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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
AFTER IRON CURTAIN ESCAPE

: 'tokSK-'
TODOROV
... may attend UF

The Florida Alligator

Vol. 59, No. 101

Budget Commission Nixes Tuition Hike

Regents Mammoth Budget
Trimmed 50 Per Cent
By HAROLD KENNEDY
Alligator Staff Writer
Floridas Budget Corn mission voted four to three against a 25
per cent tuition increase for state university students Tuesday,
but recommended a biennial budget for the Board of Regents only
50 percent larger than the last one -- the Board had requested a 9
percent increase. They passed a whopping $ 1.95 billion state budget.
The Commission defeated a late proposal by Governor Claude
Kirk to raise tuition to $125 per quarter in state universities. Sta te
Superentendent cf Schools Floyd T. Christian moved u> retain the
SIOO fee recommended b\ the Board of Regents.
The motion passed with Treasurer Broward Williams, Attorney
General Ear! Fain loth, and Comptoller Fred 0. Dickinson support supporting
ing supporting Christian.
The Commission ti mimed the Regents monumental budget but,
Christian said faculties and staffs would receive raises.
The Commission proposed to make future raises for state uni university
versity university employees competitive with colleges of 10,000 students or
more.
The Commission meeting lasted five grueling hours and tempers
often flared.
Kirk told FSU students earlier that freedom isnt free and neither
is education. And he apparently went to the meeting prepared to make
them pay up.
He ran into a wall of opposition. Christian, Faircloth, Williams,
and Dickinson fought to restore cuts in the budget.
UF administrators art not expected to view the outcome of the
meeting with joy. The 30 percent increase means tliat 49 percent
of the Boards new plans had to be >acked.
I dont know how much the older universities got, said Dean of
Student Affairs Robert Mautz. He thought the budget might leave
the university in a bind, but didn't know yet what specific areas
would be hurt.
The Commission must now present its proposed budget to the
Florida Legislature. The legislature may alter it as they deem nec necessary.
essary. necessary.
Food Service Survey
Airs Many Complaints
By JIM WHITE
Alligator Staff Writer
After a hard morning in class, theres nothing worse than sitting
down to eat lunch and finding yourself faced with soggy fried potatoes,
warm milk and cold rolls.
Thats the way many Murphree Area residents responded to a food
service survey conducted during the last week of the fall trimester
by the Murphree Area Council. Slow service and a poor attitude on
the part of food service employes were other major complaints of the
200 students who took part in the survey.
The survey concentrated primarily on the Campus Club, Pick
Katz, president of the Murphree Area Council, said Tuesdav, but it
did cover the entire food service operation.
(SEE FOOD PAGE 13)

Russian Student Finds Home In U.S.

By HAROLD KENNEDY
Alligator Staff Writer
UF students may have made a friend for America in Cvetan To Todorov,
dorov, Todorov, the 25-year-old Russian refugee who visited here and lec lectured
tured lectured to journalism classes last week.
It they did, the students overcame 23 years of Communist educa education,
tion, education, 18 months of European anti-Americanism, and seven months
of living in New York slums.
Until I got to Gainesville, Roger Himlepp quoted Todorov as
saying, I was sure that I wouldnt stay in America. But I made more
friends here than I did in the rest of my 10 months in the U.S.
Himlepp said that Todorov may return to Gainesville to enter either
UF or Santa Fe Jr. College in six weeks when he finishes his tour
of America.
The question of friendship seemed central to the young Russian.
I need friendship in this country, he said.
Todorovs family is thought to have been executed without trial
because of connections with the 1963 demonstrations against Afri African
can African students at the University of Leningrad where his parents had
been professors.
Todorov, who was attending the University of Moscow at the time,

University of Florida, Gainesville

The Tuition Hike
0
mm
BOARD of REGENTS BUDGET COMMITTEE LEGISLATURE

IN COUNCIL MEET
'New Horizon Unveiled
Cabinet To Be Reviewed

By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Editorial Editor
All the expected firew'orks re remained
mained remained conspicuousslv below the
surface as Legislatuve Council
listened to Charles Shepherds
State of the Campus Address and
then went through a mountain of
formal business.
When the meeting adjourned aft after
er after a stuffy 80 minutes in Flor Florida
ida Florida Union's Room 324, the Coun Council
cil Council had:
Listened attentively to a 20-
minute outline of President Shep Shepherds
herds Shepherds New Horizon Program.
Denied a motion to remove
last weeks tabling of the Semin Seminole
ole Seminole name-change.
Selected, after a slight has hassle,
sle, hassle, United Partys Bill Spark Sparkman
man Sparkman as s representative to the

was picked up by the secret police and shipped to Siberia. He spent
two years working in labor camps at Novosibirsk and Yakutsk
hundreds of miles east of the Urals. All the inmates of the camps
were political prisoners, said Todorov, adding that 13 million Rus Russians
sians Russians were in similar camps. Security precautions were light be because
cause because of the isolated location and the year-round wintry weather of
the camps, Todorov often refused to work and was successful be because
cause because his father had important friends in the party.
In the spring of 1965, Todorov and 83 fellow prisoners walked out
of Yakutsk and started for Europe. Temperatures in the Siber Siberian
ian Siberian Spring often dip to -20 degrees fahrenheit, but the escapees trud trudged
ged trudged westward.
Todorov received aid from Russians, Poles, and Bulgarians dur during
ing during the ten months it took to walk from behind the iron curtain.
He said they used dog sleds, boats, trucks, wagons, and walked a
great deal. He said it was particularly hard to get across the bor borers.
ers. borers. Ordinary citizens were instructed to look out for potential es escappees.
cappees. escappees. Todorov crossed most of the borders at night, he said, but
refused to go into details.
He crossed into Yugoslavia, which he noted was the most liberal
communist country, and then crossed into Western Europe.
(SEE RUSSIAN, PAGE 13)

Florida Union Board of Managers
and Allan Casey as its delegate
to ACCENT.
Approved the name change of
the new literary magazine from
Florida Review to Florida Quar Quarterly.
terly. Quarterly.
Set up a 'ipeciai committee to
review the cabinet appointments of
Shepherd and questioned on the
floor the legality of appointed'Com appointed'Commissioners
missioners appointed'Commissioners not subjc :o Council
approval.
The meeting moved along quiet quietly,
ly, quietly, deflating rumors that a power
struggle between United and FIRST
Parties would take place.
Shepherd wasted no time in get getting
ting getting dowm to business, opening with
a report of things he had already
done because of what he called
utmost importance.
He poised 10 the setup of the

Wednesday, February 22, 1967

Student Rights Com mission and the
setup of a Saturday conference of
State Student Body Presidents,
dealing with the tuition hike.
Tb whole natior has cast its
eyes upon this University in the
past week and soma have labeled
it the Berkeley of the South,
Shepherd said. With all this ad adverse
verse adverse publicity and the interest
of the student body, I felt com compelled
pelled compelled to act immediately.
The president observed the ac actions
tions actions of the Budget Com mission on
the tuition hike, but said his meet meeting
ing meeting was still on.
This thing isnt over by any
means,' he said. The Legisla Legislature
ture Legislature can still do anything it wants.
Besides, we should have an or organization
ganization organization such as this, either for formal
mal formal or informal, to handle such
(SEE COUNCIL PAGE 13)



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 22, 1967

IFC Issues Drinking Edict

By STAN SAUNDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
There were no drinking inci incidents
dents incidents at fraternity houses last
weekend, said Manuel James, pre president
sident president of the UF Interfraternity
Council QFC).
James distributed a memo
Feb. 13 to all UF fraternity pre presidents
sidents presidents emphasizing that drinking
would be restricted to menofiegal
age and that all liquor containers
would be restricted from living
areas of the houses during week weekend
end weekend parties.
Public display of drinking was
cut down tremendously, and indi individuals
viduals individuals used discretion in drink drinking.
ing. drinking. This was the first weekend
without incident this year, said
James Monday.
Older brothers can use their
Review Set
For Cabinet
The Legislative Council will fol follow
low follow a set pattern of behavior when
it reviews appointments for the
SG Cabinet, the Alligator learned
Tuesday afternoon.
According to Greg Johnson, floor
leader of United Party, a commit commit*
* commit* tee is usually set up by the vice vicepresident
president vicepresident to interview the nom nominees
inees nominees and review the qualifications.
Johnson said the proposal was
brought up at Tuesdays meeting
to have the nominations to a re reviewing
viewing reviewing committee and the names
would be presented to the Coun Council
cil Council the following week.
The legislative body has the
responsibility to review all the ap appointments
pointments appointments of the president, said
Johnson. The committee has been
set up every year to be sure the
nominees are qualified.

I See Whats
The Brows* Shop
1 The Tampa of My Childhood Susie Dean
2. Rush to Judgement(paperback) Mark Lane
3. The Principles of Art R. G. Collingwood
4. My Years With General Motors
Alfred P. Sloan Jr.
5. Foreign Films on American Screens
Micheal Mayer
6. The Mind of Germany Hans Kohn
7. The Changing Patterns of the Middle East
o ~ lit i u Plerre Rondot
o. God s Grace and Man s Hope
Daniel Williams
9. Introduction to Modern Physics Blanchard
10. C ircuits, Devices and Systems Smith I
WE ARE NOW TAKING ADVANCE ORDERS
FOR
- WILLIAM MANCHESTERS
"DEATH OF A PRESIDENT 11
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00
Campus Shop & Bookstoro
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advert advertisement
isement advertisement and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
MO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever
possible
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Ad Advertising
vertising Advertising Manager wi.***n (l) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida AUlgator
will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before nest Insertion.
TIC FLORIDA ALLIGATOR la the official stadaat newspaper ot dm UMveralty at
Fieri* tad la Published five times weekly except during May, June, and July whan
It la paMl*ad U-weekly. OalyedMerlaU wpraaaat Mm adds! opinions at thnlr authors.
Add* ass corraapoadaaee to The Fieri* Alligator, Flort* Union BalMlng, University
of nart*. GalaaavUie, fla SMOt. The AlMgater la entered as second dans matter
at the Odtiljhlii Peat OOce at Gainesville.

influence to cut down the drink drinking
ing drinking problem, said James. The
older brothers exercise good iud iudgment
gment iudgment and show responsibility in
keeping the illegal fraternity mem members
bers members from drinking.
The memo was greatly accept accepted
ed accepted on a voluntary oerause
it was -- I feel -a realistic
memo, said Janies after talking
to many fraternity presidents. He
explained that the memo pro probably
bably probably received greater approval

LSD Users Missing;
Were Placed on Bond

By ALAN COWAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Lieutenant R. E. Stanley of the
Alachua County Sheriffs Depart Department
ment Department said Tuesday the LSD raid
at a local tavern, the Pub, in
December has resulted in a con continuous
tinuous continuous investigation on the use of
LSD in Gainesville.
Stanley said the four arrested
are now out on $2,000 bond for
each count, one booked for the
possession and sale of LSD and
Marijuana.
One of the arrested has left
town, Stanley said, but our de department
partment department isnt sure of the where whereabouts
abouts whereabouts of the other three.
If convicted of the LSD charges,

The Play grou ncT
J f is coming Wm

because it did not attempt to stop
all drinking.
)
Girls restrain drinking to some
extent, and there is seldom an;,
trouble in a house where every
man has a date, said James.
Discussing what actio/ would ne
taken against offenders, James
said the IFC disciplinary commit committee
tee committee will decide all violations. Any
fraternity house involved will
probably be placed on social re restriction.
striction. restriction.

the three could i>e sentenced to one
year imprisonment and/or a SI,OOO
fine. The fourth, on the marijuana
charge, could receive up to ten
years in jail and/or a fine of
SIO,OOO.
Stanley said his department
hasnt been able to ascertain yet
whether or not LSD is being used
any more in Alachua County, or
by whom, and how it is getting
into circulation here.
Stanley emphasized that none of
the four were enrolled at the UF
when they were arrested.

alfie
IS IRRESISTIBLE!
>- A

I RELEASE a magazine j
Featuring I
Dr. Tom Hanna j
I the Erotica of bathroom walls J
I yellow journalism at Its best, the ftlliMt
j the RELEASE SEAL of
APPROVAL AWARDS
| Alan Levin j
j A biological classification of GOD
| Tolkien's Hobbits j
j a short story by corseri J
j Jilack soetrp anti Higfjt j
and more {
ON SALE NOW
P. S. our Mag should be as good as our ads.

