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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Budget Committee Cuts Glee Club Funds

By BILL DOUTHAT
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Government Budget and Fin Finance
ance Finance Committee hit a sour note Friday
which raised voices from the UF Glee
Clubs.
The Committee knocked down the Glee
Clubs request to transfer last trimesters
funds to the current budget to finance
a concert tour to Puerto Rico and South
Florida.
It puts us and the university in a very
embarrassing position, said John Van
Duyn, president of the Mens Glee Club.
We have been planning this trip since
last October.
When the trip was being planned last

Vol. 59, No. 109

SRC Recommends
Sweeping Changes

Sweeping, but realistic and
workable proposals by the Com Commission
mission Commission on Student Rights were an announced
nounced announced Sunday by Commission
Chairman Joe Mason.
Among the changes recommen recommended
ded recommended by the 11-member board were:
That the jurisdiction of the
University should cover only acti activities
vities activities on the campus proper, Uni University
versity University sponsored events, frater fraternity

Commission Proposals
Agreeable To Wisser

By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Editorial Editor
Students Constitutional Commit Committee
tee Committee Chairman Bernie Wisser stat stated
ed stated Sunday his complete accord
with the proposals of the Student
Rights Commission and called the
student body as a whole to sup support

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HONORS FOR THE
QUEEN Janis Biewend,
Queen of the 22nd annual
Engineers Fair and a Tri-
Delt, receives her trophy
from Fair Chairman Jessie
Pidkin and 12 long-stem
roses from John Osteen,

The Florida
Alligator

University of Florida

year, said Van Duyn, a check was made
with several student government officials
and the treasurers office confirming their
belief that funds unused in one trimester
could be automatically transferred to
the next.
The trip will have to be cancelled
unless we get these funds, said Van
Duyn. Its like giving us a horse with without
out without a head.
The 94-member combined Glee Clubs
(mens and Womens) planned a 18-con 18-concert
cert 18-concert tour to Puerto Rico via Tampa,
St. Petersburg and Miami. SolomonOdenz,
business manager for the Mens Glee Club,
said the maximum cost cf the trip would
be $10,991.70.
If the Legislative Council approves

nity fraternity and sorority houses and UF
student conduct on other catn catnpuses.
puses. catnpuses.
Removal of the threat of
double jeopardy which would not
allow the University to impose
sanctions on a student after he is
dealt with by a court of law.
However, if a student is found
guilty of a serious misdemeanor
or felony by a court, he is sub subject

port support them.
The 30- year-old philosophy
graduate student, chosen at the
Tigert Hall sit-in to head the
group, called the proposals on off offcampus
campus offcampus behavior and due process
outstanding and pledged his sup sup(SEE
(SEE sup(SEE WISSER, PAGE 2)

contest chairman, following
her coronation during half half
- half t
time ceremonies at Sat Saturdays
urdays Saturdays UF-Georgia basket basketball
ball basketball game. Looking on are
last years queen Harriet
Hardy, and David Martz.

Monday, March 6, 1967

ject subject to conduct probation.
Reconstitution of the Faculty
Discipline Committee into a ten
member Student Faculty Conduct
Committee. The committee would
not only hear cases, but would be
responsible for recommending
policy for student conduct. There
would be five students and five
faculty members on the committee.
A specific code of student
conduct to replace the code in the
present Student Handbook.
Mason said that specific details
would be announced later after a
few minor changes are made and
the Student Affairs Committee has
a chance to study the report.
The Alligator plans to run the
entire 15-page report as soon as
the specifics are ironed out.
The SAC, which read the pro-/
posals last Wednesday, appointed
three subcommittees on Friday
to report to the committee as a
whole at the next meeting this
Wednesday.

the Budget Committees recomendation,
the Glee Clubs will fall about $4,000
short of their goal.
In the past, money from the Presi Presidents
dents Presidents Fund was available, but the Choir
will use the fund this year for their trip
to the Worlds Fair in Canada.
David Vosloh, a member of the Bud Budget
get Budget Committee, said the Glee Clubs
request was denied because they felt the
Puerto Rican visit unnecessary. Also,
he said, no trips were taken last tri trimester
mester trimester and members were recruited under
the promise of a trip to Puerto Rico.
Its a glory trip; a vacation, said
Vosloh.
We didnt promise anything to any anybody,
body, anybody, siad Odenz. The selection of

Governors Conference
Plans Florida Education

Florida needs more educators, more
facilities and more money.
This was the sentiment expressed
by the entire Governors Conference
on Education, according to Jim Val Valentine,
entine, Valentine, student body vice-president who
attended the conference held in Or Orlando
lando Orlando Wednesday and Thursday of last
week.
Valentine said that the state leaders
at the conference regretted that more
students and student leaders had not
attended the conference.
Valentine, the only student attend attending
ing attending the conference, commented that
although the entire conference was
about students, the speakers referred
to students only indirectlysomething
like a product.
The conference was attended by the
govenor, presidents of the major uni universities
versities universities around the state, deans of
the Colleges of Education, the Board
of Regents, the Cabinet, County Super Superintendets
intendets Superintendets of Public Instruction and many
distinguished educators.
Although tne conference had as its
theme, Making Florida First in Ed Education,
ucation, Education, the substanceyof the entire
meet lay in discussing Floridas fin financial
ancial financial problems.

Study Os Draft
Draws Negative
Student Reaction
By NICK TATRO
Alligator Editorial Assistant
UF students gave generally negative reactions to the National
Advisory Commission on Selective Service proposals for a lottery
system, the reduction in numbers of local draft boards and the
elimination of occupational and student deferments, according to
an Alligator random telephone survey conducted Sunday. The Com Commission
mission Commission revealed its drastic proposals to the President Saturday.
The commission concluded that the youngest of all qualified
men should be drafted first, starting at age 19 and that they should
be summoned in a random and impartial order in effect a lot,

reported the New York Times,
Sunday.
The Times went on to say, A
majority of the commission
urged the abolition of almost all
student and occupational defer deferments
ments deferments so as to subject nearly all
physically and mentally fit 19-
yr-olds to one simultaneous risk
of induction.
The Times also quoted the com commission
mission commission as saying: It would re replace
place replace the nations 4,100 local draft
boards with no more than 500 area
centers applying uniform policies
of classification and appeal.
I dont agree with the cut in
local boards, said UFs Joe San Sanders,
ders, Sanders, 4BA, There are many in individual
dividual individual problems and cutting the
local boards eliminates the indiv individual
idual individual aspects.
I still wonder why they havent
called up the reserves, said Don
Sasser, 3LW. I dont think 19-
(SEE DRAFT, PAGE 2)

members is up to the director.
We didnt take a trip in the Fall
trimester because we were not quali qualified
fied qualified for it, said Van Duyn. We had
a new director and inexperienced mem members.
bers. members.
Van Dyun said that commitments have
already been made for the concert tour.
He said that concert appearances have
been scheduled, travel arranged and ac accomodations
comodations accomodations reserved.
Bette May, President of the Womens
Glee Club, said that the Glee Club should
be allowed to go since it was good pub publicity
licity publicity for the university and deserved
experience for the singers.
We are going to perform for our
servicemen in Puerto Rico, she said.

Seminole
'Scalped
The Seminole faces a possible
scalping by a student study
commission which will soon bo
appointed by Student Bor T \ joi joident
dent joident Charles Shepherd.
I see tfc* yearbook taking 21,000
dollars a year and tradition isnt
worth it, said Shepherd. He said
the price wasnt worth the tra tradition,
dition, tradition, when more important pro projects
jects projects also needed money.
Shepherd said that he did not
want to abolish the yearbook, but
rather search for ways to make
it financially feasible.
Were not going to spend an another
other another 21,000, said Shepherd. Sav Savings
ings Savings could be made by raising the
price and getting better promotion,
he said.

Governor Claude Kirk, airing his views
on education, launched his Brain a
Month plan in an attempt to bring one
noted lecturer per month to the state.
Kirk failed to indicate any concrete plans
for financing Floridas higher education.
Floyd Christian, whose educational
views were diametrically opposed to
Kirks throughout the entire confer conference,
ence, conference, indicated that taxes are the
only answer to better education in the
state.
I believe that the people of the
state would support higher taxes for
better education, Christian said.
Christian appeared to have sound
constructive, bi-partisan proposals for
education, according to Valentine.
Floridas educational system is the
best in the South, yet we spend less
money on education than most states.
according to Valentine.
If we can go so far on so little,
we should be able to be first with
an adequate amount of funds, he
said.
Chester Ferguson, Chairman of the
State Board of Regents, told the con conference
ference conference that state control of the uni university
versity university system is detrimental to high higher
er higher education.



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 6. '1967

Gaullists Win Election,
Communists Take Second

PARIS (UPI) President Char Charles
les Charles de Gaulle won a triumphant
new mandate from French voters
Sunday for his strongman re regime.
gime. regime.
Premier Georges Pompidou said

Draft Boards

Prom Page 1

yr-olds are tnat mucn more agile
than those 20-25 yrs old and I
dont like the elimination of pro professional
fessional professional and student deferments.
Sasser agreed, however, with the
elimination of local draft boards,
I think it prevents the wealthy
from buying their way out and
prevents favortism in general.

