Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Tlie Florida Alligator

Vol. 59, No. 86

Fire Hits Tigert Hall;
Motor Defect Cause

A" fire in Tigert Hall Tuesday caused an esti estimated
mated estimated $2,500 to 3,000 damage. The fire started
in room 26, which houses air conditioning machin machinery.
ery. machinery.
A Gainesville Fire Department official estimated
the fire to have started at 4:45 p.m., probably
on the ceiling.

'' -JiH
NO PARKING PROBLEM? -- Used to be that
the best way to beat the parking problem on
campus was to get a cycle. Low on gas and
easy to park. Now the problem is getting so
bad, even cyclists ...
Gov. Kirk May Approve
Choir Trip To Expo 67
Gov. Claude Kirk will hold a telephone conference with UF stu student
dent student body President Buddy Jacobs, University Choir Director Dr.\
Elwood Keister and choir President Arthur Johnson this morning
to discuss the choirs proposed trip to Expo 67, the 1967 Montreal,
Canada, Worlds Fair.
Sen Mallory Horne, who has been working with the Florida Dev Development
elopment Development Commission to try to find the $3,200 the choir needs
to make the trip, discussed the UF singers Worlds Fair invitation
with Kirk Monday.
Horne and Kirk were to meet again early this morning to discuss
the problem further, then to cal here to talk with Jacobs and the
choir representatives.

They're Snoopy About Campus Politics

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
Last year Birthday Party ran a partial slate of candidates
in the spring election, adding a touch of humor and fu to an
otherwise serious campaign.
This year, Snoopy Party met the challenge o run for the fun
of running by naming even fewer candidates to compose its
slate. No candidates are supported sot any of the top five posi positions.
tions. positions.
Three people qualified on the ticket before the deadline for

University of Florida, Gainesville

The Fire Department sent three trucks to the
scene of the fire and extinguished the blaze with within
in within 15 minutes. An official damage report will not
be filed until this morning.
According to University Police the probable
cause of the fire was a defect in a motor in the

room. Police said the fire spread
into the insulation and ducts, fill filling
ing filling several rooms on various
floors of Tigert with smoke. The
fire is believed to have started
on the rooms ceiling.
It looked like a large tire,
but was really a small one with
a lot of smoke, one police of official
ficial official said.
Most workers in the Registrars
office, located on the same floor
as the fire, were at a meeting
in the Architecture building. No
one was injured.
Tigert Hall was still filled with
smoke more than an hour and one onehalf
half onehalf after the fire was extinguish extinguished.
ed. extinguished.
This is the second fire on cam campus
pus campus within three days. A fire in
Broward Hall Sunday also did min minor
or minor damage.
HC Candidate
Chaffee Friend
By BILL DOUTHAT
Alligator Staff Writer
' -!
He was the greatest guy and
finest pilot you would ever find,
said UF law student Dave Cox,
speaking of Navy Lt. Cmdr. Roger
B. Chaffee, who was killed in Sun Sundays
days Sundays Apollo I tragedy.
Cox, an independent candidate
for Honor Court chancellor, said
he was a former crew member
with Chaffee and flew with him
while stationed in Jacksonville.
Chaffee was a safety officer there
when selected for astronaut train training.
ing. training.
Chaffee was a very intense in individual
dividual individual who seemed to take pride
in being a professional pilot and a
perfectionist, said Cox.
He was the aviators aviator,
he added.
Cox said that the officers in
Chaffees squadron nickmaned him
Beaver because he was one of
the most enthusiastic and busy of officers
ficers officers on the base.
Cox was in the crew with Chaf Chaffee
fee Chaffee on several operational mis missions
sions missions to Bermuda, the Azores and
while covering the Mercury space
shots.

qualifying for office. One candidate dropped out of the race at
the beginning of the week.
Left in the race are Robert Estes, 7JM, running for Honor
Court justice and Becky Baker, 4ED, running for Legislative
Council from the College of Education.
I guess its just like Birthday Party last year, said Jay
Scheck, SG secretary of the Interior, who oversees the elec elections.
tions. elections. They're just running for the sake of running. They prob probably
ably probably arent too serious about it.
Serious candidates or not, the two Snoopy Party campaigners
are on the ballot. It should provide for interesting politics if
they win.

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Election Party
In Cafeteria
Shortly after the polls close
Thursday, students are invited to
the Main Cafeterias west wing
to see the returns tallied up as
they come in.
During the traditional post-elec post-election
tion post-election gathering free coffee will be
served as students see the results
projected before them by an ov overhead
erhead overhead projector.
The results are expected to come
in rapidly this year from com computers
puters computers doing the tabulation. Re Results
sults Results will be phoned in from the
computer center at Lake Alice.

How To Use Votomatic
...And Where To Vote

University College students
will vote at their living areas,
and upper division students will
vote at the site of their upper
division college in Thursdays stu student
dent student body elections. The one ex exception
ception exception will be the College of Arts
and Sciences, which will have five
voting machines at the Hub.
In the UFs first attempt
at using electronic voting equip equipment,
ment, equipment, 48 IBM Votomatic Machines
will be placed at the various
polling places on campus.
The voter will place his bal ballot
lot ballot into the machine and will punch
the stylus of the machine into the
hole opposite the name of his choices
for the various positions. Holes
will be registered on the IBM card
used as a ballot, and will be counted
on an IBM machine that evening.
The voter will remove his ballot
from the machine when he has fin-

Wednesday February 1, 1967

Traffic Survey
Will Begin
By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Staff Writer
Now is the opportunity for all
frustrated motorists to air their
complaints on the campus traffic
situation in hopes of future im improvement.
provement. improvement.
Ramp Conculting Service, Inc.,
of New York is conducting a cam campus
pus campus wide survey, beginning Feb.
13. The first area to be covered
is the J. Hillis Mills Health Cen Center,
ter, Center, from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Motorists will be asked the ori origin
gin origin of their vehicle, their des destination,
tination, destination, their success in finding
a parking place, their decal and
license number.
The survey is designed to pre predict
dict predict present and future traffic
needs at the university and to avoid
unnecessary allotment of facil facilities
ities facilities and funds in construction
of parking areas, said Sec. of
Finance Bruce Rogow.
The information gathered from
the Med Center zone will be anal analized
ized analized for effectiveness. Additional
surveys will be taken on the main
campus at a later date. The pro project
ject project will continue over this tri trimester,
mester, trimester, and results will be assimi assimilated
lated assimilated by Ramp Consulting Service,
Inc. Application of the data should
begin to affect campus traffic
patterns by the fall quarter,
Rogow said.
Students interested in assist assisting
ing assisting with the survey should come
to Room 307 of the Florida Union,
or call extention 2239 for infor information.
mation. information.

Pr 1
IBM VOTOMATIC
. . really sin- >le
ished and will personally place his
ballot in the box provided.
Blue fee cards and picture
IDs must be presented when voting.



!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 1, 1967

Page 2

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WINNING SMILE Todays Gator Girl
Kathy Young certainly has that winning
smile. In fact, she was a Jantzen Smile
Girl. A sophomore, Kathy is a member of
Delta Delta Delta sorority and an ATO
LITTLE SISTER. She also is a spelunker,
(caver for the uninitiated).
Election Results To Be Aired

WUFT-TV. channel 5 in Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, will televise an elect election
ion election special** Thursday night from
7-7:30 p.m.
The station will feature back background
ground background stories on each of UF's
presidential candidates during the
first portion of the program. It

GOT SOMETHING TO SELL?
v\L|yLMryj am
_____
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS >g\
''-
l The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advert advertisements
isements advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
HO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever
possible
The Florida uigator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement
Involving tyj>ot, : aphlcal errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice is given to the Ad Advertising
vertising Advertising Manager within (1) one day after advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator
will not be responsible for more than one incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled
to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.
THE F? .ORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of tne University of
Florida and ts published five times weekly except during May, June, and July when
it is published semi-weekly. Only editorials represent tha Official opinions of their authors.
Address correspondence to The Florida Alligator, Florida Union Building, University
o' Florida, Gainesville, fla., 32601. The Alligator Is entered as second class matter
the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

will then switch to a tote board
where returns will appear.
WUFT hopes to have a direct
line to the UF computing center,
where returns will be tabulated.
In addition, there will be a line
to the Main Cafeteria where can candidates
didates candidates will see election results.

VA Hospital Ties Strong
With UF Medical Facilities

By HARVEY ALPER
Alligator Staff Writer
The director of Gainesvilles
new VA Hospital has a problem.
J. Mai com Randall isnt sure
who hes working for.
Randall draws his check from
the VeteransAdministration but he
says UF administrators have been
working so closely with him that
he sometimes thinks hes working
for the UF.
This is probably going to be
the closest affiliation in the VA
system, Randall says of the re relationship
lationship relationship between his hospital and
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center.
This (the VA Hospital) will in
fact function as a university hos hospital
pital hospital and much of the credit goes
to people at the UFDr. Reitz,
Dean Mautz and Dr. Sam Martin.
Ive never known a more dy dynamic
namic dynamic group than this group here,
Randall continues. Ive never
known a more cooperative group.
Randalls statements grow from
the strong links being fashioned
between the university and theVA.
When the VA Hospital opens, hope hopefully
fully hopefully in June, physicians at the
universitys Shands Teaching Hos Hospital
pital Hospital will be on the VAs rolls
as consulting or attending physic physicians.
ians. physicians.
These doctors will be directly
involved in patient care, education
and research, at the VA Hospital
Randall says.
This same affiliation for nurs nursing,
ing, nursing, pharmacy, and health related
professions, will also apply Ran Randall
dall Randall notes. The same relationship
will apply when the college of
dentistry is opened. There is going
to be an extremely close re relationship,
lationship, relationship, Randall said Monday.
Randall said the VA Hospital
was built in Gainesville to af affiliate
filiate affiliate with the UF. Its close
physical proximity to the health

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center (the hospital is located di directly
rectly directly across from the health
center on Archer Road) is part
of the VAs policy to locate
adjacent to universities, Randall
emphasized.
But the free faculty-staff in interchange,
terchange, interchange, which Randall is ob obviously
viously obviously enchanted with, has its
problems.
The greatest problem is one of
distance. The health center is not
physically linked with the VA Hos Hospital.
pital. Hospital. Nevertheless, doctors at the
health center may be making sev several
eral several trips a day to the new build building
ing building when it opens.
Physicians fear that they will
be wasting time crossing the

APATHY?
I First Party I
CARES!
H --t* H
I (If You Don't Vote... I
I DON'T COMPLAIN! ) I
B paid political advertisement

street. They are also annoyed at
the propect of having to fight
the elements during incle inclement
ment inclement weather.
There is going to be a lot
of movement back and forth,"
Randall says, But it actually
would be better if we had a tun tunnel
nel tunnel connecting us (the two hos hospitals),"
pitals)," hospitals)," he continues.
Yet, even if the two facilities
arent physically linked there will
be strong ties.
We are jointly recruiting our
medical staffs and the physicians
on our rolls must have the approv approval
al approval of the Deans Committee at
the university. Our people of fac faculty
ulty faculty stature will be f eligible for
(SEE HOSPITAL," PAGE 3)



-HOSPITAL-
From Page 2
and have faculty appointment at UF.
Interns and residents will be rot rotated
ated rotated through here as though the
Shands Hospital. All UF resident
physicians will spend part of their
time at this hospital, Randall
said.
With a staff of around 800 em employees
ployees employees the VA should act as
a considerable stimulus to the
local community.
The VA is also intent on not
becoming a public eye sore.
Since the hospital was construct constructed
ed constructed numerous local residents have
decried its roof, for thereupon
sits a fantastic maze of sheet sheetmetal
metal sheetmetal and pipes. It was claimed
that architects had no idea that
this material would be placed
there, but its esthetic effect was
devastating.
It ruined the building's appear appearence.
ence. appearence.
However, the building's plans
were sent back to Washing Washington
ton Washington architects who have decided
to put white aluminum baffels a around
round around the much discussed roof rooflevel
level rooflevel hodgepodge. Sketches of
this modification show it to be
esthetically effective.
VOTE I
for
DAVE COX
for
CHANCELLOR
* 1
The QUALIFIED Candidate
Former Chancellor Schwartz
stated of the other candidates
--None of the candidates are
qualified for the office by my I
judgment. Neither one (of the
3) is really qualified!
COMPARE! COMPARE!-
COMPARE!
Attorney General of Honor
Court
Asst. Atty. Gen. / Chief
Defense Ivestigator
GRAD: U.S. Navy School
of Justice
Navy legal officer (2 yrs.)
Proposals:
Remove Honor Court from
Party Control
Keep Party spoils system
out of ILC.
Protect student rights
Extend student privileges
DAVE COX
for
CHANCELLOR
jj paid political advertisement

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PUB-LIC WEDDING -- Hal
Jones and Jennifer McCloud tie
the knot Friday night in a wed wedding
ding wedding ceremony held at the Pub,
a local tavern. A notary public

Womens Independent On Move

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
Women's Independent of Florida,
organized last fall to provide act activities
ivities activities for the independent woman
on campus, has released its sch schedule
edule schedule events for the winter trimes trimester.
ter. trimester.
Plans are finalized for five act activities;
ivities; activities; others, such as weight
reducing and guitar playing are
still to be set up.
A travel series will begin on

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Tuesday, Feb. 7, at 8:30 p.m. Dr.
Clark Cross, associate profes professor
sor professor of geography, will show slides
on the Soviet Union and will lead
the discussion on that area of the
world. The program, held in room
116 of the Florida Union, will be begin
gin begin at 8:30 in order to not con conflict
flict conflict with progress tests.
Activities in the Union craft shop
are on tap for Wednesday nights
and will start on Feb. 8 in the
first floor craft shop in the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union. Mrs. Anne Strickland

Wednesday, February 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

officiated at the wedding. Ano Another
ther Another wedding, less formal than
the Jones-McCloud one, was
held in the Pub during the sum summer.
mer. summer.