HdH
f fflt .
:-r HI ' W *
ISpr 'w
BgKp BgKpnaHkllk
naHkllk BgKpnaHkllk
Ll \ -- Sometimes takes strange wavs of I
showing itself, as I F theatre-goers can dis- I
cover for themselves when the New York I
comedy hit comes to the University Audi- I
torium stage 8:15 p.m, March 5. Tickets I
for students go on sale noon today at the I
Florida Union Box Office.

| STAK n SHAKS
I
I mLa TTUjaJt
featuring QUICK, COURTEOUS CURB SERVICE
I Dl Nl NG ROOM
I COUNTER
I CARRY OUT
I Open Til 1 AM
| 1610 S.W. 13fh St.



B ftb A WITH~ PLACE TO 00//J]
(there so/ /J r roof'<

B* u J
AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL t|
j |bk Lunch a a Dinner
R 1212 St. (4 min, from campus) Gainesville Shopping Center |

I FACT 1/The communications industry is growing at a I
I rapidly accelerating pace with increasing customer de- I
I mands for new services. I
I C ACT 2/The Bell System, the nation's largest company, I
I is the pacesetter in communications equipment and 11
I services. II
I FACT 3/The Bell System is a widely diversified or- 11
I ganization requiring a variety of talents and skills. 11
I FACT 4/To be effective, a growing industry needs top- 11
I flight individuals with new ideas and a desire to learn; 1 1
I persons who can grow and develop with the industry. 11
I FACT 5/Many college graduates have a desire to learn 11
I and are willing to work for advancement. 1 1
I RESOLUTION/Talk to The Bell System about your inter- IJ
I ests we may have a place for you. 11
I Representatives will be on campus February 27, 28 11
I and March 1 interviewing for the entire Bell System II
I NOTE/Sign up and get details on the group meeting at II
I the placement office. II
bHHtI -.. o HHi Mm
BBi o MB pH

j it 11111111111 ii 11111
Space Capsules, Beauties
To Highlight Fair Docket

lt \s annual 22nd Engineers
t ail, to be held at the College
of Engineering March 10, 11, and
12, will feature 22 industrial and
governmental exhibits including a
1908 Atlas Missile and models of
all phases of the U.S. space effort,
including space capsules from the
Mercury, Gemini and Apollo pro programs.
grams. programs.

AI/FIE
IS SHOCKING!

1 / /_/
f 15 7H£
l / ofsrJtfp
Hi-vCSK DEPR&ATOR
! V\rvy C5/V/W 1 iy f \ A TOPER
, \LcJ \ I \ A OOOM
/ A Drop im
/ k tomorrow
sSs'
1

Free of charge to Florida stu students
dents students and the general public the
fair is presented to promote en engineering
gineering engineering education throughout the
state.
Tlie crowning of a Queen, at the
March 4th Florida-Georgia bas basketball
ketball basketball game will highlight the
fair event. Coeds will compete
in the contest.
The Air Force will present a
lighted display of the Eastern Test
Range, including a model of the
Cape Kennedy launch complex with

Wednesday, February 22, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

1111111111111111111111111111111
CORRECTION
A story in Tuesdays Alligator
reported The Right Honorahi.- Lord
C a radon,. Permanent Repre Representative
sentative Representative to the United Nations
and Minister of State for Foreign
Aifairs for Great Britain, would
speak here on Thursday.
This is incorrect.
lord Caradon will, instead,
speak at the University Auditorium
Friday evening at 8:1
1111111111 i hii

a projected moon launch pad and
a Titan 3C booster rocket.
An electric car, run by :?.10,000
worth of batteries, will whi/ by
Fair visitors at 49 miles per
hour. Tlie car, a small Renault,
is made by General Electric.
Visitors will be allowed to talk
and watch themselves on a TV TVtelephone"
telephone" TVtelephone" designed by the Bell
Telephone system.
V sc; model of Florida Power
and i \t's nuclear power plant at
Turkey Point and a quarter scale
model engine of the supersonic
transport plane recently designed
by Lockheed and Boeing are some
of the many Engineer Fair
features.
The Fair Committee, pre predominantly
dominantly predominantly students from the Col College
lege College of Engineering, has been
working on the Fair since last
July.

M/r f 11
; r l iSSjB
Hes late,
hes late |
for a very §
important date with
his financial future.
For White Hares, as with the rest of I
us, time has away of slipping by un- I
noticed. Notice Begin today to
think positively about your financial 3
A good life insurance policy pro- sis
vides one of the sturdiest foundations H
for anyones financial planning. And H
Provident Mutuals trained proses- I
sionals can design programs specifi specifically
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Times a-wasting. Stop by our If
office, or give us a call today. Remem-
ber, life insurance costs less, does 1
more for you if you get it while youre
young. And, seriously now, how many If
of us can afford to live in Wonderland? R
W. D. Thompson Jr.. I
And Associates I
Consultants I
Wilford Thompson Jr.
Lake Shore Towers I
Phone 376-4479 J
PROVIDENT I
Ml HUAI LITE
INtUMANCf COMMNV Os PHIt AOtIAHIA

Page 3



1, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 22, 1967

Page 4

Miami Beach Bids
SBOO,OOOforGOP
Nat. Convention

WASHINGTON (UPIj Mi Miami
ami Miami Beach sought Tuesday to
lure Republicans to its ocean oceanside
side oceanside playground for their 1968
national convention with a bid
of at least .SBOO,OOO.
Miami Beach, which has nev never
er never before hosted a major na national
tional national political convention, and
San F rancisco, which has had
three, made their pitches to a
GOP site committee at the wind windup
up windup of two days of hearings on
bids by half a dozen cities.
Miami Beach Mayor Elliott
Roosevelt said the resort city

OPENS sth CONFERENCE
Geneva To Ban Nuclear Spread

GENEVA (UPI) President
Johnson urged the 17-riation dis disarmament
armament disarmament conference Tuesday to
bring the atom to heel through
a treaty banning further spread of
nuclear weapons. The Soviet Un Union
ion Union said it was striving to ach achieve
ieve achieve such a pact.
The disarmement conference, in
recess for six months, opened
its fifth year at an afternoon ses session
sion session Tuesday during which chief
U.S. negotiator William C. Foster
read a message from Johnson.

RELEASE is here
v '- ;; > : \
CLASSROOM BUILDING
iMSffOWv

would meet the $650,000 mini minimum,
mum, minimum, plus $150,000 more in
services for a total of SBOO,-
000.
Asked if Miami Beach might
go even higher, he said he
would be willing to negotiate.
Miami Beach made a strong
bid for both the GOP and Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic conventions four years
ago after building a big, new
convention hall and auditorium.
But unrest among Cuban refu refugees
gees refugees in the area and the fear
of demonstrations by civil
rights groups hurt the citys
chances then.

Failure to reach agreement on
a treaty, Johnson said, would drive
more and more nations to acq acquire
uire acquire nuclear weapons and create
a situation in which even local
conflicts will involve the dan danger
ger danger of nuclear war.
Agreement on a treaty to stop
the spread of nuclear weapons will
be an historic turning point in the
long effort to bring the atom to a
heel, Johnson declared.
Chief Soviet negotiator Alexei
A. Roschin in turn said Russia

I UFi
NEWS

Council Meets
On Sukarno
JAKARTA (UPI)--The chairman
of the all-powerful Congress and
the commanders of the Indonesian
armed forces held a secret strat strategy
egy strategy meeting Tuesday to consider
President Sukarnos fate.
Highly informed sources re reported
ported reported that Sukarno and army
strongman ruler Gen. Suharto had
reached an impasse in their talks
aimed at achieving an official res resignation
ignation resignation from the figurehead pres president.
ident. president.

wanted such a treaty despite dif difficulties
ficulties difficulties presented by the contin-1
uing Vietnam war. He said the
meeting here was to solve a ripe
and urgent international problem
and the Soviet Union was per persistently
sistently persistently striving to achieve an
agreement.
British Prime Minister Harold
Wilson and United Nations Secre Secretary
tary Secretary General Thant also messaged
the negotiators calling for speedy
conclusion of a treaty.

Marines Clobber
Red Battalion

SAIGON (I'PI) U.S. Marines surrounded the battered remnants
of a Communist main force battalion just south of the big Da Nang
Marine base and reported killing as man\ as -41 Tuesday in a meth methodical
odical methodical noose-tightening maneuver.
We put a cordon around them and kept closing down on them like
a meat grinder, said Lt. Col. Van D. Bell, former All Navy boxing
champion who organized the operation. We never had a cordon
this tight before. 1 1 11

1 be Marine squeeze and casual casualties
ties casualties inflicted in 14 other U.S. and
Allied operations accounted for 2G7
Communists estimated killed and
sent the toll of North Vietnamese
and Viet Cong troops killed in the
past seven days close to the 2,500
mark.
Action also was reported in the
air war in both North and South
Vietnam.
In the north, U.S. jet fighter fighterbombers
bombers fighterbombers caught 127 big semitrail semitrailer
er semitrailer trucks out in the open as they
rolled Communist supplies south southward
ward southward and damaged or destroyed
106 of them.
Other U.S. jets destroyed three
key bridges, two of them around
the Mu Gia Pass entrance to the
Ho Chi Minh Trail. One U.S. Navy
Phantom jet was shot down Mon Monday
day Monday over the North and its two
crewmen were missing.
In the south, 852 Stratofortres Stratofortresses
ses Stratofortresses kept up their most intensive
raids of the war, striking three
times Tuesday, dropping 500-
pound bombs on Communist base
camps, supply areas and troop con concentrations
centrations concentrations near Bong Son, Quang
Ngai and Quang Tri.

Educators
Condemn
CIA Subsidies
WASHINGTON (UPI) Two lead leading
ing leading educators condemned a student
groups association with the Cen Central
tral Central Intelligence Agency Tuesday.
Meantime the whole CIA affair
got a private airing before a select
Senate panel.
Criticism of the National Student
Associations ties with CIA came
from Prof. Clark Byse of Harvard
Law School, president of the Amer American
ican American Association of University
Professors, (AAUP), and AAUPs
general secretary, William P. Fid Fiddler.
dler. Fiddler. They said in a statement:
We believe that such clandes clandestine
tine clandestine subsidies and instances are
incompatible with the standards
and objectives of higher education,
with academic freedom and with
the integrity of persons and in institutions
stitutions institutions in an open society.
But Rep. Robert L. Sikes re reaction
action reaction to the CIA-NS A furor was
so what? The Florida Democrat
said an investigation of Commun Communist
ist Communist activities on college campuses
would be more fertile than a
probe of the CIA.