From page 1

port for them.
In giving his support to Student
Body President Charles Shepherd,
who appointed the Rights Com mis mission,
sion, mission, Wisser asked Student Gov Government
ernment Government for two actions to help
implement its proposals:
Call a campus-wide refer referendum
endum referendum within two weeks to allow
the student tjody to express its
approval or disapproval of the
SRC recommendations.
Sponsor a teach-in Tuesday
or Wednesday to acquaint students
with the SRC proposals.
Wisser said his committee had
doubts that Student Government
could do the job of rewriting the

Pick up either Volkswagen
in Europe.

If you have a driving ambition
so see Europe, the cheapest way t
to do the driving is in your own
VW. And picking it up in Europe
is the cheopest way to buy one.
You can get a genuine beetle
In more than fifty cities in twelve
countries.
And, if you wont a VW with
o little more room and a little
more power, spend a little more

[MILLER-BROWN 22 n.w: isst.l
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| Please send me your Lee illustrated brochure and price list.
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1
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advert advertisements
isements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever
possible
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
involving typog rapid cal errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Ad Advertising
vertising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appiears. The Florida Alligator
will not t>e responsible for mor than one incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several limes. Notices for correction must he given before next Insertion.
THE EMJKIUA AEt.IGATOH is the official student newspaper of the University of
Florida and is published five times weekly except during May, June, and July when
It is published semi-weekly Only editorials represent the official opinions of their authors.
Address correspondence to The Florida Alligator, Florida Union Building, University
of Florida, Gainesville, fla 32F01. The Alligator is entered as second class matter
at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

the country has heeded de
Gaulls call in what will probably
be the largest voter turnout for
a legislative election in France
since World War 11.
The Gaullist Fifth Republic

Os the fifteen people called in
the survey, 11 were generally op opposed
posed opposed to the lottery, nine to the
cut in boards, and 11 to the elim elimination
ination elimination of occupational and student
deferments.
Two students refused comment
because they had served in the
military and didnt feel they were
involved and two refused to make
any comment what-so ever, no
reasons given.

Wisser

Code of Conduct and procedures
of the Faculty Discipline Com Committee.
mittee. Committee.
We gave Shepherd and his Com Commission
mission Commission two weeks to show some
positive signs of action, Wisser
said. Friday was sign day and
we were satisfied with the re results.
sults. results.
Wisser said he feels his commit committee
tee committee will support the SRC proposals
as much as we have to.
Wissers request for the refer referendum
endum referendum and teach-in were made
to keep interest alive.
We dont want this thing tabled
or dropped by the Student Affairs
Committee or theFacultySunate,
he said. Therefore, we must have
concrete action completed before
final exams for this term.

moneyood get the VW Fostbock
Sedan. Ilf's fust as genuine, but
not so beetle-ish.)
WeM attend to the details of
purchase, delivery, insurance
and licensing. And if the cor
needs servicing after you ship it
home, we'll attend to that, too.
If you think that's a lot to ask
of a total stranger, come in and
get to know us.

alliance was the clear winner in
the first of two rounds of general
election voting for a new 486-mem 486-member
ber 486-member National Assembly. The alli alliance
ance alliance was certain to return to po power
wer power with a new absolute majority
in parliament.
At 12:00 p.m., 6:00 p.m. EST
with about 60 per cent of the vote
counted, official returns gave the
Gaullist Union for the New Repub Republic
lic Republic UNR part 38.1 per cent of the
vote.
The Communists surged to the
second spot with 22.8 per cent and
its political ally, the Leftist Fed Federation,
eration, Federation, was running third with 22.1
per cent.
The remaining 17 per cent of the
vote was split among other, smal smaller
ler smaller parties.
An extimated 22 million votes
were cast and the ministry of the
interior estimated the turnout at
about 81 per cent of the 28.5
million eligible voters.
Run-off elections are to be held
next Sunday for those seats where
candidates failed to get a clear
majority.

Senator Pastore
Speaks Tuesday

Senator John Pastore will ad address
dress address UF students at 8:15 p.m.
Tuesday in the University Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium.
Senator Pastore is the former
governor of Rhode Island and has
served that state in the UJS.
Senate since 1951.
Florida Union Forums Com Committee
mittee Committee is sponsoring the opening
meeting.

SIXTH ANNUAL COLLEGE AUDITIONS
This could be your year to join the hundreds of young men and women at the college
showcases of the nation SIX FLAGS Over Texas and SIX FLAGS Over Georgia.
Each of these theme amusement centers features live and lively variety productions,
specialty actsspontaneous entertainment everywhere for all the family. If you are
among the registered college students selected, youll enjoy a full summers employ employment
ment employment while working under professional theatrical direction.
Only one audition visit is scheduled for this area, so whether your talent is singing,
dancing, ventriloquism, magic, acrobatics, playing an instrument, or other specialty,
dont miss your opportunity. SEE YOUR PLACEMENT OFFICE FOR FURTHER
INFORMATION.
AREA AUDITIONS flfW Wf V AH
Saturday, March 11-2p.m. I ftj I #\
WSB-TV Studios, White Columns on Peachtree Ulii J. JJALjU
1601 W. Peachtree Street N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia OVER TEXAS / OVER GEORGIA
(Registration is 30 minutes prior to audition time.) OAUAS 1 r * T WORTH aua ta
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Unavoidable Leap
In UF Tuition Rates
By HAROLD KENNEDY
Alligator Staff Writer
With or without a per-quarter tuition increase, student expenses will
take an unavoidable leap upward when the UF switches to the quarter
system in the fall.
Facing burdgeoning increases in tuition, rent, food, and books
student and administration leaders are moving to hold down expenses
in at least one area -- housing.
Student Government Secretary of Housing Jack Zucker is looking
into On-Campus Housing and UF Off-Campus Housing Director Carl
B. Opp is working on reforms in off-campus rentals, it was learned
Friday.
Zucker's investigation, under student government official Carol
Marcus, will compare rents at other universities with those at UF.
The results we obtain from this survey, said Marcus Friday, win
then be presented to the UF Director of Housing, Dr. Harold Riker."
Students attending three quarters under the new system will spend
approximately two more months on campus than those presently
attending two trimesters. The SIOO-per-quarter tuition for three
quarters is 15 per cent higher than the present $l3O-per-trimester
for two trimesters.
The additional time will of course, result in higher costs for room
and board per year from $250 for two trimesters to $345 for three
quarters is the most common increase for rent on campus.
Freshmen entering in the fall must plan on buying books for 12
quarters rather than 8 trimesters during their college careers
a possible 50 per cent increase.
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Monday, March 6, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

t, The Florida Alligator. Mo"dav, March 6, 1967

'WRITING IS DAMNINGLY PRIVATE

'LUV Author Does Things Own Way

By NICK TATRO
Alligator Editorial Assistant
(Editors Note: Murray Schis Schisgal,
gal, Schisgal, author of the smash Broad Broadway
way Broadway hit Luv which played in
Florida Gym last night, was inter interviewed
viewed interviewed by phone in his New
York apartment. Alligator Editor Editorial
ial Editorial Assistant, Nick Tatro, ques questioned
tioned questioned him on his play, the art
of writing and the state of con contemporary
temporary contemporary theater.
. Schisgal (accent on the second
syllable) received the Vernon Rice
Award for outstanding achievement
in off-Broadway theater in 1963
and the Outer Circle award for the
outstanding playwright in the same
year.
The avant guard playwright
lives with his wife, Rennee, and
his daughter, Jane, in a West
End apartment in Manhattan. He
is 41, bearded and has an affinity
for sloppy sports clothes.)
Alligator: Why did you choose
the title of Luv instead of
Love? Is there any special sig significance?
nificance? significance?
Schisgal: No. One of the things
the play deals with is a perversion
of love. I tried to manifest this
with a unique angle. It is more a
respelling to fit a new thinking.
Alligator: Is your play written
just for fun or does it have a soc social
ial social criticism in mind?
Schisgal: I hope it exists at two
levels rather than one. I think the
characters themselves, their atti attitudes
tudes attitudes and reactions to things and
people should reveal that LifV'-

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is more than a surface comedy.
There are good people in it and
it attempts to show the best of
both worlds. As for the critics,
some dug it; others didnt.
Alligator: Have you seen the
group that performed at UF?
Schisgal: No, but I have met
Don Hotton who plays Harry Ber Berlin.
lin. Berlin. Hes excellent. Ill catch it
when it gets closer to New York.
Alligator: Since Luv what
have you been working on?
Schisgal: A few TV things mostly;
one called the Love Song of
Bonnie Capensky with Gieulguld.
Im setting up two one-act plays:
Max and Fragment and Ive
written a movie called The Ti Tiger
ger Tiger Makes Out with Eli Wal Wallach;
lach; Wallach; its adapted from one of my
earlier plays, The Tiger. Oh
yes, there is a movie being made
from Luv but Im not writing
the screenplay because Im getting
a little sick of it. Ive been with
Luv too long.
Alligator: What are your opin opinions
ions opinions of the underground theater,
Mcird and so forth? And where do
you consider yourself?
Schisgal: There are no dividing
lines in theater. Marat/Shade is
about as close as you can get but
I dont consider it Underground
because it is valid and compelling
for a large audience. Underground,
as such, would have to be for ex extremely
tremely extremely limited numbers of people.
I dont consider myself subject to
that kind of category nor, for that
matter, any category or school.
Alligator: What are your feel feelings
ings feelings towards writing?

