Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
flk vfisggtf Jr
I UFs SECOND RELEASE
has four nudes on the cover

The Florida Alligator

Vol. 59. No. 99

End Off-Campus
Control By Tigert
Protesters Ask
By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Editorial Editor
Bernie Wissers Student Constitutional Committee has evidently
run into a snag and where it goes from here is anybodys guess.
Wisser, chairman of the committee chartered by the 150 Tigert
Hall protestors, charged that Student Body President Charles Shep Shepherd
herd Shepherd has refused to set up formal constitution lines between his

Appeal
Decision
In Doubt
By STEVE HULL
Alligator Executive Editor
Plans to appeal the punishment
given to Pamme Brewer for posing
nude in the off campus humor
magazine, the Charlatan, have
reached a stalemate.
Originally the decision to appeal
the case was to be announced early
this week, but according to Selig
Goldin, we are not sure when the
announcement will now be made.
Goldin has contacted Miss
Brewers parents concerning the
possibility of reversing the FDCs
decision to place the coed on social
probation.
However, Goldin, when contacted
Sunday, wouldnt release what
terms were discussed with the
coeds parents.
There is a question whether a
punishment handed down by the
FDC can be appealed.
We are doing further research
into the case to ascertain if the
punishment can actually be ap appealed.
pealed. appealed. Goldin said.
Goldin could recall no precedent
setting case where a university
discipline committee decision had
been reversed.
A student on social probation,
is closely scrutinized by the Dean
of Women concerning all campus
activities, and can be expelled
from school for infraction of stu student
dent student conduct rules.
Miss Brewer was placed on
probation for two trimesters.

committee and the already alreadyexistent
existent alreadyexistent Student constitutional
committee.
The last time I met with Shep Shepherd,
herd, Shepherd, he gave me a copy of the
proposed constitution, Wisser
said. The Shepherd Constitu Constitution
tion Constitution has no statement of pr '.ci '.ciples
ples '.ciples or bill of rights.
Wisser added that the proposed
constitution allows for all Honor
Court appeals to go before the
Faculty Discipline Committee.
Thats absurd, Wisser said,
especially in view of student opin opinion
ion opinion of the FDC.
Wisser said his committee would
not accept anything less than a
definite policy that the University
cannot govern the off- campus, non non(SEE
(SEE non(SEE RIGHTS PAGE 9)

FORMED ALTERNATE SG GROUP

UF Students Vetoed Joining NSA

By HAROLD KENNEDY
Alligator Staff Writer
Never has the National Student Association (NSA)
been affiliated with the University of Florida, ac according
cording according to Student Body President Charles Shep Shepherd.
herd. Shepherd.
NSA is the student government organization which
the Washington Post and Rampart Magazine say is
subsidized by the Central Intelligence Agency.
In fact, according to Drew Haslett, 4AS, UF stu students
dents students who opposed the radical NSA were instru instrumental
mental instrumental in forming the Associated Student Govern Governments
ments Governments (ASG) of the United States, a rival group.
In the fall of 1963, says Haslett, students voted
in a referendum not to join NSA. It was too for
left of center; because of malapportionment it was
dominated by small New England colleges; and most
of the members were small colleges with little in
common with us.
Students felt that NSA concerned themselves too

More Humor, Satire
For Second 'Release

By J. T. COATES
Alligator Corresoondent
Release/ a UF sponsored magazine combining
satire and literary style goes on sale today at various
locations on campus. This months edition will deal
more with humor and satirical barbs, than the first
Release.
Getting the magazine started has been a combination
of headaches and pleasure for Earl Kicliter, Release
Editor.
The first thing we had to consider in planning
the format of the magazine was to try and stay bet between
ween between the students and Dean Hale, Kicliter stated.
Hale has the power to kill the publication if he does doesnt
nt doesnt like it, and if the magazine is too sterile, the stu students
dents students wont buy it.
Actually, money isnt a big problem, since Re Release
lease Release is supported by university funds, Kicliter
said. What were trying to do now is find new people
for our staff who will able to take over next year.
I spend about 20 to 25 hours a week working on the
magazine, and would like to relinquish the job to
someone else next year.

University of Florida, Gainesville

Research Library Being Readied
For Opening In Late March

Moving more than 600,000 vol volumns
umns volumns of rare books and research
materials into the new research lib library
rary library will begin this week.
The six-story graduate research
library costing almost $2 mil-


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If 2 fljli m 8 SSI IIL flj ''
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if J*
BY GOD YOU WONT, Con Melody, played by Mike Biestle,
tells his daughter Sara, who is played by Ruth Ann Hellwig in Florida
Players production of A Touch of the Poet. The play will start
this week. See Story page 2. (Photo by Nick Arroyo)

much with national political and social problems
and not enough with individual colleges problems,
according to Shepherd.
A movement headed by Ken Kennedy, then Student
Body President, Bill McCullom, and Haslett organi organized
zed organized opposition to joining NSA, and the measure
was defeated.
Seeking to form a non-political, college-oriented
organization, representatives of several college
student governments, including UF, met the follow following
ing following spring to form ASG.
Shepherd says membership in ASG helped UF
acquire such ideas as the ACCENT program and the
teacher evaluation plan.
Haslett notes the difference in financing between
the rival groups. NSA receives donations from
* private organizations" to support its many public
relations activities and large full-time staff. ASG
receives only dues from member colleges to pay
for its one full-time employee, the presidents
private secretary, and for its yearly conventions.

We believe our present issue is a lot different
from the previous one. There is a lot more humor and
satire than before, he added.
This issue includes Gainesville the City of
Light, a humorous history of Gainesville, a criti criticism
cism criticism of the liberal attitude by Alan Levin, and a
couple of serious essays.
There will also be an article, You Have Lost
the Right to Choose, by Dennis Jowaises, concern concerning
ing concerning the lack of choice in our societv.
Jon Wiles has written a political analysis of the
November elections. In this piece, Wyles points out
that there was a lot of difference of opinion between
the campus and the rest of the state when the ballots
were counted.
A short story, Eurydice, by Gary Corseri, and
the work of three poets; Martin Curry, Spencer Cook,
and Charles Oliveros will also be included in this
issue, Kicliter added.
There will also be an Alligator parody that is
bound to get censure from someone, Kicliter stated.

lionis one of a kind in the entire
Southeast.
The movement should be com completed
pleted completed in late March.
Library Director Stanley West
said moving started immediately

Monday, February 20, 1967

after the Board of Regents architect
authorized occupancy of the building
late last week.
Included in the move will be rare
.books, special collections and the
P.K. Yonge Library of Florida His History.
tory. History.
West said it is hoped the fourth
and fifth floors, where these books
will be located, can be opened to
researchers by March 1. The rest
of the library will be opened on a
schedule in accordance with the
progress of the move.
The first floor, where the general
reference service will be located,
and the second floor, containing
administrative offices, are listed for
top priority in the move.
Other floors will contain faculty
study facilities, seminar rooms,
open and closed study carrels, read reading
ing reading rooms, reference departments,
stacks, periodicals and special col collections.
lections. collections.
Started in April, 1965, the library
was designed as a center for re research
search research and teaching at the graduate
level in the areas of the humanities
and social sciences to correspond to
the campus centers for the pro professions
fessions professions and sciences.
(SEE "LIBRARY, PAGE 9)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 20, 1967

Contest
- tzzfr-
Photos
Needed
The UF Fine Arts Committees
student photo contest is in danger
of fizzling for lack of entries.
Only a handful of entries have
been turned in so far in the Fine
Arts Committee office, despite
the fact that the office has been
open for entries since Feb. 1.
Our main problem, Helme
Walter, chairman of the Fine Arts
Committee, said, is thatstudents
dont know about the contest. We
havent been able to publicize it
enough to make the amateur photo photographers
graphers photographers aware that a contest
exists.
The deadline for submitting en entries
tries entries to Room 315, Florida Union,
is 5 p.m., Feb. 27.
The photos will be judged and
placed on display in the Florida
Union Gallery during the month of
March. Prizes will be awarded
for best of show, and first and
second place prizes in both the
black and white and the color
divisions.
Art Show
Features
USAF
Passers-bys walking through the
foyer of Shands Teaching Hospital
in the J. mills Miller Health Cen Center
ter Center have been seeing something un unusual
usual unusual in lobby decorationsfighter
pilots and ballistic missies.
The pilots and missies are on
canvaspart of the US Air Force
Art Exhibit on display in the Health
Center.
The exhibit is composed of 40
original paintings from the USAF
Art Collection of more than 2,500
paintings and drawings dating back
to World War I, The paintings in
the display here were donated to
the Air Force by artists from the
Scoieties of Illustrators of New York
Los Angeles and San Francisco.
To record on canvas the contemp contemporary
orary contemporary life of the Air Force, the
artists were flown to Air Force
installations all over the world.
Their impressions of what they saw
and felt have been documented on
more than 750 paintings donated dur during
ing during the past ten years.
The display, open from 8 a.m.
to 8 p.m. through Sunday, is spon sponsored
sored sponsored by the UF Air Force ROTC
, department and is open to the public
free of charge.