'Farenheit4sl Indictment Os Visual Matter

By DON FEDERMAN r l
Alligator Columnist
I
Truffauts Fahrenheit 451' is \
a film made by a man who loves i
books. Trufiaut takes as his i
basic premise that books are not
so much the repositories of know knowledge
ledge knowledge as they are the repositories i
of human character. Behind the
creative process that motivates the
writing of all kinds of books is the
unifying notion that the printed
word approximates the condition of
people and things as they art-.
Now the oral, aural, and visual
communication media also re recreate
create- recreate life, but they stress motion
and sound rather than thought, the
gestures of living rather than its
essences.
The printed word transmits a
different experience, its function
more cognitive than sensory. It
calls forth infinite mental associa associations,
tions, associations, which taken collectively are
the sum total of vhat it is to be
human. If it me utifi/ed more
imaginative!', b. T.V. ami radio,
it could effect a ti an '-.format ioi in
conscHlie ness.
The world of Fahrenheit 451*'
is tlie ultimate extension of this
state of affairs. Civilization has
come to outlaw all printed matter.
In such a condition, the pain of
being human no longer exists as
knowledge. The public media make
life a pleasant but lioring tran tranquilizer.
quilizer. tranquilizer. Ihe family is dying be because
cause because the responsibility of children
entails pain. The insidious thing
is that the people of such a world
do not even realize they are sick,
but the traits of their suffering
persist (e.g., nervous quirks, nar narcissism,
cissism, narcissism, hypochondria). Man need
not be able to remember what
mental anguish is to suffer it.
Countering this are the outcast
minority, the book people. They
are strangely human witha variety
of character fraits that remind one
of a Dickens novel. They are
alive in having committed to mem memory
ory memory a part of the definition of their
humanity, their whole life be becoming
coming becoming the particular book they
memorize so that they can pass
it on to another generation, who
perhaps will be allowed to commit
their memory back into print. Now
the thought of Jiving to become
a book seems almost inhuman
But it is the only human action
in tlie movie, for keeping alive
the body of facts and fiction that
is our quality of being demands
a self-sacrifice that can only be
called love. .and what could be
more human than love"? Yes,
Fahrenheit 451 is a movie in
which Truffaut has t ransformed the
Bradbury novels concern about
books. They are not bodies of
knowledge, but acts of love de defined.
fined. defined.
Now if you can feel this about
the movie, you will be able to
excuse its stylistic lapses. The
acting is weak, except for Oscar
Werner as Montag, the fireman
who starts to read the books he has
been burning. Ithink his portrayal
is more successful because the
conflicts he undergoes are simply
human, which is easy for an actor
of his skill. Julie Christie, who
plays two roles, is far more suc successful
cessful successful as the book girl because
she is more human than Lynda,
wife of Montag, who is so inhuman

CONTINENTAL
BREAKFAST
All students who may be inter interested
ested interested in leasing an apartment in
Summer, Aor B term, or in Sep September
tember September are invited to a Con Continental
tinental Continental Breakfast, Sunday Feb. 26
10:30 to 12:30 A.M. in the rec recreation
reation recreation room at:
FRENCH QUARTERS
999 SW 16th AVE.

'her overall perforr: a: re though
is very disappointing
Truffaut said while working on
the rnovie that if it were a fail failure
ure failure it would be because It as
too realistic. I think he,.-meant
that to portra.. an anti-human sit situation
uation situation in exacting visual terms
would be self-defeatin'.. i eca.l
that Truffaut is indicting visual
media, .jo, in addition to at tin.
problems, there are problems' in
details. In iact, the more polished
and anti-humau the scene, the r: oi e

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pretty good reason
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for your Masters.
Now here
good ones for I
putting it to work.
; i
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i

THE WORLD OF
CINEMA
stiiaed ami st-1: conscious it
Seem s; witness the SCei.e." betv rel
Monta. a i.cl his .vim. or the "d 'ol
scene.
Better control of the subvet
i's evi'ient ill the scene" where
Monta. rediscovered the printed
.void and the closeups of books
but: in.. Monta. reads David

Wednesday, February 22, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Copperfield including every word
oi the title page. As the camera
moves closer to the printed text,
Montac is heard reading in a
monotone, reflecting both his in inabi.it;.
abi.it;. inabi.it;. to >tiil comprehend'.mean comprehend'.meaning.
ing. comprehend'.meaning. and the explosion of curiosity
inside him over discovering the
power of the printed word. The
burnings remind me of snowflakes,
each book igniting ditferentlv, >ust
as each snowflake is unique from
one another.
The best scene involves the com community

munity community of book people who close
the film. In a scene great
love and tenderness, the genius of
and hope for man are captured
in the comniunaf gesture of devo devotion
tion devotion to books t,a library* created
in a wilderness of woods and snowl.
Fahrenheit 4">1 M is the Pla/as
most interesting showing in some
time. I nqualifyingly recommend recommended,
ed, recommended, in spite of the reservations
cited. It*> a contradiction I mst mstif\
if\ mstif\ because 1 too love the printed
word.

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 22, 1967

The Florida All igator
i-'yA
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR 808 BECK
Editorial Editor Snorts Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecessanly reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the AUlfator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is the editorial In the left
column.
Yellow Hand
Leave it to Gov. Claude Kirk to try
and top the Mafia.
The infamous Black Hand of the Mafia
has been associated with crime for many
years. In Sicily, home of the Mafia, the
Black Hand is feared by all.
Kirks topper comes in the form of
billboards. Thats right. Billboards.
According to a Kirk aide, the signs
will show a huge, ominous yellow hand
coming up over a metropolitan skyline.
The word crime will be set in white
letters on a black background. There
will be six different slogans beneath,
such as Crime puts a fee on freedom.
Ad agencies and outdoor advertising
firms are joining together to provide
free services in the campaign.
Who knows? Soon the Yellow Hand of
Gov, Claude Kirk may strike fear into
the hearts of criminals everywhere. The
Black Hand may become obsolete, out of
date in comparison with Floridas self selfacclaimed
acclaimed selfacclaimed Go-Go Governor and his
Yellow Hand.
Perhaps The Wackenhut Detective
Agency will become synonomous with the
Yellow Hand. You know. The good guys
wear the yellow hats.
Seriously, it seems to us that Kirk could
do more to fight crime in Florida by keep keeping
ing keeping quiet. He talks about Floridas image
and then goes around destroying it with
his talk that Florida may turn into the
nations crime capital.
Advertising is a wonderful thing. It would
be a shame if Gov. Kirk really is serious
about this Yellow Hand billboard idea.
Its one thing to fight crime but its
quite another when you make Florida a
laughingstock.
11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 l
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
accepts all letters to the editor Due to
space limitations however we ask that
letters not exceed 350 word Typewrit Typewritten
ten Typewritten and double-spaced letters are prefer preferred,
red, preferred, and all must be signed Names will
be withheld upon request Editors reserve
the right to select or reject letters for
' publication

Harlatts For Disneyland?
REALISM NEEDED

By HAFVEY ALPER
Alligator Staff Writer
Last Monday we had the privilege of talking "ith
a reluctant high official at Walt Disney Enter Enterprises.
prises. Enterprises. For obvious reasons the ufiicia! reques requested
ted requested that his name not be revealed. Nevertheless,
he had a good deal to say for publication.
Disney East, which we are currently plan planning
ning planning for Florida, is lacking a lot of things,
the official told us.
Basically its lust not real: there is no blood
and guts to this thing. Its just going to be ano another
ther another super amusement park, he said. It needs
humanity.
We asked the official what could be done to
remedy this situation.
Well, for one thing, he said, we need real realism
ism realism and that means we need to be brutally true
to life.
I for one would recommend that as a start in
this direction one quadrant of Disney East be set
aside as a sort of Poverty-Land -- complete
with slums, air polution, race riots, murders,
assults, rapes and a generally mean type of lo local
cal local resident.
Os course, he continued, we would employ
actors to perform the rolls of the slums seeth seething
ing seething masses. You know, this would be a big break
for some of the Negro actors and a lot of Puerto
Rican talents might show up too.
**\ye asked the official if this was only a beg beginnin
inning beginnin 5
Yes, he said, there is a lot more to be
done. Lets face it, if something like this War
on Poverty through programs like VISTA works
our childrens children will have no idea how bad
things used to be.
As a start the concept of Poverty-Land is
a good one, but there is room for imporvement.
We can also build Ghetto-Ville, Lynch-Ville
and Depression-Ville within Poverty-Land as
related areas.
Ghetto-Ville would depict the fate of immi immigrants
grants immigrants in early twentieth century America. We
would be careful to heep garbage in the streets,
build mock sweat-shops, and maintain a realis realistically
tically realistically strong-armed police force.
Lynch-Ville would depict the South at the

OUR MAN HOPPE
How We Won In West Vhtnnng

By ART HOPPE
It was in the G3rd year of our
lightning campaign to wipe the
dread Viet Narian guerrilas out
of West Vhtnnng. And at last an
honorable cease-fire was
achieved.
It came about when the Presi President
dent President of the United States went on
nationwide television to propose
concrete terms to that clever
joker, Premier Ho Ho Ho of East
Vhtnnng.
Much as we love peace, said
the President, were not about
to give up something for nothing.
They can't hoodwink us. Well give
up something, if theyll give up
something. I propose an end to
the bombing raids in exchange for
an end to supplying troops in West
Vhtnnng.
As luck would have it, Premier
Ho was trying to tune in to that
popular East Vhtnnng program,
I Ruv Roocey, when he picked
up Pierre, S.D., by mistake. So
he caught the Presidents speech.
And to the surprise of all the
experts, he immediately accepted
the Presidents terms!
* *
He did? said the President,
flabbergasted. I dont believe it
We have his reply, night let letter
ter letter collect, right here, sir, said
the Secretary of State proudly.
Let me read it to you again;
Accept your terms. Have ordered
my planes to stop bombing your
cities at once. Expect you to stop
supplying your troops in West
Vhtnnng soonest. Regards to the
Mrs.
A cloud passed over the Presi Presidents
dents Presidents brow. That doesnt seem
quite right somehow, he said.
But fair is fair. And at a time
like this lets not quibble.
So the President went back on
nationwide television and an announced
nounced announced that the might of America
had, as he had long predicted,

crushed East Vhtnnng and Prem Premier
ier Premier Ho had abjectly accepted his
terms.
Oh, there was jubilation in the
streets. No longer must we fear
the East Vhtnnng bombers! peo people
ple people cried joyously. And while a few
malcontents pointed out that East
Vhtnnng had never had any bom bombers,
bers, bombers, most everyone was so re relieved
lieved relieved the war was over that they
couldnt care less about technical
details.
Ihe trouble, of course, came in
West Vhtnnng when our Ambas Ambassador
sador Ambassador called on Premier 1100 Dat
Doh Dar. Our two million mili militar>
tar> militar> advisers have always con considered
sidered considered themselves as guests in
your country, he said, andfrom
now on youll have to feed them.
What. said the Premier.
They eat like horses. But its
possible, I suppose, if youll dou double
ble double your shipments of TV sets
hair spray, and underarm deo deodorant
dorant deodorant to your PXs.
No more shipments of those

Florida Alligator Staff
NICK TATRO JIM WHITE NICK ARROYO
Wire Editor Assistant Managing Editor Photo Editor
i
STEFANIE JARIUS JO ANN LANGWORTHY GENE NAIL
Society Editor General Assignment Editorial Assistant
Editor
STAFF MEMBERS Harvey Alper, Bill Douthat, Elaine
Fuller, Kathie Keim, Bob Padecky, Judy Redfern, Frank
Shepherd, Lori Steele, Joe Torchia, Harold Kennedy,
Justine Hartman, Eunice Tall.
LAB ASSISTANTS -- Diana Folsom, Peggy Sneider, Andrew
Haslett Jr., Robert Blount, Joan Allen, Eddie Gutter
. ma cher, Dick Blakely, Bob Menaker, Dave Reddick, David
Weiss, Karen Eng, John Ellsworth, Diann Devine, Jerome
Warren.

turn of the century. Wed have a lot of poor look looking
ing looking colored people picking cotton and every few
days wed accuse one of them a deflowering white
womanhood. Then we could have him realisti realistically
cally realistically lynched.
Os course in Depression-Yille, wed have a
lot of guys march on Washington: or what would
look like Washington. Then wed get some realis realistic
tic realistic looking soldiers to shoot em down. We'd
also have guys selling apples along with guys jump jumping
ing jumping off roofs.
It would really be terrific, he continued.
And, naturally we could build a duplicate of
both Harlem and Watts nearby to show progress
in our own time. I think wed probably call this
* Harlatts-Vi le, he said.
Keally, the Disney official continued, this
can be a sort of living museum to an America
which seems to be disappearing.
We asked if this was a total and final concept
as presented to us.
At Disney East there wont be such a thing
as a total concept, the official replied. We
realize that growth comes to any good idea much
as it comes to a healthy child.
No, I believe there can be continuous addi additions
tions additions to Poverty-Land. We can build ramshackle
Southern slums there along with crumbling Nor Northern
thern Northern tenements. We can even re-create such things
as murderous fires caused by antiquated Kerosine
space-heaters.
And then, too, we could do cities like Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville justice by giving their more select areas
a place in our little world. Certainly, it is entire entirely
ly entirely feasable to build homes one hundred years old,
without plumbing, without heating, without even a
coat of paint. Whatsmore, Pm sure you realize
that we can re-create streets without sewers.
And, it might not be too hard to get some anti antique
que antique 1967 model cars submerged in the puddles
this twentieth century oversight created.
Infact, we might even be able to depict the
lives of migrant workers if we could get hold of
some beaten up old school busses.
The most important thing is to keep an open
mind in this thing. Poverty is an evergrowing
concept and it should not be artifically limited,
he said.

either, said the Ambassador
firmly. Thats the deal.
You have just wrecked our
economy, said Premier Hoc
sadly. There is nothing left to
fight for.
So the U. S. withdrew its
advisers. Premier Hoo made a
dramatic flight to freedom os tl, (
French Riviera taking all his
democracy-loving officers id
him. In a chartered Piper
And Premier Ho, good as his rd,
never bombed another count;.,
again. If ever.
* *
So the world gladly forgot West
Vhtnnng. But the peace-loving
Vhtnnngian peasants grate! ally
erected an obelisk in the capital
of Sag On. The moving inscription
says: This shaft is for the Ameri American
can American President in memory of his
fair and generous peace offer which
ended the war.
But, oddly enough, they got his
name wrong. For at the bottom it
says: Ho Ho Ho.



