet
in sight."



Ow! Ow! Ow! Ow!

On
*-
Sex
EDITOR:
(To any proud males:)
Theodore Reik, 19th century
psychologist noted for his works
in the realm of sexual behavior
points out that while about 45 per
cent of the endeavor of the mature
male is directed toward sexual
responsibility and indulgence, the
mature female, on the other hand,
is inclined to devote somewhere
in the neighborhood of 90 to 95
per cent of her enterprises to her
sexual responsibilities, which in include
clude include to a great extent the rearing
of a family, the keeping of the
home, her companionship
as a spouse, etc.
Just about every red-blooded
unmarried female has a sort of
MENTAL NOTEBOOK in which
is listed on one side a number oi
CANDIDATES who she con considers
siders considers a sufficient challenge to
her female ego to be worthy of
her efforts.
While on the other side of this
mental datebook opposite each
CANDIDATE rests a small box
reserved specifically for
QUALITY POINTS lettering A
through E, rating the extent to
which she has been able to ** HAN HANDLE
DLE HANDLE the CANDIDATE.
I know a number of girls car carrying
rying carrying a fifteen hour (a day) load
with a 4.0 average.
Remember the girl you took to
the fraternity party? Tough, huh?
She has a study date every week weeknight.
night. weeknight. To her, you're a name in
her datebook with a letter beside
it. How many quality points did
she rate herself on you?
Do you like being a statistic,
a name on the list? Do you think
I'll settle for tills?
You're damn right I will
TOM JONES, ZUC
(PLEASE I
Limit Letters To The j
Editor To 250 Words I
And Make Sure j
They're Signed. We
Will Omit Names
At Writer's Request.

Tenure Problem Exists At UF

(FROM PAGE 6)
market, which requires larger resources, as qual quality
ity quality always does.
Other universities have created competitive situ situations
ations situations by automatically weeding out faculty members
_who do not perform. A big turnover on the in instructor
structor instructor and associate professor levels at a uni university
versity university is desirable. If three junior professors are
hired, one will be let go at the end of the first year,
another at the end of two years, and at the end of
three years the third may be dismissed, depending
upon his performance. This turnover cannot occur
at ur oecause mere is no money to bring new blood
in from the national market.
It is not to be said that tenure is without its
uses or its merit. The danger is that tenure will
become an end in itself. The danger is that vigorous,
self-seeking scholars will become fixtures in bureau bureaucratic
cratic bureaucratic machinery.
Tenure can too easily be cherished by those who
depend on a certain institution for their security

Faculty Member
Ignorant
EDITOR:
Our anonymous faculty member
should know that his type is the
reason the best students never
come to the University of Florida
and the better ones soon leave in
despair and disgust.
HLs pseudoanalytlc style does
hot succeed in hiding his ignor ignorance
ance ignorance of current issues and the
vast body of literature in political
science, education, and ethics that
underlies the protester* position.
I am sorry that his cowardice
denies roe the opportunity of en enlightening
lightening enlightening him.
I would cite sources for refer reference,
ence, reference, but he has made it clear
that as a teacher he is too old
to learn.
DALE COBERLY
More Magazines
- EDITOR:
Out of the large budget which
student government must allocate,
a tiny slice needs to be cut for a
new item.
A few dollars should be ex expended
pended expended to provide several maga magazlne
zlne magazlne subscriptions for the in infirmary.
firmary. infirmary. Many students patiently
waiting their turn without
entertainment would appreciate
this service.
JIM BRYANT, 7ED

Conduct At WSA Meet Poor

EDITOR:
As a resident of Graham Hall, I unwillingly
found my way to the meeting at our Rec Room
at 11 on Wednesday evening to listen to WSA Can Candidates.
didates. Candidates.
Once there, though, I was grateful for the oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to listen to those candidates, many of whom
will represent us and work for the improvements
we want and to abolish those things which we con constantly
stantly constantly gripe about.
I, along with the great majority of Graham
Hall residents, was ashamed and disappointed in the
rude, uncouth manner the WSA representatives
and candidates were received. Such unspeakable
conduct would be expected of pre-schoolers, but
certainly not of young women who are proud of
the right to call themselves Florida co-eds and
rpsldpnts of Graham Hall.

Smoke Screen Around Fire

EDITOR:
In response to Bob Moran's ar article
ticle article in the March 7 issue of the
Alligator, and to anyone else who
wishes to blame the faeist-pigs
and war-mongers on this cam campus
pus campus for the burning of the Peace
Caravan, I only wish to say
that since the police have no evi evidence
dence evidence as to who committed this

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and their self-esteem. It is needed by those who
can not find a job elsewhere, because they can not
meet national professional standards. It is not needed
by professors who are confident of their intel intellectual
lectual intellectual development of the quality of their research
and teaching. A good man will land on his feet
anywhere and he knows it. The prevailing concept
is that if a professor stands upright in a classroom
and teaches for years, a promotion is in order,
whether or not he has published anything or has
been sitting around filling space and serving time.
UF is a big bureaucracy which creates role and
status assignments for property and security-minded
middle classes, from whence spring most members
of the academic community. Tenure can readily
become a servile instrument of bureaucratic job
security for little people.
A university is one of the most socialized insti institutions
tutions institutions of the western world and a highly political
system. An Incompetent dean with friends in high
places is hard to remove.