CIVIL ENGINEERING SENIORS!
Plan Your. Future lr
Public Works Engineering
CITY OF LOS ANGELES
BUREAU OF ENGINEERING
The tremendous growth and development of Los Angeles presents
challenging career opportunities to young engineers, helping to build
the fastest growing major city in the nation.
Our starting salary is $735 a month. In addition to excellent
salary, we offer job rotation and tuition reimbursement.
Arrange with the Placement Office to talk with our engineering
representative who will be on campus
MONDAY FEB 27 1967
, The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone o t all advert advert,
, advert, lsements and .to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever 1
possible
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice is given to the Ad Advertising
vertising Advertising Manager within 0) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator
will not be responsible for more than one incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
>to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of
Florida and Is published five times weekly except during May, June, and July when
. it Is published semi-weekly. Only editorials represent the official opinions of their authors.
Address correspondence to The Florida Alligator, Florida Union Building, University
of Florida, Gainesville, fla., 32601. The Alligator Is entered as second class matter
' at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.
a *r

B
A
T
M
A
N

'Poet
Starts
Thursday
Eugene ONeills exciting play of
an Irishmans fight against his
enemy, the common man, will be
presented by the Florida Players
Feb. 23 thru 25, Thursday through
Saturday, and March 1-4 at Nor Norman
man Norman Hall on the UF campus.
A Touch of the Poet has been
described by Director L. L. Zim Zimmerman
merman Zimmerman as poetry, violent, sur surging
ging surging passions and complex and
compelling characters. Dr. Zim Zimmerman,
merman, Zimmerman, director of the University
theatre, calls ONeills last full fulllength
length fulllength a directors dream.
Mike and Margaret Beistle, a
husband-and-wife team, will play
the lead roles as Con and Nora
Melody. Beistle, a Ph.D. candi candidate,
date, candidate, instructs freshman English.
Maggie, a womens residence
hall counselor is currently
directing a Gainesville Little
Theatre production.
Ruth Ann Hellwig, cast as the
daughter, described A Touch of
tiie Poet as an actors play.
Miss Hellwig, who has appeared
in many student presentations,
finds the tragedy involving the de destruction
struction destruction of a braggarts pride,
realistic and very demanding.
The drama will be presented at
7:30 p.m. on week nights and 8 p.m.
on Fridays and Saturdays.
Admission is 25 cents for Uni University
versity University students, 75 cents for
children and high school students
and $1.50 for faculty and the
general public.

A Ti ,rs elementary :
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Monday, February 20, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

UFs Academic
Atmosphere Is
Tops, Says Prof
By JUSTINE HARTMAN
Alligator Staff Wrttar
Does there exist at UF that nebulous and desirable thing called
an academic atmosphere'*?
UF is outshining the whole southeast, according to Dr. Walter
Herbert, professor of English. I realize that's not as important
as the Helsman Trophy, of course,'* he smiled, but it still has
its little importance.*'
Hie place where we are most bitterly in need of academic recog recognition
nition recognition and attitude is among the students, believes Herbert, whose
main concern at UF is dealing with superior students and seeing
that they have the best educationally.
Speaking of the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship regional Interviews
held recently in Orlando, Herbert said, Our UF students snowed
the doggone daylights out of them!*'
The UF group was larger in number and markedly superior
in quality to any other Florida institution, according to Herbert.
They were also superior to students from the rest of the region
(Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina) combined, he feels.
Dr. Ernest Cox, assistant dean of Arts and Sciences, feels that
there is, and yet that there is not, a stimulating academic atmos atmosphere
phere atmosphere concern for scholarship among the students. However, if
you're talking about the general culture here, theres not much of
an academic attitude.*'
The intellectual atmosphere at UF has improved quite a bit
and is continuing to improve,*' said Dr. E. Ruffin Jones, head of
the graduate school for Arts and Sciences. Evidence of this
improvement is the higher caliber of UF students and the high
ratings they are achieving on national tests. Florida students are
considerably sought after now, whereas in the past, they were
looked down upon,'' he said.
Jones would like to see the dean's lists published in the Alligator
and some type of printed recognition of superior scholarship sent
to those students who make the dean's lists.
Through the high honors program we've tried to show the
students how much we think of them, said Jones. Wed like to
enlarge this program and see this kind of instruction in many
areas of the university.
However, it is a more expensive kind of instruction and we
just don't have the money we need.*'
Jones feels that one of the main problems with the budget is
that UF is not allowed to spend the money where it is needed.
To encourage honors work in all areas of the university, there
has been discussion of creating a coordinator of honors pro programs,
grams, programs, according to Dr. Roy Lassiter, assistant dean of academic
affairs.
There are a few scattered honors courses here and there,
but no college other than Arts and Sciences has a coordinated
honors program. So far there has oeen no real effort devoted to
this. It is to be honed that quality will come with quantity,*' he
concluded.
Former Brazil President
Will Speak Here. Tonight

m
Brazil and the Alliance for Pro Progress
gress Progress will be discussed here
tonight by Juscelino Kubitschek,
former president of Brazil.
Speaking at 8:15 p.m. inUniver inUniversity
sity inUniversity Auditorium, Kubitschek is
sponsored by the Universitys
Public Functions and Lectures
Committee.
He served a five-year term as
president of Brazil, ending in 1961.;
He is presently on a two-month
lecture tour of the United States.
Kubitschek is a physician but
entered the political scene in
Brazil in 1934 when he was elected
federal representative for the states
of Minas Gerais.
Since his political exile, Kubit Kubitschek
schek Kubitschek has lived in Paris and New
York.

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Page 3



Page 4

!,. The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 20, 1967

Speck Trial
Set Today
In Peoria
PEORIA, 111. (UPI) Richard
Franklin Speck goes on trial here
today on charges of slaying eight
nurses at their Chicago dormi dormitory
tory dormitory last July 14.
The trial, moved here from
Chicago on a defense change of
venue motion, will be conducted
under the tightest security re restrictions
strictions restrictions and news coverage curbs
in Illinois history.
Circuit Judge Herbert C.
Paschen, brought here from Cook
County Chicago to preside at the
trial, scheduled a 9 a.m. news
conference today to comment on
protests against his restrictions on
news coverage of the trial, and
perhaps to modify those restric restrictions.
tions. restrictions.
Protests on the curbs were sub submitted
mitted submitted by the American News Newspaper
paper Newspaper Publishers Association, the
Radio and Television News Direc Directors
tors Directors Association and the American
Society of Newspaper Editors.
Speck, 25, a sometime seaman,
truck driver, laborer and a high
school dropout from Dallas, Tex.,
will be defended by Cook County
public defender Gerald Getty, 53,
an experienced defender of accused
slayers with an impressive record
of obtaining acquittals.

Thieves Net $350,000
Reubens, Old Masters Stolen
ZURICH, Switzerland (UPI) Burglars stole $350,000 in old
master paintings including a Peter Paul Rubens from a movie mag magnates
nates magnates office, police said Sunday. They said it looked like an amateur
job.
The theft raised Rubens, master of the buxom nude, to the lead in
recent world art thefts. The plucking of his Beheading of Cyrus
from the Zurich office made it six Rubens stolen in four burglaries.
The burglars also took an adding machine besides the $233,000
Rubens and paintings by Honore Daumier, Ferdinand Hodler and Jakob
Jordaens Saturday from the museum-like office of E mil Stoler, director
of Switzerlands Elite Film Co.
Police said there were signs the burglars possibly stumbled
onto the art treasures.
The burglars clumsily broke the paintings out of their gilt frames,
indicating they were strangers to valuable art, police said. The
crooks also smashed costly antique furniture they used as step stepladders
ladders stepladders to reaclr the old masters.
NFor Food Itoliano
Those in the |
Know I
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4:30 10:00 CLOSED TUESDAY

1
1
>4
j
Court Rulings,
Crime Said
Not Linked
WASHINGTON (UPI) Mem Members
bers Members of the Presidents Crime
Com mission Sunday rejected
claims that Supreme Court rul rulings
ings rulings and the civil rights move movement
ment movement caused U.S. crime rates to
spiral.
Nicholas Katzenbach, chairman
of the Commission, said claims
that court rulings haul sharply ag aggravated
gravated aggravated the crime problem were
inutterable nonsense.
Some critics have said this was
a side effect of the civil rights
movement and one of its major
tactics-civil disobendience.
Katzenbach and four commission
members appeared on the televi television
sion television show Meet the Press with
the groups executive director.
The commission made public a
340 page report Saturday that in included
cluded included more than 200 recommen recommendations
dations recommendations for reforms in police, court
and correctional practices.

HOUSE COMMITTEE MEETS

Powell Decision Due Today

WASHINGTON (UPI) A special
House committee, which will meet
today to explore ways of
disciplining Adam Clayton Powell,
apparently has dismissed the legal
issues which prompted the investi investigation
gation investigation of the Harlem Democrat.
The committee headed by Rep.
Emanuel Celler, D-N.Y., must
recommend to the House Thursday
whether it believes Powell should
be permitted to take the seat he
was denied on the opening day of
the 90th Congress, Jan. 10.
No report was expected from
todays meeting, but sources said
the committee would consider its
alternatives and may reach general
agreement on what action it should
recommend.
The issue which prompted the in investigation
vestigation investigation was Powells tangle
with New York State courts over
a defamation judgment and a con conviction
viction conviction for criminal contempt now
being appealed.
Hie nine committee members,
all lawyers, have steered clear of
this issue in the investigation,
which has focused instead on Pow Powell*
ell* Powell* s hiring practices and alleged
Soviet Paper
Criticizes NSA
MOSCOW (UPI) A Soviet
newspaper Sunday criticized the
U. S. National Students Association
for its links with the Central In Intelligence
telligence Intelligence Agency.
The entire history of the inter international
national international activities of the U. S.
National Students Association is
a long list of actions bearing the
hallmark of the Central In Intelligence
telligence Intelligence Agency, the newspaper
Komsomoloskaya Pravda said.
The newspaper is the organ of
the Soviet Young Com munist move movement.
ment. movement.

Well be on campus
soon to talk about a new
breed of engineering you
cant get a degree in.
. I
RANGE PROFESSIONAL." ItS a new discipline of our own creation... a blend of the
many technologies required to support our nations space and missile launches.
When a new grad joins Pan Am at the Eastern Test Range with a degree in electronic,
electrical, mechanical, chemical, civil or industrial engineering, physics, or math...or even
if hes an experienced specialist in telemetry, optics, hydraulics, radar, statistics, infrared,
orbital mechanics, data handling, communications or what have you...he soon becomes
proficient in many disciplines.
The multiple striking power of this all-around engineer goes a long way in explaining
our success with planning, engineering, and directing operation of the Air Forces multi multimillion
million multimillion dollar instrumentation complex stretching from Cape Kennedy to the Indian Ocean
and why were working ahead confidently for launches of MOL, Apollo, Voyager and a
host of other sophisticated programs.
Find out more about your potential as a Range Professional when our team visits
your campus. Arrange an appointment with your Placement Director now.
INTERVIEWS for BSEE. Monday, Tuesday, February 27, 28, 1967
f p r in i orma,ion * ana er of Co "Be Relations. Dept. 727. Guided Missiles Range
Aal fWayS lnC 750 rlando C a BaaCh " ri a
%
GUIDED MISSILES
RANGE DIVISION
PAN AMERICAN WORLD AIRWAYS, INC.
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personal travel at taxpayer ex expense.
pense. expense.
Celler said the committee felt

South Viet Paratroops
Repel Infantry Attack
SAIGON (UPI) South Vietnamese paratroopers supported by U.S.
air strikes and artillery fire repulsed a human wave assault by an
estimated 600 North Vietnamese infantrymen Sunday on the coastal
plains 325 miles north of Saigon.
Military spokesmen reported 200 Com munists killed in heavy fiehtinsr.