Growing Eyebrows
The Latest Fad?
EDITOR: _

Maybe the following conversation was overheard on campus:
Excuse me sir, but may I take your picture?
What are you, some
Im from the Alligator and were running a feature article on eye eyebrows.
brows. eyebrows. Would you tell me why you decided to grow eyebrows?
Well, lets see. Pve always wondered how Id look if I let my
eyebrows grow, but social pressures kept me from doing so. But

No Place
To Park
EDITOR:
When I registered at the univ university,
ersity, university, I did so in order to be
permitted to attend classes at the
university. I also had to reg register
ister register my car, so that I could
drive it, not on campus as I
was led to believe, but in Alachua
Countv.
I am married and over 21 years
old (24). I must drive to school,
or be driven by my wife. Recently
I made the mistake of using the
rights or privileges which
I had supposedly bought by reg registering
istering registering my carl drove it to
school
About 8:30 a.m. I parked behind
Norman Hall to go to the library
in that building. It took John
Law no more than 10 minutes
to slap a yellow ticket on the
windshield.
What was I supposed to do doleave
leave doleave the car in the middle of
the street? Park it in the middle
of Gainesville? I only brought
the car to school one day because
I needed it. I learned early that
there is no place on campus to
park, especially if you are a com commuter.
muter. commuter.
In attempting to contact someone
to protest the ticket, I was given
such a run-around that I finally
gave up. I certainly hope that
our illustrious traffic-committee
receives more benefit from my
SI.OO fine that my baby would have
received.
STEVE HULSEY, £UC

Support Committee Statements Mostly Fact

By BO LOZOFF
Wayne Boyntons second article, entitled
Support Committee Statements Border
Mostly On Ignorance, is an amazing work.
Everyone who has ever been to the Farm
Workers Support Committee meetings must
wonder where Mr. Boynton heard those
statements. I shall briefly display his journal journalistic
istic journalistic style where relating statements is
concerned.
Boynton states, A woman about to have a
baby was denied admittance to a hospital
because of a lack of insurance. She walked
behind the hospital and had her baby in the
alley. The basis for this statement was a
discussion of migrant health problems, and
what was really said by me was that I know
(and I do) a woman from the area who was
denied admittance to a hospital because she
had no money, and her labor pains began
shortly after leaving the hospital.
She had her baby in a car, as do many
women who begin unexpected labor. This
statement wasnt even made as testimony
to bad migrant living conditions, for I have
also been denied admittance to a hospital
(a county hospital) for lack of money, when_l
needed an operation.
Many instances happen like this every
day, and naive students should realize this
before they assume the duties of news newspaper
paper newspaper columnists.

now the political philosophy gen generally
erally generally associated with long brows
is less unpopular.
I see. Would you say this is
an outward manifestation of an
inner desire to assert your mascu masculinity
linity masculinity or to prove a point of some
kind?
Perhaps. But what really hap happened
pened happened was that I ran out of brow browshaving
shaving browshaving blades the same weekend
that I ran out of money and when
I finally had money enough to get
blades again, I found myself trying
to decide how I should trim my
curly brows, not whether I should
keep them.
Do you feel that having long
brows has affected your per personality
sonality personality or what people think of
you?
I would say yes. One is bound
to feel more defensive and sus suspicious
picious suspicious of others when he has so
much difficulty seeing through his
brows.
I have found that people nat naturally
urally naturally assume you never bathe.
It is also disconcerting to walk
past a Security Seminar partici participant
pant participant and have him give that faint
condescending sneer. One called
me a wild-eyed radical when he
overheard me telling another in interviewer
terviewer interviewer that 15,000 cars cant be
parked in 5,000 spaces.
I see. What do your friends
say about your long eyebrows?
They agree that I look better
with them. See, with my eyebrows
long, my eyes appear set and firm,
giving me a determined look. With Without
out Without the brows, I just have fat eyes.
I can understand your point.
Well, shall we shoot that picture
now?
0.K., but would you take It
from the left. Im better looking
from the right and the Alligator
always puts the pictures in back backwards.
wards. backwards.
On the other hand, maybe it
wasnt.
ART CRUMMER

S/TvlK/V, (H I

Since space wont allow me to quote all
of Mr. Boyntons incredible misstatements,
I must instead document some facts which he
has attributed to our ignorance. Yes, 100
per cent of farm workers children do have
parasitic diseases in context with the
rest of the statement in Immokalee,
Fla., of those children examined in a medical
survey in 1965, of farm workers* children
15 years of age and under.
Again, I resent the journalistic style by
which the latter part of that statement was
kept from the student body. Yes, there are
no child labor laws for agriculture in
context with -- except the clause concern concerning
ing concerning hazardous duty (operating machinery,
etc.) Otherwise, anything goes for farm
workers kids, including field work.
Boyntons statement that all farmers
are subject to Federal Offense charges if
caught using child labor is, Im afraid,
without legal foundation, as can be proven
in any law library.
Boynton denies the existence of any for formalized
malized formalized or non-formal, public or secret,
farmer's union in the glades. I suggest
he contact George Wed,..worth, President of

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the second of a
two-part column on the recent Tigert Hall
sit-in).
By 808 MORAN
Alligator Columnist
BOB: There was a picture in one of the papers
of two coeds carrying a sign Nude Power.
Was that a part of your demonstration?
TRUDY: It was just a spontaneous thing. It
was a joke, an attempt to lighten the atmosphere.
No more of that was seen. Except for another
joke Id like to clear up. A group of us were
sitting in the vigil before President Reitzs
office. We were making up signs to let the
students know there was going to be another
teach-in that afternoon. One of the boys sitting
there was playing a round and making up signs
just for fun. One of them said Colonel Boaz
Lives another said Nude Power. Unfor Unfortunately
tunately Unfortunately when the signs were gathered, rather
hastily, these were included. But they were
a joke and not meant to be put up.
BOB: You mentioned the steering committee.
Just what was that?
TRUDY: After sitting around with the whole
demonstration talking, a few of the interested
participants met on the second floor to draw
up suggestions for the group to vote on. I was
part of the steering committee because I was
interested and wanted to find out what was going
on and maybe help.
BOB: Would you comment on your leaders?
TRUDY: The leaders were people, I guess
like myself, who have big mouths and enjoy
shooting it off. I shouldnt say that about them
it puts them in a very bad light. They were
just shoved in front of the group because they
had something to say and leadership qualities.
I would like to clarify one point. Alan Levin
was not a leader, just a very vocal participant.
BOB: Did you feel your leaders tried to
guide you? Or do you feel they worked against
you?
TRUDY: For the most part they tried to guide
us. At least Armando (Lazano) and Bernie
(Wisser) did. I dont know if its libel if I say
Bo (Lozoff), perhaps unconscienciously, tried to
guide us to his own ends. Maybe I shouldnt say
this, but its something I feel after having
looked over the situation in retrospect.
BOB: Was the demonstration organized at the
first teach-in?
TRUDY: It wasnt organized. It just happened.
You might call it a demonstration happening.
BOB: Steve?

More Needed Like Protesters
For A Great University

EDITOR:
I think the statement by 27
student leaders that the protesters

Nude Power Said f Joke

the Florida Fruit and Vegetable Growers
Association, who is a wealthy farmer him himself
self himself in the Belle Glade area, and who had a
conference with James Pierce, Coordinator of
the Industrial Union Department, AFL-CIO
during this past month, in which Wedgworth
represented the farming interests of the area
in discussing the conflicts with Pierce, who
represented the union efforts. The black
list of wompn workers denied by Boynton
does exist, since this is the truth I an not
afraid to mention names: Sam Crissam, the
farmer against whom the wildcat strike was
first enacted, refused to rehire the women
who had been his employes, who now com comprise
prise comprise the union office staff. Mr. Boynton
refers to several criticisms I voiced against
some (not all) crew leaders concerning of offers
fers offers of high wages and then payments of
low ones.
He concludes this attack by saying Com Common
mon Common sense would tell even j>ejple unfamiliar
with agriculture that this type of crew boss
would not last long.
His logic is valid. The union is the result
of all these activities which common sense
could tell someone would not be perpetually
permitted. This kind of crew leader wont
last much longer because the people will have
a union to prevent such practices. Meanwhile,
many crueler acts than these characterize
the farm workers life, as will be discussed
further on.

Wednesday, February 22, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

at Tigert Hall are not represen representative
tative representative of the UF Student Body as
a whole highlights the function

STEVE: Shell know more about that. Shes
the one who gave the speech to get us over
there.
BOB: Oh! You made THE speech?
TRUDY: Im the one. I got up on the micro microphone
phone microphone and said, 1 think they might hear us a
little bit better, papa might understand what
the kids want, if we go over and sit on his
knee. And his knee happens to be Tigert Hall.
So we went over and sat on the steps of Tigert
in hopes Papa J. Wayne might hear whaFwe
were saying. I think he was out for the evening.
BOB: What do you mean by Papa J. Wayne
Reitz?
TRUDY: I mean that President Reitz repre represents
sents represents the University. The University is acting
in loco parentis. Therefore President Reitz is
our father.
BOB: The second teach-in originated from
the demonstration?
TRUDY: Yes.
BOB: Why did it originate from the demon demonstration?
stration? demonstration?
STEVE: Well, we felt we should regroup.
People would have classes during the day and
we needed time to come back and decide what
we should do from there. There were no
definite plans.
BOB: Anything to add Trudy?
TRUDY: I want to comment on some of the
problems. The fact that it was spontaneous.
Everyone was upset over this issue but didnt
know what concrete plans to make. There were
many different points of view and student
types.
BOB: Is there any other comment either of
you would like to make?
STEVE: I have one gripe about the demon demonstrators.
strators. demonstrators. A person got up to make a speech.
Our leaders were in disagreement with him.
It seemed they couldnt wait to get the micro microphone
phone microphone away from him. This, I think, sort of
defeated our whole purpose, that ALL students
are first-class.
This boy, making the speech, said, The
real Americans shouldnt be here with all these
beatniks. These sloppy, bearded people. There
just wasnt that many bearded people there.
TRUDY: Theres one further point Id like to
make. One thing that convinced me we should
continue the demonstration. I was one of a group
of about 10 students that met with President
Reitz, informally. We told him the things we
thought important. He nodded his head and
seemed interested. Then we brought up the
major point in asking him to speak before
us.

