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The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

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Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
! MOVING OUT OUT!
! OUT! Card catalogs spend
j their last days in
Main Library before
| they move to the
| Graduate Research
!' 7
; Library later this
| month.

The Florida Alligator

Vol. 59, No. 73

OUT-PATIENT TREATMENT CHANGING,TOO
Remodeling Job For Infirmary

By HARVEY ALPER
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF Infirmary is currently undergoing a remodeling of
its physical plant and out-patient treatment system.
Dr. William A. Hall, director of student health, said Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday that the Infirmary is now operating under a Triage Sys System.
tem. System.
The Triage System involves a physician working in close
association with nurses in the out-patient clinic. Under this sys system
tem system the doctor stays in the clinic throughout the day and sees
any cases which cause the nurses concern. The Triage doctor
therefore sees from 50 to 60 per cent of tnose patients report reporting
ing reporting to the clinic.

Computerized Registration
All Set For Fall Quarter

By GEORGE DUFOUR
Alligator Staff Writer
The tedious job of pulling sec section
tion section cards will become a thing of
the past with the adoption of a

JMMMHMMHHHHMMftJ
*
*
*
*
*
t £
Gator Staff
Meets Today
There will be a mandatory staff
meeting of The Alligator Frida>
At 4:30 ip the Alligator suite in tne
Florida Union. *

v 4.1 %
jp
Sp 9

University of Florida, Gainesville

fully computerized registration
system.
The new computer-assisted
program of registration being
introduced with the quarter system
will save money, time and energy,

************^
Hair Bugs }
Barber }
Eddie Tompkins agrees.
Its getting so you
cant tell the girls from
the boys without a score-
card.
Tompkins, a Florida
Union barber, has been
in the business 35
years. Hes cut heads all
over Florida.
Its been long enough
for him to observe sev several
eral several trends in haircuts.
Used to be, Tomp-
kins said, theyd ask for +
flat-tops. Now they want +
it long. We cut a lot of +
ivy-league styles and
Princton haircuts.
They dont cut hair
for women in the Union
Shop, but Tompkins fig- 4
ures it doesnt matter.
A lot of men have 4
longer hair than women
these days, Tompkins
said.
Despite his being an
authority on the subject,
most longhairs -would be
reluctant to listen to the +
barbers views on it. +
Tompkins, you see, is a
bald.

If the Triage physician believes that a patient needs further
treatment he has the patient moved to see another physician who
can expend the necessaVy time. Otherwise the Triage doctor
prescribes treatment for the patient and lets him go.
In conjunction with the adoption of the Triage System the in infirmary
firmary infirmary is instituting several other changes.
The most obvious change is the rebuilding of much of the first
floor.
When construction is concluded the clinic, reception desk,
doctors offices, records room and laboratories will all have
been shifted to new positions.
Plans call for an entirely new reception system. The old high

UF Registrar Richard Whitehead
said.
He considers the registra registration
tion registration process to be in two dis distinct
tinct distinct phases: academic advisement
and sectioning.
Counseling for the fall quarter
will be in March for those stu students
dents students returning in September, but
not attending the spring term.
The sectioning phase will under undergo
go undergo the greatest renovation in re recent
cent recent history. In conference with
his advisor, a student will fill
out one card the Course As Assignment
signment Assignment Card. On this card will
be entered the courses of the stu students
dents students program for the fall, win winter,
ter, winter, and spring quarters.
Prior to reporting to Tigert, the
student will fill in a trial sche schedule
dule schedule in the appropriate blocks on
the card. This card will then be
fed into a computer.
As registration progresses,
the students will be provided, on
a daily basis, a report showing
the adjustments made in the sch schedule
edule schedule of courses made necessary
by the previous registrations,
the Registrar stated.
Privileged pre-registration will
be granted to those students with
a 2.0 over-all average.
Some of the advantages of this
new system are:
The objectionable system of
mass registration at the Gyn Gynmasium
masium Gynmasium would be ended.
It retains the advantages of
free selection of courses and sec sections
tions sections for the better students.
It allows the departments to
adjust their course offerings to
demand as registration progress.
It allows a significant reduc reduction
tion reduction in the time spent in coun counseling.
seling. counseling.

