Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida Alligator

Vol. 59, No. 106

UF, Professor Heads CIA Linked Group

School Officials Deny
University Involvement

By HAROLD KENNEDY
Alligator Staff Writor
A UF professor, who is direc director
tor director of a foundation listed as CIA
supported, also directs the an annual
nual annual UF-sponsored Conference on
the Caribbean the Alligator lear learned
ned learned Tuesday. But Univers cy of officials
ficials officials deny any CIA affiliation
with either UF group.
Dr. A. Curtis Wiigus, UF re research
search research professor of history and
director of the Conference on the


Professors
Views Differ
On CIA Role

NICK TATRO
Editorial Assistant
Ever since "Ramparts, a mag magazine
azine magazine of the New Left, disclosed
the CIA subsidies of student gro groups,
ups, groups, such as the National Stu Student
dent Student Association (NSA), controver controversy
sy controversy has flared over whether or not
academic freedom has been com compromised.
promised. compromised.
NSA, the largest of these groups,
has over 300 hundred member uni universities
versities universities and represents over 1.3
million American students. For the
last 15 years the CIA has pumped
over $200,000 into NSA annually.
Reaction to CIA involvement was
expressed by two UF professors,
Dr. Merlin G. Cox, associate pro professor
fessor professor of Social Sciences and Dr.
Marshall Jones, assistant profes professor
sor professor of Psychology.
"The CIA would have been jus justified,
tified, justified, Dr. Cox said, "if they
would have operated publicly.
Cox felt the CIA was accustomed
to "closed-door procedures but
(SEE "PROFESSORS PAGE 2)

Faculty Talent
Show Tonight

Dean Lester L. Hale will per perform
form perform a clarinet solo tonight while
Philosophy Professor Thomas L.
Hanna demonstrates his capacity
at th3 guitar in the Faculty Ta Talent
lent Talent Show.
Hale, who will also do "read "readings,
ings, "readings, and Hanna are both un unwinding
winding unwinding for the benefit of the
World University Service (WUS)
along with several other faculty
members.
Dr. Robert Cade, inventor of
"Gatorade, a drink the football
teams use, will also be perfor performing
ming performing at the benefit which starts
at 8 p.m. in University Auditor Auditorium.
ium. Auditorium. Cade will be doing humor humorous
ous humorous songs.
Dr. Gilbert N. Lazier will pre present
sent present "short selections at the
event.
Dr. Delbert E. Sterrett will
perform at the piano, and Mrs.
Elizabeth C. Lessard will be show showing
ing showing her ability at the modern
dance.

Caribbean, was named by the Tam Tampa
pa Tampa Tribune as a director of the
Pan American Foundation. The
foundation was listed by the New
York Times on Feb. 19 as one
of several groups financed by the
Central Intelligence Agency. The
Times story claimed that the foun foundation
dation foundation was located at the UF.
School officials denied the UF
was connected with the Founda Foundation
tion Foundation at all. The foundation head headquarters
quarters headquarters were located in the
Gainesville Security Building un until
til until 1964 when it moved to Coral
Gables, said Dr. Lyle McAlister,
director of the Center for Latin
American Studies, Tuesday. Wil Wil.
. Wil. gus was "operating as a private
individual as director of the
Foundation, he added, and not as
an official of the university.
Wiigus is also director of the 1
Conference on the Caribbean, an
annual conference which discus discusses
ses discusses political, social, educational,
and economic problems in the
Caribbean area. Representatives
from all over the United States
and many Latin American coun countries
tries countries attend annually. Nearly 400
people attended the 1965 confer conference.
ence. conference.
Until 1965, the conference was
financed by such private organi- i
zations as the United Fruit Com Company
pany Company and Alcoa.
Since then, according to McAl McAllister,
lister, McAllister, UF has picked up the tab
estimated at $3500 $4500
per year. McAllister said most
of the expense was in paying spea speakers
kers speakers expenses. The money was
thought to come from the presi president's
dent's president's contingency fund.
Each speaker for the conference
is expert in one aspect of the
political, social, educational, or
economic condition of the Carib Caribbean
bean Caribbean area. Many of the Ameri Americans
cans Americans have worked in State and
Defense Department intelligence
offices before, according to bio biographical
graphical biographical sketches in the UFs
office of Informational Services.
Wiigus organized the Conference
in 1951, soon after he accepted
the post of Director of the Sch School
ool School For Latin American Studies.
This was near the time CIA
began subsidizing private organi organizations
zations organizations but McAllister, who suc succeeded
ceeded succeeded Wiigus when the School be became
came became the Center for Latin Amer American
ican American Studies in 1963, feels there
is no connection between the Con Conference
ference Conference and the CIA.
The Foundation, which was in incorporated
corporated incorporated in 1930 by a "group
of leaders in inter-American af affairs
fairs affairs from the UJS. and Latin
America, lists among its activi activities
ties activities travel, and research.
It also publishes a "Journal of
Inter-American Studies which
bore the imprint of the UF Sch School
ool School of Latin American Studies un until
til until 1963, when the school became
the center and McAllister suc suceeded
eeded suceeded Wiigus.
That year, the journal moved
its offices to Coral Gables and
the University of Miami. It is
still published in Gainesville. For
a while the journal was circula circulated
ted circulated by the foundation without char charge.
ge. charge.
The journal is highly respec respectable
table respectable in academic circles, said
McAllister, who thought it might
(SEE "CIA PAGE 2)

University of Florida, Gainesville

Fire DestroysPeaceWagon

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Staff Writer
The SDS Peace Caravan wagon
left in the Plaza of the Am Americas
ericas Americas to prevent traffic citations
suffered a much worse fate ear early
ly early Tuesday.

Union Opening April;
Penalty Clause Seen

JOE TORCHIA
Alligator Staff Writer
If a liquidated damages clause
is invoked by the Florida Board
of Regents, the H.L. Coble Co.,
constructor of the New Florida
Union, may have to pay as much as
S7OO as day for each day over
its deadline, according to D. Nell
Webb, UF zone architect.
The union is expected to be com completed
pleted completed by April 1, about seven
months overdue. The Coble Co.
had its finishing date extended six
times to date.
The liquidated damages clause
is included in the universitys con contract
tract contract with the Coble Co., and says
the university can claim S7OO a
day if it has been damaged be because
cause because of delay.
If the contractor can prove that
"factors beyond his control caus caused
ed caused the delay, Webb said, part or
all of the damages cannot be claim claimed.
ed. claimed.
"Os course, the university must
prove it has been damaged, Webb
added.

mm 1
igPlpig PHBjfjK
(Photos by Nick Arroyo)
The Peace Wagon In Better Days...
jf y -* v.. * ./HP
m MW IBp- ****'
; . h, : .I, b
f
...But All The Dreams WentUp In Smoke

Arsonists or invaders set the
unguarded Conestoga afire at about
1:30 a.m. and by the time Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Fire Department could mus muster
ter muster up, it had been completely
destroyed.
According to SDS member Tom
Sharpless, the wagon was left there

"The Coble Co. said it would give
me reasonable evidence that it was
held up by conditions beyond its
control during the whole period,
Webb said. "But I have my doubts
that they can give reasonable just justification.
ification. justification.
Webb said that once the union
is completed, the Coble Co. will
state the circumstances causing
the delay and he (Webb) will re recommend
commend recommend to the Board of Regents
what he thinks is a fair settle settlement.
ment. settlement.
The university claimed liquidat liquidated
ed liquidated damages on three projects this
past year, Webb said.
"The university sets up sche schedules,
dules, schedules, and when a project is de delayed
layed delayed it causes inconvenience,
Webb said. "But you have to
prove more than inconvenience
in courtyou have to prove dam damages.
ages. damages.
"It is easier to prove damages
when sales or rental is involved,
he added. Dormitories and the sta stadium
dium stadium come under this heading.

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

because it had been ticketed while
hauled around town. The police
had said it was illegal to tow such
a vehicle. So, said Sharpless, they
left it in the Plaza.
The blaze was reported atl;3o
by a University Police officer.
The Gainesville Fire Department
had been notified of the fire be before
fore before that time by an unknown
source.
According to Lt. William Holli Holliman
man Holliman of the University Police, the
fire was possibly started by a
kerosene heater.
Owner of the caravan, Robert
Shetterly, estimated the damage
at approximately S3OO.
The investigators report stated
that from the burnt wood in evi evidence
dence evidence the fire started in the cen center
ter center of the wagon and spread out outward.
ward. outward.
"Whether someone came in and
used the heater, or it was star started
ted started intentionally by someone we
do not know at this time, Hol Holliman
liman Holliman said. "We do know that a
can of kerosene was left in the
wagon by Mr. Shetterly earlier
in the day. He is meeting with
his people today to find out if
any of them know anything about
it.
Students for Democratic Society
member Alan Levin, called the
episode a "sad commentary on
what militarism and a war socie society
ty society can do to people.
He shared a common opinion
among SDS and Peace Caravan
members that the fire was not an
accident.
"I dont think that it was caused
by the military overshooting a tar target
get target like you hear about in Viet
Nam all the time.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 1, I9bv

Food Service Facilities Need Renovation

Slow service and poor attitudes on the part of em employes
ployes employes proveded the major complaints in a recent Food
Service survey conducted by the Murphree Area Coun Council,
cil, Council, reported an article in the Alligator last week.
But Rick Katz, president of the Murphree Area Coun Council,
cil, Council, and supervisor of the survey, said Tuesday that
blame for the low ratings rested, not with the Food
Service organization itself, but with the physical plant plantthe
the plantthe cafeteria facilities.
The equipment in the main cafeteria is outdated by

Sen. Pastore Speaks Here

U.S. Sen. John Pastore, a Dem Democratic
ocratic Democratic veteran of 16 years in the
Senate and a member of several
important committees, will ad address
dress address the student body next Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday night.
Pastores lecture at 8:15 in
University Auditorium is being
sponsored by the Florida Union
Forums Committee.
A native of Providence, R.1.,
Pastore served as governor of
Rhode Island from 1945 until 1950.

from Page T

that it was a mistake to apply these
techniques to student organiza organizations.
tions. organizations.
Cox also considered the CIA as
too independent. He said the for foreign
eign foreign policy makers and congress
should exercise more control over
the agency's actions. The most
serious infringement is on the right
of privacy, he said.
Liberal campus critic, Jones,
said, There is no justification for
the ClAs activities; subsidies are
unnecessary and damaging to gro groups
ups groups like NSA if they are to auth authentically
entically authentically represent American stu students.
dents. students.
All agencies fund trips to Eur Europe,

.^fe
U For Food Italians
I Those in the |
Know I
.GO! GO! GO!
Ui
U.S. 441 4 miles south of University Ave.
4:30 10:00 CLOSED TUESDAY
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advert*
lsements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever
possible
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Ad Advertising
vertising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator
will not be responsible for mor than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must he given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of
Florida and Is published five times weekly except during May, June, and July when
it tspublished semi-weekly. Only editorials represent the official opinions of their authors.
Address correspondence to The Florida Alligator, Florida Union Rul)ding, University
of Florida, Gainesville, fla 32001. The Alligator Is entered as second class matter
at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

I

KATHIE KEIM

Alligator Staff Writer

Professors

He was elected to the U.S. Senate
on Dec. 18, 1950.
He is a member of the important
Senate committees on appropri appropriations,
ations, appropriations, commerce, atomic energy
and Democratic policy.
In August, 1964, Pastore was
keynote speaker at the Democratic
national convention.
On three different occasions--in
1955, 1958, and 1961 he was
the Senate-designate to the Geneva
conferences on peaceful uses of
atomic energy.

ope, Europe, he said, but they should
go as professionals not spies.
Dr. Jones was pleased, however,
with the American public. I am
pleased that people are upset, he
said. Jones explained similar kinds
of revelations by the New York
Times had met with no response
because Americans were so im immersed
mersed immersed in cold war thinking.
Commenting on a recent state statement
ment statement by former Senator Barry
Goldwater that the CIA was only
funding left wing groups like NSA,
Jones said, Right wing groups
have no place over seas.
Former members of the CIA on
the faculty were contacted but they
refused to comment because they
had signed CIA papers forbidding
them to give information.

RECENT SURVEY REVEALS

a good 10 to 15 years, said Katz. It was designed
for a smaller college. This has not been a small col college
lege college for several years.
Katz said that all major food production is done
in the kitchens at the main cafeteria. He indicated
that the increased amount of food preparation had for forced
ced forced expansion into other rooms in the building.
For instance, the meat is prepared in the kit kitchen
chen kitchen that is farthest from the cafeteria lines, Katz
commented. Then it has to be carried out to the line,
geting cold on the way.

CIA Link Possible?

be discredited now because of the
tie-in with CIA.
Vice President of Academic Af Affairs
fairs Affairs Robert Mautz agreed with
him. Thats the trouble with CIA
meney, he said, Something
which is respectable suddenly be becomes
comes becomes suspect.
Wilgus was out of town Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, according to his secretary,
and would not be back until Thur Thursday.
sday. Thursday. The Tribune reported that
he was enroute for here from New
York, via Washington.
He has reportedly been plan planning
ning planning to resign from UF for over
a year. Once source reports he
intends to move to Miami.
Veteran Meet
The UF Veterans Club will meet
tonight at 7:30 in the Florida
Union Auditorium. All veterans of
the Armed services are invited.