of the protest. The student leaders
are right in saying the protesters
are not representative of the stu student
dent student body as a whole, because they
are in political science terminol terminology
ogy terminology a pressure or interest group
who are lobbying with the only
tangible asset they have their
physical presence.
Admittedly, they have a vested
interest, but one of the most im important
portant important in our pluralistic soctety soctetytheir
their soctetytheir rights and freedoms as citi citizens
zens citizens and students.
Student leaders, by virtue of
their positions, can influence Uni University
versity University policy through formal
channels, but this does not pre preclude
clude preclude the right of interested groups
to also seek recognition for and
attainment of their objectives.
Political Science texts adfnit the
positive functions of interest
croups in st' te and national gov government,
ernment, government, and it is here the Uni University
versity University community, the adminis administration,
tration, administration, the student leaders and
the Student Body, have failed both
themselves and the protesters.
They seek to ignore and/or belittle
the questionings and contributions
of a group interested enough to
sleep on the floor and become a
focus for ridicule and pressure.
Perhaps, if more people were like
these all too few students and
faculty, the UF would become the
first rate University it is always
talking about becoming.
TIM DRAGO, 7AS

Page 7



l, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 22, 1967

Page 8

Buz is a mighty proud fellow when esco^
Goheem, XO, to his Big Week- new Tenses
x *~ I
JM K
m'< ..3JWHKI BHRHtf .WV ; M
j|jSj^:, , >"' '?£ '
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jB ,'~ I H ;. a.. i "-j-'J-.' ,' ,;' *,-. "^r^Bj /.*; -.*... '-fc
v B[
McGinnis, >L
AOPi, will enjoy J\ j^B
next week-end because J^y^L\j JB
she did this last week ~. BP*
she deposited her mad money in a savings tF
account at UNIVERSITY CITY BANK. Sandy knows it. f
safe, and its there when she needs it. Join Sandy and .^^a^H||||Bi||H^^fcy.-
hundreds of other smart students. Let your mad money gaii. w
some sane interest at UCB:
S,

J

Youre In The Swjl
(BIG WEEK-END!
'.' Jp|gjl|||

**
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For YOUR Big Week-End t
ever in this stylish shit
Junior Accent, hut the
This long-sleeve shift e- 1
flattering stand-up collai.
Penetrating dots float in
special party dress. i uS
. .worth coming downtown



c Os Things With
lon campus)
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om SILVERMANS. Its called
ccent is definitely on Susan.
u res the Empire look with a
fii in luxurious Rayon acetate,
jlazzling yellow to make this a
one of m any from SILVERMANS
for!

Youll be the sweetheart of any party in this tri-color 4^
linen dress by Lanz. Its just one from the fabulous
Springtime Selection of party dresses from DONIGANS. lKj|||£k
Accessories are easily coordinated -- like these sling- % I.mHMI
back heels by Etienne. The Aigner-straw bag is also m J/tKESSLe>>-
fv.
Iff | 4.
. xHMply Whenever hunger strikes during
Bfc : MSmjW the Big Week-End, take a tip from
Hi JKBmm Car l yn Greanys, (DG) wink. Enjoy
WmW a J B y from JERRYS, North
or South. After the party, have a piece
more
M"' 1 Ik.
t??,Jr 9 ****'* < 1%&
When she gets
the big news, Nancy Fath needs to be lying down.
What more comfortable spot could she find than B&
her own bedroom at UNIVERSITY GARDENS!
Comfort is the keynote at University wardens.
This could go on for hours, so wed better
leave her here. .where we know shell be
By* . *;; i
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Kj' aaMlWy .f:,, WaHHLjSf. ,-
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4
Wednesday, February 22, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
GOOD USED MOTEL TV sets at
very low price. GE-RCA makes.
Call 376-4667. (A-101-3t-c)
BEGINNING GOLFERS: Wilson
starter set, 5 irons, 2 woods
Plus bag. $25. Call 376-0509.
(A-101-lt-p)
10 x 57 HOUSETRAILER. Two
bedrooms, study, 1 1/2 bath, air
conditioned, also has small awning.
First $2500. offer accepted. Pine Pinehurst
hurst Pinehurst Park Lot 22. 378-4341. (A (A---101-3t-pj
--101-3t-pj (A---101-3t-pj
19GG HONDA 305 cc SUPER HAWK
for sale. 2,500 miles, will sac sacrifice
rifice sacrifice for $395 cash or will trade
for car. Call 372-597 G. (A-101-
st-c)
MYSTERIES, SCIENCE FICTION,
and other good novels. All hard hardback
back hardback books. Just 25 to 50? a
piece. Call 378-2058. (A-101-lt-c)
4x7 ENCLOSED UTILITY trailer.
Good for Storage, $125. Call
372-59G2. (A-101-lt-p)
UM MONO TAPE RECORDER AND
tapes. Takes five inch reels.
S4O. Call Mike Farris, 376-9229,
room 3128. (A-101-3t-nc)
GO 60 MPH. WITH 100 m.p.g.
on GS Honda S-90 in perfect con condition.
dition. condition. Babied by married student.
s2socallEd 376-1896. (A- 101-3 t-c)
10x50 PACEMAKER, 2 bedroom,
fully carpeted, air-conditioned.
Ideal for student. Prefer to sell
but will consider renting. 378-
2982. (A-97-10t-c).
BASENJI PUP, Registered AKC,
top blood lines, $75.00. Call 481-
2362 after 5 p.m. (A-96-st-c).
1957 TRIUMPH 650 Motor Cycle,
dependable road machine. $275.
See at Diamond Village, 305-13.
(A-99-3t- c).
a
$290 WEBCOR 4 TRACK STEREO
tape recorder. One year old.
$l9O or make offer. Call Gary
372-9351. (A-100-3-C)
HONDA TRAIL 55, just overhauled,
excellent condition, can be seen at
111 NW 19 ST., room 14.
(A-100-5-P)
1965 VESPA 150 motorscooter.
Extras, 1500 miles. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Originally $495. Forced
to sell. Call 372-9285, Rm. 785,
evenings. (A-100-3-P)
|
rT 7:15 io-50 ,:i Siss

_ for rent
ENJOY EVERY MINUTE OF Spring
in the quiet luxury of UNIVERSITY
GARDENS APARTMENTS. Youll
love it! Phone 376- 6720, 708
SW 16th Avenue. (B-101-st-c)
FOR RENT OR SALE three bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, two bath home with central
heat. Built in Kitchen, carport
and storage area. Available now.
Call 372-3826. (B-101-10t-c)
3 BEDROOM and 2 bath, central
air-condition and heat, family
room, screen porch, fenced patio
with child size doll house. Dish Dishwasher-disposal,
washer-disposal, Dishwasher-disposal, electric stove
and oven. Available April 15.
Yearly lease at $170.00 per month.
Call 372-6524. (B-98-lOt-c).
COED Room mate to share spacious
2 bedroom house immediately.
Close to campus. Own room. Rent
$45 per month. Call 378-3315. (B (B---
--- (B--- st-c).
TWO OR THREE STUDENT APT.
Living room, kitchen, one bedroom
and bath. Completely furnished,
air-conditioned. All utilities in included.
cluded. included. SIOO per month. Call
376-8463. (B-100-4-C)
HEY! HAVE YOU HEARD? Colonial
Manor Apts. NOW have Summer
rates of SIOO per month, May thru
August, on all apts. BUT Reser Reservations
vations Reservations MUST be made NOW. Call
or go by Colonial Manor Apart Apartments,
ments, Apartments, 1216 SW 2nd Avenue, 372-
7111. (B-97-10t-c).
THREE & FOUR Room Apt. Uti Utilities
lities Utilities partially furnished. S4O, $45,
S6O Craddock Apts. 11l S.W. 3rd
Ave. 376-6424 after 5:30 p.m.
(B-99- 3t-c).
TWO BEDROOM Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, living room, dining room,
kitchen, private bath and entrance,
lights and water furnished. Four
blocks from Campus. Call 378-
5811 or 372-9704. (B-95-10t-c).
GO GO GATOR ADS!
help wanted
SUMMER RESORT
Southern Michigan Resort
30th year, Jack & Jill Ranch,
young adult guests exclusively
19 to 35. Reply S. Winslow,
1430 So. Baysbore Drive,
Miami, Florida 33131. Will
correspond and arrange Inter Interviews
views Interviews on campus. Single appli applicants
cants applicants only, age 20to 35. Gross
monthly pay shown for each
position. You will be charged
S2O weekly for lodging, meals
and activities. START WORK
MAY Uth THRU SEPT. 17th.
FEMALE POSITIONS:
WAITRESSES $244.
SNACK BAR CLERKS-$244.
OFFICE, Experience,
Good Typist $260.
MALE POSITIONS:
MUSICIANS COMBIN COMBINATION
ATION COMBINATION SPORTS A SOCIAL
STAFF Guitar, Plano
Organ, Trombone, Trum Trumpet,
pet, Trumpet, Accordlan $309.
WRANGLERS Minimum
Age 21, Experience with
horses $276.
YARD MAN Lawns A
Maintenance $260. >
OFFICE- Good Typist,
Mlsc. Work $260.
DISH WASHER Operator
s26o.
POTS A PANS Washer
- $260.
BUS BOYS Kitchen, Din Dining
ing Dining Rm. $260.
SNACK BAR CLERK $260.

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 22, 1967

Page 10

wanted
RIDE RS WANTE D TAL L A HAS
SEE AND BACK ANY WEEKEND.
CAR HAS STEREO UNIT. 376-
9205 ASK FOR STEVE IN 814
OR LEAVE MESSAGE. (C-101-
lt-p)
WANTED ONE MALE roommate
to share apartment at French
Quarter with three others. Ex Expenses
penses Expenses SSO per month. Contact
Joe Southern 376- 8317 (C-101-
4t-c)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for two bedroom unfurnished
apartment. Near campus and town.
Call 372-2429 after 5 P.M. (C-100-
4t-c)
help wanted
EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY for
bright gal to assist major company
in its advertising programs. Short
hourson campusexcellent pay.
Write American Association of
College Students, 30 North La
Salle, Chicago, 111. 60602 (E-100-
lt-C)
STUDENT or student wife to oper operate
ate operate Justowriters in preparing copy
for FLORIDA ALLIGATOR. Ex Experienced
perienced Experienced operator preferred but
not essential. Proficient typing
ability mandatory. Contact Mr.
White or Mr. Myking in office of
the Board of Student Publications,
Basement, Florida Union. (E-85-
tf-nc).
lost-found
FOUND MANS wallet, Turned in
at Student Publications office,
Basement, Florida Union. Owner
may claim upon identification and
payment of this ad. (L-101-tsc)
LOST Carmichelle, fussy black
puppy with flea collar in NW
section. Miss him muchly. Call
378-4647 after 5 P.M. REWARD.
(L-101-3t-c)
sM
Wmm
Ingmar Bergman is one
of the most peculiarly
gifted and demoniacally
creative movie makers
of modern times. Wild
Strawberries' has been
widely acclaimed as his
master piece...smoshingl y
beautiful to see."
lil'll P BERGMANS
r A 1 \
_ y 13 5 7 9 Out 10:30

autos
1960 FALCON FOR SALE, clean,
low mileage; Triumph 650 motor motorcycle,
cycle, motorcycle, $450. Call 378-1776 after
5:30 P. M. (A 101-st-c)
1964 Rambler American Station
wagon, 4 doors, very clean perfect
condition. S6OO cash and assume
payments. See at 321 N. E. 9th
St. after 5:30 p.m. or weekends.
Phone 376-8458 (G-101-lt-P)
1967 VALIANT FOUR DOOR, Pick
up payments of $75 per month.
Call Mrs. Hinton at Campus Fed Federal
eral Federal Union ext. 2973. (G-101-3t-c)
1958 MGA WITH 1962 engine, mach machanically
anically machanically good, body needs some
work. Must sell fast, $275. Call
372-5464. (G-101-3t-c)
1959 VOLVO, FOUR SPEED, runs
good, call Bob, 378-1174 (G-101-
2t-p)
WOULD YOU BELIEVE! SIOO
below list. 1964 Fiat 1100 D. low
mileage, good tires, in excellent
condition, radio, heater, seatbelts.
$595 Call: Ext. 2832 between
8 a.m. & 5 p.m. (G-101-3t-nc)
1960 AC BRISTOL, new michelin
tires. Many spare parts. Beaut Beautiful
iful Beautiful aluminum body, tube chassis,
light and fast. 378-3353 or Univ.
ext 2848 S. Boots (G-100-4-C)
1960 TRIUMPH TR3- A, yellow with
red upholstry, white top and ton tonneau
neau tonneau cover. Call Ron, 376-3261,
ext. 2360 days or 376-1505 eve evenings.
nings. evenings. (G-98-st-c).
1965 FASTBACK MUSTANG. 28?
cu. in. 4 speed, chromed wheels
and many extras. Contact R. Litt
after 6 p.m. 372-6078. Leave mes message.
sage. message. (G-97- st-c).