Monday, March 13, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

regrettable act of arson, I believe
it unfair for the more liberal
members of our society to blame
those of a more conservative lean leaning
ing leaning for the arson.
It seems that these certain lib liberals
erals liberals are immediately blaming a
reactionary element for the
burning of their waeon when there

Those who participated in the despicable laughter
and comments, and especially the impertinent ques questioning,
tioning, questioning, should be especially chagrined by their
conduct in the presence of Mrs. Johnson, our
receptionist, who regards all of us as her daughters
and takes pride in our achievements.
She went out of her way to come to our meeting,
and must have felt great disappointment in the con conduct
duct conduct of those few*. .1 am sure I express the feeling
of the majority of Graham Hall residents in apologi apologizing
zing apologizing to the WSA, the candidates, our Resident
Counselors, and to Mrs. Johnson for the regretable
conduct.
I hope that in the future, WSA will be graciously
welcomed in Graham Hall as the representative of
Florida women.
LINDA A. SMITH, lUC

is absolutely no grounds whatso whatsoever
ever whatsoever for this belief.
oft the contrary, $e arson did
bring a great amount of attention
to the Peace Caravan's** cause,
perhaps more than it would have
otherwise received. Since no one
has leveled such a charge, and
since the more liberal elements of
our society have seen fit to hurl
unfounded accusations, I will
. return their dirt by proposing that
the fire was intentionally started
by a leftist to attract attention to
his cause, and that the attempt to
immediately blame the right wing
for the arson was, if you will
pardon the pun, a smoke screen*'
tactic.
Do I really believe that a leftist
started the fire? No. The students
and others who took the time to
organize the Peace Caravan*'
would not burn it any more than
wodld those on this campus who
oppose it stoop so low as to recog recognize
nize recognize it as a real threat to their
way of thinking.
However, I do wish in the future
that Bob Moran study the legal
system for which Americans are
dying in Vietnam, and take note
that one is Innocent until proven
guilty.
DOUGLAS LAWLESS

Page 7



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1964 HONDA 250 cc Scrambler,
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STUDENT SPECIALS Admiral
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dents. students. Sudden Service Fuel Oil
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1965 HONDA 90, S2OO or best
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1966 KAWASAKI Model F-2 r 169
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MIRANDA F-1.8 single reflex. F
3.5, FB, Telephoto, $300.00. 376-
9775 after 6 P.M. (A-114-st-c).
1965 YAMAHA 80cc excellent con condition,
dition, condition, asking $225.00. 372-9487
ask for David. (A-114-2t-c).
. i i
VESPA Motorscooter 125 cc; 1964
model. Phone 378-4880. (A-113-
3t-c).
1966 HONDA 305 Scrambler; cus custom
tom custom blue paint job, perfect condi condition.
tion. condition. Call: Mark any evening except
Thursday 378-6534. (A-111-st-c).
V.
* M J
Will sell or trade 650 cc BSA,
immaculate. Come see, make
offer. Will consider any 250 cc or
larger Honda for trade. 376-0298.
(A-111-3t-c).
- i
RCA Portable Stereo, perfect con condition,
dition, condition, floating head, extra length,
extended speakers. Reasonable.
Call 372-1553 between 5:30 and 6
P.M. (A-111-st-c).
l O' ii ~ aVi i ii i 01 *** i
for rent
ONE BEDROOM Apartment for
, rent during summer. Air condi conditioned,
tioned, conditioned, four blocks from campus.
$95. Call 378-3846. (B-113-st-p).
AVAILABLE SPKiNU rnmestei,
beautiful two bedroom apt., suit suit,
, suit, able for four. Air conditioned,
fully carpeted, swimming pool,
parking in front of door, near,
campus. $155 per month. 378-5959. j
(B-112-3t-c).
TWO Bedroom apartment avail available
able available for summer. Behind Norman
Hall and within walking distance
from campus. Furnished, kitchen,
plenty of room and free dart board.
1125 SW 7th Avenue. 378-6183.
(B-112-et-nc).
ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT in
the Colonial Manor for sub-lease.
Swimming pool, air conditioned,
modern, one block from library,
SIOO per month. Call David 378-
3952. (B-112-3t-nc).
PtHRU TUES. 1,3,5,7,9'1
SMmseMn-YVES MONTANO | ]
0000000 ** 0000000

for rent
AVAILABLE FORtwo girls, spring
trimester, one bedroom in 2-bed 2-bedroom
room 2-bedroom Landmark Apt. Air condi conditioned;
tioned; conditioned; carpeted; faces pool.
Phone: 878-4613. (B-114-3t-p).
GOING TO BE AROUND this sum summer?
mer? summer? Like to live at Colonial
Manor Apts, for only SIOO pe"
month? Then call 372-7111 or stop
over at 1216 S.W. 2nd Ave. Just
a few left. Hurry. (B-114-10t-c). /
APARTMENT for rent, one bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, built in kitchen, air con.
dition and heat. Three closets
and swimming pool. $95 per month.
Call 372-3826. (B-112-10t-c).
XIR-CONDITIONED APTS., for
summer with pool close to
campus, 1524 N.W. 4th Ave. For*
2,3, or 4 people $65, S7O, $'T r
per month plus electricity. 376-
8990, University Apts. (B-109-
lOt-c).
wanted..
1 **"-
WANTED PILOTS Previ Previous
ous Previous rated military pilots, any
branch, to fly for Florida Army
National Guard. 72 pay period per
year. Contact Captain H. P. Good Goodling,
ling, Goodling, Gainesville 378-5188 after
5 p.i.\ (C-114-lOt-c).
WANTED FEMALE roommates
for summer term to Village Park
Apartment on pool and air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, 378-5618. (C-114-3t-c).
BASS PLAYER needed for new
local band. Call Ron, 378-1071.-
(C-114-2t-p).
WANTED TO BUY room air
conditioner, approximately two
tons. Must be in good mechanical
condition. Call 376-3211, ext. 5472
after 5, call 378-1401. (C-114-3t (C-114-3tc).
c). (C-114-3tc).
NEED ONE MALE roommate for
summer trimester. Last month
rent free. S3O per month. 3 bed bedroom
room bedroom furnished house close to
campus. 378-5434. (C-114-st-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted,
now and (or) Spring trimester.
Please call 378-3484 between 5 and
6:30 p.m. (C-114-2t-c).
'POETRY WANTED for AntbcJlogy.l
Include stamped envelope. Idlewlld
Publishing Company, 543 Freder- I
ick Street, San Francisco, Califs
94117. (C-104-10- P)
1 WANTED one male roommate
TMMEDIATELY to share two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment at French Quarter
or four students to sub-lease for
summer term. Call 376-9017. (C (C---m-st-DL
--m-st-DL (C---m-st-DL
*
WANTED -- Riders to Savannah,
Charleston, or Myrtle Beach, S.C.
. Leaving Friday, March 17, and
returning Sunday, March 19. Call
Louise in 2307 Jennings. (C-112-
3t-p).
i &!30 WtOTHTOWMBr \
I 1
I Frtn W* Avalon U F|RRAIMCAA^I