Peking Reports
Chinese Rift
HONG KONG (UPI) Peking
Radio Sunday reported a serious
rift among supporters of Com Communist
munist Communist Chinese party Chairman
Mao Tse-tung in Tsingtao, Red
Chinas largest naval base and
one time headquarters of the UJ3,
7th Fleet.
A broadcast said pro-Mao
revolutionary rebel organiza organizations
tions organizations which seized power in the
port city in Shantung Province last
month had engaged in irresponsi irresponsible
ble irresponsible physical attacks against each
other.
The broadcast Sunday said
Shanghai police have arrested the
ringleaders of two organizations
pretending to back Mao but working
to undermine the cultural revo revolution.
lution. revolution.

it would be improper to consiaei
charges against Powell which ma>
be dismissed by the appeals courts,

The new battle boosted the Com Communist
munist Communist death toll to more than 1,700
In a series of allied ground oper operations
ations operations launched since the Lunar
New Year cease-fire ended a week
ago.
Poor flying weather over wide
areas of North Vietnam limited
U. S. pilots to 87 missions Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, most of them against
bridges and coastal shipping in the
southern panhandle.
one Air Force Thunderchief jet
fighter-bomber was shot down by
groundfire over North Vietnam.
The UJS. command said both of its
crewmen were listed as missing in
action. It was the 475th plane lost
over the north since the air war
began more than two years ago.
U. S. military headquarters re reported
ported reported that artillery fire from the
destroyer Strauss sank a large
steel-hulled cargo vessel early
Sunday off the North Vietnamese
coast about 20 miles southeast of
Vinh.
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WORLD OF CINEMA

Tunny Thing More Than Funny

Bv DON FEDERMAN
Alligator Columnist
Richard Lester, creator of the
Beatle's films and "The Knack,*'
has scored another ringing triumph
In his adaptation of the ribald
Broadway hit, "A Funny Thing
Happened On The Way To The
Forum." Utilizing his now familiar
technique of frenetic camera
movements, dream fantasies which
define character, and "happening"
gags, coupled with an intimate
knowledge of the New Comedy of
Rome and the "commedia dell
'arte" o f Renaissance Italy, he
has put new zest into the already
great stage play.
In the ancient comedies of Rome,
the plots were dictated from sit situations
uations situations in private life, complete
with stock characters (e.g. the

Earl
Powers
U of F Graduate
Member Blue Key
Active in Alumn
Affairs
STATE SENATE

(Paid Political Advertisement)

Monday, February 20, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

scheming slave, downtrodden hus husband,
band, husband, young lovers, foolish ser servant,
vant, servant, etc.), stock props and situa situations
tions situations (e. g. empty house, com complex
plex complex plot of intrigue, slave girls),
and a somewhat earth dialogue.
The Renaissance polished the stock
characters and added the lazzi,
physical and verbal jokes which
were often irrelevant to the action,
but heighten the troubles being de depicted
picted depicted in the scene, For example,
the forty minute orgy scene of
"Funny Thing" is actually a fan fantastic
tastic fantastic collection of erotica situ situations
ations situations which underscore the para paradoxical
doxical paradoxical plight of slave Pseudolus
at that moment and the character
of Roman soldiers.
In addition to its Roman flavor,
the movie is also contemporary
in its hippy' choreography (note
Vibrata's frug), and the dropping

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of masks and marvelous inform informality
ality informality and freedom of expression.
During the music numbers, Lester
uses his camera to portray a vis visual
ual visual idea of his characters beyond
the stock conventions they norm normally
ally normally portray. Underlining the buf buffoonery
foonery buffoonery and human folly is a feeling
that comedy, more than a dramatic
vehicle for dissecting human na nature
ture nature and the "ways of the world,"
goes behind its commentary to
explore the limits of imagination.
For Lester, comedy is energy.
Lester's other trademarks of
greatness are also in abundance.
The women are again beautiful
Lester must have the greatest eye
in the business for conveying sen sensuality
suality sensuality in such talented bodies.
Acting too is superb. Mostel is
a master of facial expressions,
and his performance is no less than
his Broadway showing. Good sup support
port support from Silvers, Crawford, Gil Gilfors,
fors, Gilfors, and Horden with perhaps
only Keaton giving the only dis disappointing
appointing disappointing performance.
Overall "Funny Thing" does
not achieve the heights of say
"The Knack." It is still well
paced, very funny and highly im imaginative,
aginative, imaginative, though it overextends
itself towards the end in a chariot
scene in need of a little editing.
It is highly recommended and worth
a week night off from studies, since
it is scheduled to play at the Center
only through Thursday. Do try
and see it; it is the best thing
playing in town.

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 20, 1967

The Florida Alligator
'A Myyvty Ii Out RwM.PU'TltTuilt.'
i
> ~
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
? Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
j ANDY MOOR 808 BECK
Editorial Editor Soorts Editor
I j I I I 11. MU
What Did I Say?
Score another one for Tigert Hall.
Making a decision in the Pam me Brewer
case is one thing, but how you go about
releasing it to the public is quite another.
Normally, most of the public relations
releases on the University of Florida come
from Informational Services. The release
on Pamme Brewer and the FDCs decision
came from Info Services.
But it looks like every single word of it
was dictated by the powers that be in Tigert
Hall.
In fact, one FDC member called the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator recently and asked for a copy of
the release so I can see what I said.
Parts of the release, heavily slanted,
read as follows:
The committee took into account that
the Student Handbook contains a complete
statement concerning the ethical and moral
responsibilities of a student of the Uni University
versity University of Florida.
J
As weve pointed out before, thata a lot
of baloney. The Student Handbook and the
Code of Conduct are about as easy to pin pinpoint
point pinpoint as a needle in a haystack.
If you really want to have your intelli intelligence
gence intelligence insulted, read the following sen sentence.
tence. sentence. Its all one sentence.
The student agrees that his conduct
affects more than the mere academic or
scholastic aspects of University Life, that
the University has a responsibility to a
minor students parents for the conduct of
the student insofar as it is reasonable for
the University to assume such responsi responsibility,
bility, responsibility, that the student is under no obli obligation
gation obligation to continue as a student, if he is
unable to reconcile the requirements of
the University with his own ideas of proper
personal conduct, and that, as a member of
the University community, a student has
the obligation to conduct himself on and off
the campus in such a manner as not to
degrade him self or the University, regard regardless
less regardless of whether his conduct is lawful or
unlawful.
Thats what all the argument is about--
and it may be overturned if Miss Brewer
decides to fight the decision in court.
- But just as important, we feel ashamed
that the university, through Informational
Services, would try to pawn off such a
story on the states newspapers and the
public,
li thats an official Tigert Hall state statement,
ment, statement, someone should have had the
to pronounce the statement,
instead of giving it out through a thoroughly
despicable release.

THE CAMPUS MIRROR

Buddy' Is A Misnomer

By 808 MENAKER ~
Alligator Managing Editor
Now that the campaign is over,
we can all sit back and have a
good laugh. One of the funniest
sights of the compaign was former
Student Body President Buddy Ja Jacobs,
cobs, Jacobs, running around trying to
decide who to back in the pres presidential
idential presidential race.

Big Man On Campus
Ronsons Lighter Moments
- By SPENCER
Alligator Columnist

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Columnist
Ronson is no stranger to the pages
of the Alligator*-having been
around through both the editorial
purges of David Lawrence and
Benny Cason. Ronson, now re resigned
signed resigned to spending his life in
oblivion, will revisit from time to
time with his observations on
everything from Charles DeGaulle
to George Wackenhut.)
Some sage once muttered Pol Politics
itics Politics makes strange bedfellows,"
which was recently altered to
Bedfellows make strange polit politics,"
ics," politics," following Lurleen Wallace's
entrance into gubernatorial pol politics.
itics. politics.
As yet, no one has conceived a
slogan descriptive of the influx of
movie stars into the sequestered
halls of politics. One should.
Perhaps one like Movie stars
are best seen, not counted," or
Old movie stars never die, they
just run for office."
And win, it seems. First it was
George Murphy, wresting the Cal California
ifornia California Senate seat from the clutch clutches
es clutches cf cigar- smoking, pen-swinging,
oiano banging Pierre Salinger,
late of the Kennedy camp. But
the skeptics were willing to bet
Murphy's victory was the result
of the curious politics of Southern
California.
Then Steve Allen got the urge to
carry his liberal Ideas from tele television
vision television to the House of Represent Representatives.
atives. Representatives. Sadly to some, happily to
the likes of national columnist,
National Review editor and arch archconservative
conservative archconservative William F. Buckley,
Allen withdrew from the race.
Enter Ronald Reaga*, star of the
forties, of Death Valley Days, once'