Friday, January 13, 1967

desk is being replaced by two re receptionists
ceptionists receptionists seated at low desks
in the northeast section of the
waiting room.
When patients enter the build building
ing building these receptionists will ask
them to fill out a brief IBM card
upon which they will list their
name, student number and other
pertinent information. Then,
clerks will retrieve the students
medical records from a new shelf shelfon-end
on-end shelfon-end filing system.
Simultaneously the student will
be timed into the infirmary.
After treatment he will be timed
out.
Once the patient has his record
he will move on to a traffic co coordinating
ordinating coordinating nurse sitting in the
center of the floor. She will in inquire
quire inquire as to what type of treat treatment
ment treatment the student desires and guide
him to the proper service.
Under this system students will
no longer be forced to visit the
clinic if they wish to see a doc doctor.
tor. doctor. The traffic nurse will simply
guide patients to the doctor, lab laboratory,
oratory, laboratory, X-ray room, clinic or
pharmacy, according to student
needs.
This traffic control nurse will
be aided by special direction mark markers
ers markers placed in the floor. For ex example,
ample, example, if a student wants to see
Dr. X, the nurse will advise the
student to be seated and to follow
the purple squares when he is
called for. Students who are go going
ing going to the clinic would, likewise,
be told to follow the orange trian triangles
gles triangles on the floor to the clinic.
Once in the clinic students will
take advantage of the Triage Sys System.
tem. System. (This system has never be before
fore before been applied to college health
situations in the U.S.). There, un unless
less unless their complaint is very minor,
they will see a doctor who will
make the medical decision of whe whether
ther whether a student requires a more
thorough examination by another
physician.
(SEE INFIRMARY* PAGE 2)

Honor Court
To Toughen
Check Policy
l
By BILL DOUTHAT
Alligator Staff Writer
The honest mistake of pass passing
ing passing a bad check, if done a se second
cond second time, will be an offense
against the student body, accord according
ing according to a new UF Honor Court
policy.
Student checks returned to local
merchants marked insufficient
funds, will open the student to
Honor Court prosecution if he
doesnt make-good the check within
a certain time period, or if he
has a previous bad check record.
The new arrangement, explained
Jim Crabtree, assistant Honor
Court attorney general, is an at attempt
tempt attempt to enforce the letter of the
bad check policy a little more.
Previously, students who have
passed checks without sufficient
funds to back them up, the most
typical bad check offense, have
faced no prosecution even.with re repeated
peated repeated offenses.
Checks bounced because of no
account, a closed account or a
forged signature open the student
to first offense prosecution.
Under the new arrangement, said
Crabtree, the reported students
are notified by the Honor Court
that they must redeem their boun bounced
ced bounced checks within a week. If thr y
fail to comply, their college Te Tecords
cords Tecords are flagged and a letter
is sent to the dean of men. A
student cannot graduate with a
flagged record.
If the student commits a second
bad check offense due to insuf insufficient
ficient insufficient funds, his record is flagged
immediately and he will face pro prosecution.
secution. prosecution.
Cases are frequent under the in insufficient
sufficient insufficient funds category, but only
three pending cases deal with in intentional
tentional intentional passing of bad checks.
The Honor Court has been re reorganized
organized reorganized to put an officer of the
court over each category of vio violation
lation violation that the Honor Court hand handles
les handles bad checks, cheating and
stealing.
ACCENT Mag
Available
The ACCENT *67 magazine,
with original contributions by na national
tional national state and local figures, will
be made available to students and
guests in conjunction with the
ACCENT Symposium, General
Chairman Charles Shepherd has
announced.
The magazine was described as
something that most faculty and
students have never seen before,
by magazine assistant editor Drex
Dobson. The editor of the maga magazine
zine magazine is Mike Dowling, who grad graduated
uated graduated in December.
Magazine contributors are Ed Edward
ward Edward M. Keating, Ted Sorenson,
Hans Morgenthau, Norman Thomas
and Russell Kirk.
UF, contributors are Dean
Student Affairs Lester L. Hale,
Political Science Professor Harry
Kantor, Dean of Arts and Science
Ralph Page, Journalism Profes Professor
sor Professor H. G. Buddy Davis and
sthdents John Kelso and Ira Bruk Brukner.
ner. Brukner.
The magazine -was published as
a special edition of the Florida
Alumnus and over 5,000 copies
will be made available to the stu student
dent student body. It is 32 pages long.
Art work for the magazine was
done by WUFT Art Director David
Matteson. He was assisted by Bill
Wilson, lUC<



