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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Proposed Tuition Hike Stirs Hornets Nest

By 808 MENAKER
Alligator Managing Editor
When State Treasurer Broward Wil Williams
liams Williams suggested recently that tuition might
be raised under the quarter system, he
probably had little idea of the hornets
nest he would stir up.
He found out in a hurry.
Students at FSU started a petition pro protesting
testing protesting the hike. Candidates for president
of the UF student body made it a salient
campaign issue and students at the other
state universities also reacted,
quite vociferously.

jwfc-. mf&'r fl
J |gP% 9

m Jfl
*, i.ASAr-.V JHK:
(Photo by Jim White)
PAMME BREWER LOOKS ON
. . as her lawyer Selig Goldin reads the penalty.
Shepherd Appoints 7
To Re-evaluate FDC

By HAROLD KENNEDY
Alligator Staff Writer
A seven-man commission to
re-evaluate the constitution and
procedures of the Faculty Dis Discipline
cipline Discipline Committee and the Code
of Student Conduct, was set up by
Student Body President Charles
Sheppard Monday.
Spurred into action by the
Semi-Finals
Tonight For
UF Crown
Ten semi-finalists in the Miss
University of Florida contest will
compete tonight at 10:30 in the
televised talent competition over
WUFT, Channel 5. The semi semifinalists
finalists semifinalists were named after the
preliminary judging of 22 contes contestants
tants contestants on Feb. 7.
The semi-finalists will also be
judged for personality and swim swimsuit
suit swimsuit appearance, with the talent
weighted double.
Five finalists will appear during
intermission of the A1 Hirt per performance
formance performance on Feb. 22 to answer a
question similar to those asked
Miss America contestants.
The new Miss University of
Florida will be announced during
the intermission.

When the Board of Regents finally looked
into the matter, it decided not to rec reccommend
commend reccommend an increase.
Its reasoning was based on three points,
according to Don Starr, director of re research
search research and information for the treasurer's
office. The points were:
O Under the quarter system, there
exists a built-in increase because there
ape more terms. Students attending the
normal two trimesters pay $260 over that
period. Under the quarter students will pay
SIOO per quarter, or a total of S3OO.
O Students are financially not able to

Brewer controversy, Sheppard
created a Student Study Com Commission,
mission, Commission, named seven student
leaders to it, and picked yester yesterday
day yesterday as the first meeting date.
Named to the commission were
Fred Breeze, president of Uni University
versity University Circle, Barry Sinoff,
Florida Blue Key President; Lee
Ann Draud, president of Mortar
Board; Ed Dunn, former chan chancellor
cellor chancellor of the Honor Court; Eddie
Sears, editor of the Alligator, and
Joe Mason, presidential legal ad advisor,
visor, advisor, and Dave Welch chancel chancellor
lor chancellor of the Honor Court. Reports
say that law student Sam Ullman
has been added to the committee.
Sheppard charged the commis commission
sion commission with four specific responsi responsibilities:
bilities: responsibilities:
1. Evaluate the present Code
of Student Conduct as well as the
proposed revisions.
2. Evaluate the present consti constitution
tution constitution of the Faculty Discipline
Committee and its procedures,
with a view to strengthen student
representation on the committee.
3. Draft a set of proposals on
the above-mentioned points for
presentation to the Student Affairs
Committee.
4. Present a report to the
president of the student body within
two weeks.
Sheppard was moving to head off
a split with the administration over
(SEE FDC" PAGE 2)

ALLIGATOR INTERPRETATIVE

Vol, 59, No. 96

UPHOLDS FDC DECISION

Pamme Brewer Placed
On Probationy Reitz

By HARVEY ALPER
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF Monday imposed im immediate
mediate immediate disciplinary probation
upon Pamela Brewer for posing
nude in the latest issue of
Charlatan, an off-campus maga magazine.
zine. magazine.
The Springfield, Va. sophomore
was judged guilty of indiscreet
and inappropriate conduct by the
Faculty Discipline Committee.
Dean of Student Affairs Lester
L. Hale announced the action at
4 p.m. The probation will con continue
tinue continue in effect for the next two,
full academic terms Miss Brewer
is enrolled at the University.
Bob Lynch, director of the UFs
Informational Services, said Mon Monday
day Monday that if Miss Brewer attends
school through the summer she will
be on probation until January, 1968.
If she does not attend college
through the summer but re reenrolls
enrolls reenrolls next Fall, she will be on
probation until May, 1968.
In their decision the committee
and University officials noted that
this was Miss Brewers first ap appearance
pearance appearance on a disciplinary charge.
They also considered the fact that
she may have been subjected to
undue pressures and influence.
The FDCs decision last Sat Saturday
urday Saturday was sent to Dr. J. Wayne
Reitz who judged it valid. He sent
it then to Dean Hale f 1 conclud concluding
ing concluding action.
Under terms of the disciplinary
probation Miss Brewers status
at the UF is in question but it
is felt desirable to establish a

4NNMM I
HUNDREDS OF STUDENTS ATTEND TEACH-IN < photo Nldt Arr W
... to protest FDC Action Against Pamme Brewer

meet the increase because of an increase
in the cost of living.
O The State Budget Commission (the
Cabinet sitting ex-officio) must approve
an overall university budget of $274
million. The proposed tuition hike would
gain an estimated nine million in new funds.
This may seem like a lot to you or
me, but its a small sum compared to
the total budget, Starr said. This might
cause several students to drop out, de defeating
feating defeating the overall effort.
The Regents didnt recommend the pro proposed
posed proposed increase, which would have gone

The Florida
Alligator

University of Florida

trial period during which her
ability to maintain a high standard
of department will be evaluated.
A University news release stated
The committee took into account
that the Student Handbook contains
a complete statement concerning
the ethical and moral responsi responsibilities
bilities responsibilities of a student of the UF.
Miss Brewer and her attorney,
Selig Goldin of Gainesville, had
contended that the rules govern governing
ing governing her action were vague.

Protesters Sit In
Tigert Waiting...

By JUDY REDFERN
Alligator Staff Writer
A marathon demonstration'*
developed Tuesday afternoon at
Tigert Hall from a sit-in demon demonstration
stration demonstration which in turn developed
from a teach-in at the Plaza of
the Americas.'
The teach-in was to protest the
Faculty Discipline Committee
finding Pam me Brewer guilty of
indiscriminate and inappropriate
conduct/* because she posed nude
in an off-campus magazine.
The stand at Tigert grew after
a statement made during the two
hour session of the teach-in where
members of the faculty and student
body voiced their views concern concerning
ing concerning the Universitys jurisdiction of
en loco parent >.
Protesters Tuesday night an-

first to the Budget Com mission and then to
the Legislature. This undoubtedly has
made students happy, but politicans are
still hopping in Tallahassee.
Williams is concerned about an issue
that doesnt exist, Starr explained. It's a
dead 4ssue, but if attention is called to it
it might attract the Legislature. They
might increase tuition anyway, as an addi additional
tional additional source of revenue.
Just because the Cabinet approves a
tuition hike doesn't mean the Legislature
will pass it, he said. Ive seen them
(SEE TUITION PAGE 2)

Wednesday, February 15, 1967

The University news release
further noted that a student
agrees to assume these responsi responsibilities
bilities responsibilities (those responsibilities
mentioned in the handbook) when he
enters the University and that these
responsibilities are not limited to
the student's individual con conceptions
ceptions conceptions of whit is moral- or
ethical.
-__The student agrees that his
(SEE PAMME PAGE 3)

nounced plans to hold a vigil at
Tigert until an official of the
university promised to meet with
students in an open discussion"
about the Faculty Discipline Com Committee's
mittee's Committee's policies.
Protest spokesmen said they
were demonstrating because no ad administrative
ministrative administrative official had made any
attempt to discuss the Faculty
Discipline Committee, or its de decisions,
cisions, decisions, with the students.
Food, transistor radios, blank blankets
ets blankets and pillows were lining the first
floor of Tigert, as the protesters
planned to spend the night in or
near the administrative building.
A poster reading Reitz Our
Rights" was on the floor and the
information desk had been turned
into a makeshift snack bar.
(SEE STUDENTS" PAGE 11)



!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 15, 1967

Page 2

B
A
T
M
A
N

' / SMmh VES ANO r* SO '\l I WHY X \ BUT __

PammeSaid She Would Fight Again

By STEVE HULL
Alligator Executive Editor
Pam me Brewer, who one faculty
member termed a cross between
Joan of Arc and Lady Godiva,
said Tuesday she would go through
the FDC proceeding all over again,
if it would help the fight for student
rights on the UF campus.
Appearing before members of

Tuition Hike Stirred Up

throw out a budget and start to totally
tally totally from scratch, id when you
get a bunch of people who dont
really know what theyre doing, it
can be trouble.
Williams office isnt the only
one that has recanted from its
original position.
When Williams first brought the
matter up at a cabinet meeting last
month, State Comptroller Fred O.
(Bud) Dickinson Jr. said he didnt
think the tuition hike would bother
college students that they just
might have to keep the same car
a year longer.
After the hike was assailed by
students all over the state, Dickin Dickinson
son Dickinson apparently had a change of
political heart. A release from his
office dated Feb. 8 says: Comp Comptroller
troller Comptroller Fred O. (Bud) Dickinson
Jr. today attacked the proposed

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The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advert advertisements
isements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever
possible
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Ad Advertising
vertising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator
will not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of
Florida and Is published five times weekly except during May, June, and July when
it Is published semi-weekly. Only editorials represent the official opinions of their authors.
Address correspondence to The Florida Alligator, Florida Union Building, University
of Florida, Gainesville, fla., 32601. The Alligator Is entered as second class matter
at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

TO HELP STUDENT RIGHTS

the press and 300 students who
stormed Tigert Hall, the shapely
Miss Brewer did not seem shaken
over the FDCs decision to put
her on disciplinary probation for
two trimesters.
Her attorney Selig Goldin, said
the punishment was much less
than he had expected.
We thought the Committee
would at least suspend Pam me, 9

state university tuition increase
as an economic axe over our
quality education program.
Comptroller Dickinson said
1 The substantial increases in stu student
dent student tuition fees would serve to
scuttle the well planned and am ambitious
bitious ambitious scholarship and assistance
programs which have been es established
tablished established to provide maximum edu educational
cational educational opportunities for the young
people of our state.
Starr says the planned tuition
under the quarter is sufficient.
Most students agree. The problem
now lies with the Legislature.
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SERVICE
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1724 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.