Jacobs started off with Shepherd
but eventually switched to Larry
Tyree, despite the fact that most
of what was done in his admin administration
istration administration was due to Shepherd.
Jacobs fraternity, SAE, jumped
from Tyree to Rob Blue, leaving
him feeling a little lower than the
man without a country.
And when former presidential
candidate Ernie Litz announced he

and ultraliberal Democrat, now a
conservative Republican. IDs pitch
Pat Browns seat in Sacramento,
the governorship of the largest
state in the Union.
Despite the fact that Brown and
his well-greased (too well?) Dem Democratic
ocratic Democratic machine had bested former
Sen. Majority Leader William
(Bill) Knowlapd and ex-Vice Pres.
Richard MilhouseNixon,therown
image was not enough when match matched
ed matched against the charm of the Rea Reagans.
gans. Reagans. Reagan won by a million-vote
plurality, Pat was without a job and
stock in Boraxo took a climb.
Accompanying Brown on his
tours through sunny California was
none other than Gregory Peck, he
of the Guns of Navarone and
(SEE ACTORS, PAGE 7)

Florida Alligator Staff
NICK ARROYO JIM WHITE 9ICK TATRO'
Photo Editor Assistant Managing Editor pWlre Editor
GENE Nail 4STEFAKIE iJfeHJSF
Editorial Assistant Society
STAFF MEMBERS Harvey Alper, Bill Douthat, Elaine
Fuller, Kathie Keim, Bob Padecky, Judy Redfern, Frank
Shepherd, Lori Steele, Joe Torchia, Harold Kennedy,
Justine Hartman, Eunice Tall.
LAB ASSISTANTS Diana Folsom, Peggy Sneider, Andrew
Haslett Jr., Robert Blount, Joan Allen, Eddie Gutten Guttenmacher,
macher, Guttenmacher, Dick Blakely, Bob Menaker, Dave Reddick, David
Weiss, Kafen Eng, John Ellsworth, Diann Devine, Jerome'
Warren.

would stomp the dorms for Shep Shepherd,
herd, Shepherd, who was on the phone to
the principal of Gainesville High,
where Litz teaches, trying to stop
him? You guessed itBuddy-800.
The name Buddy** looks like it
is getting to be quite a misnomer.
Jacobs doesnt have too many
friends left around the third floor
any more.
Its also interesting to note that
Shepherd was beleagured by Ja Jacobs
cobs Jacobs all day Thursday and Friday
before the Pam me Brewer hearing.
Jacobs reportedly asked Shepherd
not to drag the presidency into
this.** Shepherd, as you may recall,
testified at the hearing. Could
it be that Jacobs wants Shepherd
to run the same status quo admin administration
istration administration that he did?
When Jacobs announced his
choices for the hardest working and
best cabinet members, at the SG
Inauguration banquet, he turned
quite a few heads. He named
Secretary of Interior Jay Scheck
as best member and Secretary of
Athletics Ira Liebesfeld as hardest
working. Nobody will dispute that
these two did fine jobs in their
respective positions, but doesnt
it strike you as strange that nearly
everyone got some sort of award of
appreciation from Jacobs except
Shepherd and Secretary of Aca Academic
demic Academic Affairs Bob Imholte, (now
Shepherds administrative assis assistant).
tant). assistant). Thats carrying pettiness to
a point of absurdity.
Shepherds cutting the cabinet
really hurt some of the boys on
the third floor. Seems a thing
like that cuts back on the number
of majors available for Blue Key.
It also increases the efficiency of
a cabinet which in the past has
been nothing but a big political
piewith most of the work coming
from a few people.
SHORT STUFF: Theres a big
move afoot in Legislative Council
to unite First and University Par Parties
ties Parties to defeat the majority enjoyed
by United Party, but it probably
wont happenat least not yet.
Informed sources say there wont
be any jump unless Majority Floor
Leader Greg Johnson continues to
be destructive. Seems Greg has it
in for First Partyand who can
blame him?
He was all set behind First
Party, had even written them a
SSO check. Then United dangled
that vice-presidential carrot in
front of him. I guess it hurts when
you know you could have been a
winner and you blew it. (He got
the check back...uncashed).
QUOTE OF THE WEEK:
Before the recent campaign be began,
gan, began, Uniteds Mike Colodny ap approached
proached approached First's Mike Garcia and
Clyde Taylor and called them a
pair of political light weights.*
If thats the case, Colodny, who
has been a winner only once in
eight years, is in the flyweight
class for sure.



She Lauds
Housing
Survey
EDITOR:
I have just completed a question questionnaire
naire questionnaire from the Student Government
Off-Campus Housing committee. It
was a very thorough form with
space for additional comments,
which I filled up. I think this
questionnaire was a very smart
move on someones part, and I
appreciated the opportunity to ex express
press express my views.
Luckily, I live in a very nice
apartment with three other girls
who are relatively east to get along
with. However, some students are
not so fortunate and there is a
definite need to have some of the
housing investigated. I hope the
survey will make these areas more
apparent.
I have heard that the area in
which I live is referred to as
Sin City". Well, since I have
moved in, there has been no unus unusually
ually unusually "sinful" activities nor any
malicious destruction.
I hope the reputation of off offcampus
campus offcampus living will improve. I
feel. the questionnaire will help
to get our views known to those
who can do something abut it.
Off-campus living is growing at
such a rapid pace, that soon the
dorms may be used strictly for
Freshman women.
I think living off-campus is great
and I would recommend it to any anyone
one anyone who really wants an oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to experience responsibility
and independence.
LARRIE SIKORSKI 3JM
i
PLEASE I
Limit Letters To The
Editor To 500 Words
And Make Sure;
They're Signed. We,
Will Omit Names
At Writer's Request.

(FROM PAGE 6)
other assorted films. Upon defeat,
Brown said a "new look'* was
neeaea m tne uamornia ranks ue ueiore
iore ueiore the 6B Senate race
GOP Senator Tom Kuchel and hint hinted
ed hinted strongly that Peck might be the
man.
What is this all leading to?
Will the Film Actors Guild assume
as much influence in Washington
as such politically-oriented groups
as the AFL-CIO?
What about the future? With
Peck joining Murphy in the Senate,
California's ranks will be complete
(two senators, one governor). Mov Movie
ie Movie actors will have to move out
into adjoining states. Roy Rogers
and Dale Evans will probably head
for Nevada, and Gold water and his
followers may have trouble in Ari Arizona
zona Arizona if Pat Boone and Burt Lan Lancaster
caster Lancaster cast eyes to the southeast.
Back in California, with Speaker
of the House Jesse (Big Daddy)
Unruh preparing for a future try
at the state ho use, no doubt the GOP
will hold back ex-British actor and
present TV star Sebastian Cabot,
a bulging 265 pounder to do battle
against the calory-ridden Unruh.
This one could be truly called the
Battle of the Bulge", and if Ca Cabot
bot Cabot is unavailable or unacceptable
due to his Redcoat ancestry, Andy
Devine could be waiting in the
wings.
John Wayne seriously is involved
in GOP politics in the West, was a
strong supporter of Goldwater.

The Actors Are Taking Over

How Should Wfc
Bomb China?

Open Letter to Richard Krieg:
Suggesting a policy of "pene "penetration
tration "penetration bombing" (whatever that
is) of China is based on an irra irrational
tional irrational and unjustified assessment
of the threat which that country
poses to the United States. It
assumes that China is and will be
controlled by fanatics, that China
will exercise no restraint whatso whatsoever
ever whatsoever on its future military
potential; that in the 10 to 20
years it will take to develop a
significant delivery capability, the
attitudes and intentions of Chinas
policy-makers will be thoroughly
hostile and committed to the im immediate
mediate immediate destruction of the United
States.
It seems that the only source of
information which could lead you.
to such assumptions is the propa propaganda
ganda propaganda of the Chinese themselves,
and they dont even go this far.
Your willingness to accept at face
value the verbal belligerancy of
this propaganda suggests that you
would make a good Bolshvik!
It is unclear what the outcome
of the current civil strife in China
will be. These disturbances indi indicate,
cate, indicate, however, that the Com Communist
munist Communist menace is not the mono monolithic
lithic monolithic and unrestrained conspiracy
some assert it is, that the govern government
ment government and party is not of one mind
on many questions of policy. But
if we assume the worst and con consider
sider consider the faction represented by
the Red Guards will win control,
it appears doubtful that the resul resultant
tant resultant party elite would be consider considerably
ably considerably more militant than that of Mao
Tse-tung. An examination of
Chinese policy under Mao does not
show a record of unrestrained
aggression. Compared to the image
which those of yourpersuasion de delight
light delight in drawing, Chinese policy has
been considerably moderate. Aside
from some limited actions in Indian
territory (which may in feet be
legally that of China), the incor-

Peter Lawford, we all know, has
strong family ties to the Kennedy
Klan. Louis Armstrong wornu ue
perfect for the Republicans should
they decide to mold together the
business, conservative and Negro
votes of Louisiana into a major
threat against the established
Democratic control there. Ben
Gazzara of "Run For Your Life"
would be perfect running as a con congressman
gressman congressman at large, from almost
any state. (And Bobby Kennedy has
demonstrated that residence re requirements
quirements requirements are simply rules to be
circumvented in the best of carpet carpetbagging
bagging carpetbagging tradition.)
Os course, there's Jimmy Stew Stewart,
art, Stewart, who has already accumulated
legislative experience by virtue of
his appearance in Mr. Smith Goes
To Washington.
Were Peter Sellers only an
American, he'd be perfect for a
candidate so r president, since he
filled that spot so well in Dr.
Strangelove.
Marlon Brando, off his brilliant
performance in On The Water Waterfront,'
front,' Waterfront,' 'would make a fine Secretary
of Labor, with Rod Steiger as his
able assistant, and you wouldn't
have to look farther than Raymond
Burr to find a new Attorney Gen General.
eral. General. Earthy types like Lee Mar Marvin,
vin, Marvin, Paul (Hud ) Newman, and Kirk
Douglas would doubtlessly find
positions carved to their ow&spec ow&speclalty.
lalty. ow&speclalty. Marvin, Palance and other
bad guy* types might have initial
difficulties transforming their im-

poration of Tibet, and the bombing
of the off-shore islands, the
Chinese have not INITIATED any
direct military actions against
their neighbors. From their
ACTIONS, rather than from their
WORDS, there seems little reason
to assert as you do that the
Chinese will exercise no restraint
in the future and will willingly
begin a nuclear war.
But I am curious: what type of
war do you feel the US should now
wage against China? Should we
merely bomb their nuclear fa facilities?
cilities? facilities? If so, should we do it
just once, or periodically, say,
every five years? Or should we
send land forces in and occupy the
country? Our past four presidents
have agreed that it would be in inadvisable
advisable inadvisable and perhaps impossible
for us to occupy so vast an area.
While I cannot state that there is
absolutely no chance whatsoever
that the Chinese will, at some
future time, pose the grave threat
that you suggest they will pose,
the probability that this will
actually happen is slight To a
moral absolutist, to one who
simplifies reality and reduces it
to black-and-white, good-guy-ver good-guy-versus-bad-guy
sus-bad-guy good-guy-versus-bad-guy terms, there is evil
Inherent in moderating ones
actions. You do not coexist with
evil, you destroy it. But to those
of us who arent sure that God
has chosen our side and who view
the world as a more complex
organism, a little risk is toler tolerable
able tolerable if it means avoiding a poli politically
tically politically and morally grave error.
Your idea that the rest of the
world would support such a ven venture
ture venture is fiction and self-delusion.
But this should not surprise you.
For people who are different and,
therefore, more "primitive than
we are cannot be expected to
recognize the divine hand that
guides our actions.
ROBERT COHEN, 7AS