LOOK/,
for \ VjS
im (%sM
BOOK SALLif 1
COMING SOON I
ME b I CAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 1
JWU.iS Mn.LER u.c. 1

The steamtables are just as old as the rest of the
equipment theyre using. Because of this, everybody
complains about the food being cold.
Katz indicated that he felt the need for definite
remodeling.
New more mechanized kitchens were seen as a means
of improving layout of the facilities and keeping foods
warm until they were served. Curtains and repaint repainting
ing repainting of the walls were also recommended, in order to
improve the drab appearance that had been criticized

by some customers.

ymCW^" v_3BHW* iJmmm^
Going to Europe?
SAAB
Prices for European
delivery start as
low as $ 1495 00
We bring your car
back from Sweden to
New Haven FREE
Pinna Proformorce Motors
615 N. Main

ToAiMii LUtav
QJUp RENTALS
itmufrAity g^np
1620 W. Uniy. Ave.
Carolyn Plaza



ssss SPEND $$ $ $
ONE MOMENT
On Gator Advert!sments
Where's the best place
for the flamenco in Madrid?
How much for a nice
double room facing the Parthenon?
Hows the weather in
London these days?
Can I get a cheeseburger
in Hong Kong?
What do I need to get
a passport?
Does the concierge
get a tip?
HOUSE B|j£
ask TRAVEL
3415 W Univ Ave
1,
CvoiKiw6CN or AMcmc, me.
HBnF %
V','' j % 1 /'
ot 8y.
Bp
- !
Theres a bit of the beast in every bug.
It doesn't take much to unleash the savage fury of a
Volkswagen.
Take almost any old VW, replace the body, make
a few simple adjustments, and you've got a Formula
Vee racer.
How can a mild-mannered, practical, everyday
Volkswagen convert so easily into something so delight delightfully
fully delightfully impractical?
In the words of the Formula Vee International Manual:
"Volkswagen components seem to have been made
expressly for use in a racing car.
"The engine, air-cooled and mostly aluminum, is light
for its power output and already adapted to the rear rearengine
engine rearengine concept of modern racing cars.
"Its ruqged construction provides c power plant
which seems to be practically indestructible, even at
racing speeds.
"Operating costs are amazingly low. One set of tires
will ordinarily last more than a season and one oil
change a year is sufficient."
It seems that the fame things that make the VW a
sensible car for people who aren't in any particular
hurry to get somewhere also make the Formula Vee a
sensible car for people who are in a big hurry to get
nowhere.
MILLER-BROWN
MOTORS INC Q 0
4222 N.W. 13 St.,

! III ESftiMl
... jfiAfatoK
j - -&VMfcTO t r At

UP ON ROOF -- It may
seem the Beta Thetas Pis have
originated a new open air caf cafeteria.
eteria. cafeteria. However looks are deceiv deceiving.

Frame Destruction Doubtful

Bv JUDY REDFERN
Alligator Staff writer
Frame E *iT be open for both
A and B terms n half the pre present
sent present residents indicate they want
to live in the frames during that
trimester, Director of Housing
H. C. Riker, said Tuesday.
The housing office had previous previously
ly previously announced the closing of Frame
D after the current trimester.
We had understood tha. f *Ti
frames (C and D) would be torn
down during the early summer,
but have recently learned from the
business manager's office that the
buildings wont be demolished un until
til until late summer," Riker told the
Alligator Tuesday.
Frame D houses 34 men. Riker
said that the building would re remain
main remain open if at least 17 men in indicated
dicated indicated an intention to remain in
the dorm during the summer on
theif housing preferential forms.
Forms must be returned to the
housing office March 6.
Frame C is not in present use,
Riker said. There nre no plans
at present for the property after
it is demolished.
Jack Zucker, Student Govern Government
ment Government secretary of housing, said
he had been contacted by resid residents
ents residents of the dorm desiring to re remain
main remain in the building during the
summer trimester.
As long as the property was wasnt
nt wasnt going to be used for anything,

WEDNESDAY
SPECIALS
mu t>
\.
LIVER i&X
DINNER ||t|f
I(A $1.65 VALUE) 79t | *T
I Tried *" I
I Norik Arnicas ffospitolikj Dish... I
I 3 Locations: 214 NW 13th St. 376-6472 I
I 114 NW 34th St. 372-3649 I
I 207 NE 16th Ave, 378-2959 |
illMPPPPPPMPMPP

Wednesday, March 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

the residents felt there was no
reason to close the dorm for the
summer," Zucker said.
Thats great," said Jack Irish,
4AS, when told of the housing of offices
fices offices decision. Those that stay
will very much want to have the
frames open."
Irish said that a group of the
dorms residents were thinking of
taking a petition to the Housing
Office.

College Presidents Plan
SecondTuitonHike Meeting

The Council of Student Body Presidents, formed this past week weekend
end weekend in Winter Park, will meet again at the UF March 18.
It is the stated purpose of this Council to express and effect,
in an informed and responsible manner, the wishes of the students
of our respective universities," the organization stated in a release
Tuesday.
With this purpose, and the interests of the students in mind,
this Council actively and unanimously supports the Board of Regents
and the State Budget Commussion in opposing the proposed tuition
hike," the release continued.
The released stated that the Council condemned the tuition for four
reasons.
The reasons and justification for a hike of any size has been
neither offered nor proven;"
No effort has been made to increase the financial aid pro programs
grams programs to offset the adverse incidence of the proposed hike;"
This increase would place undue burden on students trans transferring
ferring transferring into our senior institutions from the junior colleges; and,*
The revenue generated from this proposal would hardly begin
to meet the expenditures called for by the State Budget Commis Commission.
sion. Commission.

ing. deceiving. A group of Beta pledges hop hoping
ing hoping to fool the brothers ?.T.*:day
night secretly moved the houses
diningroom furniture On to roof.

We really wanted to keep it
open. Seventeen of us submitted
a letter to the Alligator concern concerning
ing concerning the dorm, said George La Lakich,
kich, Lakich, 2UC.
According to Tom He. 'ovich,
4ED, the dorm residents didnt
expect the frame to be kept open.
We thought we were fighting
a losing battle, he said. Most
of us want to stay here for fin financial
ancial financial reasons.

Page 3



Page 4

[, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 1, 1967

U.S. Losses Heavy After
Viet Cong Tear Gas Attack

By EUGENE V. RISHER
SAIGON (UPI) Communist
guerrillas using large quantities
of tear gas for the first time in
the Vietnam war inflicted heavy
casualties Tuesday on a compa company
ny company of about 180 American infan infantrymen
trymen infantrymen in the jungles of War
Zone C, the U.S. command re reported
ported reported Wednesday.
The guerrillas attacked the U.S.
units during Operation Uunction
City, the big American offensive
through the longtime Communist
stronghold along the Cambodian
border northwest of Saigon.
Although specific American los losses
ses losses were not announced, the U.-
S. command said they were hea heavy,
vy, heavy, meaning that the unit was so
badly mauled that it was not able
to complete its missions.
The fighting started as mili military
tary military spokesmen disclosed that a
battalion of American Marines had
stormed ashore onSouth Vietnams
central coast in a leap-frog land landing
ing landing designed to trap a large North
Vietnamese force.
The Marine assault force of up
to 1,500 men landed before dawn
Monday on a narrow spit of beach
about 320 miles northeast of Sai-

Journalistic 'Giant Luce Dies;
Headed Magazine Empire

PHOENIX, Ariz. (UPI) Hen Henry
ry Henry R. Luce, who pioneered mass
circulation news and picture mag magazines,
azines, magazines, and became one of the
journalistic giants of the 20th cen century,
tury, century, died at St. Josephs Hospital
early Tuesday following a coro coronary
nary coronary occlusion.
He was 68
Luce fell ill at his $750,000
winter home late Monday and was
taken to the hospital. He died in
his sleep at about 5 a.m., MST,
(7 a.m., EST) a spokesman said.
His wife, Mrs. Clare Boothe
Luce, former ambassador to Italy,
was here with him when he be became
came became ill. She will accompany
the body to New York City where
funeral services were scheduled
tentatively for 3 p.m., EST Fri Friday
day Friday at the Madison Avenue Pre Presbyterian
sbyterian Presbyterian Church.
Luce parlayed the $86,000 in investment
vestment investment in Time magazine in
1923 into a vast publishing em empire
pire empire with current assets of $363,
375,000. His interests were main mainly
ly mainly editorial but he had headed vir virtually
tually virtually the whole Life-Time-For Life-Time-Fortune
tune Life-Time-Fortune operation until 1964 when he
relinquished some of his power to
take the title of editorial chair chairman.
man. chairman.
He also is survived by two
sons by a previous marriage, Hen Henry
ry Henry R. Luce 111, an executive with
several of the Luce publications,
and Peter Paul Luce.

hrrenK/t*HflK
I U3L CL TtUudL I
FEATURING QUICK, COURTEOUS CURB SERVICE!
I DINING ROOM I
' |||||
I Open Til 1 AM I

gon. A spokesman described the described as the heaviest so far
maneuver as a 16-mile side- in the in the operation the
step., largest American ground offensive
Tne War zone C fighting was of the war that began a week ago.

Soviet Trawler Sinks
57 Reported Drowned

HIRTSHALS, Denmark (UPI) -A Soviet trawling factory ship,
one of the most modern in the Russian fishing fleet, sank Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday in a raging North Sea storm with a reported loss of 57 lives.
Only 22 survivors of the 79 crewmen aboard the Tukan were
rescued from lifeboats after the ship went down shortly after send sending
ing sending a short SOS at 2:45 a.m. (8:45 p.m. EST) Tuesday.
The 2,435-ton, 261-foot long vessel went down off the northwest
coast of Jutland as it and a sister ship, the Vilis Lacis, groped their
way through mountainous seas out of the Skagerrak, a North Sea
arm between Norway and Jutland.
All of the survivors were taken aboard the Vilis Lacis.
Danish fishing vessels found 47 bodies. Ten others were still
missing. Kanish fishermen who assisted in the search and rescue
operation said wristwatches on some of the bodies were stopped
at 3 a.m. The ship apparently went down 15 minutes after it had
called for help.
Several of the bodies recovered, including that of a woman crew
member, were dressed only in pajamas, indicating they had rushed
from their berths to jump into the icy waters.
The Tukans crew was believed to have included only about a
dozen deck and machine room personnel. Most of them aboard were
engaged in fishing and processing. The Tukan deep froze its own
catch.

Statements praising Luces 44-
year career as a publisher poured
in from scores of public figures,
ranging from President Johnson to
Playboy publisher Hugh Hefner,
subject of Time magazines cur current
rent current cover story.
A number of eulogies were made
on the U.S. Senate floor Tuesday
afternoon.
His enlightened judgment will
live and grow despite his passing,
said the President. Johnson prais praised
ed praised Luce for penetrating the sur surface
face surface of the events to interpret
their meanings, their causes and
effects and taking an intense con concern
cern concern in the spiritual and edu educational
cational educational well-being of his fellow
men.

XEROX COPIES
1 l9 10$ each
20 & up 9p each
Complete Printing ..Service
1 Day Rubber Stamp Service
(Central Florida
jui yrn
978-2577
503 SW 2nd Av.
1 - -E

Senate Democratic Leader Mike
Mansfield, Mont., noted that Luce
had created a new type of jour journalism
nalism journalism and was therefore a man
of controversy.
Luce was born in Tengchow,
China, the son of Presbyterian
missionaries who imbued him with
the duty of improving the lot of
his fellow men. He served on the
board of many religious and edu educational
cational educational institutions and made his
magazines forums for discussion
of free enterprise and national
purpose.

1963
CORVETTE Stingray, Radio, Heater,
Four speed transmission $2395
1966
FORD MUSTANG Fast back V-8 with
GT equipment. Radio, Heater.
PRICED TO SELL
1962
VW Radio, Heater A
$845
1960
VW Radio, Heater.
$575
1966
CHEVELLE Hardtop Couae. V-8 Auto Automatic,
matic, Automatic, Radio, Heater. $2495
BARKLEY MOTORS, INC.
NEW-USED l7OO N. MAIN STREET 376-1266


JFK Assassin Probe
Tightens In New Orleans
NEW ORLEANS (UPI) -- The New Orleans States Item said
today Lee Harvey Oswald and William David Ferrie were seen
together prior to the assassination of President Kennedy in 1963.
The States-Item said a law officer making a check early one
morning in the fall of 1963 found two men sitting together in a
car.
One of them identified himself at the time as Oswald, the re report
port report said. The officer last week identified Ferries body as the
other occupant of the vehicle, the newspaper said.
The policeman told Dist. Atty. Jim Garrisons investigators
last week about the incident, which was contrary to Ferries
own statements that he did not know Oswald.
Ferrie was found dead in his apartment last Wednesday during
an international furor caused by Garrisons claims that he was
investigating a conspiracy preceding Kennedys assassination.
Dr. Nicholas Chetta, New Orleans coroner, said today Ferrie
apparently died a natural death from a ruptured blood vess-
Garrison had called it apparent suicide.