will give an introduction to the shop
at the first Wednesday meeting,
scheduled for 7 p.m.
Monday night bridge lessons.and
Thursday night painting lessons
are scheduled, but openings are
limited for these sessions. The
bridge lessons, beginning Feb. 13,
will be given for eight weeks and
will cost women SG. Lessons in
water colors will be given by Dr.
Robert Carson, starting the end
of February. There will be a charge

of $5 for the course.
Judy Miller, an organizer of the
independent organization, emphas emphasized
ized emphasized that the number of women tak taking
ing taking the lessons will be limited,
and those who are interested in
the program should contact her
her at 2314 Jennings or in the
Student Government offices, where
she is an assistant.
Miss Miller also noted that the
formers of Women's Independent
delayed the starting of activities
so that they would not conflict
with other events.
We formed so late in the term
last fall that finals came up and
the girls needed the time to study,
she said. Then the ACCENT
programs were held and student
elections followed. We didn't want
to conflict with them.
The schedule of events is open
to any woman who joined the or organization
ganization organization at the end of last fall.
Others are also encouraged to
join and participate in the acti activities
vities activities by contacting Miss Miller.
1 BEST FOR CLERK j
jjACK ZUCKERj
l|
I CHAIRMAN Os JUDICIARYI
I COMMITTEE of Legislative #
J Council J
J HONOR COURTBPEAKERS I
I BUREAU #
J Chairman V' Os Forums J
| Committee < J
C Outstanding Committee#
J Chairman AHW4 1966 J
J President of Pi Mu Epsilon (
Honorary Mttfe Fraternity#
I INDEPENDENT Chairman!
1 of World UfliWsity Service j
C Orientation Group Leader#
J Dean's List
C first party C
J(Paid political advertisement) \
'" 1

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 1, 1967

Two Astronauts
r
Buried In Virginia

ARLINGTON, Va. (UPI) Vir Virgil
gil Virgil Gus Grisson, the veteran as astronaut,
tronaut, astronaut, and Roger B. Chaffes,
the rookie, were buried side by
side Tuesday on a frost-browned
knoll in Arlington National Ce Cemetery
metery Cemetery while their commander-in commander-inchief
chief commander-inchief stood with head bowed.
Twice during the day, the mour mourful
ful mourful notes of Taps, and honor
guards 21 rifle volleys and the
shriek of jet fighters overhead
shattered the stillness at Arling Arlington
ton Arlington as two gray steel, GI issue
caskets first Grissoms and
then Chaffee's -- were lowered
into the hallowed ground of the na nations
tions nations heroes.
And on a cold, wind-swept bluff
high above the Hudson River in
New York, the body of Edward
H. White II was buried in the
Madrid Student
Dies In Protest
MADRID (UPI) A 23-year 23-yearold
old 23-yearold Spanish student leaped to his
death from a sixth floor window
of his familys apartment Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday and became the first known
fatality in a wave of student and
worker 'freedom" demonstra demonstrations
tions demonstrations and strikes sweeping
the country.
The suicide was identified as
Ranael Guijarro, who was study studying
ing studying to become a social worker.
Friends said he killed himself in
protest against the alleged lack of
students freedom.
Madrid University was closed
Tuesday and all classes suspen suspended
ded suspended by order of the Council of
Regents. There had been four days
of rioting on the campus culmina culminating
ting culminating in a five hour pitched bat battle
tle battle with police Monday. Three
newsmen were beaten by police
during the latter disturbance.

WORLD NEWS
Exchange Diplomats
BONN (UPI) West Germany and Romania agreed Tuesday to
establish diplomatic relations despite their opposing views over
Communist East Germany.
West German Foreign Minister Willy Brandt and Romanian For Foreign
eign Foreign Minister Coreliu Manescu shook hands and smiled as they issued
a communique saying the agreement was reached in open, unbiased
and sincere terms.
Diplomatic observers said the pact marked Romanis independent
foreign policy and it took Bucharest one step further from the shad shadow
ow shadow of the Soviet Union.
Anti-Soviet Demonstrations
MOSCOW (UPI) Communist China has carried its anti-Soviet
campaign to the North Vietnamese capital of Hanoi where Chinese
diplomats and students staged provocative demonstrations outside
the Russian Embassy, the Soviet government newspaper Izvestia
said Tuesday.
The newspaper also said nonstop demonstrations outside the Sov Soviet
iet Soviet Embassy in Peking went into their sixth day. Tass said Soviet
diplomats were forced to listen to death Sentences broadcast
over loudspeakers by besieging Red Guards.
Reports reaching here also told of anti-Soviet demonstrations
by Chinese students in Paris, London and Phnom Penh capital of
Cambodia.
i
Wont Discuss Peace
BEIRUT, Lebanon (UPI) The Syrian-Israeli Mixed Armistice
Commission will not discuss Syrias proposal for borderland peace
between the two countries when its meets again Thursday, a U.N.
spokesman was qfQted by Jordan Radio Tuesday

cemetery of his alma mater, the
U.S. Military Academy, in the pre presence
sence presence of Vice President Hubert
H. Humphrey.
Thus did America lay to rest,
briefly and simply, the three men
who were burned to death Friday
m a flash fire that swept their
Apollo 1 spacecraft on a launch
pad at Cape Kennedy, Fla.
Exactly three weeks before they
were to have ridden that same
spacecraft on the first manned
flight aimed at landing Americans
on the moon by 1970, Grissom and
Chaffee were borne on creaking
black, horse-drawn caissons to a
plot on the southwestern edge of
Arlington Cemetery.
The site is about a half-mile
south of the Tomb of the Un Unknowns
knowns Unknowns and a mile south of the
grave of President John F. Ken Kennedy,
nedy, Kennedy, who nearly four years ago
had said of space:
"This is the new ocean, and
I believe the United States must
sail on it and be in a position
second to none."
Retired Marine Col. John H.
Glenn, who was with Kennedy in
the White House rose garden that
day, stood by Grissom's gravesite
Tuesday morning, along with the
five other members of the ori original
ginal original "Mercury** team of astro astronauts.
nauts. astronauts.
President Johnson, one of the
early backers of an all-out space
program as Senate Democratic
leader in the 19505, took a seat
alongside Grissoms wife, Betty;
his sons, Scott, 16, and Mark,
13, and his parents. Mr. and Mrs.
Dennis Grissom of Mitchell, Ind.

UPI
NEWS
9
King Os Gypsies
Buried By Clan
TAMPA (UPI) Tom Mitchell,
the king of the gymsies, was bur buried
ied buried Tuesday by 500 wandering
clansmen who assembled here to
pay homage to "The Great One"
who ruled them for 43 years.
The gypsies were silent during
the graveside service. They could
not ging or chant because their
king was killed in an auto ac accident.
cident. accident. Gypsy law reserves the
burial chant for those who die of
natural causes.
Most of the gypsy women, who
wore long satin dresses embroi embroidered
dered embroidered with sequins, wept openly
as they filed past the open grave
and tossed dirt onto the casket of
their ruler.
After the services, the gypsies
drove to the Sarasota Memorial
Hospital, where their queen, Mo Mother
ther Mother Rose, and Princess Linda lay
in critical condition.

Mao May Lose
ControlOf Arsenal

HONG KONG (UPI) The army
commander in Sinklang Province
has threatened to seize control of
i om munis t Chinas nuclear arsen arsenal
al arsenal unless Chairman Mao Tse-tung
gives in to certain demands, re reports
ports reports from Peking said Tuesday
night.
The development was reported
by the English language Hong Kong
Star, a sensational tabloid, but
appeared to be verified by Mai Mainichi
nichi Mainichi Shimbun, a prestigious Tok Tokyo
yo Tokyo mass circulation daily.
A Peking dispatch in the Tok Tokyo
yo Tokyo paper said the situation was
so serious Mao was sending Pre Premier
mier Premier Chou En-lai to the vast wes western
tern western province which mines uran uranium
ium uranium to negotiate with the com man-

NEW YORK
STOCK REPORT
NEW YORK (UPI) Dow
Jones closing range of ave averages.
rages. averages.
Net Change: 30 Indus., up
1.78; 20 Rails, Unchanged;
15 Utils., off 0.19; 65 Stock
up 0.28.
.Stocks: HIGH LOW CLOSE
Stocks: High Low Close
50 Indus 857.02 844.82 849.89
20 Rails 229.65 226.91 228.01
15 Utils 140.18 139.16 139,19
65 Stocks 367.90 303.74 305.51
Bonds: Close Chg.
40 Bonds 83.52 off 0.04
10 Ist Rls 75.10 off 0.05
10 2nd Rls 83.90 off 0.07
10 Utils 85.67 up.o3
10 Indus 89.40 off 0.06

Troops Capture
Cong Document
SAIGON (UPI) A secret Viet Cong document captured by
U.S. troops in their Iron Triangle drive indicates the Communists
have lost control of over one million South Vietnamese in a year,
U.S. authorities said Tuesday. The document also admitted the
Viet Cong were having trouble recruiting new followers.
In the Saigon area, however, there were fresh outbreaks of
Viet Cong terrorism that killed at least four persons and wound wounded
ed wounded 17, including two American servicemen.
In ground fighting, South Korean White Horse Division troops
battling in mountainous country northwest of the coastal city of
Nha Trang, reported they killed 71 Viet Cong in the past three
days without suffering a casualty.
The dramatic evidence that the Viet Cong are losing control
over the population was contained in a document captured during
Operation Cedar Falls, the biggest ground action of the war that
destroyed a traditional Viet Cong stronghold only 30 miles north
of Saigon.
American authorities said the classified document was intended
only for limited circulation among high-ranking Viet Cong
cadres.
They disclosed that in the document the Viet Cong said they
considered some 5 million of South Vietnams estimated popu population
lation population of 15 million persons to be under Communist control in
the countryside. They said they considered another 5 million to
be under control of the Vietnamese government in the rural
areas.
A comparison with the early part of 1965 shows a decrease
of one million people in the rural areas due to the presence of
U.S. troops, the Communist document said.
The Viet Cong paper also said:
The people who frequently go in and out of the rural areas
are not under our control or under the enemys. This does not
mean that the enemy has great ability. Rather this reflects poor
leadership on our part.

der. identified as Gen. Wang En En-9
-9 En-9
Mao.
Sinking, in the west and bor bordering
dering bordering on the Soviet Union, is
Red Chinas largest province. Am American
erican American intelligence has established
that the Lop Nor area of Sin Sinkiang
kiang Sinkiang is the site of the country's
Mainichi, quoting Peking wall
posters, said Chou's offer to dis discuss
cuss discuss the situation with Wang and
Sinkiang politburo member Ting
Sheng-chien was contained in a
four-point directive issued Tues Tuesday.
day. Tuesday.
Wang was appointed by Presi President
dent President Liu Shao-chi, considered
Mao's principal oppoent in the
Chinese power struggle.

Kirk Reprimands
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI) Gov. Claude Kirk publicly re reprimanded
primanded reprimanded Secretary of State Tom Adams Tuesday for letting
attorneys on his staff practice law on the side.
TMs sort of practice starts out in good faith but every now
, bby BakeF iS created > Kirk said to Adams, in a
surprise deveiopment during the weekly Cabinet meeting.
f tvTl? e / mer secretary to the Senate Democratic major majority
ity majority in Washington who was convicted of income tax evasion lar lar*unds
*unds lar*unds and admitted there were four attorneys
said m a PrlVate law office but he
conflict of taterelt aPPear C Ur r d anythln e tl,at woul a
Urges French Role
4^ en Ro^>er t Kennedy said today after talks
with President Charles de Gaulle that the United States will be
in far greater difficulty than I have thought* if it rejects a pos possible
sible possible French peacemaking role in Vietnam.
Tbe i ? emoCratic senator from New York conferred on Viet Vietnam
nam Vietnam with De Gaulle for 65 minutes.
I think that without any question France and Gen. De Gaulle
re go ng o play an important role in any successful effort that
vfptnam peace£ul solution to the struggle in
Vietnam, Kennedy told newsmen.
If that is not recognized by the spokesmen In Washington,
£ nL, a r r ,?J, n ,,f r at ve£ W,lh 06 Ga " e and
A^sss adn,,rer f u,esena, r s

CHOU EN-LAI
... to negotiate



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WORLD OF CINEMA

Georgy Acclaimed For Wrong Reasons

By DON FEDERMAN
Alligator Correspondent
Beginning at the State today is
the widely acclaimed Georgy
Girl, acclaimed, however, for the
wrong reasons. TTie film of a sen sensitive,
sitive, sensitive, plain looking young woman,

her need for love and her flam flamboyant
boyant flamboyant behavior by which she hides
her feelings of inadequacy, is in indeed
deed indeed witty and warm, irres irresistible,
istible, irresistible, and charming, not to
mention any other cricital cliche
you can think of along these lines.
But I think the films strong
point is in the consistency of Ge Georgys
orgys Georgys insecure character, which
ironically makes for a sad, bit bittersweet
tersweet bittersweet ending.
Putting it another way, the mov movie's
ie's movie's strength is its movement to towards
wards towards a mood of pathos rather
than its comic celebration of mo modern
dern modern love. Consider the following
facts from the plot.
Georgy, painfully self-cons self-conscious,
cious, self-conscious, believes in her inade inadequacy
quacy inadequacy to the extent of accentua accentuating
ting accentuating her large, gawky figure in
bulkish clothing. She is not bea beautiful,
utiful, beautiful, but it is obvious from ob observing
serving observing her that she could at attract
tract attract men by her qualities of ex exuberance.
uberance. exuberance.
Georgys singular joy is mus musically
ically musically educating young children
whose spontaneity and happy nar narcissism
cissism narcissism are in line with Georgys
own behavior. The love received
from her young pupils is not,
however, completely satisfying.
Her London roommate, Meredith,
a beautiful nymph with many lov lovers,
ers, lovers, earns the envy of Georgy.
Apparently Georgy wants to have
affairs, but unlike Meredith, whose
lovers are an endless series of
thrills, she wants a man to love
her and be loved by her in re return.
turn. return.
Well opportunities develop. Me Meredith
redith Meredith gets pregnant by Jos, her
favorite lover, and decides to

marry him and have the child.
But her pregnancy and restricted
married life embitters her, and
Georgy and Jos take over the
care of the child as Meredith
leaves Jos.
By this time Jos has fallen in
love with Georgy, realizing that
Meredith is a cold-blooded, vic vicious
ious vicious woman. But Merediths baby,
being a full-time responsibility,
leaves no time for Jos. Mean Meanwhile,
while, Meanwhile, James Reamington, the em employer
ployer employer of Georgys father, who
having been married to a frigid
hypochondriac and having earlier
asked the healthy Georgy to be
his mistress, proposes marriage.
She accepts, but in a surprise
ending, leaves James with the be belief
lief belief that his new wife is more
than he bargained for.
The point to be emphasized in
this brief synopsis is that Geor Georgy,
gy, Georgy, when finally offered love, re rejects
jects rejects it. For one thing, Jos and
James come to Georgy only after
realizing the mistakes of their
own lives, having treated her like
dirt prior to their realizations.
Furthermore, Georgys love of
children was more than compen compensatory
satory compensatory behavior, for Georgy is
more a mother than a woman, and
what she wants to love are human
beings as helpless, honest, and
carefree as she is; that is, child children
ren children appeal to her more because
they create with her a feeling of
mutual security, a vital need
overlooked by Jos and James in
their respective passion and pro propriety.
priety. propriety.
Jos and James learn too late
that Georgys fantasy world in-