GET A KICK OUT |
{ OF GATOR ADS! \

M I "WILD ANGELS" I M
M I m
STARTS TOMORROW!
\BEAUTIFUL YOUNGI
V MOONLIGHTING' J
COLOR WIVES
F,RST J?O
NO ONE ADMITTED
UNDER 18 V
j?nSil
- IN COLOR PAUL NEWMAN*
..A J< i A WOODWARD 1
I n/CMAiniun op chaveliar |<
IflfCWjVjjVP OF LOVE THELMA RITTER!

PART-TIME STUDDir
Work 20 Hours/Week
Earn S4O/Week
6pm-10pm
M onday-Friday
For Appointment,
Call 372-5594
6PM-7PM
GATOR ADS
JUST SLAY ME! I
te)ARWIHY THING'S*!
S, HAPPENED I§|
ON THE MW TO fl
UtHEFORUM'* JM
I sugcistid kS~|
\ LAST TIME /
\ TOMORROW /
\ Jfk/
\^a£Sri
\ DAILY AT 2 P.M. & /
1 8 P.M. 1
1
THEATRE



CLASSIFIEDS

H personal
MS 208? Small group
session 7-10 P.M. Friday
3-6 P.M. SATURDAY. VERY
RATES. Call Bob
Heart, One way Sigma Kaps
win on Derby Day. (J-101-lt-p)
OBSESSION is the finest
film on a contemporary
that I have seenPaul
NY Herald Tribune. In
fainr. Sunday MSB. (J-101-lt-c)
BcORD CLUB FOR STUDENTS
HLY 30% discount on your choice
jazz, folk, pop, classical
. Send $2.00 for membership
price list and catalog
Am pus Communications, Box
Ad, Village Station, New York,
- 100- Bt- P ).
Anted: People who like to hold
Hch other while dancing. Great
sound at Winn jammer. El Trio
Besco. Winn jammer Tuesday,
Bursday and Saturday, 9:30 p.m.
Bd S.W. 2nd Avenue, 376-9265.
97-7 t-c).
1 w
llf GATOR ADS \
ARE DREAMY!/
I m
l\ **
[ *B
V§ ? i
I V 1 I
*
BAB| 1

HS. CHOICE
ast Beef
id Dressing
IO x=, 1
( a^e Qa
9iJW.Univ.Av*. 9 v
Block West of Fla. Theatre
1 A SHORT WALK FROM CAMPUS

BI3BB-STABTS TODAY- -UZZ -1- l -.^t-
Emot^nanm^!
As ,:. f ,# .* *< -* * ** T

Wednesday, February 22, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

personal
TRAVEL TO EUROPE Rome,
Switzerland, Paris, London. 5
weeks, 4 college credits. Less than
SBOO, (including all meals and
transportation). Contact: Danny
Scarborough, Box 7777, 376-9120.
(J-98-4t-p).
Have pet RABBIT would like to
find good home for it. Interested?
Call Mel at 372-5749 after 5 p.m.
(J-99- 3t-c).
ELECTRIC Utility rates inGaines inGainesville
ville inGainesville are the HIGHEST in the con continental
tinental continental U.S.A. for small commer commercial
cial commercial users of up to 6,000 KWH in
cities our size. Above 6,000 KWH,
a few cities have worse rates.
Your church, your schools and your
grocery store pay these high com commercial
mercial commercial rates. Who pays in the end?
You do, of course. COURT
COLLIER will work for lower cost
electric power. Vote COLLIER for
City Commission, March 21. (J (J---
--- (J--- st-p).
services
BE GENTLE, BE KIND, to that
expensive carpet, clean it with
Blue Lustre. Rent electric sham shampooer,
pooer, shampooer, sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(M-101-lt-c)
IN A HURRY? Passports applica applications,
tions, applications, childrens photos, commer commercials
cials commercials and special problems.
WESTLEY ROOSEVELT STUDIOS,
372-0300, 909 N.W. 6th Street.
(M-68-ts-c).

Page 11

SALES
A R
0
1C
K
I Use
Gator
Ads

KUBITSCEK:
Revolution Will Come
m
To Latin America

Revolution will come to Latin
America, in one form or another,
the former president of Brazil
told UF students Monday night.
Dr. Juscelino Kubitschek, pres president
ident president of Brazil from 1956 to 1961,
said the tone the revolution
would depend on the extent of
development and democracy
within the Latin American coun countries.
tries. countries.
In a lengthy address sponsored
by the University's Committee on
Public Functions and Lectures in
University Auditorium, Kubitschek
insisted the development and
democracy hold the key to the fu future
ture future of the Latin American
nations.
He charged the United States,
as the powerful leader of the free
world, with the obligation and
duty to assist in the development
of South America, largely through
the Alliance for Progress.
Kubitschek criticized the pres present
ent present administraton in Brazil for
destroying democracy in that coun country
try country and said unrest, hunger,
growing cities, lack of jobs, and
general lack of development in
Latin America were leading toward
the necessity of social change.
The Alliance for Progress has
within itself the seed of mutual
understanding. If it is implemented
with intelligence and foresight, it
will bear fruits, the former Braz Brazilian
ilian Brazilian president said.
He added: When there is
tyranny, when each year there are
more and more people clamoring
for food, then change is inevitable.
And when the change is deeper and
fundamental, that is a revolution.
The changes will have to be
deep and widespread and in this
sense we must expect revolution
in Latin America, he said.
Kubitschek pointed out, There
was fundamental change when I
was president of Brazil. Where
there was no industry, we built
jobs. That is true revolution. That
is democracy and development.
Whether the revolutions which
are to come in Latin America
will be peaceful or violent, dem democratic
ocratic democratic or totalitarian, no one
can say. But.the revolution wall
come, in one form or another.
In a country where govern governments
ments governments rule with popular support,
where the need for change and
development is understood, the
revolution will be peaceful, he
said. But where a handful of
power-seeking men in an alliance

For Food Italiono
Those in the |
Know I
| GO! GO! GO!
ISPCCIAU.T KM AUTHENTIC ITALIAN FOOD
U.S. 441 4 miles south of University Ave.
4:30 10:00 CLOSED TUESDAY

with some military elements
choose to ignore popular demand,
choose to rule outside democratic
forms, then the change that will
comethe revolution will be ex explosive,
plosive, explosive, uncontrollable and vio violent.
lent. violent.
Kubitschek warned against the
changes taking place in Brazil
today, such as the elimination of
free elections, free speech and
that nations constitution and
warned they could only lead to
trouble.
He also went on record sup supporting
porting supporting freely the doctrine of non nonintervention
intervention nonintervention and said the Inter-
American police force supported
by Brazil and the United States
could lead to intervention in any
country where the government was
not acceptable to the Hemispheres
two most powerful countries.
Latin America, he said, is much
more important to the United States
than Vietnam and Southeast Asia.
He questioned how the United States
could fight for liberty in Asia
and yet support governments that
would do away with democracy in
Latin America.
Symphony Sets
Benefit Concert
A worthy cause, a nationally
known soprano and the University
of Florida Symphony Orchestra
will make music together Sunday
and Monday.
The occasionan annual benefit
concert for the Cleva J. Carson
Memorial Music Scholarship Fund
Concert.
The soprano-Saramae Endich Endichhas
has Endichhas brought warmth and color
to audiences of the opera, the re recital
cital recital and the orchestra.
Singing selections - Mozart,
Strauss, Gounod and others, Miss
Endichs performances are de designed
signed designed to help support students
studying music at the university
through the Carson Fund. She
will be assisted by Symphony Con Conductor
ductor Conductor Edward Troupin.
The late Cleva J. Carson, whose
name is carried by the scholar scholarship,
ship, scholarship, was director of music at
P.K.Yonge Laboratory School from
1934 till 1947.
The performances at Universit}
Auditorium, will r- :t 4 p.r
Sunday and 8:15 p.n Monday. Ad Admission
mission Admission is free for IT students
and $2 for all others.
Tickets are on sale at the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union, the Record Bar anc
Belk-Lindseys.



Page 12

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 22, 197

CASH
Available
$25 to S6OO
Payday Short Term

Orange

Address All Campus Calendar
Not ices To Public Functions
Office, Florida Union
*
.. #"V 4 -*-
Special Not mi*; ,r1 a. Union Sponsored trip to Puerto
Rico and tin Vii ii. Mantis. April 22-23. San Juan,
St. Thomas a,a 21 5 I nit'll, e>.i. 37 1 i
Applations it... In-inn accepted for Ridon Boat 1
International ( nil n ittee, Apply 21a Union
Wednesda ~ : 11 J
I ycftm (os i ; : Ai HI 1. T- t I la. Gym., 2:la p.n
Volinn It. Col ul in ineering tor Engineer's 1- air
Gtim mi i inulj.sl
Stall' Board mid Pharmacy Exam, College of Pharm Pharmacy
acy Pharmacy 9 a.in.
Phi Sipina Sigma: l ecture, lld Union, 7 p.m.
1-la. Speleological Society, meeting: 212 Union, 7p.m.
Veterans ( hit): Group meeting and movie, Union Aud.,
7:20 p.m.
Florida folk 1 lancers: Gance, Social Poom, 8 p.m.

Address All Administrative and General Notices
to tin Division of Informational Services, Building H.
ETS ORE: The Graduate Record Examination will
be given Saturday, Feb. 25, 8:45 a.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
ID CARD PHOTOS: Identification photographs will
be taken every Friday, 8 a.m. 12 noon, at Photo Photographic
graphic Photographic Section, Building L. There will be a $5
fee for replacing lost or stolen ID cards. Anyone
finding an ID card should return it to Photographic
Services, where it will be kept on file.
Ki Mo\ \| in I GRADES: Feb. 27 is the dead deadline
line deadline tor removing l grades (excluding 699 and 79 )
for all graduate students who wish to receive their
degrees on April 22.
FAI I ORIENTATION GROUP READERS: Students
with at least a 2.0 average may sign up to inter interview
view interview for group leaders and stalf positions Feb.
20-24, Feb. 27, March 0 and March 12, from 1-
4:30 p.m., Information Desk, Tigert Hall. Inter Interview.-,
view.-, Interview.-, will be held i eb. 27 through March 17, from
2:30 4:30 p.m., Dean of Men's Oft ice. Graduate
students will l>e interviewed Feb, 28, 2:30-4:30,
Dean of Men's Office.
PROGRESS TESTS
Students in the following courses are expected to
take the following tests. Each student must b~i a
No. 2 lead pencil and will be required to use his
SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER.
CEH 131 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Feb. 23,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with (A-L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12,
13, 14 or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.

LOW
INTEREST RATES
.
ON LOANS

TRAVEL EXPENSE
CHECK DELAYED

Call
376-5333

Administrative
s Notices

Se rving U of F Employees Since 1935
PROGRAM OF THRIFT, CREDIT, SERVICE
&
Goinesville Florido Campus Federal Credit Union 5 $
Building J Extension 2973

Marion Finance Co.