Murder Trial Delayed;
Ailment Strickens Speck

PEORIA, 111. (UPI) Richard
Speck, accused killer of eight nur nurses,
ses, nurses, was stricken with a stomach
ailment Tuesday, halting his mur murder
der murder trail. Specks attorney used the
respite to rally behind the trail
judges curbs on news coverage of
the trial.
In his answer to a Chicago
Tribune mandamus suit filed in
the Illinois Supreme Court chal challenging
lenging challenging constitutionality of the
news restrictions, Circuit Court
Judge Herbert C. Paschen said:
The order in no sense impinges
the rights of news media to attend
the trial.
The order does, however, at attempt
tempt attempt to assure that the trial will
be conducted with appropriate jud judicial
icial judicial calmness, solumnity and dig dignity
nity dignity and free of a carnival at atmosphere.
mosphere. atmosphere.
Cook County public defender
Gerald Getty, Specks defense
counsel, received permission from
the state Supreme Court to in intervene
tervene intervene in the Tribune action and
filed a petition for dismissal of

Fidelity Life Insurance
US

the mandamus suit.
Paschens answer, filed in the
Chicago office of Illinois Supreme
Court Justice Walter V. Schaefer,
said the Tribune suit was a thin thinly
ly thinly vailed attempt to bring pressure
on the trial.

"Bill.
Evans is
JPr
one of the very tiny group of
real poets we have: a sensitive,
intuitive and imaginative genius
in his medium." Jazz Magazine
"The delicate probing fingers
are like tendrils of sound that
curl around the melodies with
a wispy ethereal quality... Such
music wears well. The more one
listens, the more there is to
hear." Down Beat Magazine
Thats what the jazz critics say
about him. But even people who
don't like jazz respond to Bill
Evans.
His music is tender, lyrical, pas passionate.
sionate. passionate. Its
A SIMPLE MATTER
OF CONVICTION,
and thats the title of his new newest
est newest album, with Shelly Manne
and Eddie Gomez (V/V6-8675)
Treat yourseif also to these two i
recent releases:
INTERMODULATION
with Jim Hall, guitar
(V/ V 6-8655)
"The sustained interplay of the
two musicians is of a quality
rarely found in jazz."
John S. Wilson
BILL EVANS TRIO WITH
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(V/V6-8640)
"So perfect it s hard to dis distinguish
tinguish distinguish between Bach, Chopin
and Evans." Leonard Feather
Exclusively on
Verve Records is
a division of Metro-
Goldwyn-Mayer Inc



Bv A to?#o J only MWN t no use, robin:
'A,'* v -v 3NE place llf f \Y\ / v V 1 the aperture 19 yBBSS O |f(/ 0 (
\ Y where did tmev )( coulp j Right. \IVN>L ( j y s 71,0 NA**ov } MM J/ g
A/s\ 'Su^wwas s POISON IVY Tfflf |M 40ULOB X fjJfV 4
N l

I '^^UC^GONMEALsI
from |
f OP£N n AM-9PM 3
rffiDEROSA
I JUL FWIAXHOUm j
Westgate Shopping Center 3321 W. Unlv. Ave. at 34th St.

Look first at the challenges offered
Tffa by LTV Electrosystems. Examine
the career opportunity with the
same care and objectivity you
would bring to an experiment in physics.
Evaluate the creative challenge, the chances
for advancement, the benefits, the educa-
tional opportunities, the
HH4J| pattern
the Relate
_ the potential to what you want
and what you like. After all, youve spent the past
several years developing your talents and your tastes.
You should recognize a worthwhile opportunity when
you see one. We
Kill a prom promise
ise promise waiting for
A you at LTV Electrosystems. Our primary business is
HA HA the design and development of highly sophisticated,
major electronic systems with a wide range of
ground, air, sea and space applica-
_ tions. For the full story, talk it over
with our representative when he
HFHF your campus.
Opportunities exist at.our Garland, Greenville and Dallas, Texas, facilities.
Our engineering representatives will be on campus
Campus
Interviews March 6
* : i
Please contact your placement office for appointment.
GARLAND DIVISION / GREENVILLE DIVISION / CONTINENTAL ELECTRONICS COMPANIES
xk ac/es/D/Av or=- ir^icz.
v 1
>
\
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F

Florida Players To Sponsor
An Evening of Psychidelics
Have you ever been to an evening of psychidelic intramedia total
involvement-type theater?
The Florida Players Lab Theater will present one March 11,
at 7:30 p.m. in Norman Auditorium. It will be one of several pro productions
ductions productions the Lab Theater plans for this trimester.
The Lab Theater provides an outlet for concepts and actors not
used in the major Florida Players productions, Robert E. Boyd of
the Lab Theater working committee said, Tuesday.
The theater presents shows which are too short or experimental
for the Florida Players, Boyd said. (They've already presented an
evening of Zen Buddhist poetry this trimester).
Later this trimester, the Lab Theater will present two original
one-act plays.

Wednesday, March 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Liebesfeld
Outstanding
SG Leader
Ira Liebesfeld, 3AS from Holly Hollywood,
wood, Hollywood, received the Outstanding
Student Government Representa Representative
tive Representative Award" at the annual Student
Government Banquet this month.
LIEBESFELD HIV
...student leader
The mens award, goven lor the
first time in four years, was
named for Dean Beatty.
Liebesfeld, who served last year
as Secretary of Athletics, was the
only junior to be named to Whos
Who in American Colleges and Un Universities,"
iversities," Universities," on the basis of his
cabinet record.
Liebesfeld planned student
transportation to and from the Lake
Wauberg recreation area when he
was a member of Buddy Jacobs
Wauberg Improvement and Plan Planning
ning Planning Committee.
Liebesfeld, a member of Tau
Epsilon Phi fraternity, works as
social chairman of the Interfra Interfraternity
ternity Interfraternity Council and organized Fall
and Spring Frolics.

This is a
Cool Cat.
What breed
of cat
are you ?
If you're a smart cat, you just
naturally play-it-cool.
For example, you can begin a
carter in life insurance sales while
still in college. Consider a business
that will be built by your own ability
and initiative; a livelihood that offers
plenty of financial rewards, security
and personal satisfaction. And our
Campus Internship Program gives
you a chance to earn while you learn.
Play-it-cool, cat. Plan now for your
future. For complete details on our
Campus Internship Program, call or
write
W. D. Thompson Jr..
And Associates
Consultants
Wilford Thompson Jr.
Stan Foy
Lake Shore Towers
Phone 376-4479
PROVIDENT
MUTUAL LIFE
INtURANCC COMPANY OP PHIIAOKLPMIA

Page 5



Page 6

Tite Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 1,1967

The Florida Alligator
'A h Ou RwwPfcw'Tlt'Tiudi'
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR 808 BECK
Editorial Editor Snorts Editor
Opldoas of columnists do not uecessanly reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
volee of toe Alligator staff Is toe editorial in the left
column.

Progressive
Its about time.
Yes, in fact its past time that state
university students organized somebody to
look after the interests of its students
and, for that matter, faculty members.
With no strong organization holding them
together, control of the state university
system is totally in the hands of the
Board of Regents and Budget Commission.
No one was around to question their au authority
thority authority or the validity of their decisions.
Consequently, they have run the uni universities
versities universities as they saw fit, sometimes with without
out without any regard for objections from the
president of the schools (i.e. President
J. Wayne Reitz in 1965.)
The five student body presidents of the
now-functioning state universities may
have changed that all last weekend.
Spurred by a 25 per cent tuition hike
proposal, these leaders and some of their
assistants met in Winter Park to hear
each other out on it.
What they came out with was a un unanimous
animous unanimous ding of any tutition hike and
an organization with a lot of potential.
Saturday the Council of Student Body
Presidents was born.
Much through the efforts of UF Stu Student
dent Student Body President Charles Shepherd and
Commissioner of University Relations
Lewis Miles, the Saturday meeting char chartered
tered chartered the new body. With concrete pro proposals
posals proposals and ideas in hand, Shepherd and
Miles aided it greatly.
We can see in the CSBP a potential
for growth and action in the areas of
academic freedom, funds for higher edu education
cation education and more rights for students --
but only if it can become a strong, uni united
ted united force.
Another meeting is slated for the UF
campus March 18 and plans are already
in operation to meet regularly on the dif different
ferent different campuses on a rotating basis.
We hope the next meeting -- which will
include new FSU Student Body President
Gene Stearns, conspicuously absent in
Winter Park will be more fruitful
and will offer a chance to duscuss some
other pertinent issues.
Our eyes will be on the CSBP for
the next few months to see if it can
really become an effective force.
We hope we can report progress.

SPEAKING OUT

Mas# Culture Invades UF

By EMILY S. MAC LACHLAN
Dept, of Sociology
First of Two Parts
A big American state university
is not a particularly democratic
organization. It is not quite as
authoritarian as a military estab establishment
lishment establishment or a corporation, both of
which are run almost entirely from
the top down with a minimum of
advice flowing from the bottom up,
nor quite as authoritarian as r
church ruled by bishops who can
still excommunicate members, de defrock
frock defrock clergymen, and even expel
one of their own, though such
authorities are less exerted today
than formerly. A state university
is run by its administrators with
the advice of its full professors
sitting as a Senate. These admin administrators
istrators administrators are responsible to a
Board of Regents who are appointed
in staggered terms by the gov governors.
ernors. governors. And everybody is at the
mercy of the tax authorities who
pay the bills. Although ideally a
state university administration
should be free from political pres pressures,
sures, pressures, it seldom is in fact. The
political climate and the public
opinion of the entire state must
always be kept firmly in mind
when proposing changes in admin administration.
istration. administration.
While some students and some
faculty membes always feel that
a larger measure of self-govern self-government
ment self-government would be desirable, many
other students and faculty mem members
bers members do not feel that they have
the time or energy to give to
adequate self-government. Their
days are already overflowing with
work. They look upon the admin administrators
istrators administrators as poor guys who are
doing a thankless job for a good
cause, suffering from long hours

By ART HOPPE
Alligator Columnist
Formation of The Fair Play
for North Vietnam Committee has
been announced by The Reverend
Homer T. Pettibone, D.D.S.
"As evidence mounts that our
planes, accidentally or not, have
been bombing civilians in Hanoi,"
Dr. Pettibone gravely told a tele televised
vised televised press conference, our
Committee demands that the U.S.
Government yield to the dictates
of fair play."
"We assume, Doctor," said a
reporter with a yawn, "that your
Committee is calling for an im immediate
mediate immediate end to the bombing of
defenseless civilians?"
"Oh, no," said Dr. Pettibone,
aghast. "A spirit of fair play
merely requires that we declare
war on them first."
***
Several reporters who had jotted
"left-wing dove" in their note notebooks
books notebooks scratched that out to write
in "right-wing hawk."
"The Fair Play for North Viet Vietnam
nam Vietnam Committee wants us to de declare
clare declare war on North Vietnam?"
asked a reporter.
"Fair play is fair play," said
Dr. Pettibone, nodding." The rules
of war are jperfectly clear: you may
bomb anyone you wish, as long
as you have declared war on him.
But to go around dropping bombs
on people you are not at war with
is sneaky, infamous and downright
unfair. Remember," he added with
a frown, "Pearl Harbor?"
Practically speaking, inquired a
reporter, how did The Fair Play
Committee plan to achieve its
idealistic goal?

Fair Play For Hanoi

and political pressures. Admin Administrators
istrators Administrators enjoy none of the excite excitement
ment excitement and sense of creativity that
comes with either teaching or
research. Poor guys, who would
want such a job! Who would want
to cope with either the Budget
Commission or roudy students?
A few universities with highly
selected student bodies and long
traditions of internal norms turn
over the problem of student con conduct
duct conduct to the student government.
Places like the University of Vir-

\UI

"Well," said Dr. Pettibone en enthusiastically,
thusiastically, enthusiastically, "as a first step
all we have to do is select one
Congressman to stand up and pro propose
pose propose that we declare war on North
Vietnam."
Which one had the Committee
chosen?
"Oddly enough," he said,
scratching his ear lobe, "weve
run into a little trouble finding
one. The doves understandably
show little interest in declaring
war on the grounds theres enough
shooting already."
What about the hawks?
"Well, they support the Presi President.
dent. President. And while they agree that
it is the function of Congress
to declare war, they dont wish
to function unless the President
tells them to."
And the President is against
declaring war?