Goldin stated.
Goldin said he would reveal
plans to appeal the FDC punish punishment
ment punishment sometime next week.
Miss Brewer, who has had stor stories
ies stories and pictures flashed around the
world, said people from all over
the country have written her let letters
ters letters praising the stand she has
taken.
Notoriety of Miss Brewers
hearing has spread to the Sunset
Strip of Hollywood, California,
where Chuck Landis, owner of the
Club Largo offered her a screen
test to appear in his night club.
Miss Brewer however declined
the offer.
When asked what she plans to do
now that the hearing and verdict
were complete she said, Get some
sleep.
Ive lost a lot of study time.
My books are probably caked with
dust from lack of use.
The pretty coed emphasized she
will stay in school.

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When questioned concerning the
sit-in in which 300 UF students
were participating, Miss Brewer
said she was very pleased with the
student response, and hoped the
sit-in would make UF administra administrators
tors administrators realize college students were
more than just second class
students.

mm
the FDC. We must never allow
those few students on our campus,
he wrote recently, to drive a
wedge between students 0n the one
hand and the administration on the
other.
Student Government has always
been proud, said Sheppard, of
the role it has played in repre representing
senting representing the students of our campus,
not to the administration but WITH
the administration in meeting the
needs confronting OUR uni university.
versity. university.

FDC Re-evaluation

Campus
Briefs
INTERNATIONAL HOSTS
There will be a general meeting,
Thursday, February 16, at 7 : 30
p.m. in room 220 of the Florida
Union for all interested in becom becoming
ing becoming an international host or con continuing
tinuing continuing their application from last
semester.
WOMEN OFF CAMPUS
Your assistance is needed in all
phases of campus activity. If you
are interested in working for cam campus
pus campus organizations, contact Diane
Bartoo for Womens Student Asso Association
ciation Association at College Terrace, Florida
Union. Nelle Johnston at the Chi
Omega House for Lyceum, or Con Connie
nie Connie Adams at the Delta Gamma
House for activities, such as Pin Pinstripers,
stripers, Pinstripers, Coedikette staff, Intra Intramurals.
murals. Intramurals.
If you are having any problems
living off-campus, Mrs. Hudson
is the womens off-campus coun counselor
selor counselor in the Off-Campus Housing
Office to see.

It for this reason Shep Sheppard
pard Sheppard said, that he created this
commission. On Monday letters
went out to the commission mem members
bers members and to Dean of Student Af Affairs
fairs Affairs Lester L. Hale, revealing
the creation and purpose of the
commission.
Its first meeting in the office of
the student body president in the
Florida Union Tuesday was merely
organizational, according to one of
the commissioners.
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And new is the time to begin build building
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So stop by our office today. Or give
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tive, informative, helpful... and as interested as
you are in rerouting that wolf to some someone
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Phone 376-4479
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Pamme Given Immediate Probation

conduct affects more than the mere
academic or scholastic aspects
of University life, that theUniver theUniversity

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When we say
we want people
for the outer limits,
this isn't what v"
we have in mind,

Forget science fiction. Were talking about the
outer limits of technology. And these days it
can be even more exciting than science fiction.
Right now IBM needs qualified men and
women to help reach these outer limits. The
kind of people who have made IBM the leader
in todays fastest-growing major industry: in information
formation information handling and control. And the kind
of people who can grow with us as far as their

Whatever your immediate commitments, whatever your area of study,
sign up now for an on-campus interview with IBM, March 2.3.

If for some reason, you arent able to arrange an interview, drop us a line. Write to: Manager of College Recruiting,
IBM Corporation, Room 810, 1447 Peachtree Street, N.E., Atlanta, Georgia 30309. IBM is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

sity theUniversity has a responsibility to a minor
student's parents for the conduct
of the student insofar as it is
reasonable for the University to
assume such responsibility, that
the student is under no obligation

to continue as a student if he is
unable to reconcile the require requirements
ments requirements of the University with his
own ideas of proper personal con conduct,
duct, conduct, and that, as a member of a
University community, a student

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talents and abilities allow.
The result? Greater personal responsibility
and recognition; the dual satisfaction of per personal
sonal personal achievement and continuing personal
rewards. A pretty satisfying result.
o
Job opportunities at IBM are in six major
areas: Computer Applications, Programming,
Finance and Administration, Research and
Development, Manufacturing and Marketing.

Wednesday, February 15, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

has the obligation to conduct him himself
self himself on and off the campus in such
a manner as not to degrade him himself
self himself or the University regardless
of whether his conduct is lawful
or unlawful, the University's
statement concluded.
Counsel for Miss Brewer has
contended that he will fight dis disciplinary
ciplinary disciplinary action by the University.
It was announced after Miss
Brewer's judgment that he will
make a statement on such possible
action within one week.

Band
Gives
Concert
The Gator Symphonic Band, the
most advanced in the family of
Gator Bands, will present its an annual
nual annual formal concert in University
Auditorium Thursday evening,
Feb. 16, at 8:15 p.m. The concert
is open to the public without
charge.
Conductor Richard W. Bowles
has chosen the Dramatic Van Vanfare,
fare, Vanfare, by Morton Gould, to open
the program. This selection is one
of a series of such works Gould
prepared for the television series,
World War I.
Trumpeter Robert Foster,
assistant conductor of the band,
will perform the brilliant Danze
Alegre, by Jimmy Burke. Flutist
Leah Russell will also perform as
a soloist, with the Chaminade
Concertino.
Two highly contrasting preludes
and fugues will be performed. The
first, highly traditional, is by Han Handel,
del, Handel, in an arrangement by Hans
Kindler. The second is an original
work for band by the contemporary
-composer Vaclav Nelhybel.
Lighter selections will include a
medley from the George Gershwin
musical, Porgy and Bess, and a
descriptive number by Sergei Pro Prokofieff,
kofieff, Prokofieff, entitled Train Ride.
Overture for the evening is the
exciting Flag of Stars, by the
English composer Gordon Jacob.
The title refers to the American
flag, and the work contains an
imaginative setting of phrases
from the Star Spangled Banner.
The Gainesville concert is the
first of three to be performed by
the band the same weekend. The
band will appear in Lake Wales
on Saturday night, and in Winter
Park on Sunday afternoon, in a
brief tour sponsored by Student
Government.
Accent Open
For Applicants
Wayne Rich and Frank Gram Gramling,
ling, Gramling, chairman and assistant chair chairman
man chairman of the ACCENT General Com Committee,
mittee, Committee, announced they will
Interview candidates for chair chairmanships
manships chairmanships of seven ACCENT
Committees this afternoon in the
Florida Union.
Rich and Gramling will hold the
interviews from 1 to 5 in room 123
/of the Florida Union. Candidates
for the following positions are
asked to come in during the after afternoon:
noon: afternoon: Program Director, maga magazine
zine magazine editor, publicity chairman,
personnel chairman, technological
director, and chairmen of thepub thepub-1i
1i thepub-1i c relations and speakers'
committees.
_ --
International Club
Reorganizes
N
The International Committee of
the Florida Union Board will meet
this Thursday night at 7:30 in room
220, Florida Union.
This meeting will be primarily
for reorganization of the commit committee
tee committee due to the election of Lynn
Bachman as chairman of the Inter International
national International Committee.

Page 3



, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 15, 1967

Page 4

The Florida Alligator
'A Ii One RwtmPCiw'Tlie'Tiiitli/
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR 808 BECK
Editorial Editor Snorts Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecess&nly reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is the editorial in the left
column.
Thanks, Regents
The worst is over now. The Board of
Regents has met and, as expected, turned
down the proposed 73 per cent tuition
increase. An increase of about 30 per
cent was suggested, but no action was
taken.
We are grateful for the actions of the
Regents in this matter and for those who
were willing to stand up and state their
opposition to the fee hike as proposed.
State Superintendent of Schools Floyd
Christian deserves special praise for
speaking out against the great leap
forward** in the cost of education re requested
quested requested by Gov. Claude Kirk and seconded
by Comptroller Fred O. (Bud) Dickinson--
although Dickinson has recanted.
It is heartening to know that Christian,
at least, is aware of a world where
financial matters are not reckoned in
millions and rounded off to even thous thousands,
ands, thousands, but in fives and tens and a little
more than 100 at registration time. The
world of many students, indeed, is a world
of financial wizardry at times, but the
problem is trying to make SSO do the work
of a hundred. It doesnt always work.
Thus it is good" to know that some are
aware of the need to give students a chance
to plan for any major rises in the cost of
education.
We were also happy to see that the
Regents requested a slow-down in the con construction
struction construction of new Universities and colleges
until existing needs can be taken care of.
Contrary to the beliefs of some people --
usually state legislators -- not every town
in Florida needs a university within the
next five years, nor can the state afford
to water down its educational system for
the sake of spreading it out.
The decisions made at the lastegents*
meeting were good ones, for the state and
for the university system.
We appreciate them.
4
jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
accepts all letters to the editor Due .to
space limitations however we ask that
letters not exceed 350 word Typewrit
ten and double-spaced letters are prefer preferred,
red, preferred, and all must be signed Names will
be withheld upon request Editors reserve
the right to select or reject letters for
publication