A( to white bat types for the
purpose of gleaning popular sup support.
port. support. But in politics, anything
is possible and usually probable.
There remains many other pos possibilities,
sibilities, possibilities, notably the entrance of
the Hollywook starlet-actress to
the scene. Reagan could always
Initiate this phase of the exper experiment
iment experiment by naming Jayne Mansfield to
the position of Commissioner of
California Development. Slogans
like Mansfield or Bust''would en enliven
liven enliven the zany world of California
politics. And if Margaret Chase
Smith can represent Maine, why not
Bette Davis or Roz Russell? And
cgo't you imagine Liz Taylor in the
statehouse, with Richard soliciting
votes by daily performances of
hamlet in the courtyard.?
Lest we take this all with great
frivolity remember the Reagan and
Murphy triumphs, the victories of
Idaho's guitar-swinging cowboy
Sen. Glenn Taylor, of the twin
victories of Louisiana's Jimmie
(You Are My Sunshine) Davis and
others.
It may even spread to other
nations and continents. 'Hiats why
we Americans must begin prepplng
a Kim Novak or Ann-Margret for
the top spot. After all, can you
imagine Lyndon Johnson sitting
down at a summit meeting in Gen Geneva
eva Geneva with new French president
Brigitte Bardot? Why, Lyndon even
has trouble with Charles the Great.
Save your movie marquees,
boys.

Mondav. February 20, 1967. The Florida Alligator,

XL \
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i
Killeen Go Home,
We Dont Want You
EDITOR:
As a student of the University of Florida and resident of Florida,
I wish to say a few words about the recent controversy on this
campus. I presume to speak for no one but myself. I have watched
silently the whole fiasco of Miss Brewers photograph, the FDC
and the world press. It is easy to see that no one has lost but the
University, and as a consequence, its students. Now to Bill
Killeen, I say go home. Take your filthy magazine and your bearded
friends and go home. This is my University just as it is every
other students; this is my state of Florida, and I am truly saddened
by what you have done to it.
You have made a mockery of our administration, of our students
and of our University. The London Daily News has carried the
story of our rioting students,; Walter Cronkite has shown us
as another Berkeley. Yes, I agree, the Faculty Disciplinary
Committee needs to be revised. Groundrules need to be laid,
the students need to know what conduct, in specific terms, is
expected of them. (Actually, Im sure they know, just as I do what
is appropriate and what is not, but give them what they wish:
the limits past which they should not go.) But all that should a
accomplished and could be accomplished by our Student Government
with our backing in an intelligent orderly manner, not with world
publicity or the Charlatan or riots. After all, our student government
is not elected merely to chastise Food Service.
The UF does not need a champion for its causes who lives off
slander and doesnt even belong to it. It has enough Intelligent
and enlightened people who can carry out its reforms for.
Sell your magazine if you will, Bill Killeen; live in your gutter
and profit, I dont care. Everyone knows that King White doesnt,
as you put it, fornicate with kangaroos. After all, youre the one
who came up with the idea, maybe you have the firsthand knowledge.
But what I do care about is this University. I believe it has been
damaged, and I hope not irreparably. Maybe I am alone in my
feelings, but I sincerely hope not. I hope every student cares enough
about this University to feel saddened about what has happened.
If they dont now, someday they will.
KAY MOREFIELD, 3AS
Killeen Inconsistent
EDITOR:
A brief but pertinent clarification of facts in Mr. Killeens
hasty response to my letter in the Alligator: I am not faculty ad advisor
visor advisor to Release and I dont know Mr. White.
Mr. Killeen could easily have discovered that Professors Hanna
and Jourard are Releases advisors by examining the inside of
the magazines cover where they are cleverly listed under Faculty
Advisors. Score one point against Mr. Killeen for error in facts.
Since I dont know Mr. White, so much for Mr. Killeens impli implication
cation implication that I am a liar. Score one point against him for error of
judgment.
In little things, as in big, Mr. Killeen remains consistent.
WALTER ROSENBAUM,
Assistant Professor

Page 7



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complete engine. Transmission
rebuilt. Scrambler equipped S4OO.
Gibson J-50 Guitar and case.
Good condition $l3O. Fletcher
Howe, 372-9220, 680 Tolbert. (A (A---
--- (A--- 3t-p).
FOR SALE: Sales sth Ave. (2)
Sports coats, size 39 and 40,
$lO and S2O; Black wing tip shoes,
11 1/2 c, $10; Cable stitch sweater,
size 39, s*.oo. Call 378-5518.
10x3u PACEMAKER, 2 bedroom,
fully carpeted, air-conditioned.
Ideal for student. Prefer to sell
but will consider renting. 378-
2982. (A-97-lOt-c).
BASENJI PUP, Registered AKC,
top blood lines, $75.00. Call 481-
2362 after 5 p.m. (A-96-st-c).
35 MM FILM. Fresh. Reloaded
cartridges, 20 exp. Kodak Plus-X,
50£: Tri-X, 60$ allow 10 days.
George Adkins P.O. Box 14374.
(A-97-4t-c). t
1957 TRIUMPH 650 Motor Cycle,
dependable road machine. $275.
See at Diamond Village, 305-13.
(A-99-3t-c).
for rent
3 BEDROOM and 2 bath, central
air-condition and heat, family
room, screen porch, fenced patio
with child size doll house. Dish Dishwasher-disposal,
washer-disposal, Dishwasher-disposal, electric stove
and oven. Available April 15.
Yearly lease at $170.00 per month.
Call 372-6524. (B-98-10t-c).
HEY! HAVE YOU HEARD? Colonial
Manor Apts. NOW have Summer
rates of SIOO per month, May thru
August, on all apts. BUT Reser Reservations
vations Reservations MUST be made NOW. Call
or go by Colonial Manor Apart Apartments,
ments, Apartments, 1216 SW 2nd Avenue, 372-
7111. (B-97-10t-c). Li
MALE Roommate wanted to share
node rn, air- conditioned, split splitevelish
evelish splitevelish apartment close to
.ampus. S4O a month. Price in in.ludes
.ludes in.ludes utilities. Call 372-6050.
B-97- 3t-nc).
MOTORCYCLE Trailer for rent.
7 per use. Tilt bed for easy
oading, hold down ropes, bumper
litch. Trailer will be available
intil August, 1967. Phone 372-
1576. (B-97- 3t-p).
3 MINUTES from Medical Center.
I bedroom duplex apt. 1240 S.W.
14th St. $65 per month. Bargain.
372-3576 or 372-4692. (B-97-
3t-c).
TWO BEDROOM Furnished apart apartnent,
nent, apartnent, living room, dining room,
dtchen, private bath and entrance,
Ights and water furnished. Four
docks from Campus. Call 378-
>Bll or 372-9704. (B-95-10t-c).
rfIREE & FOUR Room Apt. Uti Utiities
ities Utiities partially furnished. S4O, $45,
560 Craddock Apts. 11l S.W. 3rd
Lve. 376-6424 after 5:30 p.m.
B-99-3t-c).
'OED Room mate to share spacious
! bedroom house immediately.
Hose to campus. Own room. Rent
;45 per month. Call 378-3315. (B (B---
--- (B--- st-c).

help wanted
STUDENT or student wife to oper operate
ate operate Justowrlters in preparing copy
for FLORIDA ALLIGATOR. Ex Experienced
perienced Experienced operator preferred but
not essential. Proficient typing
ability mandatory. Contact Mr.
White or Mr. Myking in office of
the Board of Student Publications,
Basement, Florida Union. (E-85-
tf-nc).
personal
E LEC TRIC Utility rates in Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville are the HIGHEST in the con continental
tinental continental U.S.A. for small commer commercial
cial commercial users of up to 6,000 KWH in
cities our size. Above 6,000 KWH,
a few cities have worse rates.
Your church, your schools and your
grocery store pay these high com commercial
mercial commercial rates. Who pays in the end?
You do, of course. COURT
COLLIER will work for lower cost
electric power. Vote COLLIER for
City Commission, March 21. (J (J---96
--96 (J---96 st-p).
TRAVEL TO EUROPE Rome,
Switzerland, Paris, London. 5
weeks, 4 college credits. Less than
SBOO, (including all meals and
transportation). Contact: Danny
Scarborough, Box 7777, 376-9120.
(J-98-4t-p).
WANTED: People who like to hold
each other while dancing. Great
new sound at Winn jammer. El Trio
Fresco. Winnjammer Tuesday,
Thursday and Saturday, 9:30 p.m.
520 S.W. 2nd Avenue, 376-9265.
(J- 97-7 t-c).
Have pet RABBIT would like to
find good home for it. Interested?
Call Mel at 372-5749 after 5 p.m.
(J-99-3t-c).
SIGMA CHI The Sigma Kappas
may be slow starters, but were
just saving for a winning finish
on Derby Day! (J-99-lt-p).
ODD OBSESSION ventures into
regions that even the recent French
and Italian movies have side sidestepped.*
stepped.* sidestepped.* New York World
Telegram. See it Sunday, MSB.
(J-99-lt-c).
autos
1964 KARMAN GHIA, Yellow with
black interior, excellent condition.
Call 376-3211, ext. 5581 for further
information. (G-99-lt-c).
I co staffing kJ
pibaniM n ||
WyS