Florida Alligator Staff
NICK TATRO JIM WHITE NICK ARROYO_
Wire Editor Assistant Managing Editor Photo Editor
STEFANIE JARIUS JO ANN LANGWORTHY GENE NAIL
Society Editor General Assignment Editorial Assistant
Editor
STAFF MEMBERS Harvey Alper, Bill Douthat, Elaine
Fuller, Kathie Keim, Bob Padecky, Judy Redfern, Frank
Shepherd, Lori Steele, Joe Torchia, Harold Kennedy,
Justine Hartman, Eunice Tall.
LAB ASSISTANTS Diana Folsom, Peggy Sneider, Andrew
Haslett Jr., Robert Blount, Joan Allen, Eddie Gutten Guttenmacher,
macher, Guttenmacher, Dick Blakely, Bob Menaker, Dave Reddick, David*
Weiss, Karen Eng, John Ellsworth, Diann Devine,.

ginia and the University of the
South see themselves as a com community
munity community of gentlemen-scholars
training for professions which have
always been largely self-govern self-governing.
ing. self-governing. They operate under norms
they consider superior to the oper operating
ating operating norms of the outside world.
Penalities for infringement of the
Honor Code are severe, self
imposed by student government.
But once a student body in increases
creases increases beyond a few thousand
students such intprna. > up-

"Hes against Congress declar declaring
ing declaring it. You see, this would re require
quire require a spirited debate in Con Congress.
gress. Congress. And the President feels that
a debate at this time on whether
or not to declare war would ser seriously
iously seriously interfere with the war ef effort.
fort. effort.
***
Dr. Pettibone squared his shoul shoulders.
ders. shoulders. "But we of Hie Fair Play
for North Vietnam Committee
arent giving up. Surely, out of
our more than 500 Congressmen
there must be one willing to sug suggest
gest suggest or perhaps even just drop
a vague hint that maybe we
ought to declare war on these peo people
ple people we have so long been at war
with. Fair play will prevail!
At this point, the reporters
scratched out "right-wing hawk,
wrote in "some kind of nut and
the press conference ended.



We Ought To Take Care Os Our Own

EDITOR:
I read with great interest, the articles about the poor* crop
workers who have to work long hard hours everyday, receive
little pay, and have to live in inexpensive, substandard housing.
I think it is fine that the student body takes an interest in such
people, but I also feel that such charity should begin at home.
Right here in Gainesville, we have thousands of people liv living
ing living and toiling under even worse hardships. To make the situa situation
tion situation even worse, these people receive no pay at all for their
labors. They are forced to live two or three to a room that has
no plumbing or kitchen facilities. Most rooms have only one
window, usually covered with an old, broken Venitian blind.
Heat is provided, but there is no thermostat. The landlord
determines what the minumum amount of heat is.
These rooms are located in big, dingy tenement houses.
Each floor has one dimly lighted hall and one community bath bathroom.
room. bathroom. The inside walls are painted in putrid shades of brown,
green, gray, and off white. The harsh exteriors of the buildings
are made of dull colored bricks, and have no paint at all.
For many, the day starts before the sun is up and does not
end until after midnight. Some have gone for weeks without see-

I Fear For
My Turtles

EDITOR:

In all the whoop-tee-doo about
Pam me Brewer and the code of
student conduct, one fact that
comes up again and again is that
students desperately need Official
Recognition of their Rights. The
Administration is either ignorant
of this need or indifferent to it.
Tigert has persistently failed to
recognize students rights as
members of the academic com community,
munity, community, as citizens under the Con Constitution,
stitution, Constitution, and as human beings.
Take me, for instance. lam pas passionately
sionately passionately devoted to May-day pa pageants,
geants, pageants, turtle racing and walking
barefoot through oozy mud. These
are innocent pleasures, pursued
without offense to God or man.
Yet amazingly enough, the Univer University
sity University has never stated that stu students
dents students have the right to do any
of these things! I for one am fed
up with living under such oppres oppressive
sive oppressive rule. The time for action is
at hand. May-day is but two mon months
ths months off; the turtles will be com coming
ing coming out of hibernation within a
week or two; and even today I
could be standing on the tidal
flats with cool, soft, lovely mud
between my toes if only Tigert
would give me the unaccountable
witheld Official Recognition of my
Rights.
This letter is a call for that
Official Recognition. If, as I ex expect,
pect, expect, it elicits no response, I in intend
tend intend to march bodily on Tigert
Hall with muddy feet, dressed as
St. George the Dragon-killer,
cradling a gopher turtle in my
arms, chanting gladsome songs of
universal love and freedom. I am
doomed to failure from the start;
but that is irrelevant. I will have
asserted my Independence. I will
have demonstrated my Concern.
I will have stood up for my Rights.
MARCUS JOHNSON

holding standards higher than those
of the surrounding society begin to
break down. Cultural diffusions
from mass culture seep in.
We have already witnessed large
amounts of mass culture trying
to take over the ancient traditions
o f the university with the coming
of professional sports, organized
gambling and the beauty-queen and
other glamour industries. Com Commercialized
mercialized Commercialized sex in all its variety,
from sex movies and the middle middleclass
class middleclass pornography of off-campus
humor magazines to the strip striptease
tease striptease cabaret washes at the gates
of the campus. It becomes im impossible
possible impossible to keep it out. No longer
can the colleges attain that high
standard of protection voiced by
John Dewey when he said every
school should be a social envi environment
ronment environment where the very best in the
cultural tradition is selected, pur purified
ified purified and protected against the bru brutalizing

Culture Invades

(FROM PAGE 6)

EDITOR:

Recently, we of Frame D Dormitory were
informed by the Housing Office that Frame
D would be closing at the end of this trimes trimester
ter trimester not to be open during the summer.
Aside from the aesthetic value of living in
the Frames, more important is the financial
saving. And most of us are here because of
a limited budget.
By closing the Frames, Housing is forcing
us to move into much higher priced rooms.
This will cut deeply into our food allowance.
Finally, we were told that the results of our
petitions to break our contracts in order to
move into cheap Off-Campus rooms would not
be returned until next month. This delay cuts
the time needed to fund other cheap housing
for the summer down to an impossibly short
time that is provided our petitions are ap approved.
proved. approved.
The Housing Office realizes that Frame D
had the second highest overall Grade Point
Average in Murphree Area just behind a
special section. We of Frame D have also won
the Murphree Area Intramural Championship

Heres Why They Testified

EDITOR:
For the benefit of all Tigert
Hall officials who cannot compre comprehand
hand comprehand the recent testimony of cer certain
tain certain student leaders, would you
please print the following quota quotation
tion quotation from John Stuart Mills es essay
say essay On Liberty, as I feel that

Try To Base Your
Decisions On Truth

On February 19, a letter to you
entitled, Base Your Decisions on
Christ was put forth (as) an al alternative
ternative alternative view in the hope of en encouraging
couraging encouraging further serious thou thought.
ght. thought. Hoping, to encourage further
serious thought, I would like to

talizing brutalizing influences of mass cul culture.
ture. culture.
Mass culture erodes the old
middle class virtues of self selfrestraint,
restraint, selfrestraint, self-discipline and hard
work that built America into the
richest, most powerful nation on
earth. Mass culture presents
people with routine, boring jobs,
too much money and too much
leisure, frustration, anxiety and
the escapes into drugs, instant
sex, and large-scale spectacles
that emphasize violence. Billions
of dollars are made by illicit
organized rings selling violence,
gambling and all the vices ever
known to Sodom and Gomorrah with
some new ones recently dis discovered.
covered. discovered. This money flows into
legitimate businesses and into the
political institutions tending to
corrupt them along with the work working
ing working classes.

Let Us Stay In Frame

ing the sun. Their jobs are hazardous. Scores have fallen into
large holes and pits, which are hidden in the dark unlighted
streets. These pits are so big and numerious that many victims
are never found or heard from again.
These poor people have no union to demand a forty hour work
week, a minumum wage, or safer working conditions, so their
cries of despair go unheeded.
To add insult to injury, now the landlord* demands a higher
rent, and has raised work fees. These people are desperate
for help poverty is so rampant that many cannot even afford
one decent meal. These are people in our own community, treat treated
ed treated as second class citizens. I propose that we should solve our
own problems, before we start to help others.
ROBERT ERHARDT, 3ED
(EDITORS NOTE: We agree. Because of this and an over overabundance
abundance overabundance of letters on the local situation, we have decided to
discontinue the controversy over the migrant workers. We will,
however, give Bo Lozoff one last chance to air his views on the
situation through a Speaking Out column.)

it expresses the sentiments of
many people on campus.
The object of this Essay
is to assert one very simple
principle, as entitled to govern
absolutely the dealings of soc-

add another possible alternative
viewTry to Base Your Decisions
on Truth.
Edgar S. Brightman once wrote,
If all these religions and relig religious
ious religious value claims are true, which
ones are and WHY. I think that
Brightman was speaking of earth earthly
ly earthly or geocentric religions--
that is Buddhism, Hinduism, Jud Judaism,
aism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, etc.,
etc. He was maybe even concern concerned
ed concerned with those people who based
their decisions on Gautama Bud Buddha,
dha, Buddha, Krishna, Abraham and Mos Moses,
es, Moses, Jesus, Mohammed, etc., etc.
Quite probably he was also inter interested
ested interested in the same people who base
their religious thinking according
to the testimony of the New Test Testament
ament Testament eyewitnesses, Tripitaka
eyewitnesses, Mahabharata eye eyewitnesses,
witnesses, eyewitnesses, Old Testament eyewit eyewitnesses,
nesses, eyewitnesses, Koran eyewitnesses, etc.
eyewitnesses.
One last serious thought. The
possibility of intelligent life some somewhere
where somewhere else in our Galaxyor Un Universe
iverse Universe might very well become a
reality one of these days. And if
we ever do communicate with other
beings, I would be quite cur curious
ious curious as to what they base
their decisions on.
CHUCK ELLIOTT, 4AR

even though two sports remain to be played.
It cannot be dineid that the high spirit and close closeness
ness closeness among the residents of Frame D is un unequalled
equalled unequalled in any of the Mens Dormitories.
Therefore, we the undersigned request that
the Housing Office reconsider and reverse its
decision to close Frame D this summer --
OH hurry and approve our petitions to allow
us time to locate off campus.
GEORGE LAKICH
ROBERT THORNTON
MALCOLM LINDLEY
JIM SCHORTEMEYER
ROBERT SPARKS
JACK IRISH
ROBERT MILLER
R.E. GOODWIN Jr.
DAVID CABLE
RICHARD MURRAY
THOMAS McMANUS
THOMAS HERLOVICH
MIKE WILLARD
THOMAS GREEK
JERRY SULLENBERGER
JAMES SIMMONS
PAUL HABEL

Wednesday, March 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

iety with the individual in the
way of physical force in the
form of legal penalties or the
moral coercion of public op opinion.
inion. opinion. That principle is, that
the sole end for which man mankind
kind mankind are warranted, individually
or collectively, in interfering
with the liberty of action of any
of their number, is self-pro self-protection.
tection. self-protection. That the only purpose
for which power can be right rightfully
fully rightfully exercised over any mem member
ber member of a civilized community,
against his will, is to prevent
harm to others. His own good,
either physical or moral, is
not a sufficient warrant. He
not rightfully be compelled to
do or forbear because it will
be better for him to do so,
because it will make him hap happier,
pier, happier, because, in the opinions
of others, to do so would be
wise, or even right. These are
good reasons for remonstra remonstrating
ting remonstrating with him, or reasoning with
him, or persuading him, or en entreating
treating entreating him, but not for com compelling
pelling compelling him, or visiting him with
any evil in case he do other otherwise.
wise. otherwise. To justify that, the con conduct
duct conduct from which it is desired
to deter him, must be calcu calculated
lated calculated to produce evil to some
one else. The only part of the
conduct of any one, for which
he is amenable to society, is
that which concerns others.ln
the part which merely concerns
himself, his independence is, of
right, absolute. Over himself,
over his own body and mind,
the individual is sovereign."
ANOTHER
STUDENT
LEADER

Quakers
Worked Too
EDITOR:
I would like to point out an
error in Wayne Fultons article
in a recent Alligator. Mr. Ful Fulton
ton Fulton states that when the Student
Group For Equal Rights set up
the campaign for desegregation
of eating places on the campus
periphery, none of the . Cam Campus
pus Campus Religious Organizations gave
support. This is not correct.
As soon as the request came
from SGER, the Gainesville Mon Monthly
thly Monthly Meeting of the Religious ~
ciety of Friends, which is ass .ia .iated
ted .iated with the University Religious
Association as the Quaker Meet Meeting
ing Meeting serving the campus, responded.
Members were on the picket line,
bearing signs identifying them as
Quaker witnesses and quoting pas passages
sages passages from Quaker abolitionist
John Wollman, every Sunday mor morning
ning morning for as long as SGERs ac action
tion action continued.
We hope that you will print this
correction; although it is true that
some campus Religious organiza organizations
tions organizations ignored the SGER request,
this was not universally the case.
MORRIS TRIMMER
Clerk
Gainesville Monthly Meeting
Students Need
Not Post Bond
EDITOR:
Regards your editorial criticiz criticizing
ing criticizing the City of Gainesville Po Police
lice Police Departments bond procedure:
To correct the false impression
which might have been produced
by your editorial of February 21,
the following information ought to
be published in the Alligator.
A UF student, arrested for a
traffic violation, and desiring to
appear in court to contest the
charges, does not have to post
any money for bond. The student
merely has to show his student
ID card and sign his ticket. The
students signature acts as his
bond. The student is free to go
and must only appear in court to
answer the charges against him.
Thus, only if found guilty in court
will the student be required to pay
his fine or serve his time.
BILL STARK, 3LW
(EDITORS NOTE: This is good
to know. Being so, however, the
student should be informed of this.
At present, he wont know unless
someone outside the police station
tells him.)
UF Students
Are Above
Concern
EDITOR:
Kudos recently have been
claimed or awarded in the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator on behalf of former SG
officers and student bodies for
keeping our virtue intact by de declining
clining declining affiliation with NSA, now
disclosed as a hot-bed of ClAism.
It was claimed that NSA was
dominated by New England col colleges,
leges, colleges, with which we have, or
should have nothing in common,
and thus too liberal, ie., too much
concerned about national and inter international
national international affairs. Presumably UF
students are above all that.
You can hardly complain that
your views are not represented
when you absent yourself from the
forum!
The irony, of course, is that
those among us who would rather
be *fink* than pink* missed their
great moment. Instead of being
contaminated by liberals and com communists,
munists, communists, they could have hobnobbed
with the ClAs finest!
' RICHARD H, HIERS
Asst. Prof, of Religion