Page 8

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 13, 1967

help wanted
RECEPTIONIST-Secretary so r
pediatrics office, at least three
years availability desired. Ability
to deal with people essential.
Typing and dictaphone required.
Write Box 2427, stating age, edu education,
cation, education, qualifications and refer references.
ences. references. (E-111-10t-c).
ALES MAN WANTED Part time
pr full time to work for old estab established
lished established firm. High Commissions
for summer work. Car necessary.
Call 372-0500. (E-111-st-c)^
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT. Male
camp counselors needed. Must be
accomplished horseman. WSI also
needed. If interested call 378-6595.
(E-111-10t-c).
NEEDED: Male assistant, must
have transportation. Machine shop
or electronic experience preferred
but not necessary. $1 $1.50 per
hour. 372-8273. (E-113-3t-c).
NOW HIRING bellboys for Ramada
Inn. Day and night shift. Part time
or full time. Apply in person 9 to
5 p.m. Ramada Inn. (E-114-lOt-c).
NEED FULL TIME Bookkeeper,
knowledge of billing machine, ex experience
perience experience preferable. Pay accord according
ing according to ability. Apply in person,
Silv rmans, 225 W. Univ. Ave.
(E-114-ts-c).
NEEDED Part-time, medical tech technologist-technician.
nologist-technician. technologist-technician. Immediate
open lg. Good salary, and working
conditions. Inquire Personal Di Director,
rector, Director, Alachua General Hospital,
914 SW 4th Ave. (E-114-10t-c).
WANTED Cashier and Assist Assistant
ant Assistant Manager Trainee. Contact
Harry Fehrman at 378-1001. (E (E---108-10t-c).
--108-10t-c). (E---108-10t-c).
situations
wanted
MOT HER WITH Ph.D. in chemistry
desi: es to return to work. Avail Available
able Available approximately 4 hours a day.
Cal 378-4533. (F-113-3t-p).
\
ARE DREAMY!/
Air
(OCK GEORGE 1
I HUDSON PEPPARD 1
GUY NIGEL
I STOCKWELL GREEN I
TOBRUK
I TECHNICOLOR* 1

11 I
autos
1957 CHEVROLET two door, stan standard
dard standard shift, 6 cylinder, green, rad}o
and heater. $225. Call 376-6831.
(G-111-3t-c).
1964 GTO Convertible, automatic,
blue-green with white top. Very
good condition, a rare one. Must
sell. $1,600. 372-5613. (G-112- ;
st-p).
1960 SUNBEAM ALPINE, regret regreta
a regreta tly must sell wife*scar,hardtop,
tcft c op, new motor and trans transmission
mission transmission 500 miles ago. Need mon money.
ey. money. 376-0201. (G-112-lOt-c).
* i. ... ' .i.
1962 CHEV. Std. 6, 4-dr., radio,
excellent condition, recently re replaced
placed replaced battery, two tires, exhaust
system, rear springs and shocks.
Valve job, trans. overhauled. $650.
Available in April. 372-5671. (G (G---112-3t-p).
--112-3t-p). (G---112-3t-p).
1964 VOLKSWAGEN, red, radio
and heater, wsw, $995. Call 376-
3529 after 6 p.m. (G-113-4t-p).
1959 AUSTIN HEALY SPRITE, ex excellent
cellent excellent condition. SSOO firm. Call
378-6341 after 8 p.m. (G-113-3t-
P).
1960 RAMBLER WAGON. One own owner,
er, owner, radio, heater, and RECLINING
SEATS. Five good tires, need mon money.
ey. money. Only $75 dollars. Call Don,
372-9454. (G-111-3t-p).
FOR SALE: 1960 4 door Falcon,
straight shift. Call: 378-3087 after
6 D.m. (G-111-st-p).
L
1965 VW SEDAN, excellent con condition,
dition, condition, radio, seat belts, luggage
rack. 376-2968. (G-114-st-c).
1962 Corvair Monza, mechanical mechanically
ly mechanically perfect, new tires, clean interior
Best offer accepted. Call 378-
4630 after 5:30 P.M.(G-111-st-c).
real estate
FOR SALE: One acre, zoned for
mobile home, 6 miles S.W. of
Gainesville on Archer Road. Call
372-9950 or University Extension
2678. 0-111- 10t-c).
Imr-OMicKinj
fc TECHNICOLOR
ftpT 7:15 & 10:35
Wt
L^nDeiSnl
Hr*; joey Bishop I
m|Tq(AS Across I
I
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE JgM