LARRV TY ree
PRESIDENT
V Pres. Florida Union Board
V Orientation Director, Traffic Control
V Student Govt. Sect. of Inter
University Affairs
V President Pro-Tem, Legislative
Council
V Traffic Court Justice
V 3.1 Average
V Man of the Year Award
Fla. Union Board
V Independent' *
/ University
fARTY
w. -

Wednesday, February 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

dicates needs greater Uiantneiove
they offer her. So Georgy, for all
her charms, is a monster to men,
out no more than men are to her
(you see, there is no other Geor Georgy
gy Georgy deep inside).
Her actions suggest that in a
heartless world no one can have
love too good, let alone understand
it. Thus if Georgy's behavior at
the close of the movie seems ir irritating,
ritating, irritating, it is probably because the
viewer's illusions are crumbling.
For love, to utilize Eliot, ends not
in "a bang but a whimper."
To the prospective moviegoer
faced with the choice of whether
to see "Alfie" at the Florida or
"Georgy Girl" at the State, I
would choose the latter.
The quality ofSilvioNarizzano's
directing in "Georgy Girl" is less
pretentious than Bilbert's in "Al "Alfie."
fie." "Alfie." The realism and cynicism
of "Alfie" are weakened by its
ambivalent hero, and studs with without
out without distinction who rely on cute
dialogue are rather boring.
"Georgy Girl" though has the
imaginative improvisational qua quality
lity quality of Lester's "The Knack,"
thoush it is obvious that Nariz Narizzano
zano Narizzano is a mimicker rather than an
innovator. "Georgy Girl" is the
funnier movie since it contains
better and more action gags than
"Alfie" which relies too much on
its inconsistent dialogue. Lynn
Redgrave as Georgy and Alan Bates
as Jos are exhlliratlng.
If you can take in both mov movies,
ies, movies, do by all means. I recom recommend
mend recommend "Georgy Girl" more, if
only because Georgy is more a bas basis
is basis for a problem woman than
Alfie is for a problem man.

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 1, 1967

The Florida A ligator
'A Myyty h Ou TAmmlPlmHiT^A'
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Managing Editor Executive Editor
AHDY MOOR 808 BECK
Eaorial Editor Soorts Editor
Ofdntoos of colvmnfjsts do not uecessanly reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff Is the editorial in the left
column.
!
Another Jump?
Woe upon us.
With just 24 hours left in the campus
political campaign, one would think that
the politicking and deals would be over,
that party leaders would sit back and
watch the results and knock off the pet petty
ty petty politics.
Maybe thats what will happen. But
maybe it isnt.
The 67 campaign has thus far been
a very low key one -- almost too much
so to be true. Outside of the gib five fivehouse
house fivehouse jump the day before qualifying,
*hings have been compartively mild.
But in the past two days things have
been uneasy -- and the probability of an
election eve jump does not seem out of
the question.
There are rumblings that University
Party might join forces with United Par Party
ty Party tonight in an attempt to down Charles
Shepherds express, which seems to have
the FIRST Party candidate in the lead.
There is some animosity between Shep Shepherd
herd Shepherd and the bigwigs in both other par parties
ties parties and most of them will admit priva privately
tely privately that theyd rather see anybody but
Shepherd in the presidents chair.
If such a jump were to take place,
the only time would be at chapter meet meetings
ings meetings tonight when all fraternity mem members
bers members could be informed who to vote for.
This would almost surely have to happen
regardless of whether United absorbed
University, or vice versa.
We have already taken a stand against
jumping once in this campaign when we
said we could not support Rob Blues
candidacy because of the dealings invol involved
ved involved in the five-house switch.
We also hope we dont have to report
another such deal, but if it happens to tonight,
night, tonight, we will.
For this reason, Thursdays Alligator
may be late getting back to campus,
because were going to hold publication up
until were certain such a breach of the
student bodys confidence does not come
about.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

accepts all to the e. itor.
Du' to spaci limitations, how howev
ev howev we asK hat letters not
exceed 500 words. Typewritten
and 'loUble-sp, ei letters are

preferred, and all roust be sign signed.
ed. signed. Names will be withheld upon
request. Editors reserve the
right to select or reject let letters
ters letters for publication.

THINKING OUT LOUD

By JIM MOORHEAD
Our Man In Crimes Capital
MIAMIGov. Kirk was right.
Miami is the most crime-ridden
city in America.
You can get away from a lot
of things in Miami. You can skip
the salt air by hocking your surf surfboard.
board. surfboard. You can avoid gambling by
taking up dopeor vice versa. You
can avoid the reprehensible com company
pany company of bar girls by simply set setting
ting setting your sights on something high higher,
er, higher, like choir girls or lady po policemen.
licemen. policemen.
But crime in Miami, you should
believe it, you cannot get away
from. It is everywhere. For if
it is not your lot to be mugged,
raped or otherwise favored, you
cannot--in any case--avoid the
people. And to not avoid the peo people
ple people is to not avoid the way they
dress and the way they drive. And
that, I am here to tell you, is
a crime.
The reason the population growth
in Miami has been held in recent
years to a less-than-astronomi less-than-astronomical
cal less-than-astronomical rate is a municipal endea endeavor
vor endeavor in people control known as
Rush Hour Traffic.
This is a twice-daily game which
has come to be known in ped pedestrians
estrians pedestrians lingo as Certain Death.
For the driver it is his own form
of Oriental exercisehis answer,
as it were, to the more mundane
Far Eastern fads of yoga and kar karate.
ate. karate. It is known in traffic cir circles,
cles, circles, but more especially along
the expressways, as Kamikaze.
But for all its side effects in
helping curb a mushrooming pop populace,
ulace, populace, traffic attrition is an ill
that local authorities are trying
mightily to arrest. I submit that
one reason they are failing is
that they are going after the wrong
culprits.
Take my own personal example.
I whizzed along that deaths door
known as the East-West Express Expressway
way Expressway one afternoon and, right be between
tween between forgive us our trespasses
and lead us not into, I notic noticed
ed noticed in my rear-view mirror a traf traffic
fic traffic cop fast approaching.
Since all 28 cars abreast of me
were plummeting along at more or
less the same rate of self-extinct self-extinction,
ion, self-extinction, I decided to help clear the
way for the officer who was ob obviously
viously obviously in pursuit of some fool.

OUR MAN HOPPE

Us And Our Horrible Friends

By Arthur Hoppe
Columnist
Once upon a time there was
a scrubby little country called
Phynkia. It was ruled by the
hereditary Ratt. He observed a pol policy
icy policy of strict neutrality. But even
so, it was such a scrubby country
that not even the Red Chinese
would smuggle him anything worth
pawning.
Then one day the Ratt was
overthrown by General Tor Torquemada
quemada Torquemada Man-Chu, who was the
most evil man who ever lived.
The American Ambassador,
suppressing a yawn, dropped by to
check out the Generals stand on
the issues of the day.
**l believe, said the General,
in Horriblism. We Horribllites
have a mystic faith in torture,
oppression, stealing from shoe shoeshine
shine shoeshine boys, rape, butchery, mis miscellaneous
cellaneous miscellaneous vileness and kicking
little old ladies planting mari marigolds.
golds. marigolds.
- Good heavens! cried our Am Ambassador.

Claude Kirk Was Right

He fell right in behind me and
I precariously threaded us a path
between Not Expected To Recover
and Dead on Arrival. And then
the ingrate pulled ME!
He muttered something about me
changing lanes without signaling or
crossing myself, Then he noted my
North Florida license plates and
drivers license, and fell to talk talking
ing talking about mutual acquaintances we
had in Jasper, Istachatta and other
points primitive.
As we chatted, squadrons of
bloodthirsty vehicles varoomed by
in their daily obsequies of lets
- race the jets to and from
- International Airport. After a
time, he drawled a misty-eyed
bye (with a very long i), mo moseyed
seyed moseyed to his car and pulled away awaybut
but awaybut not, I noticed, without first
blinking and blessing.
He may have just been homesick
for some Cracker conviviality. Im
inclined to think he simply already
had his quota of wrecks for that
shift. I checked the papers next
day. There were 187 as we talked.

typ Hr '%
fc rf'''*y£^ i i?| i ~
Bookworm

bassador. Ambassador. You must be stopped."
We also," said the General,
with a villainous smile, are
vigorous anti-Communists."
Oh," said the Ambassador.
And he cabled the State Depart Department
ment Department for instructions.
Whats he bothering us for?"
said the Secretary of State testily.
If that General is anti-Com anti-Communist,
munist, anti-Communist, hes automatically a
member of the Free World. Send
him a membership card, the usual
two zillion dollars and a flock of
tanks so he can defend himself
against Communist aggression.
Thank you," said the General
on receiving the aid. Today Phy Phynkia,
nkia, Phynkia, tomorrow East Phynkia!"
And in a week he had conquer conquered
ed conquered 32 neutralist neighbors, loot looting,
ing, looting, pillaging, kicking little old
ladies and otherwise behaving
with predictable Horribleness.
Encouraged and enriched, the
Horriblites went on to conquer,
by foul means and worse, every
neutralist nation anywhere.

It made no difference that he
covered none of them. There were
no survivors.
The traffic situation here, in indeed,
deed, indeed, may be hopeless. I heard that,
the National Safety Council has
suspended Florida from the map.
Miami keeps running out of pins.
As for dress, people here gen generally
erally generally favor a line of fashion
exclusive to Miami, and Miami
Beach, which has no known name.
(It also pretty much defies de description.)
scription.) description.) But it might accurately
be termed Charity Bizarre Bizarrewhich
which Bizarrewhich is to say that practically
every other person you meet looks
as though he or she got run up upside
side upside down through the fitting room
of a Salvation Army indigent shelt shelter
er shelter during a Happening.
So, the avoidance of things crim criminal
inal criminal is impossible here, Gov Governor.
ernor. Governor. If you want to dramatically
reduce crime in Miami, eradicate
automobiles and clothes.
Besides, think what a wipeout
for all the car thieves and pick pickpockets.
pockets. pickpockets.

A triumph for the rree
World! cried our Secretary of
State, rubbing his hands.
And then they gobbled up all
our Allies. No longer will we
have to deal with a squeamish
England, nor a fractious France,"
said the Secretary. The Free
World is united. Communism can
never.win now.
And he was right. For in one
final struggle the united Horrib Horriblites,
lites, Horriblites, with our aid, wiped out Com Communism
munism Communism forever.
Total victory! crowed the
President, rubbing his bands
What do we do now?
Do? said the Secretary of
State, looking blank. Well, I don*
really know. I suppose we shoulc
get together with our er
Allies and talk about the future
of the world."
It was Horrible.
Moral: Its a good thing our
State Department is anti-Com anti-Communist.
munist. anti-Communist. Or else we wouldnt have
a foreign policy at all.



Fee Hike
Is Unfair
To Students
EDITOR:
As we look at our nation today,
it is plain to see that a college
education is necessary, but at what
costs? Admittedly, costs are con constantly,
stantly, constantly, increasing, and the tuition
at Floridas state institutions of
higher education should be raised
accordingly.
It seems, however, that the price
of an education is getting out of
hand for the general population.
In September, 1965 the tuition
was raised by nearly 15 per cent.
Now the universities have chang changed
ed changed to the faculty approved quar quarter
ter quarter system. The tuition is in the
process of being increased for the
quarter system.
It takes only a few minutes to
figure out what has happened to
the poor student.
If n the new increase in tuition
is adopted, the cost of an educa education,
tion, education, as far as tuition is concern concerned,
ed, concerned, will come within two dollars of
being double the tuition at the
States universities just two and
one-half years ago!
This does not follow the trend
of the cost of living as had been
brought out by Dr. Paul Koefod
in the Alligator.
What is happening to the poor
student who still earns the dol dollar-and-a-quarter
lar-and-a-quarter dollar-and-a-quarter an hour in
a shorter summer working period
(thanks to the quarter system)?
People have seemed to have for forgotten
gotten forgotten the most important asset
of our countrys future the stu students
dents students who will be the leaders of
tomorrow.
MICHAEL E. RAIM 3 PH

EDITOR:
Imperial Wizard Lester Maddox,
who moonlights as Governor of
Georgia, has planned a cutback in
money appropriated for Georgias
universities.
Death Valley Reagan, after rail railroading
roading railroading Clark Kerr off the Berk Berkeley
eley Berkeley campus, has pledged to bring
tuition fees to U-Cal and other
California universities.
Floridas Haydon Burns, secret

PLEASE
Limit Letters To The
Editor To 250 Words
And Make Sure
They're Signed. We
Will Omit Names
At Writer's Request.
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Hell Eat Boyntons Hat