Schisgal: Ive been writing for a
good number of years, about five
years on plays. I first wrote four
novels and some short stories, all
unpublished, until I got interested
in plays in 1958. I dont know how howvalid
valid howvalid it is to learn writing. I have
my education in this form reading
and seeing and drawing my own
conclusions. I like doing things
my own way. I practised law for
a couple of years and taught Eng English
lish English and wrote in the evenings.
I had these jobs to support my myself,
self, myself, but I did not work at any anything
thing anything that would cause me to back
away from writing. It is import important
ant important for a writer to think in terms
of language, form and style but
more important to keep himself in
private, purposely avoided advert advertising
ising advertising and journalism and things like
that.
Alligator: What do you think of
college theater? Should they take
the professional or academic ap approach?
proach? approach?
Schisgal: It doesnt matter a

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damn what theyre doing as long as
its exciting and theatrically alive.
Alligator: What are the influ influences
ences influences on your work?
Schisgal: Everything one reads
leaves an influence. A writer must
be interested in writing his work.
He must go his own way and be
intimate with good writers,
absorbing Ideas. I dont like the
gimmicks of getting published or
known, this is not the way. Writ Writing
ing Writing is always private, damningly
private, it is not social and not a
means to a glorious end. The
meaning for the author must be
in the work itself.
Alligator: What is the purpose
of the modern theater?
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Schisgal: The purpose of the
theater has become more limited,
I think, because it can no longer
sefve for social and religious
statement as it did in Greek times.
In Elizabethan times the functions
were social, historical and politi political
cal political but today theater is for what?
A night out for the ladies? Busi Business
ness Business man's free meal and show
after a big deal? The purpose has
changed and so must the plays.
I find most college students have
more interest in movies than thea theater
ter theater but yes, yes, yes the theater
is irreplaceable; it is meaningful
and essential,
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n&oJftk Center BooJeAtMe,

Monday, March 6, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Top Broadcasters
Speak Here Today

Broadcasters who have report reported
ed reported events from riots to elections
will be on the docket Monday as
Communications Week at UF en enters
ters enters a second day.
Sponsored by the School ofJour ofJournalism
nalism ofJournalism and Communications, the
event is designed to give students
a slice of life' picture of his
chosen profession.
And in the School of Journalism
and Communications, he has four
fields from which to choose.
These fields are presented as
a three-day series during the ninth
annual Communications Week Weekjournalism,
journalism, Weekjournalism, broadcasting and ad advertising-public
vertising-public advertising-public relations.
First on tap Monday morning
will be John Couric, vice presi president
dent president for public relations, National
Association of Broadcasters,
Washington, D.C. Couric's topic
will be Broadcasting and You.
One od two visiting NBC news
officials, Russell C. Tornabene
manager of NBC Radio Network
News, New York, will speak at
11 a.m.
A man who has covered vir virtually

Study in
Guadalajara, Mexico

The Guadalajara Summer School, a
fully accredited University of Arizona
program, conducted in cooperation
With professors from Stanford Uni University,
versity, University, University of California, and
Guadalajara, Will offer July 3 to Au August
gust August 12, art, folklore, geography, his history,
tory, history, language and literature courses.
Tuition, board and room is $290.
Write Prof. Juan B. Rael, P.O. Bo*
7227, Stanford, California 94305.

You Cant Do Much
On A Five Spot
These Days.
You can buy a couple of cheap dinners.
Or maybe a fifth. Thats about it.
Excitement doesnt come cheap.
Theres one place, though, that still
offers a real $5 bargain. Thats at
Cassels in the Air.
Here $5 will buy you 30 minutes of the
most thrilling excitement youve
ever experienced (unless youve flown
an airplane yourself before).
When Spring starts getting to you, drive
out to Cassels and spend $5 on an
Introductory Flight Lesson.
You will have bought yourself
a real bargain.
A bargain that will open up a whole new
world of adventure.
IN THE AIR
Gainesville Municipal Airport Waldo Road

Announcements
A Naval Recruiting team will
set up a booth today at the hub
to answer questions students might
have about obtaining a naval com commission.
mission. commission.
The Brazilian-Portuguese club
will meet Wednesday, Mar. 8 at
8 p.m. in room 215 of the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union.
Applications for membership in
Florida Blue Key should be turn turned
ed turned by Friday, Mar. 10. Anyone
interested in applying can still
obtain forms from either the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union or from the applicants
college dean.

tually virtually every field of broadcasting
activity including race riots in the
south, Tornabene will explain the
NBC Radio News Bureau oper operation
ation operation around the world.
Speaking at a Florida Associa Association
tion Association of Broadcasters Bhnquet at
the Ramada Inn Monday at 7:30
p.m. will be Frank Jordan, di director
rector director of election broadcast, NBC
News, New York. Jordan, a key
figure in NBCs coverage of the
1964 presidential election, will
speak on Election Projections.
From the state stock of broad broadcasters,
casters, broadcasters, Bill Grove, director of
News and Public Affairs, WJXT,
Jacksonville, and several of his
staff members will be on hand
Monday morning to discuss Tele Television
vision Television Journalism: Beyond the
Basic.
Also from Florida, Joseph L.
Brechner, president, WFTV, Or Orlando,
lando, Orlando, will speak on News Media
and the Courts at a 12:30 Ra Ramada
mada Ramada Inn Luncheon.
During this luncheon, presen presentation
tation presentation will be made of the Red
Barber Award given each year to
the outstanding broadcasting stu student
dent student in the Journalism School.
Tuesdays (3/7) activities will
feature nationally known speakers
from government and industry in
the fields of advertising and pub public
lic public relations.
A highlight of the day will be
the visit of Carlton E. Spitzer,
director of public information, U.S.
Department of Health, Education
and Welfare. Spitzer will speak
on Your F uture and Government
Relations at a 12:15 luncheon in
the Student Service Center.

Page 5



Page 6

5, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 6, 1967

The Florida Alligator
A M.tQvty Ii Out RwmP&w'TlitTltiti.'
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR 808 BECK
Editorial Editor Soorts Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecessaniy reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the AUlcator. The only official
voice of the Alllcator staff is the editorial in the left
column.

Tommys Year

When Georgian Tommy Bartlett was
hired to coach Floridas basketball team
last June, there were a lot of people who
had doubts.
What we needed was a big name,
some of his early opponents said. And
Bartlett was anything but.
Hed been an assistant under Ray Mears
at Tennessee and had been reasonably
successful as a tennis coach. Those
were his credentials.
The little man (5-9 is his true height
despite reports that have him as short as
5-5) didnt let all the controversy bother
him. He got his boys together and began
working -- first with a trip to Latin
America.
Bartlett made them run a little more
than they were used to, but he had the rare
quality which made them enjoy it all the
while. With his players, the new coach
was an instant hit.
It didnt take long for the fans to join
the bandwagon. The enthusiasm of the
players in the first home game against
Florida State was quickly noticed and a new
era in Florida basketball began.
Enthusiasm grew as the team rolled its
record up to 10-1 and gained recognition
in both wire services top 10s -a new
first for Florida basketball.
It reached its peak and then subsided
greatly as two losses to Tennessee were
absorbed and all chance at an SEC title
appeared lost. But Bartlett and his Gators
kept plugging. Even after a disastrous trip
to Auburn seemed to ruin the season, they
kept on working.
And it all climaxed Friday night with a
victory over Georgia which finished the
regular season with a 21-4 record un unsurpassed
surpassed unsurpassed by any past Florida team.
Tommy Bartlett had proven himself.
Whether or not the Gators will get ano another
ther another chance at the SEC title remains to be
seen -- and it will be late tonight. But
the SEC crown isnt the important thing.
And lack of it shouldnt cloud an other otherwise
wise otherwise bright picture.
In one short year, Tommy Bartlett has
taken Florida over the threshhold of
basketball greatness. He has made the
name synonimous as a team to be reckoned
with. And he did it all without making
enemies.
Thats not bad for a little man from
Georgia.