Page 7



1, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 1, 1967

Page 8

wA
WBbf WS wA
fflSk m& Jfc.
Hg liiflrMf w *--'^-'-
A ham^.
H
M P i
H V jjr aB B/
g j L bM P/
'
| jjQ§
p
i W| BER B
Hhl fli fl B s
ai W| 9H fl
if H H B m
b fp
B Bi 9
B jB H H
Thats Diane Deal up on the sign at JERRYS
to announce our theme this week. She picked
JERRYS because its a likely place to come
down and enjoy a big, juicy slice of straw strawberry
berry strawberry pie or a J-Boy. Stop in at the
friendly sign of JERRYS, North or South.

It's a
WOO,

vnorf, MU

Kitty Golnik, AXO, banks at the MODern bank,
UNIVERSITY CITY BANK. Savings, personalize
checking, fast service. .theyre all a part of the
modern banking system at UNIVERSITY Cl
BANK.

Youre a MODern hostess in this dress
from DONIGANS. Its a cool green with
blue polka dots. .dress and matching hat
both by Alexa of California. Sandals are
by Etienne Aigner. .and its all fromDON fromDONIGANS.
IGANS. fromDONIGANS.
:
iP Jm H* 91 lifH f m
fI j ip wl jl.^
I ('
w% 4 ; f
' ; -v 1 m ?lnnf
BESTIR

Hope Black strikes this pose outside her apartment
at UNIVERSITY GARDENS. You see the nearby
lake here. .the big pool is just the other side.
Life is more fun at UNIVERSITY GARDENS.
Just ask Hope!

g ii
: gfte
mV c
BB I jHHTO^i^v^.'M^^^PreMP.

igiHi^m
*3s iii 11 in nisn
iH S |J mm #
* Sfl i J jfl|jj|SHfc s&&*



Han celebrates Spring early this year with Stems and
His from SILVERMANS. This cotton sleeveless, multi-
X>red print is outstanding to say the least. It also
fMures a scoop neck and low-waisted belt. Just another
fashion at SILVERMANS
g 99 9k
I MB
I Ei> V
m 9,
I 1 1L
s m wt
9
K K
I
I WM&M V
-a. j 'SP£* f *WnH W^m
V
I mm
A* ,!%*
. : ji§|v Jt
iphhk /. t
Ul sLmk PW v%
iff i iMiHI'P k
W ,>.' gMKBt? ...%£,
y<>M

fcusie Blabaum adorns the top of the official car of the
M)D set. .a Pontiac from TROPICAL PONTIAC! See
x all-new Firebird, the GP, the GTO, the 2 plus 2,
h all the other exciting cars for 67 at TROPICAL
Antiac. ______
HB s 'JL_^ M Mkw^MucS9Bi^BM9B9^£99999B99BB3^MHHH^H
*
|b * tf.c tf.c---*49
--*49 tf.c---*49 0? ,-& x v .:
it .M -<
m /HI
8 ' .;* *feX*X2&- ,' .^.^^* ** -*'
H |§E 1 iWjt
'* ifF" 'C mfg- "i .Jgjp
HfTJSMf , *W- :
I|.. J[' 99

n a
\ / (i \ \ y
!'II M M /

? o 2
Out"
r
_
-£
.5
c
IE
w M o
x
*~. p <
| c
8. g g
-B c |
J 3
C §
. o S
c y
O S
w c? e
"g t>
* U I
5 C c "O
2.- 5 §
- 2 e
£ o c o
i
UJ -C o
cl t_J
J O ii
o ?{
< >6 You know youre up with the times when every everything
thing everything you own thats sound comes from the RECORD
BAR, Bonnie Arnold, KD, displays this impressive
assortment of Sony sound equipment thats just a
part of the selection at the RECORD BAR. Add
these to the tremendous selection of records and
tapes and youre looking at Gainesvilles sound
headquarters. .the RECORD BAR.

I M I m
m ik
m I
u m mu \ u mu
m m mm ml Mm I 1
f A If VI / I I V
I A || II / l| \
m Mm II M |
m II II | I a
m h h jjv
% ill I m i m
X V ill | X m
m b m
B m b b B
BB
1-
I m. f I 1 B^^
I llL^^

Wednesday, March 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
10x50 PACEMAKER, 2 bedroom,
fully carpeted, air-conditioned.
Ideal for student. Prefer to sell
but will consider renting. 378-
2982. (A-97- lOt-c).
REGAL SPANISH FLATTOP quitar
and case. Excellent condition sll7
new sell for $65. Call 378-3504
evenings. (A-102-st-c)
1966 DUCATI 160 cc good con condition.
dition. condition. Reasonable. 201-U Flavett
in. 376-9833 after 5:30. (A-104-
3-C)
AMPLIFER WITH reverberation,
tremolo and quitar, accessories
$175 or guitar alone S6O. Call
Erichson after 7 p.m. 376-9229
(A-104-3-P)
BASS MAN AMP AND FRAMUS
BASS $375. Also LAFAYETTE
AMP with seven speakers, adapt adaptable
able adaptable to any phono. Great sound
SBS. Call 378-6032. (A-105-2t-p)
MOBILE HOME 10 x 57 3 bed bedroom
room bedroom extension in livingroom.
Carpeted, excellent condition. 376-
9038. (A-103-5-C)
TRAILER 30 x 8, one bedroom,
air conditioned, carpet, electric.
Completely furnished with 20 x 8
screen porch, $650. Call
after 7 P.M. 378-2456 (A-105-3t-c)
FOR SALE *65 HONDA S-65. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Also 26* Girls
bicycle. Must sell. Phone 378-
5668. (A-104-5-P)
3retsch Folk Guitar- Steel Strings.
Excellent Condition. $165 or best
offer. Phone 372-7194 (A-104-
st-P)
PHILCO solid state portable stereo
with Garrard turntable. Beautifully
finished Walnut speaker cabinets.
$l2O Call Earl at 372-9616.(A 372-9616.(A---105
--105 372-9616.(A---105 st-p)
1965 YAMAHA, under 5,000 miles,
80 cc, excellent condition. $225.
Call 372-8056. (a-105-st-c)
COUCH cheap. Call 372-7292
after 5:30 p.m. (A-106-3t-C)
AUTO STEREO tape decksl3o
news3o with tapescall Steve
Kahn37B-6669.(A-105-st-p)
1959 VESPA, good transportation,
good condition, SSO. Call 372-
1553 between 5:30 and 6 P.M.
(A-106-st-c)
COUCH and matching chair, good
condition SSO. For information
372-3734. (A-106-st-c)
FENDER SHOWMAN (SNGL.),
with/matching reverb unit, covers,
seven months old $595.00 cash.
Call 372-2749 between 5-8 p. m.
(A-106-3t-C)

f SUGGtSTEO FOR MATURE AUOIEWCES >l| (
I Trtuhnm ITB Till '' s M
"fahrenheit 451 nBpM
TECHNICOLOR $ W P r*^|:
Julie Oskar k^rnfa:
Christie Werner mvDF
Hrst role since her £ winner of Me
Academy Award I New York Critics' r
for Darling jft /foe/ Actor Award tL : O- 3:10- 5:20 7:30 9:351

for sale
65 SUZUKI 50 cc-absolutely per perfect
fect perfect condition. $l5O firm. 378-
4944. (A-106-3t-P)
SKINDIVERS: Set of twin 70 Cu.
ft. tanks and new calypso regulator
with sea view guage sllO. Also
a 14,000 BTU airconditioner 1
year old, slls. Call 378-1877 after
6 p.m. (A-103-1-P)
9 mm LUGER atomatic pistol 1917
Erfert manufacture with holster
and takedown tool SBS. Call 378-
5943 after 7 p.m. (A-106-3-nc)
65 SUZUKI 250 cc. great shape,
fast, $425. Call 378-2748. (A (A---106-3-P)
--106-3-P) (A---106-3-P)
for rent
LARGE 1 bedroom apartment for
summer or just B term. Air
conditioned, wall to wall carpeting,
modern furniture. Call 378-6400
(B-106-lt-p)
ONE BEDROOM APT, modern,
furnished, air-conditioned, two
blocks from campus. Available
end of term. 372-2862. (B-106-
3t-C)
GARAGE APARTMENT. 22 double
windows, sunken tub, split level
SIOO permonth. 1523 NW 7th St.
372-4735. (B-106-3-P)
LARGE ROOMS for rent, $27 per
month. Private entrance, bath fac facilities.
ilities. facilities. Phone, All utilities in included,
cluded, included, 1/2 block from campus.
378-4790 after 6 p.m. (B-106-
st-C)
HEY! HAVE YOU HEARD? Colonial
Manor Apts. NOW have Summer
rates of SIOO per month, May thru
August, on all apts. BUT Reser Reservations
vations Reservations MUST be made NOW. Call
or go by Colonial Manor Apart Apartments,
ments, Apartments, 1216 SW 2nd Avenue, 372-
7111. (B-97-10t-c).
NOW RENTING for spring and
fall trimester. Four bedroom,
2 bath, three bedroom and two
baths. 1103 SW Second and Fifth
Ave. 376-2892. (B-104-5-C)
WANT TO LIVE OFF CAMPUS
next year? Three meals a day?
Cooperative living? One block
from campus. S6O per month room
and board. Inquire Cooperative
Living Organization. 117 NW 15th
St. or call 376-6203. (B-104-5-C)
real estate
NICE HOME on 1 1/2 acre lot.
One mile west of Medical Center
at 2950 S.W. Archer Rd. 3 Bed Bedroom,
room, Bedroom, bath and half, air-con air-conditioned.
ditioned. air-conditioned. Will sell for appraised
value. Owner will finance. Call
Wayne Mason c/o Ernest Tew
Roalty, Inc. 376-6461. (I- 103-5-C)

Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 1,1967

for rent
FOR RENT OR SALE three bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, two bath home with central
heat. Built In Kitchen, carport
and storage area. Available now.
Call 372-3826. (B-101-10t-c)
wanted
MALE roommate wanted. Total
expenses for March and April
including rent, electricity, and
phone about S6O. Phone Skid, Joe
or Neal37 B-6767, University
Gardens. (C-106-2t-p)
WANTED: 28 to 35 foot trailer
in good condition, with or without
cabana, preferable furnished.
Phone 462 -1047 Alachua. (C (C---1
--1- (C---1 lt-p)
ONE FEMALE roommate needed
for Campus Apartment, 1824 NW
3rd Place. Call 378-1989. (C (C---106-2t-c)
--106-2t-c) (C---106-2t-c)
WANTED
USED HONDA SUPER HAWK or
CBI6O. Will pay cash for cycle
in good condition. Contact Jeff,
973 Weaver, 372-9303 after 7p.m.
(C-106- 1-P)
IF YOU ARE an undergraduate
in Electrical Engineering or if
you have an electronics background
you may have the necessary qual qualifications
ifications qualifications for summer employment
with IBM Corporation from mid
April to mid September, 1967.
Openings are available in most of
the major cities in the Southeast.
If you are interested contact Mr.
Mayberry (your college placement
officer) for an interview on Fri Friday,
day, Friday, March 3, 1967 or for an
interview appointment. IBM Cor Corporation
poration Corporation is an equal opportunity
employer. (E-105-4t-c)
ONE MALE roommate wanted for
new Landmark apt. 1111 SW 16th
Ave. Now or Spring trimester.
Call Jim 372-1760 after 5 p.m.
for full information. (C-104-5-C)
WAITRESSES wanted. Prefer mar married
ried married girls, must be 21. Evening
shifts only. Apply Ginos, 2204
SW 13th St. 376-1322. (E-103-
10-C)
POETRY WANTED for Anthology.
Include stamped envelope. Idlewild
Publishing Company, 543 Freder Frederick
ick Frederick Street, San Francisco, Calif.
94117. (C-104-10-P)