Seminar Not As Pictured

EDITOR:
As an as- regular-as-possible attendant of
the National Security Seminar, I would like to
comment on the questions of disagreement, dis discussion,
cussion, discussion, and presence of the seminar on campus.
Aside from lack of formal debate, I found the
room for discussion and disagreement not com completely
pletely completely stifled. In fact I wonder whether there was
not more room for disagreement in this govern government-oriented
ment-oriented government-oriented seminar than in some of our lib liberal-minded
eral-minded liberal-minded classrooms.
There was no test on which the student must
write the answers that the lecturer wants. There
was no demand that the seminarian concur with
the lecturer or else be humiliated before his peers.
(Ask a Goldwater man who was in a C-l or PCL
course in 1964 just what its like). No subject subjective
ive subjective grades were given. In effect, there were few
restraints on disagreement.
As for discussion, the lecturers made themselves
available to the audience. Discussion took place
among the participants, and contrary to easy

SDS Should Change Image

EDITOR:
Professor Emily Maclachan of the Department
of Sociology, stated, in effect, that if it were
necessary, to promote a cause, it would be a
small sacrifice to shave ones beard or cut ones
hair.
That was the gist of Professor Maclachans
speech given at the Civil Rights Teach-in on this
last year. Tuesday a spokesmen for S.D.S.
reasoned that everyone should be a member of
S.D.S. But today I ask you, who would want to
be associated with S.D.S?
There are persons on this campus who have
a deep concern pertaining to matters upon which
your organization takes stands. However those same
persons will not join your organization until
S.D.S. changes its image.
An image is superfical but for the improtance
of your position do not ramble on as you are
now doing. You should be seen as those who

Lets Modernize Telephones

EDITOR:
Help! We have a cultural lag
on campus. The students living in
the dormitories are suffering a
great communications deficiency.
We are faced with the predica predicament
ment predicament of the communal pay tele telephones
phones telephones and the restrictive swit switchboard
chboard switchboard in our communications
system.
During our nightly study periods,
we are constantly disturbed by the
ringing of the telephone and the

agent for the Charley Johns Com Committee,
mittee, Committee, once threatened to a witch
hunt in Florida higher education.
He has since retired to become a
racist-at-large, but he has left
his imprint on the present ad adinistration.
inistration. adinistration.
Why do semi-literate governors
wage war on the one institution
that may produce people better ed educated
ucated educated than actors and axe-handle
salesmen the university?
Such actions will merely widen
the rift between student and elder,
giving the Pepsi Generation reason

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I£lL a TUmjblE
FEATURING QUICK, COURTEOUS CURB SERVICE
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COUNTER
CARRY OUT
Open Til 1 AM
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noise caused by the attempts to
locate the persons wanted. There
is also a long line of waiting
students who are trying to use the
switchboards. There is much in inconvenience'
convenience' inconvenience' and waste of study
time in each case.
I would like to propose the fol following
lowing following in an effort to modernize
our system:
1. Eliminate switchboards and
communal pay telephones.
2. Using the present intercom

to become more cynical than ever,
I congratulate Georgias Student
Organizing Committee for raising
a perhaps futile voice to protest
this anti-intellectual backlash.
Rousseau (remember him?)
wrote: Man is born free, but
everywhere he is in chains.
Someone else once, said: The
truth shall make you free.
If Maddox, Reagan, and their co cohorts
horts cohorts are interested in truth and
higher education, Ill eat Wayne
Boyntons hat.
DAVID MILLER, 2UC

generalization, not all seminarians were conser conservatively
vatively conservatively oriented.
A second pertinent point at the teach-in was
the right of the seminar to be present on campus.
I would think the true liberal would applaud the
apparent violation of a rule he holds to be un unjust.
just. unjust. The precedent has been established; perhaps
the next event will be more to the liking of the
protestors.
Had more protestors accepted the invitation to
attend the seminar, they might have been chag chagrined
rined chagrined at the innocuous sessions. If they were in
fact appalled at a strong political message (which
I apparently failed to grasp), they might take
comfort at the somewhat disinterested audience
waiting for the ball to set them free.
I fail to discern the dangers of the past sem seminar.
inar. seminar. I believe any voices should be free to speak
on a college campus and look forward to any
speakers, left or right.
MARYLE GOODNOW 7AS

care about a democratic society (as I am sure
you do) and not as those whose members are
misfits in society. That is how the majority of
people on this campus regard the members of
S.DjS.
Tuesday on this campus you once again focused
attention upon yourselves. There is a difference
between attention and respect. Respect is what
Professor Maclachan was talking about last year.
Tuesday you had a interesting and provacative
program, but I dare say an unsuccesful one.
Your speakers were of the highest quality,
but the S.D.S. presentation of those speakers,
obviously appeared immature to the military for
whom they were intended.
If your future programs are to be similar to
the event of Tuesday I request that you conclude
any impending plans until S.D.S. can develop a
beneficial image, for yourselves, and your cause.
EDWARD F.NASH, 2UC

Wednesday, February 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

wires (installed in most dorms)
install a telephone having a low
tone chime in each room.
Too much expense and distraction
for the students?
On the contrary, the students
could save time and money by
having their own personal phones.
I say lets take the noise out
of our hallsmodernizegive
the students this deserved luxury
of personal telephones.
I have no connection with any
communications business. I have
seen the proposed system work
very effectively at a modern uni university
versity university at no additional cost to
the student.
DANIEL C. NEGETHON 2UC

FIGURE IT OUT. I
Why have over 30U young men and women learned to fly at Cassels 1
In The Air in the past two years? Obviously, theres something 1
worthwhile in having a pilots license. We can answer your questions I
and show you why you should learn to fly. Come out any time. Youll I
be under no obligation to us just to your future. I
IN THE AIR
MUNICIPAL AIRPORT WALDO ROAD |

m
Short
Sleeve
Shirts
s]99
Sizes:
Small
Medium
Large
ML
HD
HrpH
GATOS
SHOP)
1710 W. UNIVERSITY AVENUE
ON THE "GOLD COAST*
ids sel l gator ads sell goto

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| for sale j
8x35 TRAILER with 9x20 movable
cabana. Completely furnished good
condition, Call 372-4551 after 3:30
p.m. (A-76-lOt-c)
FLAMENCO GUITAR ons of
the few made in Madrid by Fran Francisco
cisco Francisco Fernandez. Peg tuning,
Spanish cypres & mahogany. Call
Chuck Tasca at 376-0622 after
8 p.m. $270. (A-83-st-p)
YAMAHA 250 Big Bear Scrambler.
Custom paint. Call 376-7543. (A (A---85-3t-c)
--85-3t-c) (A---85-3t-c)
LIGHTED beer sign for sale,
great for decoration, comes com complete,
plete, complete, make offer. Phone Rod 376-
9381. (A-85-4t-c)
1966 VESPA 150 Motorscooter.
Like new, 8 weeks old, only 700
miles. $325.00. Call: Ron in room
632 at 372-9280. (A-84-st-p)
BRAND NEW HONDA S-90, 1,200
miles, 4 months old, perfect con condition,
dition, condition, used only on campus. A
steal at S3OO. Call HOKUS at
376-9208 or 372-9427. (A (A---
--- (A--- st-c)
1964 HONDA 305 Dream, new
Rings, valves, chain, and sprocket.
If interested call 378-6195 between
5-7 p.m. (A-83-10t-c)
MUNTZ Stereo tape player. Four
Speakers, tapes, wiring included.
Call 376-9740 after 6 p.m. (A (A---
--- (A---
TWO CASTRO Convertible beds,
good condition, $25.00 each. Call
372-6822 anytime. (A-86-3t-c)
FOR SALE Symphonic Stereo,
excellent condition. Real Bargain
at S4O. Call Paul at 378-6030.
(A-86-3t-c)
1966 BERNZ-A-M .TIC portable
refrigerator. Excellent condition.
Retails for S9O will sell for SSO.
Call Bruce at 378-6639. (A-86-
st-c)
LAFAYETTE 4 track stereo tape
recorder. Must sell S9O. Call 378-
5740 or 378-5961 after 4 p.m.
(A-86-3t-p)

for rent
TWO room suite, private, refrig refrigerator
erator refrigerator & washer. 1815 NW 7th Ave.
Phone Jackson, 372-9500 or 376-
3211, ext. 5606. (B-78-10t-c)
NEW nicely furnished, 2 bedroom
apartment, available Immediately,
AC, Heat, pool, laundry facilities.
$125 mo. 1405 S.W. 10th Terr.,
just off S.W. 16th Ave. Phone:
372-6734. (B-83-3t-c)
n /
.1/ /
GATOR ADS GET
RESULTS FAST!

for rent
YOU can spend 4 years in Uni University
versity University Gardens-from orientation
to graduation-and LOVE IT.
376-6720. (B-83-st-c)
wanted
RIDERS WANTED:
Going to Ft. Lauderdale this week weekend.
end. weekend. Leave Friday afternoon. Call
Dianne at 376-2201 today. (C (C---86-
--86-- (C---86- nc)
WANTED female roommate. Rent
$28.33 monthly. Duplex apartment
near campus. Call 376-8632 after
4 p.m. (C-86-3t-c)
WANTED: Sophomore votes to help
put ED MORRIS in Legislative
Council. (C-86-lt-p)
WANTED: Male roommate for
large modern, furnished, air con condition
dition condition apartment. $45 month per
share. Call 378-6302 evenings
(C-86-3t-c)
NEED to share quarters of or
with coed(s). 372-4633 or leave
note at 1336 NW sth Ave.
(C-86-lt-p)
WANTED two male roommates
for Fredericks Apartments. Call
378-3939. (C-84-2t-c)
Parts for Triumph Motor cycle
650 cc Would like to buy wreck wrecked
ed wrecked bike cheap for parts. Call: 378-
1776. (C-83-st-c)
: lifeT DOWN TO W N :
: |JI M j DAILY
2 PM
| 8 PM
* * *>'
HAVE YOU SEEN IT
MORE THAN ONCE?
YOU SHOULD
I P&X'Ait)
1L
iPjj I*l 1:20
:i 4:oo
9^o
MJU3MWMY MILES
TMuUooior

I, TTie Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 1, 1967

Page 8

wanted
FEMALE roommate wanted for
two bedroom unfurnished apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Near campus and town. Call
372-2429 after 5 p.m. (C-81-
st-c)
FEMALE roommate wanted for
furnished two bedroom apartment
at Landmark. $43.75 plus utilities,
will provide ride to campus if
necessary. Call 378-6367 at 6:30
(C-84- 2t-c)
real estate
HOUSE FOR Sale,Four bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, two bath, Florida room with
fireplace, built in Kitchen, corn corner
er corner lot, convenient location, swim swimming
ming swimming pool membership, many ex extras.
tras. extras. Practically new. S6OO down
and pick up payments on 5 l/4%
mortgage for qualified purchaser.
Call 372-5214 to inspect. (1-83-
st-c)
trade
IF you called before to trade a
Tape recorder (7 reel) in
good condition for 19 portable
G.E. TV in good condition, Call
again 378-4772 (D-85-lt-p)

njyrnTi > ~ lodcuf -n
pSSjjjpj i 11:30-3:30 -5:30 7:30 9:30 y
I ( BREATHTAKING! SWEEPING AND EXCITING.
CHIUS AND SPILLS CROWD THE SCREEH.
LEAVES A VIEWER BREATHLESS:'-,
MAGNIFICENT FILM. NOT TO BE MISSED."
Harpers Bazaar
BRILLIANT!-,,.
BUOYANT FUN...HYPNOTIC BEAUTY
AND CONTINUOUS EXCITEMENT. ~,,-.,
I
§ m ~
M f I JH B I
y 1 ~, m m
1 Lb
I M 0
B r-.
- / B B A 'te 'tern
rn 'tern **
m. r. 1
m. M
g ja bb _
Produced.directed,' IN COLOR

autos
1954 CHEVY good condition,
SSO Must sell! Call and leave
message, Don, Room 10, 372-
9454. (G-86- 3t-p)
1960 BUICK LaSabre, V-8, power
brakes, steering, radio and heat heater,
er, heater, new paint, excellent condition
S4OO. Call after 5 p.m. 372-
9611. (G-86-st-c)
1964 CORVAIR in extra good
condition, $750.00 Contact Harold
Branham, Gator Barbershop, 3452
W. University Ave. (G-86-3t-p)
1958 ENGLISH Ford of sound body
and engine. $350.00 Call 378-
2427. (G-86-3t-c>
IWerOl
fj J

autos
1964 FIAT, 1100-D, low mileage,
good tires, in excellent condition,
radio, heater, seat belts. $650
Call: Ext. 2832 between 8 a.m.
& 5 p.m. (G-82-tf-nc)
1963 IMPALA convertible. All
power, excellent condition. $995.00
Call Medical Center ext. 5120
days, and 376-8484 after 5 p.m.
(G-84-st-c)
3
5 fStfi
* ls jBL
Meet
Her At
The
stmt TODAY
i



CLASSIFIEDS

autos
1966 VW 1600, Fastback, white.
Opportunity: $1,500. Call 376-3261
ext. 2271. (G-86-st-c)
1964 FALCON SPRINT, 260
V-8, Four-speed, radio and heater,
good condition. Call 378-3842.
(G-83- 3t-p)
1955 CHEVY, good condition,
six cylinder, shift stick. $175.00
284-10 Corry Village. (G-84-4t-p)
1963 CHEVY Impala convertible.
Power brakes, steering, windows,
radio, air conditioned, heater. Re Recently
cently Recently painted. Excellent condition.
$1,275.00 Phone 378-4613. (G-84-
2t-p)
lost-found
LOST a black collapsible umbrella
in case. Lost in Medical Center
Cafeteria. Was gift; reward will
be given. Call 372-2622. (L-86-
3t-r.c)
LOST Mens perscription sun glas glasses.
ses. glasses. Left in second floor rest restroom
room restroom Matherly Hall, Friday, Jan January
uary January 27, 11:00 a.m. Please call
378-1560. (L-86-2t-p)
FOUND watch in front of Raw Rawlings
lings Rawlings Hall. If owner can identify
and will pay for this ad ,They may
claim by calling 376-6082 after 5
p.m. (L-83- 3t-c)
REWARD Will the person who
picked up the tape recorder at
the Gator Groomer, please call
Ray at 376-9235. (L-84-3t-p)
Student Desks
and
Chairs
Both $lO to S4O
TYPEWRITER RENTALS
Manuals & Electrics
KISERS
Office Equipment
604 N. MAIN ST.
uiny-HT
/?:cT& 3U |lM9ft^\
f 11:27 \
t£NMM NmUUNE IB
I 9 mwm IK9
I Only Barpaiac