jt+A 1 yAW
Lozoff Failed To Tell
OfTh \e Resistance

By WAYNE BOYNTON
Alligator Columnist
What is happening in the Belle
Glade- Pahokee area now? Repre Representatives
sentatives Representatives of the AFL-CIO,
NAACP, SNCC, and numerous
smaller national organizations
have come in to unionize all the
farm workers.
One of these men is Mike Lo Lozoff,
zoff, Lozoff, Bos brother. Mike, a mem member
ber member of the Industrial Union De Department
partment Department of the AFL-CIO, is a
technical adviser for the union.
The Union has had little support
of the local migrants. They mus mustered
tered mustered one little strike which ended
soon because the laborers refused
to continue the strike.
The true migrants are really in
a minority of the farm laborers.
They constitute about 12 per cent
of the labor force.
Bo Lozoff said Florida has
40,000 migrants and that this
number constitutes 70 per cent of
the workers. The U.S. Department
of Labor reports that therg are
100,000 farm laborers in Florida
and of these only 12,000 are mi migrants.
grants. migrants.
Lozoff stated at his last meeting
that his committees purpose was
no longer charity. Their sole
purpose now is to unionize the
farm workers.
What Lozoff has failed to tell
his committee members and sup support
port support groups is of the growing re resistence
sistence resistence to the union by the farm
workers and their leaders.
The workers have refused sev several
eral several strikes so far this year, but
fear caused them to strike at
other times. One farmers work workers
ers workers were told that their homes
would be burned down if they
went to work during the strike.
(When they reported to work, the
farmer sent them home).
A Negro man was arrested late
one night in his Belle Glade home
two weeks ago. He signed a con confession
fession confession that he was hired by the
union to make chopped glass and
chopped steel exploding bombs.
The police found a stock pile of
bombs and materials for making
bombs in his house.
Fear is the only reason some
people have agreed to join the
union.
Some of the men and women were
physically thrown off the back of
fields by a union representative
because they would not strike.
The crew bosses were forming
a local union themselves when the

union pushed them out of the pic picture.
ture. picture. The crew bosses are grad gradually
ually gradually seeing the Union abuse them
more and more.
Lozoff failed to tell his com committee
mittee committee of a meeting in Belle Glade
Sunday, February 5. The meet meeting
ing meeting was called by the Negro com community
munity community leaders. The purpose of
which was to ask the union to
leave the Glades area. The mis mistake
take mistake of the colored leaders was
inviting union representatives. The
union people continually disrupted
the meeting and argued consis consistently
tently consistently with the workers leaders.
The meeting resulted in* the ap appointment
pointment appointment of a committee to study
the local housing conditions. The
committee is an example of the
Negroes desire to solve their own
problems. The Negroes are dis disgusted
gusted disgusted with the Union as is re reflected
flected reflected in the refusal, by the
Negroes, of the Unions request
to be a member of the housing
study committee.
Lozoff has said that the Union
has signed up 5,000 members.
Bull! The Union in Belle Glade
has only been passing out cards
to the laborers. If you think
passing out cards makes people
members, then try collecting their
dues. Truthfully, not very many
laborers have signed up and you
cant prove otherwise.
The AFL-CIO has cut off all
funds to the Union in Belle Glade.
Are they realizing that it is a
hopeless cause? Lozoff and his
brother thought the laborers would
be just waiting to join the Union
but so far they have fought it.
Will the Union force them to join?

Florida Alligator Staff
NICK ARROYO JIM WHITE NICK TAT NO
Photo Editor Assistant Managing Editor Wire Editor
GENE NAIL STEFANIE JAMUS JO ANN LANGWORTHY
Editorial Assistant Society Editor General Assignment
Editor
STAFF MEMBERS Harvey Alper, Bill Douthat, Elaine
Fuller, Kathie Keim, Bob Padecky, Judy Redfern, Frank
Shepherd, Lori Steele, Joe Torchia, Harold Kennedy,
Justine Hartman, Eunice Tall.
LAB ASSISTANTS Diana Folsom, Peggy Sneider, Andrew
Haslett Jr., Robert Blount, Joan Allen, Eddie Gutten Guttenmacher,
macher, Guttenmacher, Dick Blakely, Bob Menaker, Dave Reddick, David
Weiss, Karen Eng, John Ellsworth, Diann Devine, Jerome
Warren.

GAINESVILLE
SONS
Mrs.
Kroat
Found
By JOHN BURGESS
and JOE NEUSTEIN
Our servant-boy Gurlu has just
handed us the following message
from Marvin Kroat:
Im off to Sedalia, Mo. where
Mother has been incarcerated. It
seems Cleopatra bit a policeman.
Ill keep in touch.
More on Marvin and his mother
as soon as we hear from them.
* *
As well as being witty and stimu stimulating,
lating, stimulating, this column also intends to
be educational. In this connection,
we offer FOOTNOTES TO HIS HISTORY
TORY HISTORY as a regular department.
FOOTNOTES TO HISTORY:
One day In the laboratory,
Thomas Alva Edison was working
with several highly volatile chemi chemicals
cals chemicals and accidentally left one of
his mixtures in a crucible over
the Bunsen burner. The solution
overheated and exploded. After the
smoke had cleared, Edison, shaken
but curious, peered into the cru crucible.
cible. crucible. And there, in crude but
recognizable form, was the first
working model of the electric light
hiilh
* *
/
Todays feature story is a tale
of life in the big city. In semi semifrank
frank semifrank admiration of Jimmy
Breslin, Joe tells it like it is:
The smell of burnt cat filled the
night air.
Kaufmans back, I thought. They
mustve let him out of reform
school for Christmas, dammit.
A crowd of running footsteps
shot down the block. Weve got
him, Kaufman, they shouted
wildly.
A woman screamed, nieyve
got Jerry!
It was his mother.
You cant burn Jerry! she
cried.
Kaufman spoke. It got real quiet.
Why not, lady? Is he madeouta
asbestos?
They all laughed.
You cant. .
Kaufman spit. Stone her.
And they did.
Jerry smelled no different than
a cat.
PEACE THROUGH
ANNIHILATION
SUPPORT OUR BOYS OVERSEAS



EDITOR:
Miss Kuehrs position on the
Brewer issue, is I think, the most
important to be registered on this
page. I say this because it is
probably representative of most of
the solid middle class majority.'
Clearly, this group does not like

Specific Restrictions Needed

EDITOR:
Sunday night, on WGGGs Open Forum program,
the question of just how far the administration
could go in regulating a students behavior was
raised.
The answer can most simply be found after
looking at the goal of a legal system in a demo democracy.
cracy. democracy. This goal is to allow any citizen the right
to govern his own life and property without restraint
while in the pursuit of happiness, so long as it
does not infringe upon, or harm, the equal rights
of another citizen.
Now, lets look at the limit of the administra administrations
tions administrations authority, specifically in the Pamela Brewer
hearing, in the light of this legal definition.
The law she violated did not set up any specific
regulations to protect other individuals or their
property. Instead, it was formed as a broad moral
declaration that could be used haphazardly by a
particular group (in the sense that its personality
makeup will effect its judgments of who and what
to restrict).
On the other hand, a law within the boundary
of the administrations authority, according to the

Dislikes Kriegs Blitzing Tactics

EDITOR:
Your columnist Richard (Blitz)
Krieg should have been writing
columns in the early 1950s
when the conservative or rational
(?) point of view was one of an
almost inevitable war between the
Soviet Union and the United States.
Now, in 1967, its China which
disagrees with part of our foreign
policy and thus takes over the
role of bogeyman which it in inherited
herited inherited from the Soviet Union,
which in turn had received it from
Germany and Japan.
The problem is helping China
understand that were not out to
get her. Through anadroitmix anadroitmixture
ture anadroitmixture of diplomacy, trade, tourism,
and cultural exchanges, the United
States has shown the Soviet Union
that co-existence is possible --
and in fact its probably the only
rational policy to pursue.
The confrontations in Berlin and
Cuba gave both countries a glimpse
of what could happen if either
country were to threaten the vital
interests of the other. The Soviet
Union (circa 1967) now has a
vested interest in stopping the
spread of nuclear weapons, in
banning such weapons from space,
and in halting the tests of nuclear
warheads in our atmosphere. The
bad old Russians of the 1950s
have matured into a relatively
stable world power which has its
hands full with a certain large
neighbor to the south.
While the only background I
have about Blitz is, according
to the Editors note, that hes a
recent transfer student from Cor Cornell
nell Cornell and was a dormitory
coordinator for Rob Blue in the re recent
cent recent student election, methinks
his background in international
XEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, HKea.
20 & Over, 9 Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE

Miss Kuehrs Letter Significant

to see people behave in a manner
in which they would not behave.
And, if given the resources (they
have them), this same group will
exact sanctions on deviants,
e.g., Miss Brewer.
At the same time, this dominant

relations is insufficient for one
to take him seriously. Such simple
solutions as advanced by Blitz
Krieg for such an extremely com complex
plex complex problem as China, stresses
the need for a careful and dis discriminating
criminating discriminating foreign policy and one
which is not given to an easy