personal
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
summary program features Lan Language
guage Language Houses with total environ environment.
ment. environment. Regular housing available
also. Information 1441 Broadway,
Boulder, Colarado 30302. (J-108-
6t-c).
TRIANGLE FLYING
you to fly for ONLY $4 per hour, i
LIMITED membership NOW avail*
able. In operation since 1957.
Prospective members will meet
Saturday 9 a.m. Stengel Field,
BUT YOU MUST ACT NOW. Con-
tact Desk at Florida Union. (J (J---110-4t-c).
--110-4t-c). (J---110-4t-c).
1 1
lost-found
I
J
LOST: Female light grey angora
cat vicinity of N.W. 4th Ave. & 13th
Street. Call: 372-0519 anytime.
Reward. (L-112-st-c).
LOST Siamese Kitten in vlt!-*
nity of SW 16th Avenue. For any
information, call 378-4379 after
5 p.m. (L-112-3t-c).
LOST Key chain in vicinity of
Medical Center or behind Norman
Hall. Phone 378-3484. (L-113-
2t-nc).
~ ...
services
THANKS to the people who came
to buy my poodle. This shows that
AKC poodles are in demand. How However,
ever, However, he is not for sale. STUD
Service offered at reasonable
fee. Black miniature male poodle,
AKC. Contact Mrs. R. K. Geiger,
540 N.W. 26th Ave. (M-114-3t-p).
YOU LUCKY VW OWNERS I
Keep your Volkswagen young.
Send SI.OO for 56 page catalog
on ways to increase the value
and usefulness of your VW.
Write to:
RONNIMART
P. O. Box 75
Tremonton, Utah 84337
MN^
OF
THE "' r sw
GENERALS
PANAVISION TECHNICOLOR
60WNT6WN
THEATRE
DONT MISS
IT j||^
ENDS fg
THURSO?'
am
(RECOMMENO6D FOR MATURE AUoScES)



_G/s Trapped
On Viet Hill
(EDITOR'S NOTE: UPI news film cameraman lb Heller spent
Saturday night with a unit of the U.S. Ist Air Cavalry Division
that was pinned down on a Central Highlands hillside by North
Vietnamese troops.
By IB HELLER
BON SON, South Vietnam UPI-- A Communist sniper controlled
the hillside. He was deadly accurate and already had wounded two
Americans seriously.
Our helicopter circled for a long time over the area where a
squad from C Company 2nd Battalion of the sth Cavalry was hold holding
ing holding off North Vietnamese troops.
The two wounded men finally were placed aboard the chopper
and I jumped out. I learned later that one of the Gls had died.
Four soldiers at the top of the hill were protecting the wounded
and trying to join a platoon down below, but the sniper wouldn't
let them get off the hill. Those below were pinned down by auto automatic
matic automatic weapons fire.
*.
Spec. 4 Pat Rankin of Kelso, Washington, said the trouble was
that no one could determine where the sniper fire was coming
from. About 300 Communist troops were known to be In the area.
Moving from rock to rock, hedgerow to hedgerow, we finally
got to the bottom of the hill and located a trail.
The company commander had been killed while trying to take
over for a wounded machinegunner. A sergeant and a radio operator
were badly wounded.
They and 15 other wounded GPs were moved to the edge of a po potato
tato potato field but the Communist fire was too heavy for a helicopter
to pick them up.
Suddenly, a grenade exploded nearby, but no one was hit. Two
of our people spotted the North Vietnamese who had tossed it and
each threw a grenade of his own. The explosion blew the Commu Communist
nist Communist soldier's head off.
As darkness fell, the evacuation helicopter landed under heavy
fire. The crew picked up as many wounded men as the craft could
carry and took off again under heavy fire.
By midnight, all of the wounded had been removed and the caval cavalrymen
rymen cavalrymen were able to call in artillery on the North Vietnamese posi position.
tion. position.
By daybreak, even the sniper fire had ended and patrols went
out in search of dead Americans. Hie rest of the unit sat in a rice
paddy waiting to be lifted out.

I GET ACQUAINTED SPECIAL I r I
i;
I I Free Lubrication With II
I I Your Cars Oil Change I I
I CAMPUS AMERICAN >
I At the Corner of Univ. Ave.A 13th St. I
I "We dont talk service....we give it. I
I
I I
I YOU EXPECT MORE FROM AND YOU GET IT
mm -._ ;h
fgsgj 4 jsggg

Crime War May Bag
Some Public Officials

though there was no public disclosure of wackennut
agents' involvement
Gilchrist County Sheriff Clyde Williams has an announced
nounced announced his resignation, as soon as his books are
audited, because of "rumors going over the com community
munity community (that) there is a shortage in the sheriffs
office."
Questioned Friday about the possible emphasis
on investigating corruption in government, Ralph
Kiel, Wackenhut public relations director, said the
governor directed the War On Crime against or organized
ganized organized crime and corruption in government.
Kiel said it was amazing that anycases h been
broken yet, considering the little time Wackenhut
has been under the governor's employ.
"The investigators have been working furiously.
It's just too early to judge where they are working.
"As time passes," he said, "we'll see more
results in both areas."
George Wackenhut, director of the agency, said
earlier that he was in daily touch with Kirk on the
operation of the War On Crime.
"The governor doesn't make any of the decisions
on any of the investigations. Mr. Wackenhut does,"
Kiel said.
The agency won't reveal any of the details of
the cases underway, Kiel said.
"This would only tip your hand."
"The War On Crime has not, nor ever will be
used as a political weapon," Kiel said when questioned
about the present investigations involving public
officials.
Suspended Regent Darden has denied the charges
against him, saying they resulted from his refusal

Magician Here For Crusade

Magic will come to the Medical
Auditorium Wednesday night.
Andre Kole, a professional ma magician
gician magician who does everything from
card manipulations to sawing his
wife in half, will appear in the
Auditorium Wednesday at 9:30 p. m.