Last Friday we sold 500 Seminoles. Because of the demand,
we will be selling Seminoles on* Thursday, Feb. 2 at the
following places: the Hub* Anderson Hall Broward Hall
*
Jennings Hall Hume Hall General Classroom Building
Be sure to vote and buy your Seminole on
FEB. 2nd

Wednesday, February 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

help wanted
MALE or female full time clerk
cashier and assistant mgr. trainee.
For apt. call 376-2533. (E-77-
2t-c)
OPPORTUNITY for wife of stu student
dent student to work several hours a
week in exchange for rent on two
bedroom trailer completely fur furnished.
nished. furnished. Call Ponderosa Motor
Lodge 378-2405. (E-81-st-c)
SOPHISTICATED Sales: Sell col college
lege college mens clothing for well es established
tablished established nationally recognized
firm Sell in your own frater fraternity
nity fraternity or dorm Liberal percentage
of sales Write R. J. Meyer,
College Classics, 1585 North High
Street, Columbus, Ohio 43201
(E-85-lt-p)
Student or student wife to oper operate
ate operate justowriters in preparing copy
for FLORIDA ALLIGATOR. Ex Experienced
perienced Experienced operator preferred but
not essential. Proficient typing
ability mandatory. Contact Mr.
White or Mr. Myking in office of
the Board of Student Publications,
Basement, Florida Union. (E-85-
tf-nc)
personal
MATTHEW J. FENSIN candi candidate
date candidate for sophomore Legisla Legislative
tive Legislative council Sophomores need an
IMAGE not a shadow.
(J-86-lt-p)
FREE KITTENS, six weeks old,
call or see after 5 p.m. 372-
8325. (J-86-lt-c)
ROSE BIMLER is coming!!!!
(J-86-lt-c)

HAVE YOU TRIED
GAINESVILLE'S NEWEST CAFETERIA
1/2 Block West Os Florida Theatre
Featuring The Finest In
Fresh Garden Salads # Meat Entrees
Vegetables Homemade Pastries
A Short Walk From Campus

WED. NIGHT SPECIAL
Veal Cutlet AQA
Parmigiana __T
Large Tossed Salad 15?
L

313 W. Univ. Ave.
buaJUauud free parking
kUmhAmHb On Our Paved Lot

Page 9

personal
WANTED CONCERNED STU STUDENTS
DENTS STUDENTS to vote for the only qual qualified
ified qualified and experienced candidate
DAVE COX for CHANCELLOR.
Get politics and the spoils sys system
tem system out of the Honor Court. It
hurts all students. Qualifications:
Attorney General of Justice; De Defense
fense Defense Chief Investigator. Trained,
Qualified, experienced, mature and
honest. Compare! VOTE FOR
DAVE COX FOR CHANCELLOR.
(J-86-lt-p)
COMMUTER from Ocala need ride
to University and back Mon.,
Wed., Fri. Call Ocala No. 236-
2424 (J-83-st-c)
*
services
RECORD CLUB FOR STU STUDENTS
DENTS STUDENTS ONLY 30% discount on
your choice of any jazz, folk, pop,
classical LP.Sends2.oofor mem membership
bership membership price list and catalog of
over 38,000 discount records.
Campus LP Service, Box 211 D,
Village Station, N.Y., N.Y. 10014
(M-84-st-p)
111 I ! 11l I II
ATTENTION: Horse lovers, riding
lessons at Cowboy Riding stables.
372-8460. (M-86-3t-p)
IN A HURRY? Passports applica applications,
tions, applications, childrens photos, commer commercials
cials commercials and special problems. West Westley
ley Westley Roosevelt Studios, 372-0300,
909 NW 6th Street (M-68-ts-c)
COME get acquainted with Kathy
and Martha at Agnes' Hair Stylist,
just off campus, directly across
from Wolfies. Free haircut with
regular price of shampoo and set.
(M-85- st-c)

THURS.NIGHT SPECIAL
Italian Meat Sauce
And Spaghetti _____
Large Cole Slaw 15?
- - 1

LIKE APPOLO TRAGEDY
Simulator Capsule
Fire Kills Airmen

SAN ANTONIO, Tex. (UPI)
The inside of a space cabin sim simulator,
ulator, simulator, filled with pure oxygen like
the Apollo I spacecraft cockpit
burst into flame Tuesday at Brooks
Air Force Base. Two airmen died.
The tubular cabin smoldered for
four hours and then ignited again.
No one was injured in the second
fire.
Officials withheld the names of
the victims until their families
could be notified.
It was the space programs se second
cond second fire in four days in a metal
cabin pressurized with pure oxy oxygen.
gen. oxygen. Friday Americas first three
Apollo astronauts Virgil I. Gris Grisson,
son, Grisson, Edward H. White II and Ro Roger
ger Roger Chaffee died that way at
Cape Kennedy.
The Air Force appointed an in investigation
vestigation investigation team of top military
space experts to search for the
cause of the Brooks' blaze within
hours after it occurred at about
9:15 a.m. (EST). A similar blue blueribbon
ribbon blueribbon panel appointed by the civi civilian
lian civilian National Aeronautics and
Space Administration (NASA) is
investigating the Cape Kennedy di disaster.
saster. disaster.
Four hours and 15 minutes af after
ter after the original fire, the smold smoldering
ering smoldering cabin burst into flames again,
and a base fire truck had to be
summoned to put it out. Black
smoke poured from the opened
doors of the hugh building housing
the test chamber, accompanied by
a smell like burning rubber.
WANTED: I
LINDA STEINHEIMER I
for Freshman Leg Council I
REWARD: ABetter Student!
Government J

fire.

COME 1b
MIDDLE EARTH!
J.R.R. TOLKIENS
wonderful world of fantasy
Read
THE HOBBIT
"The Lord of the Rings" Trilogy
Jte' THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING
THE TWO TOWERS
THE RETURN OF THE KING

A group of newsmen who went
to the scene after the second fire
were held briefly by air police in
an adjoining office building before
a colonel arrived to let them go.
The cabin is about 10 feet long,
7 feet high and five feet wide in inside,
side, inside, with a 5-foot-long airlock on
on the front. After the second
fire was put out, it was opened
and the charred bodies of rab rabbits
bits rabbits being used in an experiment,
a burned chair and some shelves
could be seen inside.
The tubular-shaped inside walls
were charred black.
The fire, on the heels of the
Friday disaster at Cape Kennedy,
may force a re-evaluation of the
use of pure oxygen in space, and
could delay the space program
many months.
Lt. Tom Sullivan of the Brooks
Office of Information said the two
airmen were crouched inside the
cabin performing routine mainten maintenance
ance maintenance chores when the fire erup erupted.
ted. erupted.
The cabin was being used for
tests of how space conditions af affect
fect affect the blood structure of rabbits.
Its pressure was reduced to equal
conditions at 18,000 feet altitude
about 7 1/2 pounds per square
inch psi, compared with 14.7 psi
atmospheric pressure at sea level.
There also were 16 rabbits in
cages Inside the cabin.
A preliminary report indicated
the blaze struck about as fast as
the fire in Apollo 1. The Apollo
cabin was more highly pres pressurized,
surized, pressurized, however to about 16
pounds per square inch.



Page 10

i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 1, 1967

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DAVID MEAD, 7AS -- Took just a month,
and everyone but my Grandmother likes it.*

*JH
@H ''3l
RALPH KLINE, 2UC
My wife cut her
hair -- so in retaliz retaliztion
tion retaliztion I grew this -- she
puts up with it.

- 89Se$^
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MARK GOLDBERG, 2UC -- With 7:30
classes who can shave? Besides, my pen penmate
mate penmate craves beards.*

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. v -'- v nMn sg# W*>
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ARTHUR CRUMMER, 7AS Just wanted
to see what its like, and now was a good
time as any.

' -4^j
.
Ift '<-r 4
WILLIAM McGRATH, 2UC
-- lt means some type of
special recognition -a
way of self-expression. I
dont care what others
think

PHOTOS BY
CHUCK BROWARD

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JIM HANGER, 4AR Started cause I didnt like shav shaving
ing shaving and the girls like it.

Beards
T. >
On
Campus

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RICHARD PATE, 3AR
-- I just like it,
everyone says I look
better with it, and my
girl says shed break
up with me if I shaved
it off.



Joyce Brothers Quizzes Audience On Love

By CHARLES L. GREEN JR.
Allieator Correspondent
Are you areal expert on love?
Dr. Joyce Brothers asked her aud audience
ience audience in University Auditorium
Monday night. Dr. Brothers, noted
psychologist, lecturer and column columnist
ist columnist was Florida Union Forums
guest speaker.
Dr. Brothers gave the audience
a self- scoring test on the subject
liilCT I
uj&H
Freshman Council I
Idltef# I
Wo r k f|j||pM nua I
Fla. UnJ|p||aid
Special Bmp*,ls Comm I
Council!
Invitational Honors 1
Student §
|mhl :ulvTtism ni I

paid political advertisement

of love. The audience was asked
to write down answers to ques questions
tions questions raised by Dr. Brothers to
determine how much they knew
about love.
After each question the answer
was given with an explanation of
why the answer was true or false.
Should a social butterfly marry
a book-worm? asked Dr. Broth Brothers.
ers. Brothers. The answer given was true.
The social butterfly could have
a happy relationship with the
book-worm.
Dr. Brothers says, Both are
lacking in a personality trait that
could be enhanced by the efforts
of each mate to overcome his or
her problem. The social butter butterfly
fly butterfly could fill its mates need to
become more sociable while the
book-worm helped her improve
intellectually.
The ideal couple should be un unlike
like unlike psychologically and alike soc socially.
ially. socially. They should have the same
family background and financial
status, she explained. However

the marriage will be more compat compatible
ible compatible if male is more intelligent
than female.
Dr. Brothers also commented
on pre-marital sexual relation relationship.
ship. relationship. Fidelity and sincerity play
a large part in whether a couple
should participate in pre-marital
sex. She went on to say,lf
the individuals truly love each
other it will make very little dif difference
ference difference in future relationships.
However, if they do not truly love
each other, pre-marital sexual re relations
lations relations will result in disrespect
for each other.
Divorce will result in four out
of 12 marriages, according to Dr.
Brothers. It is a grave mis mistake
take mistake not to trust the feeling of
love, she said. She said too
many people do not let the feel feeling
ing feeling of love guide them to their
marriage partner.

Technical Services Activities
Gets $41,000 Federal Grant

Federal grants totaling $41,250,
to be matched by state funds for
the continuation of State Techni Technical
cal Technical Services activities have been
approved for UF.
John W. Hoover, campus coor coordinator
dinator coordinator for State Technical Servic Services,
es, Services, said recently the projects in involve
volve involve services for the following
industries: stone, clay and glass,
timber harvesting, construction
and all others concerned with the
selection and use of materials.
Largest single project is the
stone, clay and glass industries
program directed by Dr. L. L.


HK
Hg I
HBP wm
ip*
BMP JxkiMm&k
IT HAS BECOME APPARENT OVER THE LA§T FEW I
YEARS THAT STUDENT GOVERNMENT HAS BEEN TOO 1
CONCERNED WITH ITS OWN PETTX POLITICS & SELF SELFPE
PE SELFPE RP ATU YITON. NOW-IS THE time that student I
GOVERNMENT MUST STAND UP ON THE SIGNIFICANT I
ISSUES & FIGHT FOR THE PEOPLE IT REPRESENTS. |
IT HASNT YET. I PLEDGE THAT IT WILL. 1
I ffi
i; /
I U^ ivers,ty § I
I tarty I
I Paid Political Advertisement J

Wednesday, February 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Dr. Brothers is a graduate of
Cornell University. She was
awarded her Ph.D. in psychology
from Columbiil University. She
writes a daily syndicated column
for over 200 newspapers. She also
has her own daily half-hour tele television
vision television program on ABC.
Both of Dr. Brothers parents
are attorneys. She is married to
a physician and they have a dau daughter.
ghter. daughter. She resides in New York
City.
Dr. Brothers lecture was spon sponsored
sored sponsored by the Forums Committee
of the Florida Union as a part
of its Florida Crossroads ser series.
ies. series. She was preceded on the pro program
gram program by Jacksonville Mayor Lou
Ritter who described job oppor opportunities
tunities opportunities in his home city to stu students
dents students in the audience.

Hench, assistant professor of met metallurgical
allurgical metallurgical and materials engineer engineering.
ing. engineering. The total budget will be $32,-
000.
Second highest budgeted project
is timber industries with $25,300
earmarked for improvements in
harvesting and transportation of
timber. John L. Gray, director of
the School of Forestry, is in charge
of this program.
To continue efforts to assist the
construction industry, the State
Technical Services Program
awarded $13,340 for a project
under the supervision of Courtland
Collier, teaching associate of the

|B | ||i 1
JOYCE BROTHERS
. . quizzed audience

Department of Civil Engineering.
Dr. Ellis Verink, Department ol
Metallurgical and Materials Eng Engineering,
ineering, Engineering, is director of another
project on material selection,
which received a budget of $11,860.
Including both state and federal
funds, the total award by State
Technical Services amounts to
$82,500.
Persons interested In more
information on the program should
contact Professor Hoover, Eng Engineering
ineering Engineering Building, UF or Dr.
R. W. Long, State Coordinator,
Board of Regents Office, Tal Tallahassee.
lahassee. Tallahassee.

Page 11



!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 1, 1967

Page 12

V
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Want Attendance
Referendum --Tyree

University Party Presidential
Candidate Larry Tyree, speak speaking
ing speaking Monday night in the last of
three debates with the other can candidates
didates candidates re-emphasized the need for
a really autonomous student gov governmen
ernment governmen one that looks out for
the students.
* Everyone always hears about
student government around elect election
ion election time,*' he said. But where
is it during the year? v
Tyree opposed the tuition tuitionincrease
increase tuitionincrease recently recommended by
the State Budget Committee. He
that student government send re representatives
presentatives representatives to Tallahassee
to lobby against the increase. He
encouraged students to write home
to ask their parents pressure their
state legislators into voting down
the measure.
Tyree said he felt himself to
be uniquely qualified to deal with
student housing problems be because
cause because he plans to enter an allied
profession.
He stressed the need for more
student services. He promised
a government that will dosome dosomething
thing dosomething for you, instead of merely
offering more bogus promises..