He Takes Care Os His Hair 9 Red

EDITOR:
Concerning Red Necks letter in
the Feb. 9 issue of the Alligator:
There are several discrepancies
to which I, as a target of your
slanderous barbs, would like to
call attention.
Red, in the first paragraph of
your letter you come through with
the only logical statement con contained
tained contained therein. You state that the
wearing of ones hair longer than
the traditional College man-cum-
JFK haircut in part of mans pro progress
gress progress toward liberty. Yourramb Yourramblings
lings Yourramblings then depart from all logical
thought processes, never to return.
Seriously, Redneck, the band of
which I am a member has never
performed in a circus tent. Addi Additionally,
tionally, Additionally, how can you pass judgment
on my manners, my talent, or my
human pride, why did you not
sign your name to your letter?
As for my hair beign untreated
and excessive, who determines
excess?* You, Mr. Neck? The
Campus Police? I prefer to think
that the length of my hair is solely
my affair, and you do not have to
look at it or wear yours this way

f GAINESVILLES NEWEST
Hj In
Featuring A A
W FkJ A NOON AND NIGHT M
Hv AskMJKm. SPECIALS
py CAFETERIA I
313 W. Univ. Ave.
HVjVTwVH 1/2 Block West Fla. Theatre
A SHORT WALK FROM CAMPUS

legal definition, is regulation of firearms. This
law specifies the actual crime and was set up
to protect other students (from being accidently
shot).
So a law should be formed specifying posing
in the nude to be illegal, if it can be shown that
it endangers a students life (causing violent
vomiting, or heart attacks, depending on sex),
or his property, or his pursuit of happiness.
Under this law it would have every right to indict
her.
No broad philosophical concept should be used
by one citizen against a fellow citizen, since
the crime will be based on the personality of
the accusor.
Thus, the administrations authority should not
exceed specific restrictions designed to safe safeguard
guard safeguard the life, liberty, and the pursuit of happi happiness
ness happiness of its students. .not to promote an ego egocentric
centric egocentric and vague image.
For this reason, Miss Brewer is being unjustly
and illegally punished.
JOHN MEDEARIS, 3JM

group is seen to espouse free freedom,
dom, freedom, and individual rights.
But, they are quick to qualify their
pronouncements with cries of
responsibility. Responsibility,
according to the middle class de definition,
finition, definition, is the duty of all per persons
sons persons to behave in such a manner

hey-gang-Ive-got-the-answer so solution.
lution. solution.
But Blitz has it all nicely
calculated, from the military
vulnerability of Chinas east
coast to the explosive vengeance
of the immense Nationalist Chinese
Army.

if you dont appreciate it. Also,
I wash my hair every other day,
and have it trimmed regularly,
although I have never had my hair
rolled, waved, tinted, or teased.
I actually prefer my hair the way
I now wear it, in opposition to
having it clipped to within a quar quarter-inch
ter-inch quarter-inch of my skull, or to wearing
it plastered down in a pompadour
loaded with a half-pound of Marfak
heavy-duty gear lube.
Finally, Redneck, you make un unfounded
founded unfounded remarks about my virility
and masculinity with references to
pixies, queens, etc. It seems to
be a typical reaction of those of
your apparently low mental range
and calibre to brand any male with
hair longer than the approved
norm as deviates, gurls, and
other less mentionable epithets. I
think one can see the fallacy in your
thinking when one remembers that
Fidelity Life Insurance
MUs

Wednesday, February 15, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

as not to make nice folks feel
uncomfortable on learning of their
behavior.
John Stuart Mill said freedom
ends where the other fellows nose
begins. The authoratitive middle
class regards its sense of pro propriety
priety propriety as an outer extension of
its nose.
Back to Miss Kuehr and her fear
that student liberty, if acknow acknowledged,
ledged, acknowledged, will leadtolicentuousness.
Her fears are not given substance
by her logic.
Certainly the university should
regulate the use of firearms on
campus. I can see how a person
might be injured by a bullet.
However, I cannot see how it is
not in the best interest of the
student body for a person to be
photographed in the nude. Granted,
if I thought it evil for a person
to be photographed in the nude, I
might conclude that such instances
might encourage like folly on the
part of others, thus compounding
the evil.
But I dont think such behavior
is evil and I further maintain that
a large percentage of my gener generation
ation generation shares my view.
Miss Kuehr and I suppose much
of the middle class fear that every
other coed may do likewise. This
is a silly notion. May I suggest

Well Herr Krieg, I sincerely
hope you stick to a war map with
little colored pins, and that the
only buttons you ever push are on
elevators.
RICHARD MAN, 4AS

many historic figures had hair
much longer than mine, and were
themselves quite normal.
In closing, Redneck, it would take
the manners which you accuse me
of lacking to write an apology to
me for the absurd generalities with
which you have slurred my char character.
acter. character. However, I expect no such
apology, since you havent either
the self-pride, the manners, nor
the humility to admit your wrong
ness.
CHRIS NUNLEY
Member of the
ROYAL GUARDSMEN

Aunt Jemimas
Spaghetti Special
ALL
You Can Eat
SI.OO
Aunt Jemima's
jqB£29HSfIPEX
: '. ."
1614 NW 13th

to Miss Kuehr and the adminis administration
tration administration that if and when that day
comes, the act will have indeed
become inappropriate and indis indiscriminate.
criminate. indiscriminate.
Inappropriate because few
women have the aesthetic
properties to merit the attentions
of the figure aficianado, and indis indiscriminate
criminate indiscriminate because the lensman
will surely have lost his powers
of discrimination.
Following her argument, I won wonder
der wonder how many California mothers
are forbidding their daughters to
attend UCLA or NYU because coeds
from these universities have
graced the pages of Playboy.
Is Miss Kuehr suggesting that
school boards are concerned as to
which schools dont lower the boom
on feature girls.? (Theyre
making a list, theyre checking it
twice, theyre going to find out
whos naughty and nice.)
Obviously Miss Kuehr craves
rectitude (Sunday school defini definition),
tion), definition), and shes getting it she
has a Tigert in her tank.
RON WIGGINS, 7JM
SENIORS
Starting May 15 to July 1, 1967,
the Internal Revenue Service
will have 18 openings in sev several
eral several Florida cities for
. .Internal Revenue Agent
a professional accounting
position
. .Internal Revenue Officer
a tax compliance specialist
position
ADVANTAGES
. .interesting and varied work
. .advancement based on
ability
. .a challenging and reward rewarding
ing rewarding career with a true sense
of purpose.
. .starting salaries pegged
to industry $444 to $591
per month
If you are interested, see your
placement officer today for an
appointment with the IRS re recruiter
cruiter recruiter who will be on campus
FEBRUARY 17, 1967
An Equal
Opportunity Employer

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 15, 1967

TUf "
MI a
9 9 % v
Youll be playing tennis a lot more often if you wear this
fashion from DO NIG ANS. This Florence Walsh tennis dress
in Ottoman pique is a sure-fire hit with every male on the
courts. With spring and love both in the air, dont miss your
opportunities at DONIGANS.
Lady Godiva comes in a heart wrapper this Valentines
at the RECORD BAR. Mignon Forcier, DG,isa smart shopper.
She listens to her records before buying on the convenient,
stereo units at the RECORD BAR, Gainesvilles record para paradise.
dise. paradise. Youll probably find her there today.
1
Jennifer Dennis got the best gift ever- in her Valentine -a check from home!
And she doesnt waste any time depositing it in her convenient Student Checking
Account at UNIVERSITY CITY BANK. Join Jennifer this Valentines, although
they cant deposit roses.
* 1

nffer-Jt' '- <'-*'- V-<
lx\w' 1967 GTO from TROPICAL PONTIAC. Marti doesnt just in
||j drive from place to place in isolated indifference. She has a jv
t ~ jjtQjMM ( great one under the hood. Thats 400 cubic inches of chromed **<
.JF'!



s^
W-8, with all-synchro three-speed, bucket seats, walnut grain 11 itrjylfi
Instrument panel, and an option list as long as your arm and V\(t[T JfJs Jt
twice as hairy. Its an idea on wheels from TROPICAL A tt^ fffi^tx\ {
i .1,. i
h

r

Jf '. a. * l vi'a|M^^^wH^M'
Jf-~ <**ps
I '§'-> §* I 'v
' ~
'W v
Nancy Bradley, AXO, had a dinner date at JERRY'S this
Valentine's. We think this picture expressed her thanks very
well. But don't wait for such an excuse with your sweetheart.
Take her to JERRY'S this weekend. .tonight. .anytime!
She'll love you for it. There's one convenient to you North
or South.
11l 111 11
I I | I i|
1 la 1b
nil
i II B t H
i ,- mSm.
* |BBIMB|
'Hi
. M- it PBpK
Jig v HBr * -,^',4^';^'
M. f >*^ r * >:#'Va:la
L j|' fptf t
I JB
.MS . ~ J':~ >:
-'. s£% J&b&freJKmr*
f |f
- SB
HHHHHHHHHKi
Susan says Night nightie in this mighty nice nightie from
SILVERMANS. For Valentines, anniversaries, or any other
occasion, buy her gifts from the Womens Department. His
come from the Men's Department on the main floor. The
occasion is no problem when you shop downtown at SILVER SILVERMAN'S.
MAN'S. SILVERMAN'S.
k
It was a quiet Valentines Day for Jana Feldman, AEPhi. But she enjoyed the
peace and quiet in her luxurious apartment at UNIVERSITY GARDENS. With
todays weather, though, you probably wont find Jana here. Shell be sunning
herself by the big pool. Its just outside her door!