Monday. March 13. 1967. The Florida Alligator,
*

The show is sponsored by the Cam Campus
pus Campus Crusade for Christ Inter International
national International and the fellowship o.
Christian Athletes.
Tickets are SI.OO and may be
purchased at the Florida Union,
Gold Coast Restaurant, and from

of Kirk's request for his resignation from the Board
of Regents.
Kirk hasn't ended his efforts with the collection at
evidence by the Wackenhut investigators. In both the
Brevard Count? grand jury probe and the Dixie County
investigation, the governor has replaced and shifted
prosecuting attorneys to handle the cases.
Tampa attorney Paul AnUnori has been named to
prosecute Darden and school landscaper T. A. Altman
on the charges presented by the Brevard grand jury.
In Dixie County, Kirk-appointed State Attorpey
Gordon G. Oldham Jr. has pursued an investigation
which deadlocked a grand jury now in recess
before any indictments were presented.
Oldham has filed charges against Gene Van Aernan
for grand larceny and requested Kirk to suspend an
five of the county's commissioners for their refusal
to cooperate with his investigation.
In a recent interview, Wackenhut said his agencj
had employed between 25 and 30 agents to work for
the governor.
Press figures numbered the Wackenhut force at 23
during mid-February.
Wackenhut said he couldn't give a definite number
because it was added to on a regular basis "as fast
as we can acquire the proper personnel."
But taking the 20-odd or less agents working during
January and February, and spreading them out over
the known cases, not top mar' ~miid be
left for the equally pressing 'a v vtofied
crime.
Now, it's easy to understand why Kle 1 t*'d "the
investigators have been working furiously."
After Kirk finishes his war against crime in sUtv
government, maybe then we'll know how much a
real "organized crime" problem the state really has.

student members of the Campus
Crusade.
Kole has appeared on the Ed
Sullivan and Tonight television
shows. He has been a professional
magician for 15 years.

Page 9



1 The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 13, 1967

Page 10

| f ^'**f BB CHECK DELAYED PAYDAY LOANS ffl Vr 131 E |
Available VACATION Available
$25 to S6OO Call II Cl __ 222 W. Up to S6OO,
Payday Short Term 375.5333 IYIQI Iwil I I 11. Cl 11 V O Univenity Ave. For Your Second 'Car

Orange and

Address All Campus Calendar
Notices To Public Functions
Office, Florida Union

Administrative Notices

STATE TEACHER SCHOLARSHIP LOAN HOLDERS:
Scholarship funds are now available, Scholarship Sec Section,
tion, Section, Strident Service Center, for the Winter Trimes Trimester,
ter, Trimester, 1966-67.
General
Notices
ORANGE & BLUE WEEK: Applications are now
being accepted for the Orange & Blue Week talent
show and beauty contest, available at the Florida
Union Board office and at dorm area offices. Appli Applications
cations Applications are due by March 13.
ARMY ROTC: College men who have not taken
Army ROTC during their first two years and have
two years remaining in the University either as an
undergraduate or graduate student, are now eligible
to enroll in the Army ROTC. Information on this
program may be obtained in Room 109, Military
Building, March 13, from 5-5:3Q p.m.
ART GROUP. The Museum of Modern Arts Student
Group membership plan is now open to all students
and faculty members at a reduced annual fee. For
information, contact Theo Jankowski at 378-5287.
UNIVERSITY RELIGIOUS ASSOCIATION: Those stu students
dents students interested in applying for positions on URA
committees may pick up applications in the Religion
Office. Room 207, Florida Union.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR: Prof. W. A.
Steele of the Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania
State University, will deliver a lecture on Molecular
Rotation in Liquids March 15, 2:30 p.m., Room 273,
Engineering Annex. Prof. D. Christiansen, Department
of Chemical Engineering, Princeton University, will
speak March 16, 3:40 p.m., on Turbulent Mixing and
Light Scatter Measurement, in room 273, Engineering
Annex.

| Serving U of F Employees Since 1936 1
LOW \. with AUTO LOANS
INTEREST RATES PROGRAM OF THRIFT, CREDIT, SERVICE om I
It ' m
I LOANS Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union SPECIALTY I
I Building J Extension 2973 I
' L H

Special Notice: Fla. Union sponsored trip to Puerto
Rico and the Virgin Islands, April 22-28. San Juan,
St. Thomas and St. John (freeports) Information
315 Union, ext. 2741.
Applications now being considered for Union Board
Committees: Dance, Recreation, Fine Arts, Orange
and Blue, Hostess, International, Films and Public
Relations. Apply 315 Union.
Monday, March 13
Mensa: Daily luncheons, table on west side of Main
Cafeteria, 11-1 p.m.
Interviews for Union Board Dance Chairman today,
3:30 p.m., 315 Union
President Reitz: Address to the Student Body, Univ.
Aud., 4 p.m.
Forums Committee: meeting, 123 Union, 7 p.m.
Film Classic: Macbeth, MSB Aud., 7 & 9 p.m.
I
Union Board: Dance Lessons, Union Social room,
7:15 p.m.
ASCE: guest speaker, Mr. Bill Watson, 270 Eng.,
7:30 p.m. The public is Invited.
Student Peace Union: Panel discussion, UF Profes Professors,
sors, Professors, Morality, Legality, Economics and Politics
of the War in Viet Nam, McC Aud., 8 p.m.

BLUE BULLETIN
Campus Calendar

ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAM: March 17, 1967
is the deadline date for paying examination fee to
University of Florida Cashier, Student Service Center,
for the ETS Foreign Language Exam (in French,
German and Russiii to be given April 15. March
17 is also the devalue date for providing receipt
of payment of fee tc the Graduate School Office,
235 Tigert Hall, where ticket of admission will be
given.
FALL ORIENTATION GROUP LEADERS: Students
with at least a 2.0 average may sign up to Interview
for group leaders and staff positions March 13, from
1- 4:30 p.m., Dean of Mens Office.
SPEECH SCREENING REQUIREMENT: All teacher
education majors, regardless of college enrollment,
are required to satisfy the speech screening require requirement
ment requirement before being admitted into the Advanced Pro Professional
fessional Professional sequence, or enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400
and the elementary block (EDE 300, 301, and 302).
Appointments are now being made in Room 124,
Norman Hail.