rfflfftiP'VM show I
W M VMV J
Irw. mfc sn wwASjTiJ

[ends WED Jgjg HEwiiiiKHAifeonfgoffis.,.lSlumim l 1
Ks in \k jiHwm #ii tU4t ii.i j a jh
tsmrr % au s ms iiiiPVMiii^^
*" I* Ibesi acting I
I 6:45 9:15 \fflw Film*FiMwl A^

help wanted
WE ARE IN NEED of a student
to work part time only, dishing
out food in our kitchen. Must
be able to work every weekend.
Apply Ginos, 2204 SW 13th St.
376-1322. (E-103-10-C)
BUSBOY GOOD HOURS, evening
shifts only. Must be able to work
every weekend. Apply Ginos,
2204 S. W. 13th St. 376-1322.
(E-103-10-C)
STUDENT or student wife to oper operate
ate operate Justowriters in preparing copy
for FLORIDA ALLIGATOR. Ex Experienced
perienced Experienced operator preferred but
not essential. Proficient typing
ability mandatory. Contact Mr.
White or Mr. Myking in office of
the Board of Student Publications,
Basement, Florida Union. (E-85-
tf-nc).
services j
TUTORING IN GERMAN BY A
PROFESSIONAL INSTRUCTOR.
GERMAN 133 THROUGH GRAD GRADUATE
UATE GRADUATE EXAM. REASONABLE FEE.
CALL 376-9674. (M-106-lt-p)
FAMILY COMING FOR EASTER?
Own a trailer or camper? Over Overnight
night Overnight facilities by day or week.
TRAVELERS CAMPGROUND I I-75Alachua.
75Alachua. I-75Alachua. Phone 462-1047. (M (M---106-lt-p)
--106-lt-p) (M---106-lt-p)
NEED MONEY? The Gainesville
Sun has an opening for a carrier
(Flavet HI) on the University of
Florida campus. Call Now 378-1416
ask for Mr. Cowan. (E-102-st-c)
A*
GATOR ADS
JUST SLAY ME I!

fXJTrwii.il 11 hum
3jjgSliiiPf^
LAST TIMES TONITE I^^
"Moonlighting Wives"
K "A New Kind Os Love"
RUN JJL*
I SeCReTAGeNT Bf Jinc Em I

trade
SWAP 1960 Lark V-8, Stick,
excellent condition, for motor
cycle of comparable value. Call
372-6832. (D-106-2t-c)

Lns.rvT
IS liTw 5:05 7:l
BP ~ (jl 9:15
Q
T'lD CHILDREN'S JL
TICKETS WILL BE SOLD wS\
WINNER OF W
ACADEMY AWARD
{ME
j SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES. |
/ 1:10 \
X 3:05 5:10 X
W>] A FUWNV THING (Gig
3 HAPPENED jg§
ONiHEwnrio If
*lCl \\ I SUGGUnO FOd 1
*MTUW
_ t, tW-...

m\



CLASSIFIEDS

Wednesday, March 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

autos
1962 VW excellent.condition, four
new tires, new muffler and new
clutch. Must sell. Call 378-2066
anytime. (G-106-2t-c)
CHEVY II NOVA 1963, white walls,
radio and heat, excellent condition,
must sell-$995. Call 378-5096.
(C-106-2-C)
JAGUAR XKE, 4.2 late 1965
BLACK CAT, Low mileage,new
tires, never raced, fio see and
drive call 372-4088. Priced over
$2,000 below cost. Interested per persons
sons persons only. (G-106-st-c)
1963 FORD GALAXIE 500, four
door, nice running car in good
condition, make offer. See in front
of Campus Federal Credit Union.
Call Mrs. Hinton, University Ex Extension
tension Extension (G-105-4t-c)
1960 AUSTIN HEALY 3000, re recently
cently recently painted, new brakes, body
in excellent shape, 5 good tires,
needs mechanical work, will sell
to best offer. Call Fred 372-6754.
(G-105-st-c)
64 TR-4. Low milage, fully e equipped
quipped equipped $1145.00. Call 372-7339.
(G-104-5-C)
1965 VWKARMANGIA, Tan, radio,
very good condition. 372-4216. Af After
ter After 5 p.m. Weekdays. (G-104-5-C)
ONE OWNER, 1965 Dodge Dart.
Excellent condition. Air-condition,
automatic transmission, radio and
heat, low mileage, SI6OO. Univ.
ext. 2725 or 372-3597. (G-104-
10-C)
1957 CORVETTEExcellent mec mechanical
hanical mechanical condition, equipped with
*64 327-365 hp. Also '62 4 speed.
Asking SI2OO. Contact : Shari 378-
6570. (G-104-5-P)

GATOR ADVERTISERS
WANT YOU!
MR (or MRS) ADVERTISER
Call 376-3261, Ext 2832 for your
opportunity to tap Gainesville's most
dynamic market, through advertising
in the Florida Alligator These ex experienced
perienced experienced capable student salesmen
have the time and creativity to help
you insure your share of this fabulous
market.
TIM FORD
| DAN JONES
I DAN SMITH
| JIM JOHNSON
| ED CORNWELL
I GEORGE KELLY
| BART KIMBALL
I CAROLYN VerPLANK
I They await your call. There is no
I additional charge over the low
I display rates for this service.
I CALL 376-3261, EXT: 2832
I TODAY

lost-found
LOST White gold, plain wedding
band. If found please return to
Linda Strack, 242-R Flavet HI;
call 376-0488. REWARD (L-106-
2t-c)
LOST: Intramural volley ball No.
V-146 and Helbros watch on volley
ball courts, opposite Florida Field.
If found call Mike Hittleman at
372-9438. REWARD. (L-106-2t-c)
LOST: One black briefcase con containing
taining containing slide rule, books, and note notebook.
book. notebook. REWARD offered. Please
call 376-9450. (L-3t-105-nc)
. >
personal
GOOD LUCK LOU IN YOUR NEW
ENDEAVORYOU WILL BE
MISSED IN GAINESVILLE. THE
TOWN WILL NEVER BE THE
SAME. ED (J-106-3t-nc)
EXCHANGE LONDON FOG coat
size 38 for mine, size 40, Lost
at Dance, Florida Union, Feb. 24.
Call 372-9313 Room 204. Simpson
Hall Bruce Lauer. (J-106-3t-p)
WILL CHARLES SHEPARD secure
first class citizenship for students?
Will Student Government protect
students rights? Sign Day March 3,
Lets hope the sign is positive.
(J-102-st-p)
RECORD CLUB FOR STUDENTS
ONLY 30% discount on your choice'
of any jazz, folk, pop, classical
LP. Send $2.00 for membership
newsletter, price list and catalog
of over 38,000 discount records.
Campus Communications, Box
21 ID, Village Station, New York,
N.Y. 10014 (J-100-Bt-p).

Page 11

HELP WANTED
MUSICIANS COMBINATION
SPORTS AND SOCIAL STAFF STAFFAND
AND STAFFAND ENTERTAINMENTGUIT ENTERTAINMENTGUITAR
AR ENTERTAINMENTGUITAR AND FOLK SONGSPIANO SONGSPIANOORGAN,
ORGAN, SONGSPIANOORGAN, TRUMPET, TROM TROMBONE,
BONE, TROMBONE, SAXAP HONEMAY 10
THRU SEP. 17 FOR MICHIGAN
SUMMER RESORT ENTERTAIN ENTERTAINING
ING ENTERTAINING YOUNG ADULTS EXCLU EXCLUSIVELY
SIVELY EXCLUSIVELY 19 to 35 YEARS OF
AGE. SIGN FOR JACK & JILL
RANCH INTERVIEWS MARCH 6
& 7th AT FLORIDA UNION BLDG.
ROOM 310.
PART-HME STUDENT
Work 20 Hours/Week
Earn S4O/Week
6pm-10pm
Monday-Friday
For Appointment,
Call 372-5594
4PM-SPM
n. .

Ilf'.'
i m wmMmmmm m iSi! Wg#*'


-A $. y
x; %
mk
NORA FINDS
... much sorrow

w-m
RUTH ANN HELLIWIG PLAYS ...rebellious daughter

A Touch of the Poet

OPENS TODAY

9
\sm£ 4 > ~ J§&w4. fWMSSv-cs* ?ys&#';, Vsfe s ssb§ -, §*
-- ,;
11
mm
. 4 if^^(ElL
: '-^^nHHHHH^HHHBHHH^K.' 7e ' -';R -' --'^s9a^^r r > -.-.
'W
i # < j/.'W ;^:Jg^^^9BP,^T I|s.-
MH99BB9BroS^SM9^9iM9lS9^^M^9H9999i^^s9iM^MM^B9iSiS9iiH99'^tf-'>i^ :^K^>^^^'^:
.. - ,>, ... .- .'' - ';'
MIKE BISTLE AS X-HERO
... recoils to insult of Talavera

FAITHFUL NORA KEEPS
lonely vigil



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 1, 1967

f ACU TRAVEL EXPENSE I A KJ C CHECK DELAYED || /S Kl C V
CHECK DELAYED V * PAYDAY LOANS in V/ C
Available VACATION s Available
s2s'to S6OO can ft! 222 w. Up to S6OO
Payday Short Term marion finance v.o University A ve. For Youi Second Car [

1 | £llld ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
Cv NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

Wednesday, March 1
Childrens Concert: Symphony, Univ, Aud., 9:50 a.m.
Agricultural Council: Meeting, 130 McC, 5 p.m.
Fla. Speleological Society: Meeting, 212 Union, 7p.m.
Phi Sigma Sigma: Lecture, 116 Union, 7 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club: Meeting, 121 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Veterans Club: Group meeting, Union Aud., 7:30 p.m.
AAUP: Meeting and Discussion, What are Students
Rights in a Public University?* Ramada Inn Board
Room, 7:30 p.m.
Latin American Club: General Assembly, Union Joh Johnson
nson Johnson Lounge, 7:30 p.m.
Fla Players: *A Touch of the Poet*, Norman Aud.,
7:30 p.m.
World University Services: Faculty Talent Show,
Univ. Aud., 8 p.m.
AIA Film Series: *A Time for Bach,* 105-B AFA,
8 p.m.
Latin American Colloquium, 324 Union, 8 p.m.

Placement General Notices Administrative
Notices Notices

Students must be registered with the Placement
Office to interview. Sign-up sheets are posted two
weeks in advance of the interview date at Building H.
All companies will be recruiting for April and Aug August
ust August grads unless otherwise indicated.
hiring juniors for summer employment.)
MARCH 1: HUMBLE OIL & REFINING CO.
Acctg, Gen. Bus, Mktg. Fin.* E. I. DuPONT DE
NEMOURS & CO.ChE, ME, EE, IE, Chem, NE,
Physics, Math.* CHICAGO BRIDGE & IRON CO.
BBC, ME, CE. GRAND UNION CO. mgmt, any
major*. COTTON PRODUCERS' ASSOCI.AII agri,
Gen. Bus. OWENS-ILLINOIS,INC.Lib.Arts, Engi.*
ARMY & AIR FORCE EXCHANGE SERVICEMgmt,
Acctg, Personnel, Systems, Stat., Food Tech.
MARCH 2: UNITED FRUIT CO.Acctg, Fin, CE,
ME. Aeri. Engr. Math. Stat. ERNST & ERNST
Acctg. RADIATION, INC. Acctg, Bus, Econ, Stat.
IBM CORP. ME, IE, EE, AE, Ps, Lib. Arts, ED,
Bus, Math, Stat. E. I. DuPONT DE NEMOURS &
CO.

Students in the following courses are expected to
take the following tests. Each student must bring a
No. 2 lead pencil and will be required to use his
SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER.
MS 208 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, March 2.
7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
MS 205 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, March 2,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A-L)

I Serving U of F Employees Since 1936 I
I LOW with amto loans I
INTEREST RATES PROGRAM OF THRIFT CREDIT, SERVICE AUT0 O L ANS I
I ON LOANS Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union# SPECIALTY I
I Building J Extension 2973 I

BLUE BULLETIN

Campus Calendar

Fla. Folk Dancers: Dance, Union Social Room, 8 p.m.
Air Force Dames: Meeting, Air Force Lib., Mil Military
itary Military Bldg., 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, March 2
Business Administration Seminar: Mr. Ralph
Cordiner, New Frontiers for Professional Man Managers,
agers, Managers, 18 Mat., 3:40 p.m.
Christian Science, Union Aud., 5 p.m.
Union Board: Public Relations Committee, 210 Union
7 p.m.
International Committee: Meeting, 220 Union, 7 p.m.
Fla. Players: A Touch of the Poet, Norman
Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun: Oils, 215 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Union Fine Arts: W. a Auden, poet, Univ. Aud.,
8:15 p.m. Reception followf&g in Union Bryan Lounge

FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE: Tickets now on
sale for W. H. AUDEN, FLORIDA PLAYERS A
Touch of the Poet," and LUV., Pittsburgh Symphony,
and Sen. Pastore.
J i
INTRAMURAL SPORTS: Deadline for signing up
teams for handball is Friday, March 3, 5 p.m.
Four players (1 doubles and 2 singles) will com comprise
prise comprise a handball team; play will begin Wednesday,
March 8. Deadline for signing up teams for soft softball
ball softball is Thursday, March 9, 5 p.m. Ten players will
compete in show-pitch softball, beginning Wednesday,
March 15. Sign-up sheets in Room 229, Florida Gym.
INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S CLUB: "Latin Night"
will be held March 6, 8 p.m. at the University
Women's Club. Entertainment will include a fashion
show, music and a display of crafts from Central
and South America.