Wednesday, February 15, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
SPANISH Guitar, made in Mexico,
excellent condition. $25. Call Jim
after 6 p.m. in room 72, 372-9367.
(A-95-3t-p).
STUDENT looking for extremely
reasonably priced housing Go
by Lot 25, Chi Avenue, Archer
Road Village and make offer. To Total
tal Total S3OO including Trailer and
cabana. Anna Hinson, 378-2559.
(A-91-10t-c).
' --L
1966 HONDA 50, excellent con condition,
dition, condition, call Joe between 9:30 and
6 p.m. Monday thru Friday, at
376-0031. (A-94-3t-c).
LEAR JET Cartridge stereo tape
player for your car. 8 track, two
months old, fully guaranteed, S9O.
Call 372-7339. (A-94-2t-c).
FOR SALE Furniture for sale:
Beds, sofa, chairs, refrigerator,
etc. A house full, must sell. Call:
after 5 p.m. 372-7980 or 372-
6157. (A-96-3t-c).
21 T.V. Good condition SSO.
Call 372-2957. (A-96-3t-p).
BASENJI PUP, Registered AKC,
top blood lines, $75.00. Call 481-
2362 after 5 p.m. (A-96-st-c).
for rent
FOR RENT: Comfortable corner
room, 2 closets, semi-private
bath, and entrance, 2 blocks from
campus, couple or single -- rea reasonable
sonable reasonable 378-4645. (A-96-3t-c).
TWO BEDROOM Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, living room, dining room,
kitchen, private bath and entrance,
lights and water furnished. Four
blocks from Campus. Call 378-
5811 or 372-9704. (B-95-lOt-c).
WORKING LADY has a nice bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, dishwasher or home pri privileges
vileges privileges included. Lovely yard for
BBQ. Male or female. Reasonable.
372-2191 after 5:30 p.m. (B-95-
2t-c).
I
M[ PAJAMA^P ART H
Funicelloj

for rent
TWO BEDROOM Furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, air conditioned, all electric,
pool, carpeting, available for third
trimester. Call 378-5670. (B-94-
st-c).
AVAILABLE NOW one bedroom
modern air-conditioned apt. Near
VA Hospital and Medical Center.
Adult only, no pets, lease required.
SIOO per month. Holiday Garden
Apts. 372-3488 376-4360. (B (B---88-10-c).
--88-10-c). (B---88-10-c).
GRADUATE COED in English need
mischievious yet sedate, vivacious
yet studious roommate. Only SSO
per month. Pays for private room
and for 1/2 utilities. 378-5921 after
6 p.m. or weekends. (B-96-3t-c).
wanted
WANTED One or two male room-,
mates. Rent and utilities for one:
$53 per month. Rent and utilities
for two: $37 per month. Two blocks
from campus. Call 378-3865. (C (C---
--- (C---
COED Roommate needed to share
University Garden Apartment
$41.25 per month plus 1/4 utilities.
378-5531. February rent free. (C (C---
--- (C---
WANTED one or two female
roommates to share apartment
near campus. Call 378-4589. (C (C---94-st-c).
--94-st-c). (C---94-st-c).
[PART-TIME STUDENT
Works 20 Hours/Week
Earn S4O/Week
6pm-10pm
Monday-Friday
For Appointment,
Call 372-5594
6PM-7PM

asked McLaughlin)
OF* CTfci SAID IT SHOULD BE |
WjflL HELD OVER
i^nPSI^eoRGY
( l 3 JAMES MASON ALAN BATES LYNN REDGRAVE
I 5-7 MIMMHMJi An EVtRGLAOES Production I
J 9:15 JIW i W ISUGtiESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCESI [@]|
iSmelmie. a
Funeral in Berlin g

Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 15, 1967

wanted
LEAD SINGER/rhythm guitar, or
lead guitar/singer for great new
permanent band: The Roamin'
Orgy. Clint Van Nest, 376-8194;
Jim 372-4618. (C-96-3t-p).
WANTED: Female roommate for
Colonial Manor Apts. Call 378-
5737 or 372-7111. (C-96-3t-c).
WANTED Need ride to Atlanta
this weekend. Leave Friday and
returning Sunday. Call Bob 376-
1054. (C-96-lt-c).
WANTED Female roommate to
share apartment. SSO per month.
Village 34. Call 376-6461 or 378-
6224. (C-96-3t-c).
WANTED Two responsible guys
to share large house in North
East area near town. $38.50 per
month and share utilities. Call
378-5506 or 376-6774.(C-93-st-c).
help wanted
CARRIER SALESMAN wanted to
handle newspaper on University
Campus. If interested contact Mr.
Wheeler at 376-8985.(E-95-10t-c).
iwiiy
SHIRLEY MICHAEL
A MacLAINE CfllNEyj*
V GAMBIT
o.mtmZ,
CINIMM

help wanted
RECEPTIONIST BOOKKEEPER.
Must have pleasant telephone man manner
ner manner and be good typist. Five dry
week. Ewing Photoprint Service,
305 North East First Street. 378-
2436. (E-92-st-c).
Student or student wife to oper operate
ate operate justowriters in preparing copy
for FLORIDA ALLIGATOR. Ex Experienced
perienced Experienced operator preferred but
not essential. Proficient typing
ability mandatory. Contact Mr.
White or Mr. Myking in office of
the Board of Student Publications,
Basement, Florida Union. (E-85-
tf-nc)

rfcJ*O c K*NG --
andTOMORROW
screen gives hNM
IliliiB&al^- -" y >. A > J J.
. J. /g.' 'J s^=s
| jWITTIBH.r
COLOR BV TECHNICOLOR
Blf FEATUREAT l:05-a-l0-5-15-7:25-9T30
I Si SPECI^gTUDENT
i SI.OO with This Coupon Good
ANYTIME FEB. 15 or 16
'
[jEni7<|| HEARD JULIE?
YOU HAVE ONLY
~' B li ?jPV- MORE DAYS
'ljj,
SLAPSTICK IN MOSTEL
THE GREAT, PHIL SILVERS
GRAND MANNER!" JACK GILFORD
New York Post |||||i BUSTeR KEATON 1
c K'n'G c H COLOR
Fsftmd W& "A FUNNY THING
FISBI % f HAPPENED ON THE
r-iwwTi, lAT / C'VAYTOTHE FORUM"
wf SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES ]

help wanted
MOVIE CASTING. Looking for at attractive
tractive attractive girls with acting ability,
good figure for roles in feature
spy comedy to be shot early
summer. Send picture(s) and
resume or write for information
to Cinecan Productions, Box 1235
Winter Park, Florida 32789. (E (E---94-3t-p).
--94-3t-p). (E---94-3t-p).
NEEDED Part time male help.
Dependable, married, mechani mechanically
cally mechanically inclined, hours can be ar arranged.
ranged. arranged. Must be a resident of
Gainesville for at least two more
years. Call 376-7110.(E-94-3t-c).



CLASSIFIEDS

Wednesday, February 15, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

help wanted
INTERESTED IN COUNSELLING
AT A CAMP THIS SUMMER? Red
Raider, co-ed, located in Ohio,
swimming, horse back riding, gen general
eral general counselling. Call Janet (Room
2033) 372-3621. (E-94-3t-p).
HELP WANTED Students, Male
or Female to sell paint on com commission
mission commission basis. The Brush &
Bucket, 112 S. W. 34th Street.
Telephone, 376-2431. (E-96-lt-c).
autos
Nice 1957 CIIEVY, V-8, Four door,
hard tbp. Call 378-4994. (G (G---94-3t-c).
--94-3t-c). (G---94-3t-c).
1962 FORD WAGON, V-8, radio
and heater, auto, peacock blue, 9
passenger $750. Call Gene Staudt,
376-9351, room 215. (G-92-14t-p).
1965 PORCHE COUPE, (356-C)
yellow, green interior, AM-FM
Radio, chrome wheels and head headrest.
rest. headrest. Call 376-0952 after 5 p.m.
(G-95-4t-c).

11l the DARK about
Call BH Room 9
Univ Ext B Florida
2832 B Union
PROFESSIONAL ART,
IDEAS AND SERVICES
FROM GATOR EXPERTS
i imiiiiiibiMfcinf ifiMiniriiiiiiiiv '"irii r>"iV'~r VJ fr'ihi ,*%**< : :A

autos
1960 TAUNUS. Radio, heater, 4-
door. Excellent condition through throughout.
out. throughout. $250. 378-4012. Evenings. (G (G---96-
--96-- (G---96- c).
1966 MIDGET Convertible, heater,
wire wheels, one owner, low
milage. Call 376-0567 after sp.m.
(G-96-lt-c).
1960 FORD. 4-door, automatic,
V-8. $175.00. Need money. 376-
2912. (G-96-3t-p).
59 FORD Hurst floor shift
a million laughs. Call Jim, 372-
7711 after 6 p.m. (G-96-3t-c).
services
LOFTY PILE, free from soil is
the carpet cleaned with BLUE
LUSTRE. Rent Electric sham shampooer
pooer shampooer SI.OO. LOWRY FURNITURE
CO. (M-96-lt-c).
IN A HURRY? Passports applica applications,
tions, applications, childrens photos, commer commercials
cials commercials and special problems. West Westley
ley Westley Roosevelt Studios, 372-0300,
909 NW 6th Street (M-68-ts-c)

Page 9

m 1
services
GET ACQUAINTED SPECIAL
20% discount with all hair coloring,
frosting and permanent waves with
Miss Pam. Rames Hairstylist, 319
West University Avenue, 372-5549.
(M-92-st-c).
personal
SPIRIT IS HIGH AS THE PHI
MUS VIE TO WIN DERBY. GO,
SIGMA CHI! (J-91-Bt-p).
DEAR CINDY, HAPPY VALEN VALENTINES
TINES VALENTINES DAY. LOVE YOU MUCH.
PHIL. (J-96-lt-p).
ELECTRIC Utility rates in Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville are the HIGHEST in the con continental
tinental continental U.S.A. for small commer commercial
cial commercial users of up to 6,000 KWH in
cities our size. Above 6,000 KWH,
a few cities have worse rates.
Your church, your schools and your
grocery store pay these high com commercial
mercial commercial rates. Who pays in the end?
You do, of course. COURT
COLLIER will work for lower cost
electric power. Vote COLLIER for
City Commission, March 21. (J (J---
--- (J--- st-p).