Page 2

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 13, 1967

V trr6W // 1.l PLEASE Y THE IT "(WHATEVER \ loner Vr SEE IT WHEN we

Infirmary To Take A New Look

(FROM PAGE 1)
The clinic itself will be a fast
operation. Whenever a backlog of
three patients develops a second
clinic with another Triage doctor
will automatically swing into im immediate
mediate immediate operation.
All these changes are partially
predicated upon the physical re rebuilding
building rebuilding of the first floor. In ad addition
dition addition to shifting the reception
desk, Hall has moved the clinic
from the end of the North Wing

Scene =
WITH REID POOLE
Chairman, Department of Music
Two musical campus events are scheduled next week in con connection
nection connection with ACCENT. On Tuesday, the Lyceum Council pro prosents
sents prosents George Gershwins Porgy and Bess Yn a full stage
production with orchestra at 8:15 in the University Auditorium.
On Wednesday I will present a lecture-concert dealing with
electronic music entitled The Avant-Garde in Music: A Problem
of Communication. The Wednesday evening lecture-concert will
begin at 8.
The Porgy and Bess performance, on Tuesday evening, will
star LeVern Hutcherson, Joyce Bryant, Avon Long, and Val Pringle
with the Eva Jessye Choir. The production is directed by Ella
Gerber. UF students obtain tickets on their ID cards. General
public admission is $2.50; UF faculty, staff,and students and
children, $1.50. For information regarding ticket availability,
please call the Florida Union Box Office.
ELECTRONIC MUSIC
Os several directions being taken in the field of experimental
music today, electronic music is the area which is being most
rapidly and most solidly assimilated into our musical culture on
various levels. The Wednesday evening lecture-concert will deal
with the main current developments in electronic music (no pun
intended), with the implications of the new developments, and
with the problem of communication and syntax created by the
new materials. Music to be heard during the course of the even evening
ing evening on Wednesday will include complete selections by Mel Powell,
Vladimir Ussachevsky, Bulent, Arel, and Mario Davidovsky.
LOOKING AHEAD
The Philharmonic Society of Gainesville, in cooperation with the
Department of Music, will present Yuri Yamamoto, pianist, Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday Jan. 25 in University Auditorium. Miss Yamamoto, or
Mrs. Robert Smiley, who now makes her home in Gainesville,
will present sonatas by Scarlatti; the Sonata in A Major, Opus
101, by Beethoven; the Sonata No. 3, Opus 28, by Prokofieff;
and several selections by Chopin. There is no charge for her con concert.
cert. concert.
NATIONAL BALLET
The second Lyceum Council presentation of the Winter Tri Trimester
mester Trimester is the National Ballet of Washington, D. C. on Jan. 31,
in the University Auditorium. The program will include three
ballets: a short version of Swan Lake, with music by Tschai Tschaikowsky;
kowsky; Tschaikowsky; a new ballet. Through the Edge, with choreography
by Michael Lopuszansld and music by Samuel Barber; and Ray Raymonda,
monda, Raymonda, with choreography by Balanchine and Danilova, with
m usic by Glazounov.
The printed Winter Trimester concert schedule is a little late
in arriving from the printers because of the moving of the Uni University
versity University Printing Department into its new building. The Winter
Trimester schedule includes a total listing at the present time
of some 26 concert events. We will inform you, through this
column, as soon as the complete listing of concerts is available
in print.
HM FtorMb Alligator miw the right to regtoate the typographical too* at all adT.rtU.rn.ou and
to rofioo or tan away copy which it ooaaldare obtocttooabie.
MO NHIHOM B GUARANTEED, though dwlred poolttoo will be (tree wbaarror poaalbl*.
Tho Florida Alligator will not oonatdar adJuotro.au at paymoat tor any adv.rtu.romt lantlnng typo typographical
graphical typographical error, or orraaaowo lnoorttoo walooo aotioe to glraa to tho Adv.rttoUf Manager within
(1) owe day after adr.rtto.mont appear..
no Florida Alligator will aot boraopoaotolor more than oao tooamet tooertloo of aa adr.rtto.mmn
ochoMod to ran ooewnl Hum. Mottoao tor oorroettoa moot be gtraa baton Boat tnoitioa.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR to the official atedaat aowapapar of Mm Uatraralty at Florida and to
pdMtohod Sew ttmaa waafcly oacept darlag May, Jen, and July what it to pabUabiil aoml-wwakly. Only
dMartoto rapraaaM tea official optMoaa of tbolr atohora. Tbe Tg-*T to aatond aa ow* etooo
ateltar at too Utotod Mateo Foot Offloe at OalaoorUto.