, The Florid' Alligator, Monday, February 20, 1967

Page 8

autos
1965 FASTBACK MUSTANG. 287
cu. in. 4 speed, chromed wheels
and many extras. Contact R. Litt
after 6 p.m. 372-6078. Leave mes message.
sage. message. fr,-97-st-c).
1963 FORD Fairlane, excellent
condition, standard transmission,
6 cylinder $650. Semi-portable
typewriter SSO. Call 376-0810 (G (G---99-lt-p).
--99-lt-p). (G---99-lt-p).
1963 CORVAIR MONZA, Converti Convertible,
ble, Convertible, 4 speed, radio, heater, new
tires, excellent condition. Best
offer. Call 378-1751. (G-98-2t-c).
TR- 3 PARTS: Transmission,
seats, gauges, top, curtains, radi radiator,
ator, radiator, rims. Any and all parts,
376-8524. (G-98-3t-p).
help wanted
SUMMER RESORT
Southern Michigan Resort
30th year, Jack Jill Ranch,
young adult guests exclusively
19 to 35. Reply S. Winslow,
1430 So. Bayshore Drive,
Miami, Florida 33131. Will
correspond and arrange inter interviews
views interviews on campus. Single appli applicants
cants applicants only, age* 30 to 35. Gross
monthly pay shown tor each
position. You will be charged
S2O weekly tor lodging, meals
and activities. START WORK WORKMAY
MAY WORKMAY 11th THRU SEPT. 17th.
FEMALE POSITIONS:
WAITRESSES $244.
SNACK BAR CLERKS-$244.
OFFICE, Experience,
Good Typist $260.
MALE POSITIONS:
MUSICIANS COMBIN COMBINATION
ATION COMBINATION SPORTS A SOCIAL
STAFF Guitar, Plano
Organ, Trombone, Trum Trumpet,
pet, Trumpet, Accordlan $309.
WRANGLERS Minimum
Age 21, Experience with
horses $276.
YARD MAN Lawns k
Maintenance $260.
OFFICE- Good Typist,
v Mine. Work $260.
DISH WASHER Operator
s26o.
POTS k PANS Washer
- $260.
BUS BOYS Kitchen, Din Dining
ing Dining Rm. $260.
SNACK BAR CLERK $260.

1 R I *w>iwci r
ImjsJ V/Oa>)
> ; \
' v fc*-'*'-
USE
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
i-

autos
5
HIDE IN STYLE The car with
personality *s2 DODGE. Every Everything
thing Everything works Best offer. Call
376-9516. Ask for Tom or Bill.
(G-97-3t-p).
1960 TRIUMPHTR3-A, yellow with
red upholstry, white top and ton tonneau
neau tonneau cover. Call Ron, 376-3261,
ext. 2360 days or 376-1505 eve evenings.
nings. evenings. (G-98-st-c).
INSTRUCTOR Leaving town soon
will sell either of his two cars:
1965 Chevelle 300, radio, heater,
A/T, W/W, carpeting $1350 1962
Ambassador air conditioned, a/t,
p/s radio etc. $675. Call Univer University
sity University ext 2179 or in late evenings,
call 378-4782. (G-98-3t-p).
QB3BEBH Feature At: ,
ZJ if*MiH 1:00-3:10-5:20 f
uTfiiimal
pierljn
TECWMCMJh* PWMWggj*
I THEWILD 1
I ANGELS I
m KfeMAVItKMr .MTMVCOUM U
( TOM JOMIS^?I

autos
AUSTIN HEALEY 100-4 all new
interior, top, tonneau, and tires.
Runs and cooks great. Student
needs money must sell S6OO. 372-
1576. (G-97-3t-p).
~ ^
' t
services
IN A HURRY? Passports applica applications,
tions, applications, childrens photos, commer commercial
cial commercial s and special problems.
WESTLEY ROOSEVELT STUDIOS,
372-0300, 909 N.W. 6th Street.
(M-6b -ts-c).
GRADE TROUBLES? Call Florida
Tutoring Agency. Competent tutors
in all subjects. 378-5518. (M (M---98-3t-c).
--98-3t-c). (M---98-3t-c).
5 M SKh
swrcjiL;
/ 1:10 X
S 3:05 5:10 X
/
W ) A FUNNY THWv3:%
M- HAPPENED
ON THE WHY K If
==, THEFORUM" JI
su'\\ I SUGCCSTIO FOft 1
U > W I Mnmt AUDttwcts } i
\ FINAL 4 DAYS /
\dgk
\ DAILY AT 2 P.M. & /
I 8 P.M. I
DOWNTOWN /
THEATRT^^If



< MONDAY NIGHT SPECIAL
ITALIAN MEAT SAUCE M
and spaghetti fj
J CHECK OUR DAILY 49? SPECIALS
r7/CAFETERIA I
313 W. Univ. Av.
1/2 Block West of Fla. Theatre
a short walk from campus

*.
Quo Vadis?
r.4
_

You know it. After graduation youll have
many paths to follow. And the path you take
could affect the rest of your entire life.
Right now youre probably looking for all the
information about these paths that you can
find. So heres some about IBM-and you.
The basic fact is simply this: Whatever your
area of study, whatever your immediate com commitments
mitments commitments after graduation, chances are there s
a career for you with IBM.

Whatever your immediate commitments, whatever your area of study,
sign up now for an on-campus interview with IBM, March 2,3.
If for some reason, you arent able to arrange an interview, drop us a line. Write to: Manager of College Recruiting,
IBM Corporation, Room 810, 1447 Peachtree Street, N£., Atlanta, Georgia 30309. IBM is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

gmmmm WfmJ/k
West said: The building is th
first unit of the University's Re Research
search Research Library and as such will
contain the core of the University's
store of recorded knowledge and will
be its center for study, research
and reference.
In addition to being a functioning
I, center of research, this building
will be the symbol of scholarship
-J in the University's life.'*

Thats it. Whether youre interested in Com Computer
puter Computer Applications, Programming, Finance
and Administration, Research and Develop Development,
ment, Development, Manufacturing or Marketing, there
could be a career for you with IBM.
Another important point to consider: IBM is
THE leader in THE major growth industry:
information handling and control. The indus industry
try industry itself may not mean much to you, just yet.
But let us tell you about it.

Monday, February 20, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

library

Connected to the main library by
a walkway, it is designed as a
modern interpretation of the Gothic
style to blend with the very Gothic
surroundings, according to the
office of Lee Campbell of Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, the architect.
Within the air-conditioned build building,
ing, building, a modern effect is provided by
a circular stairway which is com completely
pletely completely cantilevered with no supports
under the landing. Individual carrels
and cubicles are located by windows
designed to filter out direct sun sunlight.
light. sunlight.

Efficiency is provided by a floor
loading strength of 150 pounds per
square foot of live load which per-,
mits the stacking of as many books,
as possible wherever needed.
The library will have a seating
capacity of 907 to serve the Univer University's
sity's University's some 2,400 graduate students.
To facititate a faster move, lib library
rary library officials last Christmas re refiled
filed refiled all bodes according to call
number and placed them in open
stacks, the same system which will
be employed in the graduate facility.
With the research library pro providing
viding providing specialized services for
graduates, the main library now will
be devoted primarily to under-grad under-graduates
uates under-graduates and be known as the College
Library.
All told, about 400,000 books and
40 filing cabinets containing five
million cards will be involved In the
move from the main library to the
graduate facility.
This does not Include the thou thousands
sands thousands of books now being stored In
the basement of University Aud Auditorium
itorium Auditorium and Century Tower to be i
transferred both to the undergrad undergraduate
uate undergraduate and graduate libraries. Some
of these books have been In storage
for nearly 10 years.
The University's graduate re research
search research library, when in operation,
will be one of five or six of its
kind'* In the United States, accord according
ing according to Director West.
Rights*
university affairs of students.
If Shepherd's Student Rights
Commission can do this,** Wlsser
said, this is fine and it will
indicate that Student Government
is, at last, representing the stu students.
dents. students. Its failure will signify the
SG's impotence.'*
When informed of Wisser's
charges Sunday, Shepherd said the
constitution Wisser spoke of is isn't
n't isn't mine and is merely the first
draft of one that will go to Leg Legislative
islative Legislative Council.'*
I haven't even read it,'* he said.
Shepherd urged Wisser's com committee
mittee committee to make any recommenda recommendations
tions recommendations it wants to the Council,
which in turn has to put a cons constitution
titution constitution up for student body ap approval
proval approval later this trimester.
The constitution Wisser has
labeled as mine isn't any closer
to reality than he is," the pre president
sident president said. It's up to Leg Coun Council
cil Council and, ultimately, the students.' 1
This is the snag Wisser will
have to deal with.
Shepherd added that he was
pleased that the sit-in group had
left Tigert, leaving channels open
for Student Government to deal
with the situation.
I don't really see any reason
for a general constitution conven convention,
tion, convention, since it all must go to the
Council anyway,* Shepherd con concluded.
cluded. concluded. Anybody with ideas should
present them there.'* (.
Wisser said he wants to sub submit
mit submit his constitution, along with
any other one under consideration,
to a constitutional assembly of the
student body.
Let the student choose bet between
ween between the constitutions,'* Wisser
said.
Study in
Guadalajara. Mexico
The Guadalajara Summer School, a
fully accredited University of Arizona
program, conducted in cooperation
with professors from Stanford Uni University,
versity, University, University of California, and
Guadalajara, will offer July 3 to Au August
gust August 12, art, folklore, geography, his history,
tory, history, language and literature courses.
Tuition, board and room is $290.
Write Prof. Juan B. Rael, P.O. Box
7227, Stanford, California 94305.