Man And Wife
'Act Together

By ANDI ALPERSTEIN
Alligator Correspondent
They are a hard-working, aca academic-minded,
demic-minded, academic-minded, theatre-oriented
couple two individuals who per perhaps
haps perhaps luckily, and coincidentally,
live their lives as a surprisingly
intertwining unit.
Michael Beistle is loquacious,
a person who seems to express
his thoughts in words very easily.
He is teaching C-3 with an almost
unique approach; he finds fresh freshmen
men freshmen totally refreshing, and he
likes to walk into class every everyday.
day. everyday. After he receives his Ph.D.
in theatre, Michael thinks of di directing,
recting, directing, perhaps in a university,
perhaps professionally.
Margaret Beistle, his wife,
seems a bit more intense, makes
no plans, is content to follow
her husband. She is a counselor
in Rawlings, and finds time to
direct The Sandbox at the
Gainesville Little Theatre (Feb.
16-18), as well as, with Michael,
to appear in A Touch of the
' Poet, here on campus.
The Beistles have appeared in
plays together continually, since
their meeting at the University of
Tulsa. They both majored in
theatre, and both delight in the
chance to act, especially together.
In A Touch of the Poet, they
play husband and wife, Con and
Nora Melody. Con is of a peasant
Irish family that once had money
but is now in disrepute. He can't
face failure and blames Nora,
Cinema Shows
1915 Movie
D. W. Griffith's silent master masterpiece,
piece, masterpiece, Hie Birth of a Nation,
will be seen Sunday at MSB Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium.
This 1915 classic, the epic story
of the Civil War and the rise of the
Ku Klux Klan during Reconstruc Reconstruction,
tion, Reconstruction, is considered by most critics
to be the most important single
film in the history of motion pic pictures.
tures. pictures.
Griffith is credited with develop developing
ing developing the fade-out, rapid scene cut cutting,
ting, cutting, close-ups, and many other
techniques which are standard to today.
day. today.
The Birth of a Nation raised
angry protests from political and
social groups because of its glori glorification
fication glorification of the Old South and its
use of gross Negro stereotypes.
The film was based on a novel
written by a Klan member, and
Griffith was a Southern sym sympathizer
pathizer sympathizer and the son of a Confed Confederate
erate Confederate general. Despite its political
point of view, however, the film
remains a hallmark of film genius
and technical mastery. A musical
score, written by Griffith, to be
played with the film, has been add added
ed added on sound track.
Because of widespread interest
in this film, the Florida Cinema
Society has scheduled a matinee
at 3 p.m. in addition to the regular
performances at 6 and 8 p.m.
Admission is 50 cents or by season
ticket.
'NSA Subsidized
By CIA, Post
The National Student Association
has been subsidized by the Cen Central
tral Central Intelligence Agency, since the
early 1950s according to a story
in the Washington Post Tuesday.
The UF student government is
not a member of the NSA, Stu Student
dent Student Government secretary Eudine
McLeod told the Associated Press.
Mrs. McLeod said the student
government has been approached
several times by the NSA but has
never become a member of the
organization.

thinking that she forced him into
marrying her. Nora is a peasant peasantsimple,
simple, peasantsimple, loyal, and devoted to her
husband and daughter.
The Beistles agree that working
together simplifies the struggle to
learn lines, and makes it easier to
analyze and evolve into the charac characters.
ters. characters. They are cognizant of each
others moods and movements in
reality as well as in the theatre.
Margaret says that their lives
have been unplanned and fan fantastic.
tastic. fantastic. She speaks the truth.
i If
NANCY ANN HOSFORD
. . wins award
Miss Hosford
Wins Award
Nancy Ann Hosford, a senior
medical technology student in the
College of Health Related Profes Professions,
sions, Professions, has won' the first annual
Lambda Tau Award, as the most
outstanding medical technology
student in the nation.
Lambda Tau is a national medi medical
cal medical technology honor society.
Miss Hosford received SIOO for
her first-place award. Prizes of
$75 and $25 were given to second
and third-place winners.
The university student was
chosen from a field of 15 medical
technology students recommended
to the national selection committee
by local chapters of Lambda Tau.
Miss Hosford was nominated by
the Theta Chapter here. She is
president.
The award was established this
year by Lambda Tau to encourage
deserving students and to recog recognize
nize recognize their contributions to the
profession of medical technology.**
Dr. Morris
Book Now
In Japanese
A Japanese publishing company
has recently released its trans translation
lation translation of a book by Dr. Charles
W. Morris, graduate research
professor in the Department of
Philosophy.
Paths of Life, which origi originally
nally originally appeared in 1942, has been
published in Japanese by Rasosha,
Ltd., Tokyo.
Dr. Morris, whose major in interests
terests interests are in the theory of sign
and language, the theory of human
val ues and the American pragmatic
movement in philosophy, is author
of several books which have been
translated into Japanese, Spanish,
Italian and Swedish.
Prior to coming to the UF, Dr.
Morris taught at the University
of Chicago and was a visiting lec lecturer
turer lecturer at Harvard University. He
is a fellow of the American Aca Academy
demy Academy of Arts and Sciences and of
the American Association for the
Advancement of Science. He is al also
so also an editor of the International
Encyclopedia of the Unified Sci Science.
ence. Science.



Page 10

', The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February lb, 1967

CASH
AVAILABLE
$25 to S6OO
PAYDAYSHORT TERMS
376-5333

Orange and

Address All Campus Calendar
Notices To Public Functions
Office, Florida Union
Wednesday, February 15
Childrens Concert: Organ, Univ. Aud., 9:50 a.m,
Fla. Players: Meeting and pledge initiation, Norman
Aud., 6 p.m.
Fine Arts Committee: meeting, 315 Union, 7 p.m.
Fla. Speleological Society: meeting, 212 Union, 7p.m.
Phi Sigma Sigma: Lecture, 116 Union, 7 p.m.
Latin American Colloquium, 215 Union, 8 p.m.
AIA Film Series: Toulouse-Lautrec, 105-B AFA,
8 p.m.
Thursday, February 16
Phi Chi Theta: guest speaker, Mr. Morris Maybury,
UF and Its Placement Center, 208 Union, 7 p.m.
All interested girls are invited

Students in the following courses are expected to
take the following tests. Each student must bring a
No. 2 lead pencil and will be required to use his
SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER.
CET 141 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Feb. 16,
7 p.m. All students whose last names begin with:
(A-L) report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118
or 119.
CET 142 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Feb. 16,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Peabody
1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) report to Leigh 207;
(D) report to Little 121, 125 or 127; (E) report to
Little 113; (F) report to Matherly 213, 216 or 219;
(G) report to Peabody 101, 102, 112, or 114; (H)
report to Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208, or 209; (1-J)
report to Flint 110 or 112; (K) report to Walker 301,
303, 307 or 308; (L) report to Little 201, 203, 205,
or 207; (M) report to Little 213, 215* 217, 219, 221,
223, 225 or 227; (N) report to Little 233 or 235;
(O) report to Little 237 or 239; (P-Q) report to
Flint 101 or 102; (R) report to Floyd 108; (S) report

Students must be registered with the Placement
Service to interview. Sign-up sheets are posted two
weeks in advance of the interview date at Building H.
All companies will be recruiting for April and August
grads unless otherwise indicated. hiring
juniors for summer employment.)
FEB. 15: NALCO CHEMICAL CO. Chem, ChE,
Lib. Arts, Bus. TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY
Arch, CE, EE, ME, NE, CE,Chem, Econ, Real -Es -Estate,
tate, -Estate, Law. COX BROADCASTING CORP. Acct, Stat,
IE, Mgmt, Math, Stat. GREATSOUTHERN OF GREAT
NORTHERN PAPER CO. Forestry, Acctg. FIELD FIELDCREST
CREST FIELDCREST MILLS, INC. Gen. Bus, Fin, Mktg, Mgmt.

I LOW
Interest rates
I of si LOA NS

LOANS fa
VACATION
Marion Finance Co.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

Progress Tests

Placement Notices

Serving U of F Employees Since 1935
PROGRAM OF THRIFT, CREDIT, SERVICE
Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union
Building J Extension 2973

BLUE BULLETIN

Campus Calendar
SDX: Rush smoker, Sigma Chi House, 7:30 p.m.
History and Philosophy of Medicine Lecture: Sir
Charles Illingworth, Gold from Glasgow, MSB
Aud., 8 p.m.
Concert: Gator Symphonic Band, Univ. Aud.,B:l5 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi: meeting, 116 Union, 8:30 p.m.
Christian Science, Union Aud., 5 p.m.
Painting for Fun: Chinese Brush Painting, 215 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Language and Literature Club: meeting, 105-B AFA,
8 p.m.
Fla. Folk Dancers: Dance, Union Social room, 8 p.m.
p
Friday, February 17
Arnold Air Society: Dining In, SSC Banquet Room,
6:30 p.m.

Administrative Notices

to Walker Auditorium; (T-V) report to Little 101
or 109; (W-Z) report to Walker Auditorium.
CHN 251 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Feb. 21,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12,
13, 14 or 16; (M-z) report to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, or 119.
CHN 252 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Feb. 21,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Peabody
1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) report to Leigh 207;
(D) report to Little 121, 125 or 127; (E) Little 113;
(F) report to Matherly 213, 216 or 219; (G) report
to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; (H) report to Pea Peabody
body Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209; (I-J) report to Flint
110 or 112; (K) report to Walker 301, 303, 307 or
308; (L) report to Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; (M)
report to Little 213, 217, 219, 221, 223, 225 or 227;
(N) report to Little 233, or 235; (O) report to Little
237 or 239; (P-Q) report to Flint 101 or 102; (R)
report to Floyd 108; (S) report to Walker. Auditorium;
(T-V) report to Little 101 or 109; (W-z) report to
Walker Auditorium.