A ..... ... . x ; x:
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&*:

HB Respected.
M xS:
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x*:; ~ _ __ ~ ; x ; : : :
gig Time and again, when students have needed a leader, :§g
:*$ they have called on the ability of Rob Blue, and voted to :j:|:x
M have him as their decision-maker. :s:s
M ' m
W *
j:?:: Rob Blue was elected President of Murphree Area. iiS:
;j:s:j Rob Blue was elected Chairman of Religion-and-Life Council. j;j:g
&& Rob Blue was elected Vice Predisent of Men's Interhall.
p Rob Blue was elected President of his fraternity. M
M Rob Blue was electedto Legislative Council. gji;:
W Rob Blue was elected Vice President of the Southeastern %j:j:
:>x> :X;X
II ifc. H
Vy! V*J*J<
giji His performance in these, and other elected positions, has :|j:j:
1$ gained the respect of students, deans and the faculty. ||
J|VvV^
111
n
m If
Unted Party 1
XX/ *x*x
v.v ::;;
::>: ;:::
!v*v yy!
ip Paid Political Advertisement :g:g

Tyree promised to deliver the
long-awaited outdoor recreation
area behind Hume Hall in Graham
Area.
He suggested that senior law
students might be employed by the
student government to advise stu students
dents students in legal problems.

TO FIGHT TUITION HIKE

Blue Calls For Student Lobby

United Party presidential hope hopeful
ful hopeful Rob Blue called for the
establishment of a student lobby in
Tallahassee to fight the 'Board
of Regents proposed tuition hike
Monday night in the last of three
debates between the candidates for
the presidency of the UF student
body.
Speaking in the Graham Area
recreation room to a debate aud audience
ience audience of more than 100 students.
Blue stressed cooperation with the
other state university student gov goverments
erments goverments to persuade the legis legislature
lature legislature that a tuition increase of
the magnitude proposed by the
Regents would be oppressive.
In the realm of academic aff affairs.
airs. affairs. Blue advocated placing the

I ELECTION
ROUNDUP
mmmmmmmammmmmm

student body vice-president on the
Faculty Senate, thus giving the
students a voice in the determina determination
tion determination of the academic decisions of
the senate. In addition, he called
for stronger teacher-course eval evaluations
uations evaluations and more and better fine
arts and cultural presentations
on campus.
To counteract excessive se security
curity security deposits on off-campus
housing and the problem of stu students
dents students who may wish to attend
school for less than a year hav having
ing having to sign years leases for
housing, Blue advocated placing
off-campus student accomoda accomodations
tions accomodations under the Florida Hotel and
Restaurant Commission.
In response to a question from

Wednesday, February 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Shepherd Claims
Best Experience

Charles Shepherd told a Graham
Area crowd Monday night that
there is a difference between
experience and qualifications.
Speaking in the last of three
debates arranged between presi presi_ntial
_ntial presi_ntial candidates by the Stu Student
dent Student Florida Education Associa Association,
tion, Association, this one in Graham Areas
Recreation Room, Shepherd

the floor. Blue denied a rumor
that he had been a candidate for
student body treasurer under the
FIRST Party banner before the
election campaign officially got
underway.
I dont have the qualifications
for such an office, he stress stressed,
ed, stressed, and have never been, and am
not now, a candidate for student
body treasurer.
Commenting on the United Party
platform, Blue noted that the
fall trimesters Fair Bloc Seat Seating
ing Seating Bill had been passed under
the partys leadership and called
for re-activation of the student
booksale to counteract high text textbook
book textbook prices in local bookstores.

stressed that all presidentall can candidates
didates candidates are qualified.
Nevertheless, he struck at his
opponents, Rob Blue and Larry
Tyree, because they lack exper experience.
ience. experience. Shepherd said that his
work in Buddy Jacobs admin administration
istration administration made him the only ex experienced
perienced experienced candidate.
Shepherd also claimed his plat platform
form platform exceeds anything produced
here before. He said many per persons
sons persons have told him this platform
is over the heads of average stu students.
dents. students.
Shepherd denied this.
The FIRST Party presidential
hopeful next called for the
institution of a system whereby
all information sent by the
UF to employers, draft boards
and other groups be sent in dup duplicate
licate duplicate to the student concerned.
As Graham Areas clocks moved
past midnight Shepherd called
for the establishment of a 24 hour
complaint service. He said one
could be operated using a tape
recorder connected with a stud student
ent student government telephone.
The candidate also called for
efforts on the part of student
government to block a pro proposed
posed proposed tuition increase.
Lets get in there and raise
hell about it. Lets show him (Gov (Governor
ernor (Governor Claude Kirk) what were
doing with this tuition, Shep Shepherd
herd Shepherd said. He noted that Kirk is
a businessman and therefore
Shepherd said he doesnt see
how such a man, who is also un understanding,
derstanding, understanding, can enforce a
tuition hike.
In the area of off-campus hous housing
ing housing Shepherd called for the pur purchase
chase purchase of a security bond by
student government. Available to
students at $2 each, it would guar guarantee
antee guarantee deposits for utilities and
damages in off-campus resi residences.
dences. residences.
Shepherd said this has been done
at FSU and that it works. He not noted
ed noted that the bond would eliminate
the necessity of students using
large sums of money as deposits.
Following along on legal prob problems
lems problems Shepherd said that student
government should hire an attor attorney
ney attorney to serve students.
Lets strike back and use legal
remedies too, Shepherd said of
dealings with landlords.
Finally, in his closing statement,
Shepherd returned to the theme
of experience. He emphasized his
conviction that he is the only
experienced candidate.
firs#lrty
paid mi af tiMMtient

Page 13



~ The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 1, 1967

Page 14

BY
-GEORGE!-
DEAR GEORGE:
When* eating artichokes, how
should one dispose of the leav leaves?
es? leaves? How should corn-on-the-cob
be buttered? If oyster forks are not
provided, should a regular fork
be used with an oyster cock cocktail.
tail. cocktail. Should spaghetti be cut with
a knife or wrapped around the
fbrk?
CONCERNED
DEAR CONCERNED:
Under separate cover lam send sending
ing sending you a cold corned beef on
rye. Let me know how you make
out
* *
CONFIDENTIAL TO THE AVON
LADY: No, no, no! Ring once.
You're thinking of the postman.
(Problems of a confidential nature
will be blabbed immediately to
millions. So, mum's the word.)

Key Budget Is Itemized,

Says FBK Prexy Sinoff

Florida Blue Keys budget
is itemized audited, and a matter
of public record, i\ey Presi President
dent President Barry Sinoff told the Alliga Alligator
tor Alligator Tuesday.
SinofPs statement
by a charge from presidential
candidate Charles Shepherd that
we have no assurance of where
the money (given Blue Key) will
go."
Alligator Editorial Editor Andy
Moor said *uat the figure quot quoted
ed quoted in Monody's story as going
to Blue Key was erroneous, not
$15,00.) as printed.
I apologize for the mistake,"
Moor said, "I had $15,000 attri attributed
buted attributed to Student Government se secretaries
cretaries secretaries in my notes but made
a mistake when I hurriedly trans transcribed
cribed transcribed the figures."
said he was not ask asking
ing asking or an audit or local itemiza itemization
tion itemization of the Blue Key budget, just
an itemization.
We want to see the Blue Key
budget itemized by the management
consulatant which we hope to bring
in to eliminate waste," Shepherd
said. This would be true of all
organizations receiving student
fees."

DONOHUE
FOR
CHANCELLOR
paid po'Picai adv->- moment

B
A
T
M
A
N

I
i

Not Really
Banner Year
It hasnt been a banner year for
student elections this month. In
previous years the UF campus was
adorned with banners expound expounding
ing expounding the candidates qualifications
in rather gawdy letters.
But this campaign has been dif differentno
ferentno differentno banners, just the tradi traditional
tional traditional poop sheets on green boards
located around campus.
Bruce Rogow, SG Secretary of
Finance said Tuesday the
main reason for no banners was
lack of funds by each party.
A Representative from one party
stated since the other parties
aren't using banner why should
we?

There is an audit by the Uni University
versity University Auditor of all funds re received
ceived received by Blue Key from Student
Government," according to Tom
Wells, UF assistant business
manager.
The Blue Key budget is item itemized
ized itemized as specifically as any other
budget handled by Tigert. Wells
said.

ED MORRIS
for
LEGISLATIVE
COUNCIL
SOPH* M()kl i ASS
Ist PARTY
paid political advoi tisoment

yppocfonity
I I % Electrical
Y Mechanical
Industrial
ENGINEERS
| Interviews will be conducted on
Monday and Tuesday, February 6 and 7.
to discuss job opportunities with
Tampa Electric Company.
You will find good advancement
opportunities with this fast-growing
investor-owned electric utility
located on Florida's West Coast.
See job placement center bulletin
for interview time and place.
1 I
I I
Tampa Electric Company
TAMPA, FLORIDA

--IF BATMAN ISN'T \THE POOR
7 GRATEFUL THAT Py OFF FOR LAW j

r r-r batman 'Xthese -are unieasv]
WHII-5 1 1 h/jia/T/N(9]OAIS POR 60THAM
FO-HARA/



Orange and

Address All Campus Calendar
Notices To Public Functions
Office, Florida Union

Campus Calendar for Wednesday, February 1
Special Notice: Florida Union Sponsored trip to Puerto
Rico and tbe Virgin Islands, April 22-28. San Juan,
St. Thomas and St. John (freeports) Information in
315 Union, ext 2741.
Wednesday, February 1
Fla. Players: General meeting, Norman Aud., 6 p.m.
Fla. Players Lab.: Film, Antigone, MSB Aud.,
6 & 8 p.m. For CEH Classes
Latin American Club: General election assembly,
Union Social Room, 7:30 p.m.
Fla. Speleological Society: Meeting, 212 Union, 7 p.m.
Phi Sigma Sigma: Lecture, 116 Union, 7 p.m.
Christian Science: Services on Campus, 218 Union,
8 p.m.
ALA Film Series: Images Medievales, 105-B AFA,
8 p.m.
Latin American Colloquium: Dr. Lambros Comitas,
Bolivia: An Interdisciplinary Research Project,
324 Union, 8 p.m.

GRADUATE RECORD EXAM: Tuesday, Feb. 7
is the deadline for filing application for the GRE to
be given on Saturday, Feb. 25. All applications must
reach Princeton, N. J., on or before Feb. 7.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAMINATION: Spanish
reading knowledge examination and all functional ex examinations
aminations examinations will be given on Saturday, Feb. 4, Room
18, Anderson Hail, 10 a.m. 12 noon.
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS Exams
in French, German, and Russian will be given Saturday,
Feb. 4, 9:45 a.m. in Walker Auditorium.
UNIVERSITY GOLF CLUB SWIMMING POOL: Mem Membership
bership Membership applications for the University Golf Club Pool
will be accepted beginning Feb. 1 on a first-come,
first serve basis, in Room 201,FloridaGymnasium.
Faculty and staff must purchase a season member membership
ship membership for $56.65. Student memberships are available
on a monthly basis of $10.30 per month. The season
membership includes swimming lessons and applies
for single adults or an entire family. The pool
will be open May 1 through Sept. 15. University
faculty,' staff, married students and their immediate
families are eligible. Due to the limited size of the
pool, tnere will be no guests. The swimming lessons
will be divided into two sessions adult and pre preschool
school preschool children, May 1- June 16; school age children,
June 16 Aug. 31. Pool hours will be from 9 a.m.
-7 p.m. daily, except Sunday, when they will be from
TAX I*ANNUITY 1 *ANNUITY PROGRAM: Feb. 1, 1967, is the
deH'j.ice for enrolling for the tax-deferred annuity
program. Contact Personnel Division, Ext. 2101,
for further information. The next enrollment period
will be held in the fall with deductions to begin in
January, 1968.

3 Students must be registered with the Placement
Service to Interview. Slgn-up sheets are posted two
weeks In advance ol the interview date at Building
H. All companies will be recruiting lor April and
August grads unless otherwise Indicated. Indicates
hiring juniors lor summer employment.
FEB. 1: DEPT. OF INTERIOR FEDERAL WATER
POLLUTION CONTROL ADMIN. All eng. (except
IE, Chem, Biol, Microbiol, Hydrology). WKNG WKNGTON
TON WKNGTON AIR CONDITIONING CO. ME, CE, EE, WOR-

BLUB BULLETIN

Campus Calendar

Administrative Notices
ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

Placement Notices

Arts and Crafts Center: Batik Wordshop, Union
Craft Center, 9-11, 2-4, and 7-9. Call ext. 2951
for registration.
Thursday, February 2
Fla. Players Lab.: Film, Antigone, MSB Aud.,
6 & 8 p.m. For CEH Classes
Student occupational Therapy Association: Film,The
91st Day, A-91 MSB, 7:30 p.m.
Sigma Delta Chi: Meeting, 236 Stadium. 7 D.m. Elect Election
ion Election of Vice President and Trimester program
Business Administration Seminar: Mr. Charles F.
Swartz, Financial Policies in the Main Indust Industrial
rial Industrial Countries, 18 MAT., 3:30 p.m.
Sigma Alpha Eta, Union Johnson Lounge, 7:30 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi: Meeting, 116 Union, 8:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun: Chinese Brush Painting, 215 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Fla. Folk Dancers : Dance, Union Social Room, 8 p.m.
Christian Science, Union Aud., 5 p.m.
UFRA: guest speaker, Mr. Eugene Taylor, M-220
MSB, 1:20 p.m.