THE SOPWITH CAMEL

OHo, Ganglia Back Again

By DOUG MOLITOR
Alligator Columnist
The Physics Department has an
intramural softball team which is
one of the best on campus.
The College of Arts and Sci Sciences
ences Sciences has a few students whose

wacOME-QUAfmi^^M

Proposed dismissal of Chinas
nuclear capacity has prompted
many a campus beard to stand on
end in recent weeks. It has been
reported that the situation was
becoming so perilous in SDS head headquarters
quarters headquarters that no one was permitted
to ask a question or sit down lest
another member be impaled on his
chin. Negative reactions are to be
expected; they often occur when
the wishing and hoping philos philosophy
ophy philosophy is countered by one of logic
and action. However, several left leftliberals
liberals leftliberals have expressed emotion
that parallels nothing less than
personal intimidation, and it is to
these boys that this column is ad addressed.
dressed. addressed.
In the Feb. 15 Alligator, Richard
Man suggested that the problem
is helping China understand that
were not out to get her. This
would be accomplished by an
adroit mixture of diplomacy, trade,
tourism, and cultural exchanges.
Let us, for the moment, delude
ourselves into believing the boys
fantasies. Suppose that the United
States had pursued a different
course with the advent of Mao Tse Tsetung.
tung. Tsetung.
In the way of diplomacy, we
might have loaned the country
economic assistance. As a start, a
substantial loan, perhap§J3oo mil million
lion million would be in order with a one
per cent rate of interest, five in installments,
stallments, installments, and a 10-year length
of payment. Joint corporations
could provide technicians for the
plants we built within China.
Three hundred such people would
be sent to Manchuria to build a
huge iron and steel complex and
one hundred more for a huge steel
center. In a 10-year period over
10,000 technicians would enter the
country and attempt to assist the
backwards agrarian society. In
addition, we could give the Chinese

The Right Way
By RICHARD KRIEG
Alligator Columnist

presence adds the impression of
hipness to the Plaza of the Amer Americas.
icas. Americas.
The Journalism School has its
Misquoters League and the Broad Broadcasters
casters Broadcasters Drinking Society.
But what does the College of
Engineering have?

the benefit of our technology by
allowing 15,000 of their students
to attend American schools and
permitting free access to plans of
products protected by internal pa patents.
tents. patents.
In the way of trade, we might
have, in April 1950, signed many
trade agreements with Red China
as well as pressure our allies to
do the same. We could also have
shipped them food and capital goods
in huge quantities. Our pressure
would also be on an international
trade organization to accept China
as a member.
Cultural exchanges in quantity
also could have abounded in the
50s and tourism might have been
initiated. Os course, recognition of
the country never would be ques questioned.
tioned. questioned.
We might have spent the past 18
years building 291 industrial plants
(SEE CHINA, PAGE 7)

Florida Alligator Staff
s
NICK TATRO JIM WHITE NICK ARROYO
Editorial Assistant Assistant Managing Editor Photo Editor
STEFANIE JARIUS JO ANN LANGWORTHY GENE NAIL
Society Editor General Assignment Editorial Assistant
Editor
staff MEMBERS Harvey Alper, Bill Douthat, Elaine
uner, Kathie Keim, Bob Padecky, Judy Redfern, Frank
epherd, Lori Steele, Joe Torchia, Harold Kennedy,
Justine Hartman, Eunice Tall Richie Tidwell
ASSISTANTS Diana Folsom, Peggy Sneider, Andrew
mo h if/ Robert Blount, Joan Allen, Eddie Gutten Guttenc
c Guttenc er Dick Blakely, Bob Menaker, Dave Reddick, David
eiss, Karen Eng, John Ellsworth, Diann Devine, Jeroro
Warren.

Well, once a year the engin engineers
eers engineers unhook the slide rules from
their belts and put on the En Engineers
gineers Engineers Fair. They come out from
behind their Strengths and Ma Maa
a Maa terials books and provide one of the
best shows on campus.
Being a fair, the engineers are
inclined to show off the lighter
side of their profession and avoid
the serious. The exhibits display
the many disciplines of engineer engineering
ing engineering and give some insight as to
why engineers are worth high highpay
pay highpay fresh out of college.
I was disappointed when I found
out there was not going to be a
display of pipe fittings this year.
The bright shiny bits of plumb plumbing
ing plumbing have been left out.
But fear not, Otto the Robot
has returned. He and his ganglia
of wires will be there to answer
questions and chase girls. Im sure
that his nose still lights up and
says WOW.
For those who feel that every
fair needs a symbol there win be
a 68-foot Atlas Missile erected
outside. You can walk around the
Missile and say breathlessly,
What a symbol.
Os course IBM, DuPont, and
General Electric will be there.
They are entered in the Bigro Bigrother
ther Bigrother is Watching competition.
Naturally there is a beauty con contest
test contest to select a queen of the Fair.
Nothing goes on at this school
without a beauty contest and the
Engineers are not to be left out.
Although no girls from the College
of Engineering were entered.
I didnt notice any contestant
from the Miss Teach-In contest
either. I guess that they were all
getting ready for the Miss Peace
Caravan contest. Probably just an
oversight on the engineers part.
Members of the Save-our-At Save-our-Atmosphere
mosphere Save-our-Atmosphere Society will want to see
the smog-proof car. Its an electric
Renault with a special radio which
you can take out and run on gaso gasoline.
line. gasoline.
The most interesting exhibit
each year is brought to the Fair
by the boys from the computer
center. Every year they outdo
themselves by turning the big brain
into the Fairs clever clown. This
time you get back at the computer
for some travesty upon yourself
or your record, go to the Fair and
beat the living solid-state out of
it at checkers.

PLEASE
Limit Letters To The
Editor To 250 Words
And Make Sure
They're Signed. We
Will Omit Names
At Writer's Request.



Monday, March 6, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

SPEAKING OUT

By BO LOZOFF
Alligator Columnist

Since the Florida Alligator has
deemed the issue of farm workers
struggling for a place in society
to be irrelevant to the campus
community, I have been givei.
this one last chance to present
their plight. Rather than attempt
ing to cram countless statistics
concerning wages, housing, mor mortality
tality mortality rates, diseases, schooling
(or lack of it), unemployment, dis discrimination,
crimination, discrimination, etc., into one Alli Alligator
gator Alligator article, I will briefly stress
certain fundamental ideas: stud students
ents students who are interested in the
statistics may feel free to attend
the next Farm Workers Support
Committee meeting, Weed Hall,

(FROM PAGE 5)
t
and loaning the Communist giant
$3.3 billion at extremely low rates
of interest. Os course, all this
aid might strain our economy
slightly. However, mans know knowledge
ledge knowledge of world affairs would indi indicate
cate indicate that China should be nice
to us, and surely that is just com compensation.
pensation. compensation.
Those of us truly knowledgable
of world events have already real realized
ized realized something. The information
above is not conjecture. Every Everything
thing Everything mentioned was actually
granted China after the Communist
phlebotomy by the Soviet Union.
The two countries are on the verge
of complete diplomatic rupture;
perhaps border war the policy

I GET ACQUAINTED SPECIAL I
I Free Lubrication With I
I Your Cars Oil Change I
I (A $1.55 VALUE) I
CAMPUS AMERICAN
I
I At the Corner of Univ. Ave.& 13th St. I
I "We dont talk service....we give it. I
I N Complete Battery Service l
I \ Complete Motor Tune-up l
I \ All Atlas Accessories I
H H
I YOU EXPECT MORE FROM AND YOU GET IT
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Helping Migrants Helps Everyone

sdf

Page 7

directly behind the Episcopal Stu Student
dent Student Center, Thursday at 8 p.m.
A basic premise upon which the
United Farm Workers Organiza Organization
tion Organization Committee is founded is that
farm workers have the right to
collectively bargain, a right which
is both guaranteed and in the
United States under the National
Labor Relations Act, and act which,
because of farmers lobby pres pressure,
sure, pressure, was able to pass through
Congress only by excluding agri agricultural
cultural agricultural workers. A union contract
for farm workers would bring as
much benefit to their employers
as does any other labor contract,
guaranteeing reliable workers,
employer-employe grievance pro provisions,
visions, provisions, fixed wages and
hours, and one pick-up area for

China Nice

of helping China understand that
were not out to get her is a
foolish and self-delusive one.
Thus, we arrive at the crux of
liberal-conservative dissension on
China. The conservative recog recognizes
nizes recognizes the Red Savage as a unique
personage, unprecedented within
the annals of history. The unique uniqueness
ness uniqueness does not indicate sovereignty;
the savage does not allow nuclear
power.
Man, and other left-liberals can cannot
not cannot fathom this. They wish that
China will mellow as the years and
lies progress; they hope that patho pathological
logical pathological anti-Americanism will
cease by cajoling the monster.
They cannot understand that the
collective nose of the United States

all their laborers. Many farmers
realize these benefits and anxious anxiously
ly anxiously await the union. These farmers
are those who already provide ade adequate
quate adequate wages and conditions, and
they realize that they have nothing
to lose and everything to gain from
a farm workers union. The only
people who stand to lose are those
who refuse to treat farm workers
as human beings, or as one area
farmer put it, We dont buy our
slaves any more, we just rent
'em.
The unionization of farm work workers
ers workers presents ramifications which
penetrate the core of our entire
social structure. Since farm work workers
ers workers as a group constitute the low lowest
est lowest class, both economic and so social,
cial, social, of our country, a better-

has been burned several times too
many.
Perhaps the entire situation can
be summed up in the words of
one famous newspaper corres correspondent.
pondent. correspondent. While watching N. S.
Khrushchev angrily wave his shoe
in the United Nations he remarked:
Man thats a leftist for you.