ARMOUR GROCERY PRODUCTS CO. Bus. Ad,
Lib. Arts. PAN AMERICAN PETROLEUM CORP.
Geol, Math, Physics, EE, ChE,CE, EE,ME, Eng. Sci.*
CELOTEX CORP EE, ME, ChE, Chem, Acctg.
PARKE, DAVIS & CO. Chem, Biol, Zool, Acctg,
Gen. Bus, ChE, ME, Math, Stat. U. S. NAVAL SHIP
MISSILE SYSTEMS ENGR. EE, ME, Physics.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF ORLANDO Bus, Fin,
Mgmt. LIBERTY MUTUAL INSURANCE CO. All
majors.
FEB. 15, 16: ST. REGIS PAPER CO. Mgmt,
Mktg, Acctg, ChE, ME.*

MONEY
AVAILABLE
Up to S6OO
FOR YOUR SECOND CAR
222 W. University Ave.

Chess Club, 215 Union, 7 p.m.
Movie: Id Rather Be Rich, MSB Aud., 7 & 9 p.m.
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE: Tickets now on sale
for AL HIRT and the Gainesville Little Theater.
Student Tickets for the University Orchestra Con Concerts
certs Concerts February 26 & 27 go on sale Wednesday,
February 15. 2/ID. Faculty and Staff and General
Admission tickets for the University Orchestra
Concerts go on sale Friday, February 17. $2.00.
Student Tickets for W. H. Auden go on sale Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, February 16. SI.OO

General
Notices
GRADUATE COUNCIL MEETING: February meet meeting
ing meeting of the Graduate Council will be held on Thursday,
Feb. 16, at 1:30 p.m. in Room 235, Tigert Hall.
IMMUNIZATION CLINIC: Free shots will be given
to adults and children of Flavet in, Thursday, Feb. 16
from 5-7 p.m. in the Flavet 111 recreation hall. The
clinic is sponsored by the Alachua County Health
Department in coordination with the University of
Florida College of Nursing.
RESEARCH PROJECTS: If anyone on campus is
doing research on any aspect of cross-cultural edu education,
cation, education, or on the teaching of English as a foreign
language, on foreign student admissions or on edu educational
cational educational systems anywhere in the world, please con contact
tact contact the Foreign Student Advisor, International Center,
Bldg. AE, Ext. 2837 or 2838.
ID CARD PHOTOS: Identification photographs will
be taken every Friday, 8 a.m. 12 noon, at Photo Photographic
graphic Photographic Section, Building L. There will be a $5
fee for replacing lost or stolen ID cards. Anyone
finding an ID card should return it to Photographic
Services, where it will be kept on file.
FEB. 16: FRANCIS I. DuPONT & CO. Fin,
Math, Econ, Acctg, Lib. Arts. GRAND UNION CO.
Bus. Ad, Mktg, Lib. Arts, Ed. CHUBB & SON, INC.
Bus, Lib. Arts, Ed. PURE OIL CO. Bus. Ad,
Lib. Arts, Mktg. COLONIAL PIPELINE CO. ME,
EE. SOUTHWIRE CO. IE, EE, ME, ChE, Psych,
Acctg. HEALTH SURVEY CONSULTANTS, INC.
Forestry, Agron, Hort, Wildlife, Mgmt.* JEWEL
CO., INC. Bus. (vacation relief for route operators).
FEB. 16, 17: AETNA CASUALTY & SURETY CO.
All majors. TEXAS INSTRUMENTS, INC. Bus,
All engi.*

AUTO LOANS
OUR
SPECIALTY



Students Sit-In Tigert

Leaders of the group circulated
a petition asking that the Unive University
rsity University of Florida delegate sfroe re responsible
sponsible responsible official of the University
administration to meet with the
student body in order to discuss
with us and explain to us the Uni Universitys
versitys Universitys policies with respect to
the Faculty Discipline Commit Committee.
tee. Committee.
Shepherd Asks
FDC Telethon
/
Student Government President
Charles Shepherd said Tuesday
night that he has conferred with
UF President J. Wayne Reitz a about
bout about holding a telethon to discuss
the Faculty Discipline Committee
and its implications.
Shepherd told approximately 150
students gathered on the second
floor of Tigert Hall that the dis discussion,
cussion, discussion, which he will moderate,
will be aired on closed-circuit
television in various classrooms
throughout campus.
Viewers will be able to phone
questions.
Final preparations will be an announced
nounced announced in the next few days.

-
When i was stiul in they put you in a and went to
COLLEGE I HEARD THAT TRAINING PROGRAM SOME LECTURES AND
WHEN YOU WENT TO WORK AND ALL YOU DID WATCHED OTHER
IN A LARGE CORPORATION... WAS PAPER WORK PEOPLE WORK.
v \
x ( ] ( yjw] f >4/)
\Xf V-7
AND THOUGHT ABOUT
WHAT YOU WOULD DO THAT WAS WEHTTO WORK
IF ONLYTHEY ASKED YOU LAST JUNE AfriJr
TO DO SOMETHING. \ m
GENERALTELEPHONE& ELECTRONICS IS DIFFERENT. / GENERALTELEPHONE & electrics
laUI ANY lUtAo Wt LAN Uot. /' 730 THIRD AVENUE, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10017
/ Vj
/

The petition proposes that the
meeting be held in University Au Auditorium
ditorium Auditorium some evening within the
next week.
Several hundred names had
been collected on the petition ac according
cording according to Bo Lozoff, 2UC, one of
the protest leaders.
Protestors moved inside Tigert
Hall outside the Dean of Womens
Office at 4 p.m. when Miss Brewer
would learn of her sentence.
Approximately 150 people began
the sit-in on the steps after former
UF student Judy Marshall spoke
to the teach-in.
I suggest we go over and sit on
Uncle J. Waynes knee -- the steps
of Tigert and ask him to listen
to us, Miss Marshall told the
crowd.
As the students broke up to walk
to Tigert, Lou Tally, chairman of
the teach-in, said the new demon demonstration
stration demonstration was not an extension of
the teach-in.
Lozoff said that the crowd, which
had grown to about 300 persons,
didnt enter Tigert for hostile
purposes.
Doors to both the Dean of Wo Womens
mens Womens and Dean of Mens offices
were locked after the crowd ga gathered
thered gathered on the buildings steps.
Lozoff told The Alligator that
the demonstrators decided to enter

the building after they heard the
deans doors had been locked.
Its important to realize the
demonstrators are not violent,
Tally said. They probably would
have stayed outside, but it was
getting cold. The demonstrators
would have come inside even if
the dpors hadnt been locked.
Shouts of sit down so well
look peaceful were heard as the
group moved inside. The crowds
leaders made appeals for an order orderly
ly orderly demonstration.
Tigert personnel watched the
demonstration from windows and
the second floor balcony.
Theyre looking at us as if
were a bunch of monkeys, Lozoff
said in reference to the small
group of people watching the pro proceedings
ceedings proceedings from the balcony.
Theyre the monkeys, not us,
he said.
Our marathon goes on until
the administration will delineate
their position, Bernie Wisser,
7AS, told the crowd on the steps.
Wisser was later elected chair chairman
man chairman of the protest.
Lynne Jacobs, lUC, roommate of
a coed placed on similar proba probation
tion probation for posing for a semi-nude
picture last trimester, said she
thought her roommate was wrong
to hush-up her case. Miss Ja Jacobs
cobs Jacobs was participating in the sit-in.

Wednesday, February 15, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Philpot Talks About
Reitzs Resignation

By HAROLD KENNEDY
Alligator Staff Writer
. . *
AUBURN, Ala. Florida will
be losing one of the best men in
higher education, whenUF Presi President
dent President J. Wayne Reitz vacates his
office in September, University of
Auburn President Harry M. Phil Philpot
pot Philpot declared Tuesday.
Philpot served as vice president
under Reitz here for eight years
from 1957 to 1965. He developed
a great respect for the UF Presi President,
dent, President, he said, and can not believe

Director Os Info Services Said
'Tigert Doors Stay Unlocked

The doors to Tigert wont be
locked Tuesday night, Bob Lynch,
director of informational services
told the Alligator.
Lynch said he learned of the de decision
cision decision not to lock the doors from
University Police.
University Business Manager,
William Elmore told police to keep
several patrolmen in the Tigert
area, Lynch said.
Police Chief A. I. Shuler told

that Reitz resigned under political
pressure.
Reitz named presidential
fatigue" as the reason for his
resignation, and Philpot felt that
to be exactly what Reitz meant.
I think he meant that the re responsibilities
sponsibilities responsibilities of the job had lost
their glamour.
Philpot wouldnt venture a guess
as to the Board of Regents choice
for the next president. Asked how
he would feel about an offer to
be Reitzs successor, Philpot re replied,
plied, replied, The Boards not going to
offer it and I wouldnt feel.

The Alligator that he didnt know
whether or not the doors would be
locked.
The administration n. es the
decisions, and they will be going
through Bob Lynchs office,
Shuler said.
The police chief said his depart department
ment department had observers on the scene
but there was no assigned number
of police there.