Progress Tests

report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13,
14, or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119.
CBS 261 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, March 7,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A- L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12,
13, 14, or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.

Gamma Beta Phi: Meeting, 116 Union, 8:30 p.m.
Nomination of officers 1
Friday, March 3
Movie: Best of Enemies, MSB Aud., 7 & 9 p.m.
Chess Club, 215 Union, 7 p.m.
Student Committee on Academic Freedom: guest
speaker, Mr. Stanley Sheinbaum, Walker Aud.,
7*30 p m
Fla. Players: A Touch of the Poet, Norman Aud.,
8 p.m.
Mensa Lecture: Dr. Robert C. Moffat, Law and
Justice, 103-B AFA, 7:30 p.m.
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE: Tickets now on
sale for W. a Auden, Fla. Players, LUV, Senator
Pastore, and Pittsburgh Symphony.

CHANGE OF COLLEGE: March 3, 1967, is the
deadline for changing colleges for the 1967 spring
trimester.
ID CARD PHOTOS: Identification photographs will
be taken every Friday, 8 a.m.-12 noon, at Photo Photographic
graphic Photographic Section, Building L. There will be ass
fee for replacing lost or stolen ID cards. Anyone
finding an ID card should return It to Photographic
Services, where it will be kept on file.
COMMUNICATIONS WEEK: Journalism Day, Fri Friday,
day, Friday, March 3; Broadcasting Day, Monday, March 6,
and AdvertisingPublic Relations Day, Tuesday,
March 7. All discussion sessions will be conducted
in the Student Service Center. For information,
contact the School of Journalism and Communications.
Ext. 2241

CBS 262a (Evolution) PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday,
March 7,7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
CBS 262 b ( Man and Nature) PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, March 7,7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with: (A-L) report to Little 201, 203, 205,
207, 213, 215, 217, or 219; (M-Z) report to Little
221, 223, 225, 227, 233, 235, 237 or 239.



.jSSrSc'&C J£PIL &ws.
psps**
r^BfllPQraSM
WB|HpEP|apgpg
_**#?**
Jfl E^|§HjaP
JACK THE RIPPER? -- No, its all part ol
World University Service Week. Beauty, An-;
drea Jantel (AEPhi), and £feast, Chuck Sch Schwanderer
wanderer Schwanderer (Phi Delta Theta), shown above,
will be collecting money this week for
needy people around the world as part of
WUS activities.

We are looking for talented, ambitious young men ... Who want to work hard ... At a job they can be proud 0f...
k
That belong to those
For the recognition And the reward ... who see the future crystal clear...
SOUTHERN
RAILWAY
SYSTEM
\ y
fU^^>U reprefU^^> sentative will be on your
rCcampus soon. To get more
information and to arrange
a C\ £% an interview, visit your col-
X>s> f umu l I rr rrlege
lege rrlege placement ottice.
If you're our kind of man, come see us
because we are your kind of railroad! SOUthm ffi9N\
Railway System
. r r i 100* AMI AO LOOK SOUTH
An tqual-Opportunify Employer

'Poet, Experimental Film,
OnTodays Festival Docket

By NICK TATRO
Alligator Staff Writer
A Time For Bach, an ex experimental
perimental experimental film, the Childrens
Symphony Concert, and Eugene
ONeills play, A Touch of the
Poet, highlight todays activities
on the sixth annual UF Fine Arts
Festival.
The film will be shown in room
103-B of the Achitecture and Fine
Arts complex at 8 p.m.
The Childrens Symphony Con Concert
cert Concert will be presented by the
UF Music Department in Univer University
sity University Auditorium at 9:50 a.m.
The fourth performance of O'-
Neills play, A Touch Os The
Poet, will be presented by the
Florida Players in Norman Hall
Auditorium at 7:30 p.m.
The Fine Arts Festival contin continues
ues continues Thursday with award-winning
American poet, W. H. Auden, who
will read and interpret his own
poems at 8:15 p.m. in University
Auditorium. Admission for stu students
dents students and faculty is $1 and the gen general
eral general public $1.50. Tickets are on
sale at the Florida Union Box
Office.
Auden will read from his la latest
test latest volume of poetry, About the

Wednesday, March 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

House, published in 198 b. inese
poems reveal Auden as a social socially
ly socially realistic writer; they deal with
the rooms of his Vienna home.
A reception will be held in
Bryan Lounge (Florida Union) for
the 60 year old touring poet fol following
lowing following the lecture.
Internationally known theater
director, Harold Edgar Clurman,
will head a five-man panel that
climazes the theatrical portion of

City Police Chief Raps
Drinking Lawlgnorance

Most of the students are co cooperative.
operative. cooperative. It is the exception to
the rule for a student to give
any trouble to the police when
he is arrested for a liquor law
violation, Gainesvilles Chief of
Police W.D. Joiner said Tuesday.
With the amount of publicity
given to liquor laws there is real really
ly really no excuse for a person not to
know what the law is, Joiner
continued.
By far the majority of lic licensed
ensed licensed places that sell alcholic

the festival Saturday.
Clurman, author and critic as
well as director, will speak on the
relationship of the arts and the
university at 2:30 p.m. in Uni University
versity University Auditorium.
Harold Burris-Meyer, chair chairman
man chairman of the Southeastern Region of
the American National Theater
and Academy will share a panel
seat with Clurman.

beverages try to comply with the
law," the chief said.
We make periodic you might
say spot checks of the bars,
cocktail lounges and beer taverns
as a rule with agents from the
state beverage department," he
stated.
Joiner said there is no fixed
rule as to how many men from
the beverage department work yt
any given time in the Gainesville
area. However, he said that in
cases where there is unusual trou trouble
ble trouble sufficient numbers of agents
are sent to the city.
An Interfraternity Council (IFC)
edict issued earlier this month
concerning drinking in fraternity
houses raised questions about the
legality and reality of the univer university
sity university regulations prohibiting drink drinking.
ing. drinking.
IFC president Manuel James,
who authored the edict said, The
older brother should execise good
judgement and show responsibili responsibility
ty responsibility in keeping the illegal (under (underage)
age) (underage) fraternity members from
drinking.
According to university regula regulations,
tions, regulations, however, all fraternity
members are illegal," or, pro prohibited
hibited prohibited to drink while on campus.
The UF Code of Conduct says
that drinking or the possession
of alcoholic beverages is not al allowed
lowed allowed on the campus proper,"
which includes fraternity row and
all off-campus fraternities.
We are aware that drinking is
going on," said W. Harvey Shar Sharron,
ron, Sharron, advisor to fraternities, and
we take action where it is pos possible."
sible." possible." He said the regulations
are enforced where there is rea reason
son reason to enforce them.
UF Building
Boom Values
$25 Million
Over $25-million worth of cons construction
truction construction is now underway at the
UF and other projects valued at
over $6 million will soon be up
for bids, D. Nell Webb, zone
architect, revealed Monday.
The present construction inclu includes
des includes 21 projects, the most costly
being the engineering complex,
(nine buildings), the New Florida
Union and the new men's and wo womens
mens womens dormitories on 13th Street
and Radio Road.
Other projects underway ire a
new law center, a resear., lib library,
rary, library, a metellurgy buildi:.;. a :il :ilities
ities :ilities expansion, a human develop development
ment development center, NASA building, print printing
ing printing division building, university
laundry and life science biology
building.
I think UFs construction may
be considerably ahead of several
other Southern universities be because
cause because of the big bond issue coup coupled
led coupled with a tremendous amount of
federal grants," Webb said.
A possible reason for the rapid
expansion, according to Webb, is
that Florida is probably the third
or fourth fastest growing state in
the union, and it is trying to keep
pace with the increasing enroll enrollment."
ment." enrollment."

Page 13



1. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 1. 1967

Page 14

~>v.< m
' ****** jB r |BC9Hk
| ** />wt __ ff** 1 '* yj &* ~
_ ipHIBW iKE^^X&jm.
? -a; IP
P -.l^F 4 ; * <. B,l H l*fP
Jk f.- :;iiift. :HHHHir Jt; BBif./ ; a a*3
*3 a*3 £kA v|] pn t
Jb l iIRQI mmm< m m / f B

SWIMMERS PREPARE --Gators
Steve McPherson (right) and All-
American get set for upcoming

Florida Athletic Teams
Have Finest Overall Year

HOME RUN -- Jack Withrow slams out a
homerun during baseball practice while be below
low below Bill Perrin hits a serve in Tennis
practice.

SEC championship matches this
week. While (left) Florida bat battles
tles battles Tennessee for SEC lead.

Florida Gator athletic teams
head into spring sports with the
finest overall record in school
history and could well wind up with
the best in the Southeastern Con Conference.
ference. Conference.
The Gators are now 54-9 over overall
all overall with a pair of contests coming
up this weekend as the basketball
team concludes its season at home
against Georgia and the baseball
team opens its season at home
against Florida Southern.
Team records thus far are foot football
ball football (9-2), basketball (20-4), cross
country (7-0), swimming (9-3),
golf (7-0), and tennis (2-0).

HwSwbbT
COACH RAY GRAVES
. . the man behind it all

y 4 JmmHMB
1 i
r ' v 1 v }' jpg ? *& *%'-# jas,' | | -gF -*, f y"*- 1 f

' ' is* P i Jfc.
"' K 1 1! 5 cy
KjLjjgHi j 4flp '
a JH[ *%Zbs& /j9KT w 9
Jtf fmSs I^^HK'VUmiLs£
v " * t, >A % -4^*

,. i aiiri r > j3IBf *-.
. 7\t 9
Ms, V "r%J * ' ' *'

GOOD DRIVE -- Wally Armstrong (below)
leads Gator Golfers over FSU. Trackmen,
(bottom right) left-right, Don Hale, Dave
Wilson, Dan Flynn, and Dieter Gebhard
train for Florida Relays,

JKk V,:y jjfl
HK*i yfi
Mb j
is;
KHaflawp:
~ ;

Hr
\* 1 {Cf v\ V
K ?H
m " %
VHHK;
PQBHfI
. ...
:# '.q.v.-. v.-MWWW^£?i&gaKjjte^agS^' .'. WpK|^M



UF Vaults Into SEC Basketball Race

SPORTS

Wednesday, March 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Gators Win Bowling,
Chess,Pocket Billiards
At South Florida

By ALLEN D. COWAN
Alligator Correspondent
UF won the chess, three-cush three-cushion
ion three-cushion billiards, and womens dou double
ble double bowling events this past week weekend
end weekend in the Region VII tournament
at the University of South Flor Florida.
ida. Florida.
The chess team consists of
George Carswell (2UC), Robert
W. Leonard (7AS), James A. By Byrd
rd Byrd (3AS) and Roger Dorman (4AS).
This year marks the second con consecutive

WHAT SORT OF MAN OWNS M
COLLEGE LIFE INSURANCE?
Would You Believe Our
Future Leaders!! 1
THE COLLEGE LIFE INSUR AN CE
COMPANY OF AMERICA
1966 CADILLAC
Calais Coupe. Gold. AirCond., AM AMFM
FM AMFM radio, full power. In factory war warranty
ranty warranty $4795
1966 OLDSMOBILE
88 Sedan. Factory air conditioner. One
owner. In factory warranty $2795
1965 CHEVROLET
Impala Hardtop Coupe. White. 327 V 8
air conditioned and power. $2095
1956 CHEVROLET
Bel Air Hardtop coupe V 8 r, h, at
S2OO
1965 FORD
Fairlane Sedan Intermediate size car.
Economical 6 with standard shift
$1295
1963 MERCURY
Meteor Custom Sedan. Very clean. Fac Factory
tory Factory air cond. VB, power steering
$1095
1961 FORD
Convertible. Looks and runs good.
$595
BRASINGTON
CADILLAC-OLDSMOBILE INC.
2001 NW St. 378-5304

secutive consecutive year that Florida has
won the chess competition.
Suzi Bruder (2UC) and Mary
Swigonski (2UC) made up the dou doubles
bles doubles bowling team, and Robert Cruz
(3AS) represented Florida in the
three cushion billiards.
Overall, Florida placed fourth
out of 11 schools. \
In the mens bowling event, the
team competition was won by FSU
with 2850 points.