STUDENT FINANCIAL AID: Applications for stu student
dent student financial aid including scholarships and all long
term loans repayable after graduation for all or any
part of the 1967-68 academic year beginning in Sep September,
tember, September, 1967 may be obtained at Room 182, Build Building
ing Building E. Deadline for returning completed applications
is Feb. 28, 1967.
\
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MAJORS: Appoint Appointments
ments Appointments are now being made for the speech screen screening
ing screening test required of all undergraduate students in
the College of Business Administration, Room 214,
Matherlv Hall.
ORANGE & BLUE DEADLINES: All notices for
Orange & Blue Bulletin must be received by 9 a.m.
of the day prior to publication. Deadlines are Fri Friday
day Friday for Monday publication, Tuesday for Wednesday
publication and Thursday for Friday publication. No Notices
tices Notices should be typed and signed and sent to the Di Division
vision Division of Informational Services, Building H, campus.
Items for the Campus Calendar should be sent to
the Public Functions Office, Florida Union.
PROGRESS TESTS
Students in the following courses are expected to
take the following tests. Each student must bring a
NO. 2 lead pencil and will be required to use his
SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER.

THINGTON CORP. M&, IE, ChE. W. T. GRANT
CO. retailing. N. CAROLINA NATIONAL BANK
all majors (except science). W. VIRGINIA PULP
& PAPER ChE, ME, Chem. HUTHCHEON ENG ENGINEERS,
INEERS, ENGINEERS, INC. CE. LEVITT & SONS, INC. CE,
Arch, Bldg. Constr. THE BOEING CO. AE, CE,
EE, IE, ME. JOHN HANCOCK MUTUAL LIFEINSUR.
CO. -- Math, Gen. Bus, Lib. Arts.* DEPT. OF AIR
FORCE MOBILE AIR MATERIEL AREA EE.
DOW CHEMICAL CO. Bus, Engr, Phys. Sci, Lib.

Wednesday, February 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Friday, February 3
History and Philosophy of Medicine Lecture: Dr.
Charles B. Huggins, Science and Man, MSB Aud.,
12:10 p.m.
Mensa: Business Meeting and Lecture, 105-B AFA,
7:30 p.m. Nomination of officers
Hdeaway Discotheque: Band, The Souls, Fla. Union,
8 p.m.
Graham Yulee Areas Street Dance: Featuring The
Leaves of Grass,** Yulee Area, 8:30 p.m.
Movie: John Goldfarb Please Come Home,* 7 &
9:05 p.m. MSB Aud.
Chess Club, 215 Union, 7 p.m.
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE: Student tickets for
COLE PORTER REVUE go on sale Wednesday,
February 1. Seats are $1.50 and $2.50. Tickets now
on sale for the Gainesville Little Theater*s
presentation of The Sandbox'* and The Phy Physician
sician Physician in Spite of Himself.* Student tickets only.
SI.OO.

CBS 261 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Feb. 7, 7
p.m. Students whose last names begin with (A-L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12,
13, 14, or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
CBS 262a (Evolution) PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday,
Feb.77 7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
CBS 262 b (Man and Nature) PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Feb.77 7 p.m. Students whose last names
begin with: (A-L) report to Little 201, 203, 205,
207, 213, 215, 217 or 218; (M-Z) report to Little
221, 223, 225, 227, 233, 235, 237 or 239.
ID CARD PHOTOS: Identification photographs will
be taken every Friday, 8 a.m. 12 noon, at Photo Photographic
graphic Photographic Services, Building L. There will be a $5
fee for replacing lost or stolen ID cards. Anyone
finding an ID card should return it to Photographic
Services, where it will be kept on file.
BATIK WORKSHOP: The Arts and Crafts Center,
Florida Union, will hold the Batik Workshop Feb.
12, and 3. There is a $lO fee for three days or
$4 per day. Enrollment is limited. Contact Arts and
Crafts Center, Ext. 2951, for information and re registration.
gistration. registration.
EUROPEAN GROUP FLIGHTS: Round-trip jet flights
(from New York Lisbon London New York)
are available to faculty, staff, students and their
families. Flights (including Lisbon tour and hotel
fare) are $350 per person, running from June 26-
Sept. 12, and April 26 Aug. 8. For information
contact Donald L. Pevsner, 372-7772.

Arts, Acctg, Math, Stat.
FEB. 2: U.S. NAVY MINE DEFENSE LAB ME,
EE, Physics. BABCOCK & WILCOX CO. Chem,
ME, ChE, MetE, EE, IE, CE, NE, Acctg. HOUDRY
PROCESS & CHEMICAL CO. Chem, ChE. CITYOF
PHILADELPHIA CE, ME, EE, ChE, San. Eng.
ROYAL GLOBE INS. CO. all degrees. ZAYRE CORP.
All degrees. FACTORY MUTUAL ENGINEERING
DIVISION EE, CE, ChE, ME, IE. PROCTER &
GAMBLE DISTRIBUTING CO. all degrees. RADIA RADIATION
TION RADIATION EE, ME, Eng. Mech, Physics, Acctg.

Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator. Wednesday, February 1, 1967

ACCENT,
Arts Festival
On'2nd 100
UFs annual Fine Arts Fest Festival,
ival, Festival, four speakers from the
recent ACCENT Symposium on
The Responsibility of Dissent
and discussions of Vietnam, art and
national security will be spotlight spotlighted
ed spotlighted during the next eight Second
100 television programs.
Stations in Orlando, Palm Beach,
Pensacola, Jacksonville and Gain Gainesville
esville Gainesville currently are screening the
15- minute weekly show, which is
co-sponsored by the University's
Alumni Association and Florida
Blue Key.
4 The ACCENT guests include
James Farmer, a founder of the
Congress of Racial Equality;
National Review Publisher Wil William
liam William Rusher; syndicated political
columnist Russell Kirk and Chi Chicago
cago Chicago newspaper columnist Sydney
Harris.
Listed below are some of the
speakers and their topics.
Reid Poole, chairman of UF's
Music Department, and Peter
Zinober, student chairman for the
annual Fine Arts Festival (Feb.
12 Mar. 11), discuss featured
attractions that will appear on
campus during the event.
Dr. E.T. York Jr., provost of
the Institute of Food and Agric Agricultural
ultural Agricultural Sciences and chairman
of the National Security Seminar
conducted at the university Jan.
16- discusses aspects of the
program pertaining to American
citizens with Capt. Arthur John Johnson,
son, Johnson, chief of the seminar lect lecture
ure lecture team.
James Farmer, a founder of the
Congress of Racial Equality, dis discusses
cusses discusses Black Power and the fu future
ture future of the Civil Rights move movement
ment movement in the United States.
William Rusher, publisher of
National Review, offers A
Conservative Point of View.
Syndicated political columnist
Russell Kirk comments on the
topic, Conscience of a Con Conservative.
servative. Conservative.
Chicago newspaper columnist
Sydney Harris offers his views on
the Dissent of Youth Today.
The Role of the Artist in a
University Community is discus discussed
sed discussed by Hossis Holbrook, profes professor
sor professor of art, and Frank Taylor,
assistant professor of humanities.
Maj. Russell Ramsey oftheUni oftheUniverstiy's
verstiy's oftheUniverstiy's Army ROTC Department,
a recent returnee from active duty
in Vietnam, pinpoints trouble
spots in that country and what the
future offers.
2 More Chances
To Take LSAT
Law student applicants at UF
have two more chances to take the
required Law School Admissions
Test this year.
Mar. 25 is the deadline for the
April 8 test and July 22 marks
the final application day for the
Aug. 5 examination. Other than UF,
more than 125 law achools require
that all applicants submit scores
on the LSAT.
Registration forms and sample
test booklets can be obtained from
the University registrars office,
the College of Law office or the
Law School Admission Test, Edu Educational
cational Educational Testing Serivce, Box 944,
Princeton, N.J. 08540.
Aw'

88 gig;
:** M
R ant? tie 3
Issues |
the post two weeks, have
centrated my campaign on concrete ideas and
issues which can be acted upon by a United .....
Student Government.
jgjg It is my personal feeling that a campaign gig
H presenting positive issues is far more beneficial gg
*:§ than one aimed at personalities. 9|
m 1
*:*: I believe that as a campaign is run, so si
shall Student Government be run. 8$
*:: s*:
88 AA' 88
Calendar at thefrontof this catalog for the^Stes^^
/ Quarter JT
for One for Full-Tini T J
Expenses s46a^
egg Fees 436-* \ There is no reason why students should be g-g
gg 4 |*k s and Training Su PP lies Jj* taken advantage of by the policies of local gp:
\ Rent ioo book stores. Student Government should re reyj^ldentaffiap^ns^/
yj^ldentaffiap^ns^/i reyj^ldentaffiap^ns^/ 111 establish a student book sale which would
gg; "This is a problem which must be attacked
now. Before it becomes law. we must send li
a student lobby group to Tallahassee to gig:
"Student Government must simplify admis admission
sion admission procedure to the Medical Center, es establish
tablish establish campus police ambulance service, 8g
as well as satellite clinics in the living areas."
"Off-campus housing should be put under
the Florida Motel and Restaurant Commis- :jigij
sion to assist students choosing off-cam- 88
gig pus housing and so insure proper gig:
jgg dards of apartment conditions. gig:
"*"**""' tudent should stand hours to
"Every student is entitled to the right gj||.v^.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.%v^^
of appeal and review of decisions made
by the Faculty Disciplinary Committee gig:
and the Traffic and Safety Committee. @||
This shoul d be done through the use of
a student review boo-d with legal coun- v v v f I j
1 sei M uniieu rariy
gig paid political advertisement gig:



Scholarship Rule
ZouldHaveEnded
ATLANTA (UPI) lt is ironical that, by staying in the Southeas Southeastern
tern Southeastern Conference, Georgia Tech could have ended the controversial
140 rule that forced it on the path of independence three years ago.
Georgia Tech Athletic Director Bobby Dodd is of this and
there is a touch of bitterness in his voice when he talks about the
change in attitude among some of the remaining conference members.
The 140 rule states that no SEC school can have more than a total
of 140 students under football and basketball grants-in-aid at the
same time.
That certainly seems ample. But the problem is that the schools
are allowed to give 40 football plus basketball grants each year to
incoming students.
Taking just football alone, that adds up to 160 grants over a four fouryear
year fouryear period and 200 if you count redshirts. Thus, conceivable, there
could be a time when an SEC school has 140 players under grants
returning and not one opening for freshmen.
Shortly before we left the conference,* Dodd said, we were
able to offer only 23 grants. Some of the other schools, which had
been openly running off players they decided they didnt want to keep,
were offering 55 which was then the yearly limit.
Tech battled to get the rule amended, without success. A change
requires a majority under the SEC constitution and the best vote
Tech ever got on the 140 issue was 6-6 in 1963.
We decided not to put the matter to a vote in *64, Dodd said.
Rather than be rebuffed again, we told the conference that we could couldnt
nt couldnt live with its rule and left.
That was three years ago. Since then, the NCAA has become less
lenient in allowing schools to drop unwanted players and other SEC
members are beginning to feel the bind of the 140 rule.
Jim Corbett, the Louisiana State athletic director who died Sun Sunday,
day, Sunday, indicated just prior to this years annual meeting last week that
LSU might have to follow Georgia Tech out of the conference unless
the 140 rule was dropped.
Its just a question of time, but we couldnt afford to wait,
Dodd said. Hie pressure is building up and more schools will turn
their back on the 140 rule. They are finding, as we did, that you cant
live with two sets of standards.
The Southeastern Conference is down to 10 members since Tulane
dropped out last year. Tulane left not because of the 140 rule but
because its high academic requirements hampered recruiting and
made it difficult to compete at the SEC level, especially in football.
The six votes of 1963 would have been a majority in 1967.
The latest vote was 5-5 and the 140 rule remains.
FRESHMAN
DON GOODMAN
A constitutional revision
has been proposed in our
state to allow those 18
years of age to vote in
city, state and national
elections. VOTE to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow and show that
students will take part
in their government.
-- V
LEG COUNCIL n/
m Z£i sr Vs>
paid political advertisement

I Review William Goddard
U I have served with !1M on the Honor
a P, : '\''i'//\ 'y'X''' : '' T ' -./J, v;'..' J v Court and know him to be the most qualified can-
H j* 1 'SC*' I didate for Chancellor. I whole-heartedly endorse TIM
I SmbMMmPH and his proposals for the Honor Court
1 Chief Defense Counsel
I WSKSm Os The Honor Court
I \ Hank Murphy
1 "V^'* 4 j| ,; : : TIM DONOHUE has worked closely with me for
| ^ty^SK the Pa st year n the Honor Court, and I strongly
I vfl* VHk
A M and mature judgment.
QUALIFICATIONS
I. Co-Chief Defense Investigator
2. Honor Court Bar Association
3. Constitutional Review Committee
k 4. Business Staff Law Review

Carpenter Voted Top Award
Most Courageous Athlete

PHILADELPHIA (UPI) Capt.
Bill Carpenter, Armys one time
football lonely end and Viet Nam
war hero recommended for the
Medal of Honor, was hailed Mon Monday
day Monday night as the nations most
courageous athlete of 1966 by the
Philadelphia Sports Writers Asso Association.
ciation. Association.
Carpenter was saluted at the
writers 63rd annual banquet where

New York Announces
Bid For '76 Olympics

NEW YORK (UPI) Mayor
John Lindsay announced Monday
that New York City has filed a
formal application to bring the 19-
76 summer Olympics toNewYork.
The mayor, keeping a promise
he had made to sports fans, sent
a formal letter of application to
the United States Olympic Com mit mittee.
tee. mittee.
The committee will make a
choice between New York and a
number of other applicants. The
international committee has the fi final
nal final say.
Many other cities are interest interested
ed interested in the *76 Olympics, includ including
ing including Los Angeles, which is con considered
sidered considered to have an edge because
erf its climate, and because it al already
ready already has the necessary facil facilities.
ities. facilities.
City officials estimated recently
it would cost a half a billion dol dollars
lars dollars to prepare New York to re receive
ceive receive the Olympics. It would be
necessary to build a new stadium,
a swimming pool and an entire
Olympic Village, among other
things.
Mayor Lindsay noted this in his
latter, saying the city alone would
be hard pressed to bear the bur burden
den burden of capital recreation cons construction
truction construction necessary to host the Oly Olympic
mpic Olympic games.

SPORTS

Wednesday, February 1, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Frank World Series hero
of the Baltimore Orioles, was,
named the professional athlete of
the year and two-time national
decathlon champion Bill Toomey
was named the outstanding amateur
athlete.
The twice-rounded Carpenter, in
a message from Vietnam, where he
is on duty again, said he was ac accepting
cepting accepting the honor for all mem members

Governor Rockefeller, however,
has indicated to me that the state
is prepared to make necessary
funds available and will join with
us in our presentation.