COURTLAND A.
COLLIER
JmM
UNCLOG Gainesville traffic
every ? mph improvement in
a moving traffic through Gainesville
M will save motorists I 000, 000 mor
HLA hours per
City CommissionMarch 21 (Pd. Ad.)

ment of their standard of living
would upgrade the entire scale
of mankind in America truly
a significant step toward the
American ideal.
This brings us to the topic of
the campus community. What are
our purposes at a University?
Do these purposes include isolating
ourselves from the reality of po poverty
verty poverty and oppression which sur surround
round surround us? Has the University sys system
tem system degenerated to such a point
that we hold ourselves to be above
helping the poor who cant enjoy
our privileges? It is indeed a sad
day when the educated members of
a society rule that their academic
and social worlds cant be bothered
by the problems of the less for fortunate.
tunate. fortunate.
If this is the case at the Uni University
versity University of Florida, I feel confi confident
dent confident to say that Jesus Christ,
Lincoln, John F. Ken Kennedy
nedy Kennedy and all of Heaven shed tears
for our ignominy.

t e ddybea nUrS e r y
1214 1/2 NW 4th St.
376-0917
5 age groups, infant through
kindergarden Classes.
Air conditioned New building

DON'T YOU
dare!
65% 35% COTTON BLEND
16 and 17 BOTTOMS
PERMANENT PRESS
NEVER NEEDS IRONING
Nationally advertised at
$8.95. We have dared. .
Now, if you want to save
at
$799
2 pairs $15.00
this week only
(mifh's
/ Imins shop
919 West
University Ave.
(Next to The Pub)
GATOR ADS SELL

I B / ) )) j
' ) \. j
J l j



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
SHORT WAVE RECEIVER. Halli Hallicrafters
crafters Hallicrafters SX-100. Beautiful, very
sensitive, versatile. All band cov coverage.
erage. coverage. Speaker, earphones, coaxial
cable included. Less than $l7O.
378-5725. (A-109-st-p).
SLEEPING BAG, air mattress,
mosquito netting, camp stove. All
in good condition. $15.00 takes ev everything.
erything. everything. Call 378-5238. (A-109-
2t-p).
BASENJI PUPS, tri and red and
white, championed sired. Call 472-
_24QB__aiter 5 p.m. (A-109-st-c)_._
FENDER Bassman amp. and Gib Gibson
son Gibson Eb-3 bass guitar. Will sell
separate. Phone 376-7871 after 5
p.m. (A- 109-st-p).
FOR SALE MINOLTA AL range
finder camera. S-2 Lens built-in
light meter, 3 years old. Excellent
condition. $45. Call: 372-7946. (A (A---108-3t-c).
--108-3t-c). (A---108-3t-c).
FOR SALE 1962 TRIUMPH
650 cc. Engine completely re rebuilt.
built. rebuilt. Must sell. $595. Call: Bill,
376-4863. (A-107-st-c),
P HILCO solid state portable stereo
with Garrard turntable. Beautifully
finished Walnut speaker cabinets.
$l2O Call Earl at 372-9616.(A 372-9616.(A---105
--105 372-9616.(A---105 st-p)
1965 YAMAHA, under 5,000 miles,
80 cc, excellent condition. $225.
Call 372-8056. (a-105-st-c)
COUCH and matching chair, good
condition SSO. For information
372-3734. (A-106-st-c)
for rent
AVAILABLE MAY 1, across fiom
University. Suite of air-condition air-conditioned
ed air-conditioned rooms for couple ortwogentel ortwogentelmen.
men. ortwogentelmen. Also efficiency apt. for two.
Apply now 321 S.W. 13th Street.
(B-108-lt-c).
ONE BEDROOM APT, modern,
furnished, air-conditioned, two
blocks from campus. Available
end of term. 372-2862. (B-106-
3t-C)
VILLAGE 34 Apt. to rent: SIOO
per month. Furnished, air condi conditioned,
tioned, conditioned, twin beds, kitchen. Call Tew
Realty, 376-6461. (B-109- lOt-p).
WHEN YOU THINK OF LUXURY
LIVING, think first of University
Gardens. Always renting, always a
selection. Call 376-6720. (B-109-
st-c).

FURNISHED Study room for rent.
One block from campus private
entrance call 378-1609 before
9
j
I The 2nd BeST color!
SeCReTAGeNT"*
{ to the whole wide world 53 J

for rent
AIR-CONDITIONED APTS. for
summer with pool -- close to
campus, 1524 N.W. 4th Ave. For
2,3, or 4 people $65, S7O, $75
per month plus electricity. 376-
8990, University Apts. (B-109-
lOt-c).
CHOICE TRAILER SPACES avail available
able available at Pinehurst Park. 3530 S.W.
24th Avenue, 376-9610. S3O per
month. (B-109-st-c).
MODERN 1 bedroom furnished apt.
Air-conditioned, pool. Available
April-ist. Call 378-1123. (B-TGB (B-TGB
- ROOMS for rent, $27 per
month. Private entrance, bath fac facilities.
ilities. facilities. Phone, All utilities in included,
cluded, included, 1/2 block from campus.
378-4790 after 6 p.m. (B-106-
st-C)
wanted
WANTED Adult workers with
students to conduct tours to Europe
and Greek Isles -- Middle East.
Write to: Wholesale Tours Inter International,
national, International, P.O. Box 1689, Orlando,
Fla. 32802. (C-109-2t-c).
POETRY WANTED for Anthology.
Include stamped envelope. Idlewild
Publishing Company, 543 Freder Frederick
ick Frederick Street, San Francisco, Calif.
94117. (C-104-10- P)
WANTED Kosher coed pre preferable
ferable preferable senior or graduate to share
modern apt. summer trimester.
Call Carol 378-6162. (C-109-st-c).
ARTIST-MEDICAL Student wishes
to rent studio (garage, bam, etc.,)
Require electricity, bathroom fa facilities,
cilities, facilities, reply Box 529, J. Hillis
Miller Medical Center. (C-109-
4t-c).

KtiKTOI LAURENCE HARVEY- DALIAH LAV!
UlinJ (h LIONEL JEFFRIES 1
N.W. 13th SLat 23rd Road W
I Telaphona 378-2434 ln 17 PPM
'waaaaMpaawH B __ Special Guest Star jj
|1:00 3:10 5:20 7j30 9 ; 3SJ PAUL FORD
The three funniest agents |nnu| m M<-liEPBr
have'em tremblin Wilm II fIBHH
in the Kremlin COLI) m
when they unleash... |MCfIUMj
MARCiI 8 AHU 9
ITS UNEQUALED ON THE SCREEN!
A | brand-new | actual performance
of The DOyly Carte
A BHE Production of THE D OYLY CARTE OPERA COMPANY "THE MIKADO BH
by W S GILBERT and ARTHUR SULLIVAN Based on the Stage Production by KmU
ANTHONY BESCH Produced by ANTHONY HAVELOCK-ALLEN and JOHN KhN
BRABOURNE Directed by STUART BURGE from WARNER BROS.
TECHNICOLOR* WIDESCREEN
DAILY 2:00 and 8:00 Student Performance 5 P.M.- Student Dis Discour..
cour.. Discour.. Coupon Available NOW FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE

:, The Florida 'Alligator, Monday, March 6, 1967

Page 8

wanted
GOOD TYPIST needed for type typesetting
setting typesetting on THE FLORIDA ALLI ALLIGATOR.
GATOR. ALLIGATOR. Accurate, fast typing re required.
quired. required. Full- and part-time sche schedules
dules schedules available. Student or student
wife acceptable. Apply Student
Publications Office, Room 9,
Florida Union. (C-108-3t-nc).
i ii > , i n ... .mm,
MALE roommate wanted to share
modern one bedroom apartment
at Summit House, 1700 SW 16th
Court, behind new Veterans Hos Hospital.
pital. Hospital. Phone 372-3572. (C-107-
sy-p)
trade
SWAP or SELL 1960 LARK, V-8
Stick, excellent condition, for mo motor
tor motor cycle of comparable value.
Call 372-6832. (D-106-2t-c).

help wanted
SECRETARY-RECEPTIONIST for
large apt. complex. Married, 25-
40. Must live on premises. Typing
and bookkeeping, congenial per personality.
sonality. personality. 9-5, Monday Friday.
376-6720. Call Mr. Weekes for
appt. interview. (E-109-st-c).
WANTED Cashier and Assist Assistant
ant Assistant *Manager Trainee. Contact
Harry Fehrman at 378-1001. (E (E---1
--1- (E---1 lOt-c).
WAITRESSES wanted. Prefer mar married
ried married girls, must be 21. Evening
shifts only. Apply Ginos, 2204 SW
13th Street, 376-1322. (E-103-lOt (E-103-lOt
MALE STUDENT Dipper Dan
Ice Creme Shoppe. For complete
details check listings at Student
Financial Aid Office. (E-109-st-c).