Students in the following courses are expected to
take the following tests. Each student must bring a
No. 2 lead pencil and will be required to use his
SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER.
CSS 111 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, March 14,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12,
13, 14 or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
CSS 112 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, March 14,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Peabody
1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) report to Leigh 207;
(D) report to Little 121, 125 or 127; (E) report to
Little 113; (F) report to Matherly 213, 216 or 219;

Tuesday, March 14
Tuesday Fvening Supper Club: Presbyterian Student
Center, 6:30 p.m. Non-denominatlonal, everyone
single and over 21 Invited.
Union Board: Bridge lessons, 215 Union, 7 p.m.
Pi Sigma Epsilon: Group meeting, 208 Union, 7 p.m.
Language and Literature Club: meeting, 105-B AFA,
8 p.m.
Faculty Award Lecture: Dr. T. W. Herbert,Fictions
and the Shape and Meaning of Passion/'
8:15 p.m.
Murphree Area Council, 218 Union, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, March 15
Fla. Speleological Society: Meeting, 212 Union, 7p.m.
Phi Sigma Sigma: Lecture, 116 Union, 7 p.m.
Veterans Club: Group meeting, Union Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club: Meeting, 121 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Pharmacy Dames: Election and Installation of new
officers, 1826 NW 26 Way, 8 p.m.
AIA Film Series: Skyscraper," 105-B AFA, 8 p.m.
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE: On sale today, Tickets
for GRAINNE YEATS, Irish harpist and singer,
Students only, 2AD
On sale Tuesday, March 14, Tickets for GRAINNE
YEATS, Faculty and Staff, SI.OO, General Admis Admission,
sion, Admission, $2.00.

Progress Tests

Placement

Notices
Students must be registered with the Placement
Office to interview. Sign-up sheets are posted two
weeks in advance of the interview date at Building
H. All companies will be recruiting for April and
August grads unless otherwise indicated. (* Indicates
hiring juniors for summer employment).
MARCH 13: U.S. INFORMATION AGENCY Journ,
Eng, Libr, Pub. Rela. Secy, For. Langs, Pol. Sci,
Bus. HUGHES AIRCRAFT Math, Ps, EE, ME, AE.
US DA CONSUMER & MARKETING SERVICE Bus,
Actg, Econ, Mktg, AgrL CENTRAL SOYA CO.
Bus, Engr, Agri. VELSICOL CHEMICAL CORP.
Chem, ChE.
MARCH $ 3, 14: AMERICAN OIL CO. Mktg,
Bus. THE TRANE CO. All engineering.

(G) report to Peabody 101, 102, 112, or 114; (H)
report to Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209; (I-
J) report to Flint 110 or 112; (K) report to Walker
301, 303, 307, or 308; (L) report to Little 201,
203, 205 or 207; (M) report to Little 213, 215, 217,
219, 221, 223, 225 or 227; (N) report to Little 233
or 235; (O) report to Little 237 or 239; (P-Q)
report to Flint 101 or 102; (R) report to Floyd
108; (S) report to Walker Auditorium; (T-V) report
to Little 101 or 109; (W-Z) report to Walker Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium.
CET 141 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, March 16,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin witti: (A-L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12,
13, 14 or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.



Ul- Netters Crush FSU, Meet 'Cats Today

By MIKE SIKES
Alligator Sports Writer
UFs tennis players, with two solid
wins over FSU behind them, take on
Kentucky here today in their first SEC
match of the season.
Play begins at 2:30 on the new varsity
courts west of the track.
The Gator netters trimmed their FSU
visitors 9-0 Saturday in a near-flawless
performance that drew plaudits from UF
Coach Bill Potter.

§9
If you still have two years left at the
University, you may qualify for this new
2- year Army ROTC program.
Qualify for an officers commission
in 2 years
Receive S4O per month while enrolled
in the program
Continue your education and learn
to be a leader
Fulfill your military obligation of
2 years active duty, as an officer
A NEW PROGRAM OF INTEREST TO FOR COMPLETE information
JBH BHHHI mm H Attend the ROTC orientation at Room 109
1967 TIME: PM
(if you cannot contact Maj. Hadjis,

EEs! MEs!

Advanced Development Project Group checks out part of a highly sophisticated satellite communi communication
cation communication terminal which they have recently developed under government contract at ECI. Lee Blacho Blachowlcz
wlcz Blachowlcz (Florida, -60, at left) Is Group Leader for Communication Systems Advanced
Lee and John Coooer frlahtl earned their UF MSEE degrees under ECI s tuition refund program.
Jim EmoHcenST EcT receiving his MSEE at Gainesville. They are part of an ECI
team which Is establishing a new state-of-the-art In tactical commu ca ons.

It was a good win one of the best
in a long time, Potter commented after
the match. Its a good win anytime you
beat Florida State."
The Gators swept all six singles and
three doubles matches from the cross crossstate
state crossstate visitors in their second win over
FSU in two weeks. It was their fourth
win in five starts.
But todays opponent looms as a ques question
tion question mark, Potter said.
I dont know a thing about Kentucky,
he remarked, but thev are coming up.

Help Expand the Frontiers of Communication
Technology with ECI in St. Petersburg, Fla.