BLUE BULLETIN
Campus Calendar

Florida Union Prog ram Gfficp; Students Confront
State, McCartv And.. 3:30 p.m.
Thursday, February 23
Accounting Dept. Lecture: Dr. Lawrence R. Vance,
The-Road to Reform of Accounting Principles,
18 Mat., 3:40 p.m.
Phi Chi fheta: meeting, il< Union, 7:30 p.m.
Beta Alpha Psi: Business meeting, 14 Mat., 3 p.m.
Florida Players: A Touch of the Poet," Norman
Hall, 7:30 p.m.
Trends in Theology Lecture: Dr. Thomas Preston,
Moral Man in Immoral Society, Episcopal Stu Student
dent Student Center, 8 p.m.
Union Board: Public Relations Comm., 210 Union, 7
p.m.
International Committee: meeting, 220 Union, 7 p.m.
Young Republicans: Group meeting, 218 Union,
7:30 p.m.

CEH 132 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Feb. 23,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
v tto Floyd 106 or 109; (B) Peabody 1,2, 4,
5,7, 10 or 11; (C) report to Leigh 207; (D) report
to Little 121, 125 or 127; (E) report to Little 113;
(F) report to Matherly 213, 216 or 219; (G) report
to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; (H) report to Pea Peabody
body Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209; (I-J) report to Flint
110 or 112; (K) report to Walker 301, 303, 307, or
308; (L) report to Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; (M)
report to Little 213, 215, 217, 219, 221, 223, 225
or 227; (N) report to Little 233 or 235; (O) report
to Little 237 or 239; (P-Q) report to Flint 101 or
102; (R) report to Floyd 108; (S) report to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) report to Little 101 or 109:
(W-Z) report to Walker Auditorin'"
CMS 171 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Feb. 28,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A-
Z) report to Little 201, 203, 205, 207, 213, 215,
217, 219, 221, 223, 225, 227, 233. 235, 237 or 239.
MS 20G PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Feb. 2j, 7
p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Matherly 2, 3, 4,5, G, 7,8, 5, 10, 11,
12, 13, 14, or 16; (M-/) report to Matherly 102,
105, 108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
MS 207 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Feb. 28, 7
p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
General
Notices
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE: I'.cKeta now on sale
for AL HU- T, W. H. AUDEN, UNIVERSITY 01
CHESTRA, FLORIDA PLAYERS A Touch oi the
Poet, and LIT

LOANS
VACATION

and

CHECK DELAYED
PAYDAY LOANS

Christum Science: meeting, Union \ud., > p.m.
Fainting' It T Fun: Chinese brush painting, 213 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Forestry Club; Business meetim li'!insojj_l outre,
I la. Union. 7:30 p.m.
Finlay, I ebruniw 24
Political' Science am I 'Co 11 eg I; iTt ' "Ct wHi i FTi vi rTif *f .N;
Lecture, I ord Ca radon, Dangers and Hopes a: the
1.N.," Iuiv. Aud., H:l3 p.m. LecepHon tol loveim.
lecture in Bryan lounge,
Florida Players: -A Touch of the Poet Norman Ila i }~
8 p.m.
Dance Committee: Dance featuring The Better Half
and go-go dancers, Hideaway Discotheque, 8 p.m.
270 admission for men.
Chess Club, 217 Union, 7 p.m.
Union Movie: A Time to Love and A Time to Die.
MSB And., 7 & 0:27 p.m.
Placement
Notices
Students must be registered with the Placement < >f >ffive
five >ffive to interview. Sign-up sheets are posted two weeks
in advance of the interview date at Building 11. All
companies will be recruiting for April and August
grads unless otherwise indicated, (indicates hiring
juniors for summer employment.)
FEB 22: R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO. --
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MAHONEY, & ARNER -- Acctg.
I KB. 22, 23: PLOCTOI & GAMBf E CO. -- Bus,
L(;on, Mgrnt, ChE, Chem, ME, EE, Eng." Sci.' BUCK-
KYI CELLULOSE CORP. -- ChE, ME, EE, IE,
CE.- CinES SEE.VICE Oil CO. -- GE, ChE, hL,
hug. Sci, IE, ME, Acctg, Bank, Fin Mktg, Trans,
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14k PT. Os -JUSTICE -- Law, Acctg.
I LB. 23: All 1 EDUCTION CO. ChE, ME, MetE,
Phvsics, Chern, Gen. Bus, Acctg. COLLEGE LIFE
INSURANCE CO. OF AMERICA -- Bus, Lib. Arts,
LD. ELGIN All FORCE BASE -- AE, EE, ME, Math,
Physics. MEAD CORP. -- Acctg, Mktg, Fin, .Chem.
Eng, ME, IE, CE, EE. KOPPERS CO., INC. and
SINCI.AIR-KOPPEIvS CO. -- Chern, ChE, CE, EE,
ME. AUSTIN CO. -- CE, EE, Bldg. Coristr. FORD
MOTOR CO. -- Bus. Ad, Acctg, Econ, Stat, Mktg,
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Hie king of trumpet will crown a queen tonight at Florida
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King A1 Hirt will crown the 1967 Miss UF during intermission
I the Hirt music show and a packed house undoubtedly will see the
premony.
| The new University beauty will come from the ranks of five semi seminalists
nalists seminalists Josephine Brooker Young, Canal Point; Suzanne Teate,
icksonville, the 1966 Gator Bowl queen; SuzAnn Hull, Ormond Beach;
ristin E. Watson, Pensacola, and Marsha Nan Goheen of St. Peters Petersarg.
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Winner of the contest, conducted under rules of the Miss America
ageant, will represent the University in the Miss Florida Pageant
i Sarasota next June.
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In the modern corporation the
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GAINESVILLE AIRPORT WALDO ROAD

TIGERT TERMS IUEGAL
Crocodile Sale Banned

By BILL DOUTHAT
Alligator Staff Writer
The Crocodile, an off-campus
newspaper, went on sale in
front of the main library Monday
morning, but profits were cut-off
after two hours when the UF ad administration
ministration administration declared its sale
against university regulations.
Lucien Cross, editor of the lib liberal
eral liberal publication, said a campus
police officer confronted him at
the library and told him he was
in violation of the UF student
code. Cross said he then accom accompanied
panied accompanied the officer to talk with Dean
of Student Affairs Lester Hale
and UF Business Manager Wil William
liam William Elmore.
Cross said he was given per permission
mission permission to sell the Crocodile on
campus from Steve Johnson, UF
vending machine manager.
Johnson told the Alligator Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday he did not know the Crocodile
was to be sold. He said he as assumed
sumed assumed that it would be given away
as it was last summer.

From Page 1

situations in the future.
Shepherd mentioned his reor reorganization
ganization reorganization of the Ececutive branch
and called for the same in the
Legislative.
This Legislative Council faces
new challenges, Shepherd.said.
It must deal with the budget, the
new constitution and other things
of import. It must do so res responsibly.
ponsibly. responsibly.
Shepherd called for a $30,000
squeezing of the new budget to
finance new recreation areas.
There hasnt been a new ten tennie
nie tennie court built on this campus in
four years, he said. And there
are no facilities at all in the Tol Tolbert-Graham
bert-Graham Tolbert-Graham complex. It is imper imperative
ative imperative that we do something on this
immediately.
A Student Publications Commi Commission,
ssion, Commission, set up to look into the fin financial
ancial financial setup and the inner-work inner-workings
ings inner-workings of the Alligator, Seminole,
Release, was recommended by
Shepherd. He hinted that monies
might be saved here.

Student Escapes From Russia

From Page ~1

t~- refut~ Todorov arrived in New York
City in March, 1966. He decided
to take one year for a good look
at America.
He met Roger Himlepp Friday,
Feb. 10, on a bus between Tam Tampa
pa Tampa and Sarasota. During their con conversation
versation conversation Himlepp extended an in-


Active in Alumn
SENATE iH
(Paid Political Adrortlaerot) j

Hale said only registered
Florida newspapers or publi publications
cations publications applying to the personal
advocacy code could be sold on
campus. The code allows publi publications
cations publications of advocacy, but not those
designed for commercial enter enterprize.
prize. enterprize.

Cafeteria lines fared better with student comments than did the
snack bars, but both areas drew criticism on quantity and quality
of food, cleanliness, variety and slow service.
In the seven qualities measured by the survey variety, speed,
attitude of workers, cleanliness, taste, quantity, and temperature
of food -- 65 per cent of the questionnaires returned ranked the
cafeteria lines no higher than fair," and 77 per cent ranked the
snack bars from very bad" to fair."
Suggestions for improvements in cafeteria fare included adding
more meats, soft drinks and sandwiches; different breads, and more
rotation of foods. In the snack bars, the addition of more soups,
salads, vegetables and pastries were suggested.

Council Review Set

The president aimed a barb at
the Seminole, claiming it ought
to be paid for by those who buy
it and not the entire student body.
He concluded his address with
reference to the setup of a bond bonding
ing bonding program, expansion of the
housing survey and revampment
of the present insurance situation.
After Shepherd left, the Council
listened to Seminole Editor Nel
Laughon explain why she felt the
students had voted to change the
annuals name. Former Student
Body President Arthur I. (Buddy)
Jacobs backed Miss Laughon.
But, after arguments from both,
Council elected to stick with its
decision to hold another referen referendum
dum referendum when the constitution is voted
upon later this trimester.
Miss Laughon argued that the
overwhelming majority of students
did want the name changed. But
she admitted she wasnt sure if
there was a consensus on what
the new name should be.
I wouldnt be against a run runoff
off runoff between Gator and Orange and
Blue (the top two finishers in the
recent referendum), she said.

vitation to meet real Americans
not tourists, not New Yorkers,
but ordinary Americans.
In todays Russia, Todorov not noted,
ed, noted, the secret police are never
seen. They work in undercover,
carrying out political assassina assassinations
tions assassinations and blaming the deaths upon
criminals. Once a person is ar arrested
rested arrested in Russia, said the refu refut~

Wednesday, February 22, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Food Service Survey

I dont know how we will fight
it," said Cross, but it will be
fought." Cross said the Croco Crocodile
dile Crocodile would be'', sold off-campus and
given away oh- campus.
The Crocodile, which sells for
five-cents a copy, was first pub published
lished published last summer.