autos
1960 AUSTIN HEALY 3000, re recently
cently recently painted, new brakes, lsody
in excellent shape, 5 good tires,
needs mechanical work, will sell
to best offer. Call Fred 372-6754.
(G-105- st-c)
JAGUAR XKE, 4.2 late 1965
BLACK CAT. Low mileage,new
tires, never raced, /o see and
drive call 372-4088 Priced over
$2,000 below cost. Interested per persons
sons persons only. (G-106-st-c)
ONE OWNER, 1965 Dodge Dart?
Excellent condition. Air-condition,
automatic transmission, radio and
heat, low mileage, SI6OO. Univ.
ext. 2725 or 372-3597.
10-C)
personal
I
NOW on most music (WU) The
sound of PRESTON, Join him at
three on 139 radio, WHERE THE
ACTION IS. (J-109-sit-c).
SDS SSOC phone-in. Dial 376-
0506 for Vietnam talk. (J-109-
3t-p).
UNIVERSITY ~~OF COLORADO
summary program features Lan Language
guage Language Houses with total environ environment.
ment. environment. Regular housing available
also. Information 1441 Broadway,
Boulder, Colorado 30302. (J-108-
PART-TIME STUDENT
Works 20 Hours/Week
Earn S4O/Week
6pm-10pm
Monday-Friday
For Appointment,
Call 372-5594
4pm -5 pm
I WALT DISNEY I
SEVEN again... I
f§ MAGNIFICENTagain!
MIRISCH PRODUCTIONS. INC W
C I Mins s > s** P'KFMS WMW aH
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die Seven I

lost-found
LOST brown skinny puppy near
University. Please call 372-6750.
(J- 107-2 t-C)
LOST Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity
ring; Inscribed REWARD. Call
372-5588. (L- 108-2 t-p).
ANYONE FINDING Brown pigskin
wallet contact Justine Hartman,
ext. 2402. REWARD. Lost in Li Library.
brary. Library. Thursday. IDs needed badly.
(L-109-st-nc).
WILD THE PERSON who took a
Navy P-coat and a navy blue trench
coat from the Sigma Chi House
Saturday night please, at least,
return the pair of girls glasses in
the Trench coat. Call Mike Morang,
372-9138. (L-109-lt-p).
HELP WANTED
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TODAY

A Young, Veteran Cop
Runs A Night Patrol

By HARVEY ALPER
Alligator Staff Writar
(Editors note: Harvey Alper, Alligator Staff
Writer, spent one night gathering information from
the Gainesville Police Department. This is the
first in a three-part series about a night patrol.)
The cop, sitting behind the steering wheel, looked
out over the cruisers hood into the night.
I looked so much like Fidel Castro," he said,
"I was afraid Id get shot when I moved to Florida.
He continued, saying he had had a beard and long
hair before he came to Gainesville. He said he held
no grudge against college students who sport these
modern day eccentricities here.
You know, he said, theres one thing I dont
think anyone will ever do; no one will buy any part
of the Gainesville Police Department."
The patrol car dept moving; up and down 13 Street
onto deserted dirt roads and around the backs of
buildings.
Friday is supposed to be a busy night for the

at s*Â¥/
ISRp
' "wfc-
JjHprap \ i I
/wlAm\ ill mm l
W H ? 1
JB T M If J,
m
UiliM
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ah ||l
Party
Jane Sandefur and Cheryl Watson, Tri-
Delts, agree that these are two great
outfits in or out of the surfo .or basking
at the side of the pool
Jane f s dotted swiss cover up is scalloped
at the hem and covers a baby bikini .
5-15,527.95
CheryVs two piece briefer takes a ruffle
on its pants and bra, 5-15 $19.95
Shop Every Night 'til 9

Monday, March 6, 1967, The Florida Alligr or,

force, but as with any other business one never
really knows if and when the business will come.
This night there was plenty of time for a coffee
break at Jerrys.
The squad car, not yet a year old, had nearly
60,000 miles on the odometer, witnessing its Twen Twenty-Four
ty-Four Twenty-Four hour per day service. It sported a two-way
radio which constantly blared directives to police in
various parts of the city.
The officer was on the Skid Row patrol patrolsomething
something patrolsomething University students would probably name
the Sin City swingon S.W. 16th Ave.
Only moments away from the police station the
patrol car came to a sudden stop.
The officer threw the cruiser into reverse and
quickly into forward again.
That looks like the Riviera which belongs to this
rich character, the patrol man said. Lets check it
out.
The patrol car sped swiftly around several tight
corners in pursuit.
This time the results proved to be negative. The
suspicious car wasnt the one in question.

But, as the night was to prove,
crime prevention, and not appre apprehension,
hension, apprehension, is the better part of a po policemans
licemans policemans valor.
Sure we've got a dope problem
here in Gainesville," the officer
was saying as the car went down
still anther dark street, but not
as big a problem as a lot of places."
Perhaps this is because f T>
quently, in an irregular pattern, the
patrol car circled medical offices
and pharmacies with the officers
eyes peeled to back doors and indi indications
cations indications of attempted forced entry.
Most of the stuff here is done
by inexperienced kids, the officer
said. He noted that the kids"
usually got caught; and quickly, too.
It seemed as if the little things
of patrol were without end.
A traffic light was not function functioning.
ing. functioning. The officer reported it to head headquarters
quarters headquarters and two hours ;, on-a
different patrol, it appeared to be
working properly.
A motorcycle officer was tired;
he got into the patrol car and rested
for a few moments on the back seat
shooting the breeze.
But mostly there was monotony.
Far as I know there is no syn syndicate
dicate syndicate (organized) crime in
Gainesville," the cop said. It is
our job to see we never get it."
It might sound pompous on paper,
but thats what the man said and he
apparently believed his own words.
The officer, the same one who
once sported a beard and long hair,
said hed been a welder once in
Evanston, Indiana.
Hed like welding, he said, but he
didnt like having to produce pro products
ducts products which didnt personally sat satisfy
isfy satisfy him.
The man didnt say it, but he was
talking about self respect, and he
was saying he couldnt accept a job
which didnt allow him to maintain
this essential.
So, he took a 10,000 dollar cut
in pay" and came to Florida and
became a cop after trying his hand
at some more lucrative plumbing
work (which also failed to satisfy
him).
He says he likes being a cop.
He probably says this because it
provides him with this essential
self- respect.
Being a cop therefore means, for
this man, that he can stand up and
say its his job that organized crime
never comes to this town and mean
it.
Now the patrol car was moving
along Depot Ave. A car whizzed by
in the opposite direction.
That's car number one, the
patrolman said. You just never
know where Chief Joiner is at.
The chief of police, William
D. Joiner, had passed by in the
night.
He keeps us on our toes,
the cop said. Hes in several
times through the night; you
dont find that in toe many cities,
he said.

Page 9



Page 10

), The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 6, 1967

CASH TRAVEL EXPENSE I A AMC CHECK DFLAYED II AMEV
AM TT CHEOC DELAYED W M PAVQAY LOANS Isl W W K
Available VACATION Available
$25 to S6OO r a || II ¥* r* 222 W Up to S6OO
Payday Short Term MOTIOn CO,ui>... For Yoa. Sa.oad Ca,

Orange

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

Monday, March 6
Mensa: Daily luncheons, table on west side of Main
Cafeteria, 11-1 p.m. ...
Communications Week: Broadcasting Day, SSC, 8:40
a.m. 4:30 p.m. <.
Communications Week: Luncheon, Ramada Inn, 12:30
p.m.
Dept, of Geography & Comm, for African Studies
Seminar: Prof. T. J. D. Fair, The Urban Geo Geography
graphy Geography of Separate Development in South Africa,
208 Floyd, 3:30 p.m.
Student Physical Therapy Association: meeting, A-91
MSB, 7 p.m. All students interested in physical
therapy invited.
Film Classic: Henry V, MSB Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Union Board: Dance Lessons, Union Social Room,
7:15 p.m.
Real Estate Club: topic, Property Management,"
218 Union, 7 :30 p.m.
Fla. Association of Broadcasting: Banquet, Ramada
Inn, 7:30 p.m.
Ag. Economics Club: guest speaker, Mr. Ellis Clark,
160 McC, 7:30 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club: meeting, 527 Eng., 8 p.m.
Everyone interested in amateur radio is invited
to attend

Students must be registered with the Placement
Office to interview. Sign-up sheets are posted two
weeks in advance of the interview date at Building
H. All companies will be recruiting for April and
August grads unless otherwise indicated.
hiring juniors for summer employment.)
MARCH 6: THOMAS J. LIPTON,INC. All majors.
BURROUGHS WILLCOME & CO. All majors.
LTV ELECTROSYSTEMS, INC. EE, ME, Ps, Math.
NAVAL SHIP SYSTEMS COMMAND EE, ME, CE,
ChE, Ps. LIBBY, McNEIL & LIBBY BusAd,
Engr. U.S. PHOSPHORIC PRODUCTSME, ChE, EE,
Chem. SWIFT & CO. Agri. FERRIS STATE COL COLLEGE
LEGE COLLEGE (Mich.) Teaching positions in all fields.
GULF AMERICAN LAND CORP, Gen. Bus, Lib.
Arts, Ed. U. S. DEPT. OF COMMERCE CE.
MARCH 6,7: DOUGLAS AIRCRAFT CO., INC.
AE, CE, EE, ME, Eng. Sci, Ps, ChemE, Nuclear
Engr, Math. CORNING GLASS WORKS Acctg, Econ,
Bus. Ad, All Engr, Math, Ps, Chem.
MARCH 7: NAVAL RESEARCH LAB Math, Ps,
Chem, CE, EE, ME, MetE. NEW YORK STATE PUBLIC
WORKS DEPT. CE, ME, EE. DEPT. OF AIR FORCE,
WARNER ROBINS AIR MATERIEL AREA AE,
EE, IE, ME. DEERING-MILLIKENSERVICE CORP.
All phases of textile & chem. mafg. SOUTHERN RAIL RAILWAY
WAY RAILWAY SYSTEM ME,CE, EE, Acctg, Trans.* RIEGEL
TEXTILE CORP. Bus, Lib. Arts, Ed.* NASA,
JOHN F. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER EE, ME,AE.
MANUFACTURERS LIFE INSURANCE CO. lnsur,
Mktg, Bus. Ad, Mgmt. REYNOLDS METALS CO.
ChE, EE, ME, IE, MetE.