Page 15

Alabama Rips Eighth-RankedVols,
Vandy Falls To Mississippi State

UF vaulted back into the thick of the SEC bas basketball
ketball basketball race as Vanderbilt and Tennessee were
upset Monday night.
The Gators were considered out of the race
a month ago, after Auburn beat them for their
fourth loss of the season.
Florida is now in second place only one-half
game behind league leading Tennessee.
Alabama stunned the eighth ranked Volunteers
53-50 and Mississippi State edged out Vandy
74-71.
Tennessee still leads the SEC with a 13-3
record, Florida trails by one-half game with
13-4 and Vanderbilt is third with 12-4.
The upsets could cause a three-way tie for
the championship unless Tennessee can beat its
remaining foes, LSU and Mississippi State.
Vanderbilt will play Kentucky this Saturday
and LSU on Monday.
Should the Vols lose to Mississippi State and
Florida and Vandy win the rest of the way, the

Gators Shoot Down
Florida Southern

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Sports Writer
Led by Toby Muirs record recordbreaking
breaking recordbreaking performance, the Florida
Rifles shot down Florida South Southern
ern Southern in Lakeland last Saturday.
Muirs 284 points represents a
new UF record on the internation international
al international rifle target. Other Gator marks marksmen
men marksmen who fired included Jim Waugh,
Jay Weber, and Lynn Peoples.
I was very pleased with the
mens effort in Lakeland, said
Major Harvey Dick, adviser to the
Gator sharpshooters. Tlieyboun Tlieybounced
ced Tlieybounced back well from their defeat
the week before in the National
Rifle Association sectionals In
Miami.
In those sectional matches in
Miami, the Rifles failed to cap capture
ture capture a team trophy although Muir
and Waugh won individual honors.

Amateur Lawn Tennis Players
Hit With Scathing Attack

LONDON (UPl)Amateur lawn
tennis players have been hit squar squarely
ely squarely between the eyes by Herman
David, chairman of the All-England
Club which stages the Wimbledon Wimbledonchampionships,
championships, Wimbledonchampionships, who claims the
game at top level is a living
lie.
David, one of the most influ influential
ential influential people in British tennis,
made his remarks in a scathing
attack in the magazine British
Lawn Tennis.
Everyone knows that amateurs
are earning their living from the
game, and, frankly, earning them
dishonestly, David claims. The
only straight people left in lawn
tennis are the professionals who
earn their money honestly and
openly.
David emphasized that if he had

WEDNESDAY NIGHT SPECIAL
SMOTHERED
M
MV MLFj TJa steak AQI
mmrJ'Mm & white rice y f
DIA t HOTAPPLE
1 //CArETtKIA 1 cobbler 12 818 W. Univ. Avi.
jHHIfKA'jMtI 1/2 Block West of Fla. Theatre
KImMIM a short walk from campus

Muir fired a 279 mark to take
first place in the international
target competition. Waughs 290
total on the easier conventional
target nailed down top honors in
the match.
Miami took first place in the
team competition on the conven conventional
tional conventional target. FSU captured top
team honors on the international
target.
Overall the Florida Rifles sea season
son season mark stands at 16-9.
This Saturday,* the Gator marks marksmen
men marksmen host FSU, Miami, Florida
A&M, Stetson, and Florida Sou Southern
thern Southern in the annual All-Florida
match.
This is an extremely Important
match for all teams, stated Sgt.
Joe Nave, coach of the Rifles.
If I could win only one mat match
ch match a year, this would be the one
I would want.

his way, Wimbledon would stage
open lawn tennis tomorrow.
He added, however, Constitu Constitutionally,
tionally, Constitutionally, I fear this is going to
be very difficult to bring about.
It has already taken ten years and
we do not appear to be any near nearer.
er. nearer.
When asked why Wimbledon did
not go it alone and stage an
open tournament, he said: To
do so would be tantamount to re revolt
volt revolt against our governing body*
would cause immediate chaos in
the country, and, because of Wim Wimbledons
bledons Wimbledons requtation and standing,
this would quickly spread to inter international
national international levels.
1 am not in favor of unilat unilateral
eral unilateral action at the present time,
said David.

three would share the crown with 14-4 records,
probably resulting in a playoff for the leagues
berth in the NCAA tournament.
Florida must beat Georgia here Saturday night.
Mississippi State must beat Tennessee and Vandy
must close out the season by toppling Kentucky
and LSU.
If Tennessee does lose another game and Vr
and Florida both win its remaining contests then
a playoff would occur.
However, if Tennessee lost and Vandy lost,
then the championship would automaticly go to
the Vols because they have beaten Florida twice.
Chances of LSU beating either the Vols or
Vandy are slim, but Mississippi State served
notice it will be ready for Tennessee, battling
back from a 10-poirft 1 deficit to clip Vanderbilt.
The Vols were beaten on the boards by Ala Alabama,
bama, Alabama, which held Tennessees rebounding ace, sev seven-foot
en-foot seven-foot Tom Boerwinkle, to only four grabs. The
Tide had a 38-26 edge in rebounds.

SEC BASKETBALL
STANDINGS
CONF. ALL
WL W L
Tennessee 13-3 18-5
FLORIDA 13-4 20-4
Vanderbilt 12-4 19-5
Auburn 11-6 16-8
Miss. State 8-8 14-9
Kentucky 7-9 12-12
Alabama 6-10 13-11
Mississippi 6-11 12-12
Georgia 5-12 9-16
LSU 1-15 3-21
Chi Phi Wins
Southeastern
Tournament
I
Floridas Chi Phi fraternity bas basketball
ketball basketball team won the Southeastern
Phi Chi (Regional) championship
basketball tourney in Atlanta Sun Sunday,
day, Sunday, crushing North Carolina, 78-
66.
The single elimation tournament
was strictly a come-from-behind
affair with Florida tagging losses
on Alabama Georgia Tech and
North Carolina.
Florida trailed both Georgia
Tech and North Carolina at the
half, but second half rallies led
by Chi Phis Steve Kaufmannpush Kaufmannpushed
ed Kaufmannpushed the Gator fraternity to vic victories
tories victories in both games.
Kaufmann won the most valua valuable
ble valuable player award. Bob Wattles,
Mike Allison, Bob Reed and Jim
Last started for the Gator team.
Emory, Tulane, Auburn, FSU al also
so also sent teams to the contest.
Handball Begins
For Independents.
The next sport in the intra intramural
mural intramural independent league will be
handball. The deadline for sign signing
ing signing up a team will be Friday,
Mar. 3 at 5 p.m.
Softball will follow handball and
the deadline for signing up a soft softball
ball softball team will be Thursday, Mar.
9, at 5 p.m. in Room 229, Flor Florida
ida Florida Gym.

ymilUMllUHiiyUUlMing
: ts GATOR ADS \ jj
= l ARE DREAMY! / =
niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiirt



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 1, 1967

AAU Challenged By USTFF
Over Ryuns Record Run

LOS ALTOS, Calif. (UPl)The
Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) was
dared Monday to declare Sullivan
award winner Jim Ryun inelegible
due to his participation in last
years meet of the rival United
States Track and Field Federation
(USTFF).
Federation president Rev. Wil Wilfred
fred Wilfred H. Crowley, S.J., issued the
challenge after the AAU announced
it would ask the USTFF for co cooperation
operation cooperation in getting Ryuns 1:44.9
performance in the half-mile last
June 10 declared a world record.

Tulsa, Villanova
Named To Play NIT
NEW YORK (UPI) Tulsa, runner up in the Missouri Valley
Conference, and Villanova, winner of nine of its last 10 games,
Monday were named the ninth and tenth teams for the 1967 Nation National
al National Invitation Basketball Tournament at Madison Square Garden.
Tulsa 18-6 will be making its second appearance in the nations
oldest post-season basketball classic. Eldridge Webb, a 6-foot
product of Brooklyns Boys High School, is the clubs top point
producer with a 19-point average.
Villanova 16-8 is one of the stingiest defensive units in the nation,
permitting opponents a yield of 59.3 per contest. The Wildcats,
who have seen post-season action each of the last six years since
Jack Kraft has been coach,will be playing in their third straight
NIT and sixth overall.
Recently more of a football power than basketball standout, Tulsa
has already posted more wins than any other Hurricane squad in
history, with the exception of the 21-7 outfit of 1955.
Webb is aided by sophomore forwards Bobby Smith and Rob
Washington, who are both scoring in double figures. Washington
is abbht to break the all-time sophomore scoring record of 382
points set by Dick Nunneley in 1952. Smith is the top Hurricane
rebounder.
Four teams remain to be chosen by the selection committee to
fill out the 14-school field.
The committee is waiting to learn the second place finishers in
the Atlantic Coast and Big Eight conferences before issuing their
final invitations and also are considering Brigham Young, the de defending
fending defending champion, and New Mexico.
The eight quintets named earlier to the 30th edition of the NIT
are Southern Illinois 19-2, Providence 18-6, Marquette 16-8, Rut Rutgers
gers Rutgers 17-6, St. Peters 18-3, Utah State 18-5, Syracuse 19-4 and
Memphis State 17-8.

I. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
jmg certifies IV. SMITH ZACKERY LAWRENCE
* GAINESBURG, KANSAS 32062
A I DATE OF TH HEIGHT WEIGHT HAIR EYES SEX NATIONALITY yi
~ 1 12/3/09 73,w. 163 BROWN HAZEL IM l USA J
IX. HA* IttN FOUND TO SE PROPERLY QUALIFIED TO EXERCISE THE PRIVILEGE* OF T
H. PRIVATE pilot 111. CIPT. NO 1707153 I^
I RATINGS AND LIMITATIONS
XH AIRPLANE SINGLE ENGINE LAND*
Si x.
X. DATE OF ISSUE: 00 0 00 VIII. ADMINISTRATOR
FAA FORM SOSO 2 (S SS> FEDERAL AVIATION AGENCY V

Dont Let The Looks Fool You
A pilot's license is about as unimpressive a piece
of paper you'll find to look at. But it's mighty
important. It's the key to excitement, adventure,
and maybe even a career. Get yours before you
get your diploma. They go together very well.
Gainesville Airport Waldo Road

The International Amateur Ath Athletic
letic Athletic Federation rejected the per performance
formance performance because the USTFF meet
at Terre Haute, Ind., was not
sanctioned by the AAU. AAU
officials last week, however, said
they would allow the USTFF to
apply for retroactive sanction in
an effort to qualify the perform performance.
ance. performance.
Father Crowley, on leave from
the Santa Clara University staff,
said the AAU position was self selfcontradictory.
contradictory. selfcontradictory.

The meet in which Ryun set
his record was either a bona
fide amateur meet conducted under
proper conditions for the estab establishment
lishment establishment of a world record -or
it was not, he said.
If it was not, then all the com competitors
petitors competitors should be declared inel ineligible
igible ineligible by the AAU and the mark
never should have been submitted
to the IAAF in the first place.
The AAU and USTFF have been
feuding for several years over
control of amateur athletics, par particularly
ticularly particularly track and field. USTFF
claims the AAU has no right to
insist upon sanctioning college
meets in which no AAU members
compete.
Gulyas Wins
Dixie Tourney
TAMPA, (UPI)No. 2 seed Is Istvan
tvan Istvan Gulyas of Hungary captured
the Dixie International tennis
tourney Sunday, defeating the de defending
fending defending champ and the No. 1 seed
Cliff Drysdale of South Africa in
the crucial fifth set.
Gulyas had 3-6, 6-1, 2-6 and
7- before taking the final set
2-0 as Drysdale was forced out
of action because of a pulled sto stomach
mach stomach muscle.
Gulyas, 36, who took up the
game just 10 years ago, has de defeated
feated defeated Drysdale in three other
tourneys.
Ann Jones of England, the No.
1 seed, defeated second seeded
Francois Durr of France 6-4,
8- to capture the womens
singles.

TwfsUMMe- WITH
. £& Good Humor I
y UNIV OF GEORGIA t,4i,
These Colleges w . " w^"; v *> *K
Had Students . 0, ll t .**'V>'"t
With Even
Higher Earnings: * site** vllli ol l S iuets uiv.-'' o 3
' **> >c cr i
.'* -<,!-** t,SB?S2L' , v s
s *'"** V w^*7Sn-'.Ww*^V s
awnn. mil V C l *"** niif"* '- >,, < J
5 OMW** 5 T 1 ,1* * PUiOUE UNIV -SIU-2I *%1M.04 6
I ~.<> " U
ts* I** 1 ** UHN or mHO Mil" won /**'*,
V uuivtesiTY or Piwwsnwwu nt2so **
No experience needed. You are Nothing to invest .. every everyfully
fully everyfully trained and work on routes thing you need is supplied free,
with proven nigh earnings.
HOW TO QUALIFY FOR INTERVIEW
1. Minimum age 18.
2. Need a valid driver's licence and be willing to drive a
clutch transmission.
3. Be in good physical condition.
REGISTER NOW
Ask your Summer Placement Director or Student Aid Officer
to show you Good Humors folder explaining this high paying
job and to schedule you for our campus visit.
| March 15-16 j
*5* r ?j n f?-!y fe at s have not approximated this average in most cases
due to legal restrictions on working hours for women.
An Equal Opportunity Employer-(M/F)
ad m umv/W <7 H
* 1 i||