to the center of the building. He
is also enlarging the waiting room
to two and one-half times its pre present
sent present size.
The clinic itself will have two
sections. One part of it will be a
semi-private room where the
Triage doctor Will practice. The
other side will be what might be
called the nurses clinic. Never-**
theless, nurses and doctors will
work in both sections.
Where the old clinic once stood

two physicians offices have been
constructed.
Emergency procedures for after
hours callers are also being chan changed.
ged. changed. Hopefully, starting next Mon Monday
day Monday a clinic and emergency room
will be located in the basement
for use after 5 p.m. This clinic
will be accessable only from the
infirmarys rear emergency en entrance
trance entrance which will also be rebuilt
and newly illuminated.
The emergency treatment facil facility
ity facility will be just like what it would
be in. the hospital back home,
Hall says.
Also on the list of changes
for the infirmary is a new look.
Henceforth the infirmary will pre present
sent present the facade of a hospital, not
a clinic, complete with pinstripers,
plantings, and anticeptic white
walls.
An increased number of student
assistants will also be employed.
A new switchboard system will
be inaugurated, making it easier
for patients to call their doctors.
Yet, these are not the biggest
changes.
For the first time since Ive
been here weve got a full staff
weve got some doctors who
dropped out of heaven. The re result
sult result of this is that were moving,
Hall says.

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JllffkdKle^
IMCONFONATKO

New Computer
Comes To UF
An SB,OOO computer was pre presented
sented presented as a gift to the UF chem-
Istry Department Thursday.
Marathon, a new concept in elec
tronic computations, win be used
in research by students to pro produce
duce produce more accurate calculations
The University received the
computer as a result of interest
that was expressed by the Chem Chemistry
istry Chemistry Department, saidDougSev saidDougSeverance
erance saidDougSeverance of the B C S Associates
in Orlando.
The Marathon Company gave 10
computers away.
UF is the only school in Flor Florida
ida Florida to use the computer. They are
usually used in industry and space
technology.

1
Dickens cant scare
you when you're armed 1
with Cliffs Notes. As
you read "Tale Os Two
Cities,your Cliffs
Notes will provide a
complete explanation
and summary of every
chapter. It will do won wonders
ders wonders in smoothing the
rough spots and in increasing
creasing increasing your under understanding.
standing. understanding. And dont
stop with Dickens. 1
There are more than
125 Cliffs Notes ready
to help you make bet better
ter better grades in every lit literature
erature literature course.
lat your bookseller
or write for
free title list
Mil
TALE OF TWO CITIES



DNE OF TF|y OUTSTANDING MEN

Jaycees Award Goes To UF Grad

By ELAINE FULLER
Alligator Staff Writer
Many people dream of having na national
tional national recognition in their field
after obtaining a college degree.
Not many people, however, achieve
this within a year after graduation.
Dr. Walter Lane, now a Temple
Terrace physician and 1965 gradu graduate
ate graduate of the UF College of Medi Medicine,
cine, Medicine, was recognized last week

I LETS FLY! I
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8 steps, you can purchase each course and build your flying skill 8
m and your knowledge required to get a private license. 8
1 You get your choice of a new Piper Cherokee 140 or a new Ces- 8
8 sna 150 for your use. .. 1
1 To get more information call 372-6351 to schedule your $5 1
1 introductory flight lesson. This 30 minutes of instruction may I
i be applied toward your required time for private license. 8
I SOLO COURSE I
9 hours dual instruction A* A /
2 hours solo \ |XQ
At this point you fly alone in Y 1 UV
thf? local area.
I CROSS COUNTRY COURSE I
I 4 hours dual instruction 1
7 hours solo C 1 Ck I
| At this point you fly alone y IJU 1
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I LICENSE COMPLETION COURSE I
/ hours dual instruction f aaq
6 hours solo \1
At this point you are ready 1
I flight test. I
I PILOT EQUIPMENT I
I All books and supplies you will \ I
need as a pilot. I
I WRITTEN TEST SCHOOL I
I Begins Tuesday, Jan. 10, 7PM V (|j I
I Guaianteed passing grade Y I
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At this point you are a licensed Y j
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GAINESVILLE Al RPORT WALDO ROAD