B 9 < Hn
1 Serving U of F Employees Since 1936 1
INTEREST RATES / PROGRAM OF THRIFT, CREDIT, SERVICE AUI0 O ANS I
I r-' jf
I ON LOANS Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union SPECIALTY I
I Building J Extension 2973 I

Placement
Notices

BLUE BULLETIN

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, March 7

Communications Week: Advertising and Public Re Relations
lations Relations Day, SSC, 8:40 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
Dept, of Geography and Comm, for African Studies
Seminar: Prof. T. J. D. Fair, Regional Develop Development
ment Development Policy in Africa South of the Sahara, 208
'Floyd, 10 a.m.
Fla. Public Relations Association: Luncheon, SSC Blue
Room, 12:15 p.m.
AIESEC: Open meeting, 116 Union, 4 p.m.lnformation
about management internships during the coming
summer.
Tuesday Evening Supper Club: Presbyterian Student
Center, 6:30 p.m. Non-denominational, everyone
single and over 21 Invited.
Union Board: Bridge Lessons, 215 Union, 7 p.m.
UF Waterskiing Club: meeting, Basement Fla. Gym.,
7:30 p.m. All interested persons invited to attend
Dept, of Music: Faculty Concert, MSB Aud., 8:15
p.m.
Union Forums: Senator John O. Pastore, Univ. Aud.,
8:15 p.m. Reception following in Union Bryan
Lounge
Murphree Area Council, 218 Union, 8:30 p.m.

FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE: Tickets now on
sale for Pittsburgh Symphony, and Sen. Pastore.
PI MU EPSILON: Math honorary fraternity will
be Tuesday, March 7, room 209 Walker Hall. Pros Prospective
pective Prospective members are invited. For information con contact
tact contact Louis Block, 372-9421.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS: Deadline for signing up
teams for softball is Thursday, March 9, 5 p.m.
Ten players will compete in slow-pitch softball,
beginning Wednesday, March 15. Sign-up sheets in
Room 229, Florida Gym.
INTERNATIONAL WOMENS CLUB: Latin Night
will be held March 6, 8 p.m. at the University Wo Womens
mens Womens Club. Entertainment will include a fashion
show, music and a display of crafts from Central
and South America.

Students in the following courses are expected to
take the following tests. Each student must bring a
No. 2 lead pencil and will be required to use his
SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER.
, CBS 261 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, March 7,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12,
13, 14, or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
CBS 262a (Evolution) PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday,
March 7,7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.

General
Notices

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

Progress Tests

Wednesday, March 8

Fla. Speleological Society: meeting, 212 Union, 7p.m.
Phi Sigma Sigma: Lecture, 116 Union, 7 p.m.
Medico Wives: Lou Hattaway, Furniture Styles,
2125 N.W. 3rd Place, 8 p.m.
Arts and Science Dames: Mr. Ray Pettis, Life Sav Saving
ing Saving and Safety Around the Home, 560 N.E. 6th
Ave., 8 p.m.
Fla. Folk Dancers: Dance, Union Social Room, 8 p.m.
AIA Film Series: Some Flowers of the Narcissus,
105-B AFA, 8 p.m.
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE:
On Sale Today: Senator Pastore and the Pittsburgh
Symphony
On Sale Wednesday, March 8: Grainne Yeats, Stu Students
dents Students only, 2/ID; and Spring Frolics, the Righteous
Brothers, $5.00/couple.

Administrative
Notices

GRADUATE COUNCIL MEETING: The March meet meeting
ing meeting will be held Thursday, March 9, 1:30 p.m., in
Room 235, Tigert Hall.
COMMUNICATIONS WEEK: Boradcasting Day, Mon Monday,
day, Monday, March 6, and Advertising-Public Relations Day,
Tuesday, March 7. All discussion sessions will be
conducted in the Student Service Center. For infor information,
mation, information, contact the School of Journalism and Com Communications,
munications, Communications, Ext. 2241.
SPEECH SCREENING REQUIREMENT: All teacher
education majors, regardless of college enrollment,
are required to satisfy the speech screening require requirement
ment requirement before being admitted into the Advanced Profes Professional
sional Professional sequence, or enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400
and the elementary block (EDE 300, 301, and 302).
Appointments are now being made in Room 124,
Norman Hall.
FALL ORIENTATION GROUP LEADERS: Students
vith at least a 2.0 average may sign up to interview
for group leaders and staff positions March 6 and
March 13, from 1-4:30 p.m., Dean of Mens Office.
Graduate students will be interviewed Feb. 28, 2:30-
4:30, Dean of Mens Office.

CBS 262 u (Man and Nature) PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, March 7,7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with: (A-L) report to Little 201, 203, 205,
207, 213, 215, 217, or 219; (M-Z) report to Little
221, 223, 225, 227, 233, 235, 237 or 239.
CY 215 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, March 9,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12,
13, 14 or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
CPS 122 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, March 9,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with (A-L)
report to Walker Auditorium; (M-Z) report to Little
201, 203, 205, 207, 213, 215, 217, 219, 221, 223,
225, 227, 233, 235, 237 or 239.



Fair Is Foul But Gators

Alligator Sports Writer
Florida solved Georgia 96-63 Satur Saturday
day Saturday night at Florida gym. But the im important
portant important Gator win only told part of the
story.
Officials Butch Lambert and Harold
Johnson called 50 fouls on the two teams
during the hot contest. Feelings got high
with 10:09 left in the game as UF was
charged with three straight technica
fouls.
It was then, oddly enough, in Floridas
worst moment in the game, that UF
coach Tommy Bartlett gave Gator root rootwith


4 111
BARTLETT
Well Just Have
To Wait: Bartlett
Its not going to be over
until tonight, Coach Tommy
Bartlett says of the tight SEC
race.
Weve got to pull for Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi State to beat Tennes Tennessee
see Tennessee tonight. Thats what were
hoping for now.
The way were playing now,
wed be in good shape for a
playoff, and anyway we could
get a share of the SEC title
would be just great for the
players.
** Well just have to wait until
tonight.

I ppj I wri.l Help Expand the Frontiers of Communication I
CC S. IVIC S. Technology with ECI in St. Petersburg, Fla.
ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWS I
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9 9 frontiers of communication technology, has exceptional career oppor- I
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BT Wr V technology and satellite systems.
f jk. ,J m 9 Wm ECI offers outstanding opportunity for individual achievement and
m ._. MB recognition. The Company is large enough to provide the facilities,
* Jb %\ IpH programs and stability you are seeking, but small enough to give you
I *, JWL* rv fl*l every chance to realize your capabilities to the fullest. Youll never
R v /Jrn mm I be lost ln the crowd here, as any one of the more than 30 Florida
I iiiM v fei 9 engineering graduates now on our professional engineering staff will
4, emphasis at ECI is on advanced technology. The Company is
% ti~% lT A J an industry leader in command and control systems, microminaturized ll
999wK9999mSHtiM9Km transmitters and receivers, satellite ground terminals, multiplex sys sys
sys '< 41 % % M terns and space instrumentation.
*.? & lalalfe % JF ECI engineers are encouraged to continue their professional develop-
HF BBRB RpR? *JK| merit through in-house programs and Company-funded post-graduate I
R stud >- Youll be ah le to specialize, if you like, in the discipline that
intrigues you most.
*llr/ r Visit the placement office today and make your appointment to
999 i with our engineering representatives in the Student Union on
ip Monda y> Marc h 13 if this isnt convenient, call us collect to make I
i alternate arrangements. Phone Ken Nipper at 813/347-1121 in St.
petersburg I
Typical of ECls Young Engineers are Louis Pepper, Jim Adams and Sandy Reese, Florida graduates I / B
all. They devote their talents to the development of highly sophisticated, all solid state microwave R/ R
transmitters and related techniques. They are part of ECls RF Transmitter Engineering Group X R
which for years has paced the state-of-the-art in high powered solid state transmitters lor frequencies FIPCTRONIC fOMMI IMIfATIHMC IfclS* R
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o ggg