From Page 1

But the Council insisted on a
new election with Seminole still
on the ballot.
After approving the yet-to-be yet-to-bepublished
published yet-to-bepublished Florida Review request
for name change, the Council took
up the topic that was expected to
generate heat Shepherds 10-
man Cabinet.
There was no opposition to the
setup of a five-man committee to
investigate the Cabinet, but Uni University
versity University Partys Terry Moore ques questioned
tioned questioned Shepherds appointment of
three commissioners, which the
president said did not require
Council approval.
I think its usurping Council
authority to give these people Ca Cabinet
binet Cabinet stature without our appro approval,"
val," approval," Moore said.
His argument was quieted after
the meeting, however, when Shep Shepherd
herd Shepherd said he had no objection to
the committees review of the three
Commissioners Lewis Miles,
Joe Mason and Henry Mehlman.
I did not mean to deprive
Legislative Council of its auth authority,"
ority," authority," Shepherd said afterward.
I shall be happy to submit the
commissioners to the committee.

gee, he is assured of some form
of trial, but there are few poli political
tical political arrests. Dissenters simply
disappear or are murdered by
criminals."
There are 4 million Commun Communist
ist Communist Party members in Russia to today,
day, today, Todorov emphasized again and
again, and 244 million Russians
who are not communist at all.
These, he says are his people.
They live hoping not for a re revolution
volution revolution his people have seen
enough bloodshed -- but for the
gradual death of communism.
They see promising signs in the
slight liberalization taking place
under the present regime, but dont
be fooled, Todorov warns, by this
tactic.
Todorov seemed enthusiastic about
Gainesville and UF. He left Fri Friday
day Friday morning for New Orleans on
the next leg of his cross country
tour. Himlepp expressed the hope
that Todorov would return.
Fidelity Lin ion Insurance
ISIS
37G-1208

Page 13



Gators Take On Seminoles
'4 >'
Try For New UF Record

By 808 BECK
Alligator Sports Editor
Coach Tommy Bartletts Gators
go after FSUs scalps tonight at
Tallahassee in an attempt to set
a new Florida basketball won-loss
record.
The hot and cold Seminoles will
be out to stall the Gators into an
upset victim. Last time FSU tried
to stall, UF nailed the squad 50-
30.
A Florida victory would give
the Gators their best record in
history with 10-4. The old re record
cord record set in 1964-65 was 18-7.
If the Gators can break the
expected FSU dont shoot offense,
almost every Gator should get a
chance to see some action.
After this contest, Florida has
two remaining games. The Ga Gators
tors Gators play Mississippi Slate away
World Series
In Atlanta?
By DAVID M. MOFFIT
ATLANTA (UPI) -- By George,
I can not tell a lie: We could
well be within eight months of the
first World Series ever held in
Dixie.
There are plenty of baseball
people who feel that the Atlanta
Braves have a good shot at the
National League pennant this year.
Consider these facts:
The Braves start off under Man Manager
ager Manager Billy Hitchcock. Below .500
before Hitchcock took command
last August, the Braves played .640
ball (32-18) the last two months,
best pace in the league.
Young pitchers Pat Jarvis and
Dick Kelley, who pulled a sagging
mound staff up by its stocks,
will be on hand from the start
and ace lefthander Denver Le~
ma.-tri is reported well again.
Speedy Mack Jor.es, long-hit long-hitinc
inc long-hitinc .er.terfielder, ill open the
seas, in 7 after losing the
first month of GC.
The Braves infield has to be
better defensively with Clete
Boyer, the slick-fielding ex-Yan ex-Yankee.
kee. ex-Yankee. at third base instead of the
slowed down Eddie Mathews.
The Braves arent likely to miss
Mathews bat either: they hit 207
homers last season and he had
only 16- just two more than Boyer.
And you have to start off with
the assumption that the Los An Angeles
geles Angeles Dodgers arent likely to
successfully defend their title
without Sandy Koufax.
The Braves finished fifth last
season, 10 games off the pace.
They *scored more runs than any anyone
one anyone else in the league and it isnt
hard to figure out that a shade
better defense could vault them to
the top.
The key will be the pitching.
; ir t thander Tony Cloninger, a 24-
game winner in 65, went 13 in innings
nings innings opening night and seldom
returned to form while posting
a 14- 11 mark.
Lemaster staged two great duels
with Koufax before running into
arm trouble. If both are right in
67, the Braves could roll.
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Feb. 27 and Georgia here on March
3.
Forward Gary Keller is now
leading the Gator scoring aver average
age average with 15.2 points per game.
Forward Dave Miller has a 14.3
average, while Skip Higley and
Neal Walk have 11.4 and 11.0
averages.
In rebounding, Keller continues
to set a higher school record.
He has 818. Keller leads the SEC
in rebounding with a 10. 7 aver average.
age. average.
Boyd Welseh is the hottest shoot shooting

P r M |j| 1^1^; gfm. mm
Mm Hr
VBhlb V 1
l I i II IT
1 m*w (r
.*vs .m lav v
HI Wk M
mm. ft
Imm
jf#
1 j iyF
f
TOUGH BALL GAME -- Pi Kappa Phis Marty
Solomon hits for two points. Rick Perillo
(left) and Steve Goldfadden (right) defend for
Tau Epsilon Phi. TEP won the intramural
battle, 40-34. (Photo by Bob Byrk)
The Store For \
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ing shooting field goal ace on the Gator
squad, hitting 55.2 per cent of his
shots. Walk is running a close
second at 50.9 per cent. How However,
ever, However, Welseh has not scored a
point in the Gators last three
games.
1 ;
Kurt Feazel has the best per percentage
centage percentage from the free throw line,
scoring at a 83.3 per cent pace.
Jeff Ramsey is the only other
Gator hitting over 80 per cent of
his foul shots. He has an 80.4
average.

SPORTS

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 22, 1967

Page 14

Former UF Golfers Earn
Over Million Dollars

Former UF golfers have earned
more money on the PGA Tour
than any other collegiate group in
the nation.
Leading the list is Doug San Sanders,
ders, Sanders, ($454,932.08), followed by
Dave Ragan, ($195,245.54); Tommy
Aaron, ($183,061.90); Dan Sikes,
($171,377.40), and Frank Beard,
($164,373.59).
The group together has earned
over a million dollars. Laurie
Hammer, a former all-American,
has played on the tour for one
'year and has earned $3,667.57.
Other pros A1 Kelly and Don Bis Bisplinghoff

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plinghoff Bisplinghoff have also earned money
on the tour.
Bob Murphy, NCAA Winner and
National Amateur Champion has
passed up pro golf to go into
business in L.akeland.
Its a real tribute to our over overall
all overall program to produce such fine
golfers, who have graduated from
Florida, remarked Director of
Athletics Ray Graves.

ATiVTP
liJuriEi
IS BRISK, BRASH, BAWOYI



ALLIGATOR SPORTS SPECTACULAR
JERRY'S STRAWBERRY BOWL

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TWO PEOPLE IN THIS CROWD
-- arent very enthusiastic
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HTfH
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4 NEXT TIME MAKE IT CHOCOLATE*
... v ;
lra Core winner with 40 pies to his credit

Jy --^.A:?'^Sr/ft4f /a
fflP'r "A
B&. Bu' / # lEf
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By A-a *-
Hl^i
I CANT BARE THE SIGHT
-- this coed doesnt have a strong stomach
v^"' IfIBHHBBBBP 1 Sflfl
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hwi^^B:v'J^w^^wgo^:aramssife:- : -. .. : ?^^mBi^BBHBBB^^EKKnB^HBB^HKttKmBSU^^^BHBaBIi^BSH^HHaMBBSBmR^BEBKBmBBttI^B^^^&
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SAiv s|HKr /?>; i% s v { J ) |^Xf '< J n -'' e Y'X '
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GIVE THEM HELL GATOR
-- Morris Mathers ate 27 pies instead

BP
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-- to sweet
i
(Photos by Nick Arroyo)

Wednesday, February 22, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

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GULP SLURP GAG
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Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 22, 1967

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SKIP HIGLEY
. .fans favorite

Terrell Claims Foul,
Begins Rematch Effort

NEW YO-KK (Uil) Ernie Ter Terrell
rell Terrell began his campaign Tuesday
for a rematch with Cassius Clay
by trying to prove he lost their
Feb. (> heavyweight title fight be because
cause because of the champions foul deeds.
Terrell, wearing a heavy ban bandage
dage bandage over his injured left eye,
gave a running dialogue white
shown a film of the first
four rounds, during which he
claimed Clay intentionally tried to
foul him.
"My big beef is here, said
Ernie. "He used those first four
rounds deliberate!) trying to foul
me.
Clay apparently succeeded quite
well because Terrell explained that
he had multiple vision after the
third round, due to his damaged
eye which will require from six
to eight weeks to heal.
"After the third round, I saw
three images, said Terrell.
"There were always three of him,
and the images got wider, made
him look bigger when I got far farther
ther farther away. I just tried to pro protect
tect protect my eye after that.
He added, "If itd happened in
the 12th round and Clay was way
ahead, Id say hes just the bet better
ter better fighter, but it happened in the
third, and I couldnt see for 12
rounds. He was beating a partial
fighter. The whole point of this
conference is I know I can
take the guy apart.
However, Terrell was even more
upset about a recent television in interview
terview interview in which Clay said Er Ernie
nie Ernie called him by his Black Mus Muslim
lim Muslim name of Muhammad Ali.
Clay continually asked Terrell,
"Whats my name? while deal dealing
ing dealing out punishment. During a tel televised
evised televised interview, Clay said Ter Terrell
rell Terrell called him Muhammad Ali
during a clinch.
"Thats a lie, its a big lie,
said Terrell after listening to the
pe of Clays interview. "I nev never

er never called him that, and it shows
hes a liar.
From the time the fighters were
called from their corners for pre prefight
fight prefight instruction, Terrell said Clay
began calling him such names as
"a white mans Negro and an Un Uncle
cle Uncle Tom.
"Id have .been an Uncle Tom
if Id called him Muhammad Ali,
said Terrell.
"When we were getting instruc instructions,
tions, instructions, he began saying things like,
You represent the wrong group.
You cant beat us because you eat
white mans food.
He was looking at me to see if
I was afraid, but I said he was
a little afraid ox he wouldnt have
had to say those things.
The film aas run in slow mo motion
tion motion during alleged fouls by Clay,
and Terrell explained how Clay
often extended his thumb while
jabbing towards the challengers
eyes.
Terrell shrugged off his punches
at Clays back and neck during
clinches by saying that boxing
rules permit a fighter "to pound
away during clinches as long as
hes got one hand free.

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Higley Best All-Around Guard
I ve Ever CoachedBartlett

Take it from Florida basketball coach Tommy
Bartlett, theres not much room for in prove provement
ment provement for his guard and captain Skip Higley.
"Hes the best all-around guard Ive ever
coached, says Bartlett. He does everything well
and is as fine a floor leader as youll see in
basketball.
Higley, a 6-0 senior from Akron, Ohio, is a
favorite of Gator fans for his leadership and
defensive antics. He is currently averaging three
steals per game, but he can score from outside
when needed.
I know Skip could average 20 points a game
if he wanted to shoot more, says Bartlett. He
scores well now but takes only percentage shots
and would rather feed the ball inside to our big
men, who get an even better shot.
Higley is averaging 11.3 points per game, his
high being 22 in Floridas 83-75 victory over Van Vanderbilt
derbilt Vanderbilt one week ago.

This years freshman football
team should be fairly good, said
Coach Charles H. Rabbit Smith,
UF director of recruiting, but
they cant do much better than
last years team, which posted a
3-0 record.
We have signed up about 40
players on four-year scholar scholarships,
ships, scholarships, said Smith. It was a poor
year for recruiting backfield men,
but we got a good bunch of line linemen.
men. linemen. The numbers we recruited
were smaller, but we got three
or four of the best backs in the
state.
One of the reasons for the small
amount of players is the compe competition
tition competition from other colleges, said
Smith. There are about 19 col colleges
leges colleges recruiting in the Florida
high schools.
Florida high schools have some
good prospects, he said, so col colleges
leges colleges come here to get players.
Another factor accounting for
the small amount of players we
get is the high academic standards
at UF. The entrance requirements
at Florida are among the highest
in the Southeast, he said.
When we go recruiting, we are
looking primarily for football play players,
ers, players, Smith said. We have divi divided
ded divided Florida into nine areas with
a recruiter in each area, not to
mention recruiters who go out of
state.
We get some good players from
all over. But these boys must
first meet our academic standards.
If thev cannot get into the uni university,
versity, university, then we cant take them
and they go somewhere else to
play bail.
It is better to have one great
star and some mediocre players,
than to have a lot of medium
quality players. The freshman
team is the place to get prepar prepared
ed prepared for varsity football and to
build good players, but we also
like to win our games, Smith
said.

Forty Sign Scholarships

He scores quickly when the Gators need it
most. In many tight games this year he lias pro provided
vided provided the baskets which break the other teams
back and put Florida out of reach.
Against Ole Miss, for example, the Gators led
43-39 in the second half when Higley stole the
ball three consecutive times, going all the way
for two layups and passing off to Neal Walk for
a third. This broke it open and the Gators ran up
a 21-point bulge and finally won by 15.
Against Kentucky, with Florida holding only a 32-
23 margin, Higley hit two straight long jump
shots then drove down the lane and passed off
to Boyd Weisch for an easy basket. Then he stole
the ball, went the length of the court and passed
off to Jeff Ramsey, who hit a basket and was
fouled for a three point play.
By the time Kentucky got over the shock it was
45-23 with the Gators firmly in control the rest
of the way for an 89-72 victory.

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