Page 9



Page 10

L The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 20, 1967

CASH
AVAILABLE
$25 to S6OO
PAYDAYSHORT TERMS
376-5333

Orange and

Address All Campus Calendar
KJotices To Public Functions
Office, Florida Union
Special Notices: Fla. Union Sponsored trip to Puerto
Rico and the Virgin Islands, April 22-28. San Juan,
St. Thomas and St. John (freeports) Information in
315 Union, ext. 2741
Applications now being accepted for Union Board Inter International
national International Committee. Apply 315 Union
Monday, February 20
State Board of Pharmacy Exam, MSB Aud., 9 a.m.
5 p.m.
Mensa: Daily luncheons, table on west side of main
cafeteria, 11-1 p.m.
UF Swimming Team: Fla. vs. Miami, Fla. Pool, 4 p.m.
Union Board: Dance Lessons, Union Social room,
7:15 p.m.
Union Fine Arts: Photography Class, 121 Union, 7:15
p.m.
Baptist Student Union: discussion on Fathers and Sons
by Turgenev, Baptist Student Center, 7:30 p.m.
Film Classics: Hamlet," MSB Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club: meeting, 527 Eng., 8 p.m.
Everyone interested in amateur radio is invited
to attend

ETS GRE: The Graduate Record Examination will
be given Saturday, Feb. 25, 8:45 a.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
NURSING: Representatives from the Air Force,
Army, and Navy Nurse Corps will be here Tuesday,
Feb. 21, from 2-5 p.m. in the 2nd Floor Lobby of
the Medical Sciences Building to talk with any in interested
terested interested students.
PHYSICS DEPARTMENT FILMS: The Physics De Department
partment Department will show a series of filmed lectures by
Richard P. Feynman, each Tuesday, 3:40 p.m., in
Bless Auditorium, through Feb. 27. The lectures are
on fundamental questions of physics and will be helpful
to anyone familiar with sophomore physics.
SPEECH SCREENING REQUIREMENT: All teacher
education majors, regardless of college enrollment,
are required to satisfy the speech screening require requirement
ment requirement before being admitted into the Advanced Pro Professional
fessional Professional sequence, or enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400
and the elementary block (EDE 300, 301, and 302).
Appointments are now being made in Room 124, Norman
Hall.
CHANGE OF COLLEGE: Deadline for changing col colleges
leges colleges for the 1967 spring trimester is March 3,
1967.
UNIVERSITY GOLF CLUB SWIMMING POOL: Mem Membership
bership Membership applications for the University Golf Club
Pool will be accepted beginning Feb. 1 on a first firstcome,
come, firstcome, first-serve basis, in Room 201, Florida Gym Gymnasium.
nasium. Gymnasium. Faculty and staff must purchase a season
membership for $56.65. Student memberships are
available on a monthly basis of $10.30 per month.
The season membership includes swimming lessons
and applies for single adults or an entire family.
The pool will be open May 1 through Sept. 15.
University faculty, staff, married students and their
families are eligible. Due to the limited size of the
pool, there will be no guests. The swimming lessons
will be divided into two sessions adult and pre preschool
school preschool children, May 1-June 16; school age children,
June 16-Aug. 31. Pool hours will be from 9 a.m.
7 p.m. daily, except Sunday, when the hours will be
from 1-7 p.m.

LOW
INTEREST RATES
ON LOANS

LOANS
VACATION
Marion Finance Co.

BLUB BULLETIN

Administrative Notices

Serving U of F Employees Since 1935
with a
PROGRAM OF THRIFT, CREDIT, SERVICE
' Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union
Building J Extension 2973

American Chemical Society Meeting: Dr. Henry S.
Frank, Water Structure: The Present State of the
Problem," 207 Leigh, 8:15 p.m. All interested
persons are invited
Univ. Lecture Series: Dr. Juscelino Kubitschek,The
Future of the Alliance for Progress," Univ. Aud.,
8:15 p. m. Reception following in Union Bryan Lounge.
Society of Automotive Engineers: Presentation of Fair
Queen Contestant Sandy McGinnis and the Ford
Film: The American Road," 512 Eng., 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, February 21
State Board of Pharmacy Exam, College of Phar Pharmacy,
macy, Pharmacy, 9 a.m.
Beta Alpha Psi: Income tax questions answered and
help session in Atg. 211-212, 114 Mat., 2:30 p.m.
Tuesday Evening Supper Club: Presbyterian Student
Center, 6:30 p.m. Non-denominational, everyone
single and over 21 invited.
Union Board: Bridge lessons, 215 Union, 7 p.m.
SDX: Meeting and guest speaker, Major Cook, 206
Sta., 7:30 p.m.
AAUP: business meeting, 103-B AFA, 7:30 p.m. Open
meeting with candidates for the State Legislature,

Students in the following courses are expected to
take the following tests. Each student must bring a
No. 2 lead pencil and will be required to use his
SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER.
CHN 251 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Feb. 21,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12,
13, 14 or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, or 119.
CHN 252 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Feb. 21,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Peabody
1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) report to Leigh 207;
(D) report to Little 121, 125 or 127; (E) Little 113;
(F) report to Matherly 213, 216 or 219; (G) report
to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; (H) report to Pea Peabody
body Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209; (I-J) report to Flint
110 or 112; (K) report to Walker 301, 303, 307 or
308: (L) report to Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; (M)
report to Little 213, 217, 219, 221, 223, 225 or 227;
(N) report to Little 233, or 235; (O) report to Little
237 or 239; (P-Q) report to Flint 101 or 102; (R)
report to Floyd 108; (S) report to Walker Awiitorium;

Students must be registered with the Placement
Service to interview. Sign-up sheets are posted two
weeks in advance of the interview date at Building
H. All companies will be recruiting for April and
August grads unless otherwise indicated.
hiring juniors for summer employment.)
FEB. 20: AMERICAN OIL CO. ChE, CE, ME.
STATE AUDITING DEPT. Acctg. NATIONAL LEAD
CO. OF OHIO Eng. Sd, Chem, Physics, MetE,
ME. M. A. MONTENEGRO & CO. Acctg. SPERRY
ELECTRONIC TUBE DIVISION EE, ME. SPERRY
SEMICONDUCTOR DIVISION EE, ME, ChE,
Physics, IE. TEXACO, INC. Law, Mktg, Acctg,
ChE, EE, ME, Chem, Physics, Geol., Math, CE, Math.
TORNWALL, LANG & LEE Acctg.* FIRESTONE
TIRE & RUBBER CO. Acctg. ATLANTIC NATIONAL
BANK OF JACKSONVILLE Bus. Ad, Lib. Arts,
Ed. NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE

Placement Notices

MONEY
AVAILABLE
Up to S6OO
FOR YOUR SECOND CAR
222 W. Uni versify mvc,

Address All Administrative and General Notices
to revision of Informational Services, Building H.

Higher Education in Florida, 8:15 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi: guest speakers, Mr. George Losey
and Mr. Rand Edelstein, Union Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Faculty Concert: John S. Kitts, bassoon, MSB Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
Murphree Area Council: 218 Union, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, February 22
Voting in College of Engineering for Engineer's Fair
Queen finalist
State Board of Pharmacy Exam, College of Pharmacy,
9 a.m.
Phi Sigma Sigma: lecture, 116 Union, 7 p.m.
Fla. Speleological Society: meeting, 212 Union, 7p.m.
Veterans Club: Group meeting, Union Aud., 7:30
p.m.
Lyceum Council: A1 Hlrt, Fla. Gym., 8:15 p.m.
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE
On Sal 6 Today:
AL HIRT,W.H. AUDEN, UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA,
FLORIDA PLAYERS, and LUV Students Only
On Sale Wednesday, February 22
LUV Faculty and Staff $1.50; Gen. Adm. $2.50

(T-V) report to Little 101 or 109; (W-Z) report to
Walker Auditorium.
CEH 131 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Feb. 23,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with (A-L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12,
13, 14 or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
CEH 132 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Feb. 23,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) Peabody 1,2, 4,
5,7, 10 or 11; (C) report to Leigh 207; (D) report
to Little 121, 125 or 127; (E) report to Little 113;
(F) report to Matherly 213, 216 or 219; (G) report
to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; (H) report to Pea Peabody
body Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209; (I-J) report to Flint
110 or 112; (K) report to Walker 301, 303, 307, or
308; (L) report to Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; (M)
report to Little 213, 215, 217, 219, 221, 223, 225
or 227; (N) report to Little 233 or 235; (O) report
to Little 237 or 239; (P-Q) report to Flint 101 or
102; (R) report to Floyd 108; (S) report to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) report to Little 101 or 109;
(W-Z) report to Walker Auditorii^,

CO. majors uuereaied in sales and management.*
GEORGIA STATE COLLEGE Bus. Ad, Acturarial
Sci, Bus. Ed, Hosp. Ad, Acctg, Econ.
FEB. 20, 21: NAVY DEPT. CE, EE, IE, ME,
SanE, AE, Acctg, Bus, Stat, Ind. Rela, Ind.' Mgmt,
Econ, Mktg, Fin.
FEB. 21: R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO. ChE,
Chem, CE, IE, Eng. Sci, Food Sci, ME, EE, MBA.
IRC, INC. Eng. Specialist. ROBERTSON, MAY &
ZIMA -- Acctg. U.S. PATENT OFFICE All fields
of Eng, Chem, Physics. COLGATE-PALMOLIVE
Bus, Lib. Arts, Ed. COCOA-COLA CO. Bus. Ad.
U.S. GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE Acctg.
WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORP. Bus, Fin,
Acctg. COMBUSTION ENGR. ME, CE, IE, Ind.
Mgmt, Acctg. PROCTOR & GAMBLE CO. Bus.,
Econ, Mgmt, MBA with tech, undergrad degree,
ChE, Chem, ME, EE, Eng. Sci. BUCKEYE CELLU CELLULOSE
LOSE CELLULOSE CORP. ChE, ME, EE, IE, CE.*