Mantle Signs Fifth
SIOO,OOO Contract

NEW YORK (UPI) Mickey
Mantle, the pride of the New York
Yankees, today signed his fifth con consecutive
secutive consecutive SIOO,OOO contract with the
American League club.
Diver Goes
For Record
GROTON, Conn. (UPI) A sail sailor
or sailor from Ledyard will take a deep
breath next Sunday and plunge in into
to into the water off. Fort Lauderdale,
Fla., in an attempt to descend
230 feet to a new world record.
Robert Cfort, whose buddies
claim he can hold his breath for
almost six minutes, will make his
dive unaided by mask or oxygen
equipment. The present depth re record
cord record is 200 feet set in 1913 by a
Greek sailor.
The sailor, a Navy career man
and the father of three, is sta stationed
tioned stationed as a diving instructor at
the submarine base here.
During his plunge Sunday a phy physician
sician physician and crew will be on hand
in case of an emergency.

J
%
1100 S.W. Bth AVI.
QQpyniiiiPft
/ Y APAHTMENTS
Attractive new one & two BR apts.-
Kitchen equipped, A/C
Carpeted
Beautifully Furnished
In Walking distance of Univ.
Immediate OccOpancy 1
See Manager Apt. *lO4 6-8 P.M.
Call 378-2411 9:00 5:00
Mrs. Singletary
- I 1 i --

Page 17

bers members of the Armed Forces ser serving
ving serving in Vietnam.
The silver trophy was "ccepted
for Carpenter by Col. Henry Em Emerson,
erson, Emerson, the football star's ballalion
commander in combat who recom recommended
mended recommended him for the nation's high highest
est highest award for valor after carpen carpenl
l carpenl thank you for honoring me
for something which was not an
individual effort, but a team ef effort.
fort. effort. I would hope very sincerely
that you will allow me to accept
this award, not for myself, but
for all members of the team.
N
It is with a great deal of
humility that I accept this award,
and I regret very much that I
can't be present myself,'* the mes message
sage message from Carpenter said. Col.}
Emerson accepted the award from
Jack Wilson, sports editor of the
Philadelphia Bulletin.

Mantle, grinning broadly and
looking in excellent physical con condition,
dition, condition, signed his 19th contract,
and possibly his last as an ac active
tive active player, at Yankee Stadium/
The 35-j _ar-old slugger, who is
the sixth leading home run hitter
in baseball history with 496 circuit
blows, first earned a six-figure
income in 1963, the year after
he had won the league's Most
Valuable Player award for the
third timp
He has received that amount
every year since then despite a
siege of injuries which have re reduced
duced reduced the one-time super star to
a part-time olayer.
Mantle participated in 108 games
last season, many of them in a
pinch-hitting role, while batting
.288, hitting 23 homers and driv driving
ing driving in 56 runs.
GATOR ADS
SILL!



Page 18

l, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 1, 1967

ii i joslSH
The Start -- Blanchard Tual (front) takes off against North Carolina in backstroke race.

I r
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Mpii-.M : ; 4fK>
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ITS REALLY EASY
. . Gator Dave Bentley

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Gator Swimmers
Show Top Form
In Weekend Meets
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. "?*>*:.'&* y- f >*' * ux- '*** r >*(&' ~Z !!!!P..'l ft .x ^ c
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>*>

GATORS GO -- Above for Flor Florida
ida Florida is Steve Z araecki (front) and
Bruce Page. Dick Ahrens (left)
finds he cant swim underwater.
Below Captain Tom Dioguardi
(middle) sets second best time in
U.S. this year in 50 yard free freestyle.
style. freestyle. Barry Russo (right) takes
off in Relay.

,-y .i ?.'.' UP| v/ I ''\ )I!- ' f -o' v i'~-J; v
-. -' : ; .- '' '. .

!
.9
wSuem?
WHICH WAY IS UP?

. DIVER Mark Montgomery
3 \ £ Jvi '% 'iPxi
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:>:



Tennessee, Vandy Lead SEC, Florida Third

/olunteers Hold Pace,
Rip Mississippi State

KNO Term. (UPI)
rennessee, battling to keep pace
with Vanderbilt in the Southeas Southeas:ern
:ern Southeas:ern Conference race, whipped
Mississippi State Monday night
57-45 as Ron Widby connected
'or 20 Doints.
The win boosted the Vols con conference
ference conference mark to 8-1 and left State
with a 5-4 record.
Center Tom Boerwinkle and
Sophomore Bill Harm added 14
mints each for Tennessee, while
John Sapen led Mississippi State
with 18.
State started quick on a buc bucket
ket bucket by Buddy Walden and the Bull Bulldogs
dogs Bulldogs stayed ahead until Widby sank
a 14-footer with four minutes gone
to tie it at 6-6.
Walden came back with a jum jum>er
>er jum>er but a foul shot by Boerwinkle
ind a crisp by Hann pulled
he Vols ahead 9-8.
*
j ,
9: Tired of Petty Politics?
Concerned for your Honor
Court?
Vote for the only qualified
Man!!
Vote INDEPENDENT!
DAVE COX
for
CHANCELLOR
Honor Court Court
Court Attorney General
Asst. Atty. Gen.
Defence Chief Investigator
Special Public Defender
i
Service Service
Service Grad: Navy Justice School
Navy Legal officer
Proposals:
Keep spoils system out of
the Honor Court
Sever PARTY CONTROL
of Honor Court
Protect & extend student
rights & priviledges
You need a strong mature,
experienced, trained Chan Chancellor.
cellor. Chancellor.
Put your RIGHTS above Party
interests.
VOTE
for
DAVE COX
for
CHANCELLOR
I paid political advertiesment

State switched into a zone de defense
fense defense at that time but was un unable
able unable to catch the Vols who man managed
aged managed a 26-22 lead at intermis intermission.
sion. intermission.
State again got the jump at
the start of the second half on a
bucket by Sapen which cut the gap
to two points, but Boerwinkle and
Widby took charge and the Vols
began to build their lead.
With the score 30-26, the Vols
went on a spree with Boerwinkle
getting two buckets and Widby and
sophomore Bill Justus one each
before State could tally.
Widby then hit three fielders in
a row to push Tennessee ahead
42-28.
The Vols widened the gap to
16 with seven minutes left as
State began to press. The reser reserves
ves reserves increased the margin in the
closing minutes.
Tennessee shot 50 per cent from
the field while holding the Bull Bulldogs
dogs Bulldogs to 39.1 per cent.
Florida State
Beats Tampa
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI)
Florida State University poured it
on unmercifully Monday night in a
109-72 drubbing of the University
of Tampa in a basketball game
here.
The Seminoles grabbed an early
lead and didnt let up until mid midway
way midway through the second half, when
coach Hugh Durham finally clear cleared
ed cleared his bench with the score at
91-50.
All five of Florida State's star starters
ters starters were in double figures, with
lan Morrison leading at 25 and
Jeff Hogan tallying 20.

NUMBER ON||lr TREASURER
QUALIFICATIO
Budget & Finance
Com Legislative
Elected of Legisla Legisla
Legisla Social President
University
IFC DtS&Hti President
Senior ics
Bing Michael for Treasurer
Flr|l||aTY
paid #ftrtisement

Thank You.
1 ' ..
; L_
'
( FIRST PARTY )
paid political advertisement

Basketball
SEC Standings
Cons All
WL WL
Vanderbilt 8-1 15-2
Tennessee 8-1 12-3
Florida 8-4 13-4
Miss. State 5-4 11-4
Auburn 5-4 10-6
Kentucky 3-5 8-8
Georgia 3-6 7-9
Alabama 2-6 9-7
Mississippi 2-7 8-8
LSU 1-7 3-12

UF Needs New Gym
'First Things First 1

By ROBERT KEYSER
Alligator Correspondent
Does the University of Florida
need a hew field house?
First things first," said coach
Tommy Bartlett. Bartlett said that
people have been talking for years
about building a new gym, but
that he (Bartlett) had not talked
with anyone about it yet.
When asked what first things
first" meant, Bartlett said the uni university
versity university building committee decides
what new buildings are needed
most. When a new gym has high
priority it will be built, Bart Bartlett
lett Bartlett continued.
Right now Florida has a nation nationally
ally nationally prominent team, but to keep
that prominence, good recruiting
will be of prime importance. Hav Having
ing Having poor facilities could hurt the
recruitment program.
Two or three prospects have
already requested to see Florida
Gym before making a decision,"
Bartlett said.

Wednesday, February 1 1967, The Florida Alligator,

SEC Hopes Crushed,
Tigers Beat Gators

AUBURN, Ala. UFs hope
for a SEC title went down the
drain Monday night as the Au Auburn
burn Auburn Tigers, shooting 62 per cent
from the floor, crushed the Ga Gators
tors Gators 87-61
Coach Bill Lynns Tigers could couldnt
nt couldnt seem to do anything wrong
against a cold Gator team. Every Everytime
time Everytime the Gators started to warm warmup,
up, warmup, Auburn would call time out,
let the Gators cool off, then re return
turn return to push up the point spread.

Now that Auburn and Alabama
are building new gyms with seat seating
ing seating capacities of over 10,000, Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, with its 20 year old gym,
and Miss. St. will be in the SEC
cellar as far as attendance.
On campus, opinions differ as
to whether or not a new field
house should be built.
Jeff Denkewalter, 3JM, said,
For years Graves has given lip
service to having a championship
basketball team. Now we have some
of the best teams in the confer conference
ence conference (SEC) and some of the worst
facilities.
Ida J. Cook, 4AS, thinks, Sure
its ridiculous when the gym wont
hold the students who want to see
a game, but its worse to hold
Porgy and Bess in the old
church.* I think we need a new
auditorium first."
A1 Losch, 4AS, said, Youd
better believe it! I think they film
the Batman* series in there every
week. With Bartlett here were
going to have good teams and we
need something to house them.*
Hubert us Robeerst, 3AS, from
Holland said, Personally I dont
care about basketball, but I think
there should be something better."
Will Florida get a new gym any anytime
time anytime in the near future? Only
members of the Board of Regents
know for sure.
Tourney Sellout
AUGUSTA, Ga. (UPI) The
1967 Masters Golf Tournamept
April 6-9 is a sellout, tournament
chairman Cliff Roberts announced
Monday.
Tickets for practice rounds at,
the Augusta National Golf Club
will be sold at the gate, however,
Roberts said. __

Gator Gary McElroy opened the
scoring for UF on a 20-foot jump jumpshot
shot jumpshot putting Florida ahead 2-0.
It was the only time the Gators
led as Auburn's Ronnie Quick and
joe Millsap both scored to put
die Tigers out in front 4-2.
From then on it was all Au Auburn
burn Auburn as the Tigers moved to a
15 point halftime lead. Florida sev several
eral several times narrowed the lead to
three points only to turn cold
against the Tigers ball-hawking
defense.
Our defense was the whole
story" said Lynn. Gary Keller
was limited to only five points
and only four of 18 Gator bas baskets
kets baskets were within 15 feet of the
bucket.
The Gators never got close in
the second half and if Jeff Ram Ramsey
sey Ramsey hadn't come off the bench to
pump through seven of the Gators
last nine points the margin would
have been even worse.
Florida barely edged out the
Tigers in rebounding 35-34.
The Gators did narrow the gap
at one point when baskets by Walk
and McElroy left Florida trailing
by one, 15-14. But after an Au Auburn
burn Auburn time out, Tiger guard Alex
Howell pumped in three buckets
and Florida couldn't get the ran range
ge range again.
Walk and McElroy led the Ga Gator
tor Gator scoring effort with 14 and 13
points respectively. Millsap fin finished
ished finished with 17 and Howell and Quick
hit for 15 each for the Tigers.
Coach Bartlett summing up the
Gator loss said, I don't see how
any team could be any hotter than
Auburn was."
It certainly was their best
game and certainly one of our
worse. This swing through Ala Alabama,
bama, Alabama, next to the Tennessee and
Kentucky trip, is the toughest to
make. Alabama gave us a tough
game, then Auburn just put it to
us. They're hard to beat here. They
beat Vandy here pretty good, too,"
said Bartlett.
Rifle Team
Wins Match
This Saturday several members
of the Rifles will journey to Mia Miami
mi Miami for the Sawgrass Invitational
Tournament.
"Most of the top shooters in the
country will be there," emphasized
Dick. "This will be an excellent
opportunity for our men to make a
national name for themselves."
On the following Saturday, the
team will travel to Tampa to
compete in the Tampa Invitational
against Miami, Florida State, and
state higli school rifle teams.
Top guns for the Florida Rif Rifles
les Rifles in the match were Waugh with
a 267, Lee Young with a 262,
Toby Muir with a 258, and Bill
Pennock with a 258.
Other Gator sharpshooters who
competed were Mike Klein, Terry
Chatham, and Lynn Peoples.

DONOHUE
FOR
CHANCELLOR
paid advertisement

Page 19



Page 20

i f The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, February 1, 1967

DAVE WELCH

%
An experienced and
respected member of
the defense council
staff, Welch has
dedicated himself to
extending the rights
of students into areas
of campus life.

for
CHANCELLOR Os
The HONOR COURT
United Party
A PROGRAM FOR CHANGE IN THE HONOR SYSTEM:
' -' t __ y
Student Supreme Court allowing appeals from Honor Court, Faculty
Disciplinary Committee and Traffic Court.
Right to Honor Court Counsel and Constitutional due process before
Faculty Disciplinary Committee.
f Election of qualified Vice Chancellor by entire student body rather
than by law students alone.
o'
Undergraduate student assistants to work with Bar Association
investigators.
I Need Your Help In Extending Student^^^^
Rights To All Areas Os Campus Life.
\
iA.
| THE QUALIFIED CANDIDATE WITH NEW IDEAS I
V

In attendence at the
University of Florida
for six years, and
active in extra extracurricular
curricular extracurricular activities,
Welch underetands
students, their prob problems,
lems, problems, and the changes
needed for the honor
system.