By 808 PADECKY

ers their greatest joy.
Bartlett took the microphone over from
a male Florida cheerleader and issued
this choice phrase: Please do not throw
money.
And for all that Bartlett has done for
UF basketball, in its best-ever season,
it would seem only fair that Florida
owes Bartlett a few coins.
But the Gators, still nursing a pos possible
sible possible NCAA tourney berth dependent on
tonights Mississippi State-Tennessee
game, started ouf with different ideas.
UF toyed with the smaller Bulldogs
for the first six minutes of action. In
fact, Georgia worked a stall so well that

Tonight Gators Date With Fate:
Miss. State Bulldogs Must Be Great

By MIKE SIKES
Alligator Sports Writer
Coach Tommy Bartletts basketball players have done everything
they can to win the SEC title,now its out of their hands.
The Gators fate hinges upon the play of the Mississippi State
Bulldogs, who host league-leader Tennessee tonight.
The Gators at least have tradition on their side. Tennessee has
not won at Starkville U 11 years.
The Vols seem to have trouble against old traditions. They
havent beaten Alabama at Tuscaloosa since 1945, and they kept
the old custom intact a week ago by falling to the Tide 53-50 in
a game that opened the gate to the SEC title a little wider for the
Gators.
Tonights game shapes up as a rebounding battle between MSUs
6-8 center Dave Williams and Tennessees 7-footer Tom Boer Boerwinkle.
winkle. Boerwinkle.

Haney UF Overall Judo Champion

Friday tne 15th annual UF Judo Championships were held. Kiyo
Saji won the 140 lb. division for the fourth tirfie and Jack Haney,
winner of the 160 lb. revision, repeated as over-all champion.
David Frisby, winner of the 180 lbs. division, threw several of
his opponents in short order despite weighing 162 lbs. Leigh McCurry,
winner of the heavy weight division, used matwork to great advan advantage
tage advantage in winning his trophy.

Win Anyway, 96-63

with rootwith 11:46 left before half, Florida led
by a slim 15-12 score.
It was then that junior Rollyson per performed
formed performed at his best for Bartlett. Rolly Rollyson
son Rollyson scored the next three baskets for the
Gators and boosted the margin to 11
points, a lead that UF held at the half.
For all practical purposes, Florida
had the game won at half time. But UFs
four seniorsGary Keller,Skip Higley,
Edd Poore and Jeff Ramseynever let
up.
Keller, from his forward spot, paced
the Gators an All-SEC choice the last
two years, Keller led both teams in
scoring with 18 points and rebounding

Monday, March 6, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Williams is currently second in the league in rebounds behind
UFs Gary Keller. Boerwinkle is third.
If Tennessee loses tonight, and third-place Vanderbilt wins over
celler-dwelling LSUalmost a certaintya three-way playoff will
result.
Bartlett said Saturday that if a playoff ensues, it will probably
be played on a neutral courtprobably Georgias 15,000-seat col coliseum
iseum coliseum in Athens, or at the University of Kentucky in Lexington.
If we had to go up to Lexington, wed be at a disadvantage,
Bartlett said. Georgia would be more centrally-located, but Ten Tennessee
nessee Tennessee and Vandy are closer even to Athens than we are.
Bartlett added that the three teams would probably flip a coin,
with the winner drawing a bye. The two remaining teams would
play each other, with the winner taking on the third team.
Radio station WRUF cancelled the tentative broadcast of the
State-Tennessee match. WGGG will broadcast the game.

Lars (Butch) Black, captain of the UF wrestling team, took the
second place medal in the 160 lb. division.lt was his first try at Judo.
In the overall matches David Frisby, 180 lb. champion, defeated
Leigh McCurry in an overtime decision while Jack Haney threw Kiyo
Saji.
The final match for the overall championship pitted Jack Haney
with David Frisby. Haney threw Frisby to repeat as the overall UF
Judo champion.

with 15.
Florida began to pull away at the start
of the second half. It was only the foul
flare-up mid-way in the half that kept
Florida's boosters interested.
Refs Lambert and Johnson added
color to the game as they called
the 50 personal fouls and then watched
the two teams attempt 76 foul shots.
But no matter, fair is foul and the
Gators won anyway. Now they will have to
sit back with their 14-4 SEC season com completed
pleted completed and pull for Mississippi State to
come through tonight over Tennessee.
At halftime, Kelly Prior received the
Most Valuable Player trophy that he won
last year on the 1966 Gator baseball team.

Page 11



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 6, 1967

UF Swims To 18th SEC
Title With 579 Points

UFs swimmers smashed two
new league marks Saturday en
route to their 12th consecutive
SEC Championship.

UF Wins First Game
With Nine Pitchers

UF opened its 1967 baseball season on a winning note Saturday
afternoon against Florida Southern with nine pitchers for a 5-2
win over the Moccasins at Perry Field.
Giving his pitching staff experience, Gator baseball coach Dave
Fuller: threw a pitcher per inning. Meanwhile, Florida bats sound sounded
ed sounded the first inning to wrap up the game.
UF scored four times in the bottom of the first. The first two
scored on Rufus Fraziers single that drove in Nick Nicosia and
Dan Cushman.
With Frazier on third, Skip Lujack grounded out from short
to first and Frazier scampered home easily on the out. UF first
sacker Terry Stroemer then doubled and catcher Ed Gross then sent
him home with a single down the left field line.
Fuller was full of optimism after the game, particularly in the
pitching department.
Ned Woolf oik started and gave up a first inning home run to
Florida Southerns Ed League. Danny Orr and Bob Padecky fol followed
lowed followed with shutout ball in the next two innings.
The Mocassins added a second run in the fourth inning off of
David Kahn on a sacrifice fly.
Jim Courier, Jack Withrow, Jack Frake, Steve Arthur and Kelly
Prior pitched an inning apiece the rest of the way to shut out the
Mocs, now l-l on the year.

I Golfers Win |
Sophomore Rick Spears led UF
golf team to the Florida Inter Intercollegiate
collegiate Intercollegiate Golf championship at
Daytona Beach Saturday.
Spears shot a 71 in the final
round Saturday to go wtih previous
rounds of 68-72 for a 211 total,
one better than FSUs Hubert
Green.
The Gator team had an aggregate
score of 853 for the three rounds,
while FSU finished a distant sec second
ond second with 869. The six-man Gator
squad fired a combined 282 Sat Saturday
urday Saturday to ice the win.
UF Tennis Meet
Floridas tennis team with open opening
ing opening season wins over South Florida
and Florida State takes on col collegiate
legiate collegiate power University of Miami
this afternoon at 2:30 in Coral
Gables.

I
ENGINEERING OPPORTUNITIES
for Seniors and Graduates in mechanical,
AERONAUTICAL, CHEMICAL,
CIVIL (structures oriented),
ELECTRICAL, MARINE,
and METALLURGICAL
ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING MECHANICS,
APPLIED MATHEMATICS,
CERAMICS, PHYSICS and
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
? "a
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
ITHURS. & FRI., MAR. 16, 17
Appointments should be made
in advance through your
College Placement Office
Pratt & U
vvniiney q
Aircraft
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Florida won 11 of 18 events in
the three-day SEC Championships
at Lexington, and dominated the
meet with a total of 579 points.

Riflemen
Nab Title
The UF rifle team, led by cap captain
tain captain Toby Muir, captured the Na National
tional National Rifle Association sponsored
state championship Saturday at the
Gators rifle range.
FSU placed second in the event,
followed by Miami, Florida South Southern,
ern, Southern, Florida A&M and Stetson.
Muir nabbed high individual hon honors
ors honors with 275, while FSUs Warren
Niles followed with 273 and Mi Miamis
amis Miamis Fred Davis a 272.

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The Gators thus sewed up their
18th season of SEC domination in
the last 25 years.
Florida set a league record in
the 800-yard freestyle relay with
a time of 7:28.9. The relay team
consisted of Tom Dioguardi, Andy
McPherson, Barry Russo, and Bob
Bridges.
McPherson also took the 100-
yard freestyle event with a time
of :49.5, and Steve Macri set a
new league mark of :52.1 in the
100-yard butterfly.
Blanchard Tual won the 200-
yard backstroke with a 2:05.8 time.
Georgia placed second in the
meet with 493 l/2 points, followed
by Alabama 363; Kentucky, 197
1/2 and Vanderbilt, 119.
The Gators next go to the NCAA
championships March 23-25.
Floridas freshmen placed third
in the freshman division of Sat Saturdays
urdays Saturdays meet with 38 points. Ala Alabama
bama Alabama was first with 60, followed
by Georgia with 54 and Kentucky
with 38.
Vanderbilt trailed Florida with
17.
As expected, Georgia dominated
the diving, with victories in the
one-meter and three-meter divis divisions.
ions. divisions.
The Bulldogs won four of six
places in the three-meter for 50
points, and five of the first six
places in the one-meter division
for 60 points.
Alabamas Ralph Wright broke
records in the 500-yard freestyle
event, the 400-yard individual
medley, and 1000-vard freestyle.

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