Page 11



SPORTS

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 15, 1967

Best Student Bowlers
Not Representing UF
By MEL MILBERG
Alligator Correspondent
The sad fact that UF will not be represented by the best student
bowlers at the Region 6, Association of College Unions Tourna Tournament
ment Tournament in two weeks is eclipsed only by the poor way in which
the roll-off to determine the Gator bowlers was run.
The tournament, to be held in Tampa, is an annual affair
pitting the best student bowlers from the various colleges
and universities against each other from within the region.
Each, participating school sends two, five-man teams, one
of men and one of women, to bowl in singles and doubles events.
The winners of the singles events are given an all-expense
paid trip to the American Bowling Congress Tournament, which
is being held at Miami Beach this year in March.
But UF will have to settle for second best representation.
The reason they are second best and this does not by any
means make them bad bowlers is because the best were told
when the tournament was nearly over that they would not be
allowed to participate because of an eligibility, fule.
The rule states that any student who has bowled in league play
since Sept. 1, 1966 and is eligible to win cash or merchandise
prizes may not bowl in this tournament because he is considered
a professional bowler.
Wayne Ezell, director of the roll-off held at Palm Lanes last
Monday through Thursday, came up with the decision that UF
students who were league bowlers would not be eligible.
Eligibility rules were not stated anytime before the roll rolloff
off rolloff began, therefore some of the now ineligible bowlers showed
up for the roll-offs. After they had completed their games, they
were told by Ezell that they could not bowl in Tampa.
It may be a coincidence, but four of the top six scorers
were on that ineligible list, thus allowing the second best
students the opportunity to represent the UF in two weeks.
Poor organization can be the only reason for letting ineligible
students bowl in the roll-offs in the first place. Publicity
was scarce, and some of the best students may still not know that
there was such a roll-off or tournament.
In addition, the roll-off was to be held only three days
Monday through Wednesday. But Ezell added the Thursday
session because he said he felt there was not enough publicity
to begin with. He implied that the word would get around through
those who had actually bowled.
As if this was not enough admission of poor organization,
the ineligible students were told that they would be given back the
money they had spent to pay for the roll-off games.
What should be done? For this year, its too late. But for
next year the solution is easy.
A person who has been inside a bowling alley should organize
the roll-off. Ezell said Wednesday he could not remember the
last time he had been inside such an establishment.
Hie American Bowling Congress and the Womens Inter International
national International Bowling Congress have strict rules which can severely
penalize league bowlers for participating in what it considers
illegal bowling activities.
So does the Association of College Unions which is sponsoring
the student tournament.
Someone who knows what a bowling ball looks like and can be
a liaison between the tournament officials and the student
bowlers is the one to organize in the future. These are the days
of specialization let's give the job to the pros.
Florida Rifles Shoot
InTampaTournament

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Sports Writer
With seven victories and two
defeats notched to its record in
last weeks Tampa Invitational
Tournament, the Florida Rifles
team hits the road this weekend
to compete in the National Rifle
Association Sectionals in Miami.
The Gator sharpshooters sport
a 12-6 season mark. Last Satur Saturday
day Saturday in the Tampa Invitational, the
Rifles were edged by FSU and
Miami while beating seven squads.
Included among the defeated were
Stetson, Florida A & M, Miami
Military, and the Tampa Army
Reserve team.
Leading the Gator marksmen
were Toby Muir, Lee Young, Jim
Waugh, Bill Pennock, Kerry Cha Chatham,
tham, Chatham, and Jay Weber.
Although I am not disappointed
with the mens overall perfor performance,

mance, performance, I know we could have fired
better, said Major Harvey Dick,
advisor to the Rifles.
This Saturday the Gator sharp sharpshooters
shooters sharpshooters will fire against FSU,
Miami, Florida A & M, and Flor Florida
ida Florida Southern in the NRA Sectional
Match in the Magic City. In last
years sectional match, the UF
team took top honors in Miami
and finished second among ROTC
teams in the nation.
This is an extremely important
match, as the winners receive na national
tional national recognition, stated Sgt. Joe
Nave, coach of the Rifles.
T e DDy BEaR nUrSeRv
1214 1/2 NW 4th St.
376.0917
5 age groups, Infant through
kindergarten Classes.
Air conditioned New building

Florida To Host Invitational
Archery, Golf, Tennis Meets

UF will host contestants for the
Florida Women's Collegiate Golf
and Tennis Tournaments and the
Florida Men's and Women's Colle Collegiate
giate Collegiate Invitational Archery Tourna Tournament,
ment, Tournament, March 31-April 1.
The three events are open to
undergraduate students in good
standing in any Florida college,
junior college or university. The
entry deadline for all three tourna tournaments
ments tournaments will be March 10.
The university's College of Phy Physical
sical Physical Education and Health is spon sponsoring
soring sponsoring golf and tennis activity and
the University Archery Club will
coordinate planning for its compe competition,
tition, competition, scheduled April 1 only.
Betty Graham will serve as gen general
eral general chairman for the weekend
tests, as well as director of the
golf tournament.

Pro Baseball Players
Sign New Contracts

ATLANTA (UPI) Pitchers Don
Drysdale of the Los Angeles Dod Dodgers
gers Dodgers and Jim Bouton of the New
York Yankees Monday led a herd
of professional baseball players
into the signed-and- satisfied cor corral
ral corral with teams around the nation.
Drysdale, whose 1966 negotia negotiations
tions negotiations with the Los Angeles Dodgers
lasted through last spring training
when he and Sandy Koufax held out
for more money, has signed his
1967 contract for more than
SIOO,OOO, the team announced.
Dodgers Willie Crawford, John
Werhas and Mike Kekich also have
returned their signed contracts,
according to Dodger vice president
and general manager E. J. Buzzie
Bavasi.
The team would not say exactly
how much Big D would be paid,
only that he signed in six
figures. Ifls won-lost record last
year was only 13-16.
Bouton, who won 39 games in
1963 and 1964, and only seven
games the last two years, signed
for his sixth season for the same
$27,000 he earned last year.
The good-natured Bouton suffer suffered
ed suffered through the 1966 season during
which he received credit for only
three triumphs as the Yankees
sank to 10th place.
JTie Gainesville Chapter
of the
AMERICAN CIVIL
LIBERTIES UNION
invites you to hear
Jeremiah Gutman
Director, New York C.L.U.
* 4
Speaking On
THE CASE AGAINST
THE HOUSE
UNAMERICAN
ACTIVITIES
COMMITTEE
Place: HILLEL HOUSE, 16 N.W.
18th Street
Date: WEDNESDAY, FEB. 15
(Tonite)
Time: 8:00 P.M.

Miss Graham, an assistant pro professor
fessor professor of womens physical edu education,
cation, education, will be assisted by two of
her colleagues from the college
Jane C. Miller, archery chairman,
and Mrs. Jackie Morris, tennis
chairman.
Golf entry fees are $5 per play player.
er. player. There will be separate junior
college and college-university di division
vision division awards for 36-hole team and
individual winners and runnersup.
Although there is no limit on the
number of entries from a partici participating
pating participating school, the coach must indi indicate
cate indicate which players are bidding for
the team title, to be decided by the
best four of five scores for two
days.
Single elimination singles and
doubles tourneys are scheduled for
tennis with each college restricted

Bouton's signing brings the total
number of Yankees under contract
for the 1967 season to 16.
The Boston Red Sox announced
the signing of six pitchers and one
outfielder, giving them 27 of 39
varsity roster members already
under contract.
Included in the latest batch of
signings were relief pitchers Don
McMahon, John Wyatt, Pete Mag Magrini
rini Magrini and Hank Fischer, starting
hurler Dave Morehead, and rookie
Bill Farmer.
The Chicago White Sox listed
five more players on their roster.
Returning completed contracts
were infielders Wayne Causey and
A1 Weis, pitchers Don Dennis and
Jack Lamabe and outfielder Bill
Voss.
The signings gave the White Sox
a total of 27 players ready for the
new season.
Catchers Pat Corrales and Dave
Ricketts and infielders Jimmy
Williams and John Sipin have sign signed
ed signed 1967 contracts with the St. Louis
Cardinals, it was announced.
The Washington Senators an announced
nounced announced the signings of pitcher
Darold Knowles, obtained in a mid midseason
season midseason trade with the Philadelphia
Phillies.
Knowles was the 29th Senator
to sign for the coming season.

If You Go
This Year,
EUROPE!
At But Please,
teh Ask Us First.
HOUSE OF TRAVEL
I WWm

to four singles entrants and two
doubles teams. Entry fees are $3
per singles player and $4 per
doubles team. Tennis competition
also will be divided between junior
college and four-year schools.
Archers will vie in an American
Round (30 arrows at 40, 50, and
60 yards) at 10 a.m. on Apr. 1,
followed by a Columbia Round (24
arrows at 30, 40 and 50 yards)
at 2 p.m.
There are no limits on archery
entries, but teams must have two
men and two women to compete.
A trophy will be awarded to the
winning team, based on combined
scores for both rounds, and the
two high scorers in the mens and
womens divisions will receive
prizes.
An awards banquet is scheduled
at 7:30 p.m. on April 1 at the
University of Florida Faculty Club.
Tickets are priced at $2.50 each
and can be reserved when schools
submit their tournament entry
forms.
Additional information on the
three events can be obtained from
Miss Graham, College of Physical
Education and Health, at the Flor Florida
ida Florida Gymnasium.
Georgia Rips
LSU 78-65
ATHENS, Ga. (UPI) Led by
center Don Wix, the University of
Georgia burst t 6 life in the second
half Monday night to score a 78-65
basketball victory over Louisiana
State University in a Southeastern
Conference clash.
A quick-throwing Georgia de defense
fense defense forced LSU into a string of
floor mistakes. The first half saw
the teams see-saw for the lead,
with the period ending in a 30-30
tie.
Georgia took the lead for the
last time at 36:34 in the second
half.
The game left Georgia 5-9 in
the conference and 9-12 overall.
LSU is now 1-12 in the SEC.
Tumi U)m
flip RENTALS
Hmwrjaih)
1620 W. Uniy. Ave.
Carolyn Plaza