AUTO LOANS
OUR
SPECIALTY



1 L___ __
§?

(Photo by Bob Byrd)
JEFF RAMSEY IS UP FOR THE E \SY BASKET
. .dispite the interference of the Auburn deiender.
'Conservative Tennessee
Smashes Ranked Vandy

ATLANTA (UPI) The Tennes Tennessee
see Tennessee Vols have proven their point:
Theres still a place in college
basketball for some old-time con conservatism.
servatism. conservatism.
The Vols, who preach controlled
offense and sticky defense, beat
9th ranked Vanderbilt 70-53
Saturday nght to virtually' lock
up their first Southeastern Con Conference
ference Conference basketball title in a quar quarter
ter quarter of a century.
The win gave the 13th- ranked
Vols a 12-2 SEC mark. Vander Vanderbilt
bilt Vanderbilt stands at 10-3 and the lea league
gue league has only two weeks left to

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go. Florida, No. 17 nationally, is
a distant third at 12-4.
Over-all, its a great deal clos closer.
er. closer. Tall Florida has an 18-4 mark
while Tennessee and Vanderbilt
are both 17-4.
The Vols must play three of their
last four conference games on tue
road before claiming their first
SEC title since 1943. They cant
afford a slip since Vanderbilt plays
four of its five remaining games
at home.
Kentuckys Louie Dampierpour Dampierpoured
ed Dampierpoured in 32 points against Missis Mississippi

sippi Mississippi State and moved back into
the lead in the SEC individual
scoring race with a 21.3 average.
Alabamas Mike Nordholz is sec second
ond second at 21.1 after getting 18 ag against
ainst against L.S.U. and Tennessees Ron
Widby remains a close third at
20.7 although scoring only 11 ag against
ainst against Vanderbilt.
Substitute Jeff Ramsey, a 8-10
senior, turned in one of his fin finest
est finest performances of the season to
lead the Gators past Auburn. Ram Ramsey,
sey, Ramsey, who has not had a good year,
scored 13 points and hauled in 10
rebounds.
SEC STANDINGS
Cons All
WL W L
Tennessee 12 2 7 14
Vanderbilt 10 3 17 4
Florida 12 4 18 4
Auburn 9 5 14 7
Miss. St. 6 7 12 8
Kentucky 6 7 11 10
Georgia 5 9 9 13
Alabama 4 9 11 10
Mississippi 4 10 10 11
Louisiana SL 1 13 3 19

'iMBiPI VRV 1
f fufsHl
9 HL
(Photo by Al Jensen)
BILL PERRINE SMASHES ONE AS RON FICK
MOVES. .into position for the 8-6, 6-3 vic victory
tory victory over USF*s Rinehart and Heath.
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Monday, February 20, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Gators Swamp Auburn
For SEC Record

Trailing early in the game by
five-points, a determined Gator
team outscrapped Auburn 79-59 to
give Florida a new record of 12
SEC wins in one season.
Senior Gary Keller pulled down
nine rebounds to set a new car-
rebounding mark of 812, six
more than Cliff Luyks old record.
Florida needs only to win one
of three remaining games to break
its old season record of 18-7
set in 1964-65.
Coach Tommy Bartlett's Gator
squad will have the chance to break
this record Wednesday when it
meets FSU in Tallahassee.
The Tigers made things tough
for the Gators by taking advan advantage
tage advantage of good foul shooting to grab
an early 5-0 lead, Bartlett called
for a time out and plugged the hole
that Auburn had found in the Ga Gator
tor Gator defense.
It was a see-saw battle until
Jeff Ramsey hit two foul shots
to put the Gators ahead 23-21.
Florida moved ahead steadly
taking a 33-28 halftime lead. Ga-
Dioguardi
Leads Gators
To SIC Win
ATHENS, Ga. Florida rolled
to an easy team victory Saturday
night in the Southern Inter Intercollegiate
collegiate Intercollegiate Invitational swimming
and diving championships, where
records fell in all but three of the
16 events.
The Gators* powerful team, led
by Tom Dioguardi in the last of
three days of competition, piled
up 395 1/2 \ points, Miami was
second with 289 and Southern
Illinois took third with 243 1/2.
Georgia was fourth at 185.
Dioguardi won the 100-yard
freestyle in 48.2 seconds, equalling
the meet record, and he also won
the 100-yard butterfly in 52.8.
Dioguardi tied his own record
in the 100-yard freestyle, while ai
the 100-yard butterfly, he tell .5
of a second shy of breaking his
old meet record he set as a sopho sophomore.
more. sophomore.

tors Gary McElroy, Keller, Dave
Miller, and Ramsey scored bas baskets
kets baskets during the opening moments
of the second half to put UF in
front, 41-28.
Auburn threatened again late in
the game, closing the gap to six
points, 59-53.
But the outside shooting of Edd
Poore and Skip Hlgley stretched
the Gators lead to 70-59 with two
mini tes left.
Bartlett began substituting free freely
ly freely at this point but Auburn rtill
couldnt find the range as Flor Florida
ida Florida scored nine quick points be before
fore before the buzzer sounded.
UF Second
In SEC Track
Florida placed second in the SEC
indoor track championships Satur Saturday
day Saturday night in Montgomery, Ala.
The Gators rolled up 29 points
to 58 for first-place Tennessee
and 18 for third-place Alabama.
Mike Burton of Florida won the
broad jump with a distance of
23-8, and UF*s John Morton won
the shot put with 55-7 1/2.
Don Hale placed second in the
880 and Frank Lagotlc came in
second in the mile. Don Hunt of
Mississippi State won the latter
event with a record 4:09.8.
Florida also finished second in
the two- mile relay event, won by
Tennessee.
Florida State was third in the
independents* division with 19
points.
UF Netters
Record 8-1
Win Over USF
UF*s tennis team smashed Uni University
versity University of South Florida 8-1 Sa Saturday
turday Saturday in an easy win at the Bro Broward
ward Broward courts.
Freshman Greg HUley, playing
in the number four position, was
the only Florida player who did
not win in singles competition.
\ Hllley, who injured his wrist,
defaulted in the second set while
leading 2-1.
UF made a clean sweep of the
doubles.
Sophomore Armi Neely, in the
No. 1 position, defeated Jim Rine Rinehart
hart Rinehart 6-2 and 6-0.
The match was interrupted for
two hours by rain and did not end
until 6 p.m.
Florida now has a 1-0 record.
UF Coach BUI Potter said that
HUleys injury was not serious.
Results:
SINGLES Jamie Pressly
(Fla.) defeated Charles Heath (U (U---SF),
--SF), (U---SF), 6-2, 6-2. Steve Beeland(Fla.)
d. Dick Howze 6-3, 6-0. Greg HU HUley
ley HUley defaulted to John Morton. Hank
Veno (Fla.) d. A1 Blevins 6-0,
6-4. Lee Steele (Fla.) d. Larry
Bell 6-1, 6-2.
DOUBLES BUI Perrin and
Ron Fick (Fla.) d. Rinehart and
H>ath, 8-6, 6-3. WUI Sherwood
.nd Charles White (Fla.) d. How Howze
ze Howze and Blevins 6-1, 6-1. Bob
Lightfoot and Joe Godfrey (Fla.)
d. Morton and Bell 6-3, 6-2.
: I<§§S I
. 376-1208 I

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, February 20, 1967

Bartletts Star
Rises On Court
By 808 PADECKY
Assistant Sports Editor
For a guy who just got his feet wet, Tommy Bartlett has done
all right for himself.
Three months ago the sport was basketball and the new coach
was Bartlett, fresh off a tenure at Tennessee as tennis coach.
Bartlett won three SEC tennis titles for the Vols but Florida
fans wisely accepted the fact that there arent too many tennis
coaches who basketball crowns as well.
So the Gator rooters developed the wait-and-see attitude.
Apparently Tiger Tom hasnt disappointed too many.
True the Gators had a crack at the SEC championship until
Tennessee and Auburn came along. And now Florida resides
in third place in the SEC, a position they will likely remain.
But then again Bartlett didnt hope for much more at the be beginning
ginning beginning of the season.
*l see Kentucky and Vanderbilt as the teams to beat this year,
with Tennessee running a close third,* said Bartlett as the Ga Gators
tors Gators first started drills four months ago.
Bartletts evaluation turned out to be almost letter-perfect
for a yearling coach. To everyones surprise, Kentucky folded
almost from the start unexpectedly, but UT and Vandy respon responded
ded responded to their potential.
So now, three/ months later, Florida has a crack at the school
record of 19 wins. All UF has to do is win one of its next three
games Florida State, Mississippi State and Georgia.
There has been a scheduling conflict with the Mississippi
State game that was originally set for Monday, Feb. 27. It will
be changed to Saturday, Feb. 25 at 8:30 p.m. at Starkeville,
Mississippi.
The FSU match next Wednesday will give the Gators their
best chance to notch their 19th win. With that emphasis, Bart Bartlett
lett Bartlett might reward this school with its winningest basketball team
in history.
So it appears that in his first year here, Bartlett is more than
a tennis bum from Tennessee. In fact, its possible that he
may know something about basketball.
Just ask Miamis Bruce Hale. If anybody knows, Bruce baby
will.
17 Schools Feel UF All-Sports Bite
Florida gave the nation five reasons this weekend why it won
the Southeastern Conference All-Sports trophy last year.
In competition with 30 schools in track, swimming, tennis,
golf and basketball, the Gators won four of the sports and placed
second in the other.
In track, UF finished runnerup to Tennessee in the SEC cham championships.
pionships. championships. Olympic hopeful John Morton won the shot put with a
heave of 55-7 1/ 2 and Mike Burton leaped to first in the broad
jump with a 23-7 effort.
But the Gator golfers brought their team record to 7-0 against
FSU, Stetson and Rollins by churning out a team total of 281,
seven under par on the UFs course.
Florida sophomore dominated tennis team smashed South Flor Florida
ida Florida 8-1 in its season opener. And UFs swimmers, against a 17-
team field in Athens, Ga., notched an impressive 106 1/2 point
win over runnerup Miami.
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