They have several good players."
The Wildcats will probably be strength strengthened
ened strengthened by a number of good freshmen,
Potter predicted.
The Gators first SEC encounter will
also be their first match on the new
courts.
Potter said of the new facilities, We
hope these will be the best in the South."
Floridas B team defeated the FSU
subs 7-2 in the preliminary.
Saturdays Results:
SINGLES: -1. Armi Neely (Fla.) de-

ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWS,
MONDAY, MARCH 13
Electronic Communications, Inc., an industry pace-setter on the
frontiers of communication technology, has exceptional career oppor opportunities
tunities opportunities for qualified EEs and MEs in such areas as coding, modula modulation,
tion, modulation, digital communications, microelectronics, RF communication
technology and satellite systems.
ECI offers outstanding opportunity for individual achievement and'
recognition. The Company is large enough to provide the facilities,
programs and stability you are seeking, but small enough to give you
every chance to realize your capabilities to the fullest. YouMl never
be lost in the crowd here, as any one of the more than 30 Florida
engineering graduates now on our professional engineering staff will
attest.
The emphasis at ECI is on advanced technology. The Company is
an industry leader in command and control systems, microminaturized
transmitters and receivers, satellite ground terminals, multiplex sys systems
tems systems and space instrumentation.
ECI engineers are encouraged to continue their professional develop development
ment development through in-house programs and Company-funded post-graduate
study. Youll be able to specialize, if you like, in the discipline that
intrigues you most.
Visit the office today and make your appointment to
talk with our engineering representatives in the Student Union on
Monday, March 13. If this isnt convenient, call us collect to make
alternate arrangements. Phone Ken Nipper at 813/347-1121 in St.
Petersburg.
ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS, INC
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA

Monday, March 13, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Golfers Lose Twice;
Fall To Tide, FSU

UFs Gator gofers were handed
a pair of crushing defeats Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, falling to FSU 13-5 and Ala Alabama
bama Alabama 12 1/2 5 1/2 in a tri triangular
angular triangular match at Tallahassee
The twin thrashings left Coach
Buster Bishops club with a 7-2
season mark.
The Seminoles wrapped up the
affair with a convincing 13-5 win
over the Tide from Tuscaloosa.
John Darr made the best showing
for the Gators with a 74 and a
split in his\ match with the Talla Tallahassee
hassee Tallahassee arch\ rivals.
Richard Spears netted a 76, fol-
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seated Paul DeZeeuw 12-14, 6-4, 6-3.
2. Jalmie Pressly (Fla.) d. Steve Bruner
6-0, 6-4. 3. Greg Hllley (Fla.) d. Dave
Danielson 6-1, 6-1. 4. Steve Beeland (Fla.)
d. A1 Procoflo 6-8, 6-4, 6-2. 5. Hank Veno
(Fla.) d. Clint Murphy 6-4, 1-6, 6-0.
6. Lee Steele (Fla.) d. Bob Marcher
6-3, 6-1.
DOUBLES l. Neely and Beeland d.
Dezeeuw and Marcher 6-1, 6-3.2. Pressly
and Hllley d. Danielson and Procoflo 6- 2,
6-3. 3. Veno and Steele d. Bruner and
Jobson 6-3, 20-18.

lowed by Don Sayet and Phil Ride Rideout
out Rideout at 77, David Oakley with 79,
and Steve Melynk with 80.
Bishop said his squad was dowi
after Its strong showing in the
Florida invitational a week before
and expressed unhappiness with the
lfss.
We played poorly,'* he said.
Morton Sets
Track Mark
UF Shotputter John Morton het
a new school record and grabbed
a third-place finish in the NCAA
indoor track championships Friday
at Detroit.
Morton picked up three points pointsthe
the pointsthe first ever scored by a Gator
trackman in matlonal indoor com competition.
petition. competition.
Morton set his record with a
56-foot-8 3/4-inch distance.
Other UF representatives
Frank Saler in the high jump;
Mike Burton, broad jump; Dieter
Gebhard, 600- mile rim; and Dan
Flynn in the mile were all
eliminated before the finals.

Page 11



Page 12

. The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 13, 1967

Get Crystal Ball Ready For Spurrier

By 808 BECK
Alligator Sports Editor
From Riches to Rags might very well
turn out to be the theme song for Heis Heisman
man Heisman Trophy winner Steve Spurrier.
Until the New York Giants acquired
quarterback Fran Tarkenton from the
Minnesota Vikings, Spurrier looked as
though he definitely would go to the New
York club. Speculation arose that Spurrier
would receive a salary and a bonus com comparable
parable comparable to that of the New York Jets*
Joe Namath, who signed for $400,000 two
years ago.

IN STATE BASKETBALL TOURNEY

Hey, Hey, Its Gibbs In AA, Plant City In A

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
'Alligator Sports Writer/
St. Petersburg Gibbs, Plant City,
Chattahoochee, and Poplar Springs
reign today as the 1966-67 state
basketball champions.
Gibbs captured the Class AA
crown, Plant City took the A title,
Chattahoochee captured the B
crown, and Poplar Springs netted
the C trophy in hoop action this
past Friday and Saturday in Flor Florida
ida Florida Gym.
Led by a stubborn defense and
the shooting of Tom Daly, Elbert
Crumb and Norm Stevenson, St.
Pete Gibbs toppled Terry-Parker

Top Track Field Men
Here For Florida Relays
Track and field men from across the nation are preparing to fra fro
part in the 24th annual Florida Relays with 50 of the countrys top
college track teams competing in the March 25 event.
Officials conducting the earliest and largest relay invitational of the
1967 track season have also received notice from 70 Florida M C h
schools, 40 junior colleges and freshman teams, and 20 out-of out-ofstate
state out-ofstate high schools which plan to attend.
*This should be the finest Florida Relays ever held,** predicts
relay director and Florida track coach Jimmy Carnes. We have
some outstanding men and teams competing this year. Some of the
finest teams in the East will be here this year.**

Among the track powers from the
East will be Yale, Syracuse,
Princeton, Cornell, Holy Cross,
Penn State, Dartmouth, Colgate,
Catholic University of America,
and Rochester. Southern Illinois
and Northwestern will represent
Hie mid-west.
Track powers from the South
include Florida A & M, Penn
Relay champs in the 440 and 880
yard relay last season; Tennessee,
SEC Champs for the past four
years, Georgia, North Carolina,
Duke, Florida State, Clemson, and
many others.
Olympic performer Oscar
Moore, who was the outstanding
athlete in the Relays last year,
will be running once again for
Southern Hlinois. In last years
meet, Moore ran the mile in 4:06,
then came back an hour later to
run the two mile in 8:42. He is
one of the few who has ever ac accomplished
complished accomplished such a feat.
Many eyes will be on the duel
between Floridas discus thrower,
John Morton, and South Caro Unas
Art Swartz. Both performers have
been heaving the discus at the 190-
foot mark. The world collegiate
mark is 197 feet, set by Texas
A & Ms Randy Matson.
Performing for Tennessee will
be Richmond Flowers, one of the
finest hurdlers in the country.
Flowers, also an excellent football
player for the Vols, will be making
his first appearance here since
his record breaking high school
days.
Bob Cook of Miami, a retired
track coach and outstanding of official
ficial official will serve as this years
meet referee.

Tarkentons being acquired from the
Vikings changed all that, spurrier tnen
appeared headed to the Vikings, who have
a second stringer, Ron Vanderkelen as
their leading quarterback prospect. The
Vikings have the Giants* SDecial bonus
pick, out have decided not to use it
until 1968.
This leaves the Baltimore Colts with
the first pick, having won it when they
traded backup quarterback Gary Cuozzo
to the New Orleans Saints.
Ideally, this would put Spurrier in a
Baltimore Colt uniform to back up Johnny

High of Jacksonville by a 69-55
count. In doing so, Gibbs became
the first Negro school to win a
state crown.
Daly scored 17 points, Crumb
netted 14 and Stevenson 20 in pacing
the Gladiators. Earl Biggs led the
Terry Parker Braves with 20
markers.
In the Class A finals, a hot hotshooting
shooting hotshooting Plant City quintet ran a away
way away from a cold-shooting Lake Lakeview
view Lakeview of Winter Garden in the se second
cond second half, as the Planters took a
53-32 victory.
During one 14-minute stratch,
Plant City outscoredLakevlewbya
29-2 margin.
Mike Smith topped Plant Citys

WOULD YOU LIKE A GOOD
SUMMER JOB?
MANPOWER
WILL BE ON CAMPUS THIS
WEEK TO LINE UP OFFICE
WORKERS
Its never too early to start
lining up the job you want this
summer. Manpower, the
worlds largest temporary help
service, would like to hear right
now about your availability and
capability, .whether you have
office skills like typing, steno stenography,
graphy, stenography, or office machine oper operation.
ation. operation. If you will be available
to work during the vacation
time in Jacksonville, Florida
please see our Jacksonville re representatlve,
presentatlve, representatlve, Mrs. Lillian
Thorn while she is on campus.
Those students interested may
sign up in Room 309 of Hie
Florida Union Building today.
Mrs. Thorn will conduct inter interviews
views interviews on Wednesday, March 15,
from 1 p.m. til 5 p.m.
GATOR ADS SELL I
A A i

scoring attack with 17 points. Big
6-9 Doug Gamble paced Lakevlew
with 12 markers.
A fired up group of Yellow
Jackets from Chattahoochee pum pumped
ped pumped 32 points through the hoop in
the fourth quarter to swamp La Labelle,
belle, Labelle, 93-77, in the Class B champ championship
ionship championship contest.
Out-scored 68-66 from the field,
Chattahoochee found the winning

<
I Ed Peck And YOUR University
- VnlnnBKK w|f§9 *| sk |I tHK §ftsftlft § mm ~
I As Your Senator, Ed Peek Will Work For:
I ]/ Faculty Representation on the
I Board of Regents
y Freedom From 'Political Tampering
y Incr sd Faculty Salaries,
Benefits, and Sabbatical Leave
*
Ed Peck has worked for education as County Chairman of Citizens
for Florida s Future. This Committee provided the means for dev developing
eloping developing mil ions of dollars in building funds for higher education,
such as the library pictured above
ELECT PECK FOR PROGRESS |
I

Unitas for two or three years and then
stepping in as number one quarterback.
This was how it looked until Sunday when
rumors started circulating that Spurrier
would go to the Atlanta Falcons to be
used as possible trade bait. The Falcons
have the next pick after the Colts, who are
said to need linebackers more than they
need another quarterback.
With Spurrier, the Falcons could make
some deals to put them in a better
position in the coming grid wars. They
also wouldnt pay him as much as the
Giants would have.

margin at tne charity stripe as
they cashed in on 27 free throws.
Jerry Locke paced the Yellow
Jackets with 29 points, followed by
Dan Allen with 21 and Carey Iflll
with 16. Labelles Cowboys were<
led by Luther Adams* 28 points
and Phil Stinnetts 23.
Poplar Springs* Cody Taylor
netted 38 points and Doyle Holland
garnered 16 rebounds to lead the

As it stands now, it would take a crystal
ball, two soothsayers, a few itinerant
gypsies and a couple of computers to
figure out where Steve Spurrier will suit
up next year. One possibility that few
have mentioned also seems quite possible.
Steve is one of that rare breed of football
players who doesnt get injured too much.
Bearing this in mind, its not a bad
guess that Spurrier could end up in Army
green. Then again, if he is drafted by
the pros instead of Uncle Sam, he prebably
will get into a good reserve unit. So get
those palm readers and phrenologists and
start guessing. Your guess is as good as
anyone elses.

Atomics to a 92-79 triumph over
, Mount Dora Bible School in the
r Class C state finals.
The 6-0 Taylor hit on 18 of
30 from the field and 2 of 4 from
i the free-throw line to account for
his point total. Holland, a 6-3
center, pumped through 16 points
while grabbing 16 rebounds.
Bobby Sandh paced Mount Dora
Bible with 23 markers.