when he was selected as one of
Americas Ten Outstanding Young
Men for 1966, in a program spon sponsored
sored sponsored by the national Jaycees.
Lane, 32, a leading medical
researcher, joined the ranks of
a group of young men selected
yearly by a panel of judges re representing
presenting representing various professional
fields. The Ten Outstanding Young
Men (TOYM) selections in past
years have included the late John

F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Leon Leonard
ard Leonard Bernstein, the late Dr. Thomas
Dooley, and UFs own Dr. Herbert
E. Kaufman, chief of the Depart Department
ment Department of Ophthamology at the Health
Center, who was selected in 1964.
Lanes name was added to this
list on January 9. He is now a
family physician who research is
translating complex laboratory
procedures into practical, daily
office techniques, earning him

Friday, January 13, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

unprecedented recognition from
distinguished medical colleagues
while still an intern.
As a result of his development
of diagnostic procedures aimed at
reducing the incident of undetect undetected
ed undetected and untreated bacterial infec infections,
tions, infections, Lane was presented the
American Academy of General
Practice Gold Medal Award during
the 1966 convention. Less than
50 gold medals have been award awarded,
ed, awarded, and Lanes presentation was
the first Gold Medal awarded to
an intern.
Since entering private practice,
he has continued to travel widely
and publish material concerning
his research aimed at practical
bacteriology.
One of Dr. Lanes chief inter interests
ests interests is public and professional ed education
ucation education concerning the important
role of the general practitioner
or family physician in the commun community.
ity. community. The rapid decline in the num number
ber number of physicians who enter gen general
eral general practice is a problem, Lane
feels, which represents a serious
waste of this countrys medical re resources.
sources. resources.
His outstanding potential for ac acquainting
quainting acquainting the public and the med medical
ical medical profession with the need to

ROTC Scholarships
On Fall Docket

A number of UF Air Force
cadets may receive full scholar scholarships
ships scholarships for the 1967-68 school year
if they can measure up to a host
of qualifications.
Brig. Gen. Donald F. Blake,
commandant of Air Universitys
Air Force ROTC, has announced
that 3,000 scholarships will be giv-
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Choice of Italian, French, or Thousand 3 W I
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? jpfr
nil
WALTER LANE
*
. . Tampa physician
restore the vanishing family physi physician
cian physician won him an unprecendented
appointment to the public relations
committee of the Academy of Gen General
eral General Practice, a slot usually re reserved
served reserved for physicians with long
experience.
The TOYM will be honored
by the Jaycees at an Awards Con Congress
gress Congress in Jekyll Island, Ga. this
weekend.

en to qualified sophomore, junior
and senior cadets at more than
140 colleges and universities hav having
ing having the four-year program. The to total
tal total represents the most grants to
be awarded since the program be began
gan began in 1965.
Qualified students should apply
this month. Scholarship winners
will be announced in late April.
Cadet hopefuls first must pass
an officer qualification test Jan.
28 at the University ROTC build building
ing building and then take a physical ex examination
amination examination to be given in Orlando.
Candidates, who must have at least
a 2.5 grade average, will be in interviewed
terviewed interviewed in late February or ear early
ly early March by two officers from the
University Air Force ROTC de detachment
tachment detachment and two school officials.

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 13, 1967

<|g) UPI NEWS
rSAN FRANCISCO
V
Its HAPPENING Again
V #*
'**
X; EDITORS NOTE: In San Francisco, which a decade ago spawned :j
the beatniks, a new psychedelic community is spreading among jj
| youths seeking the utmost in sensual and emotional experiences. ;*
g They are the happeners and the following dispatch provides >:
j:j: an introduction to them.
x ,
X ;
S By ROBERT STRAND $
V '
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) Every day of the week he wears j:
his hair down to his shoulder blades, a full beard, wire rimmed j:
glasses, a frock coat and a necklace. j:
He is Chet Helms, who at 24 is a successful businessman and j
an influential figure in San Franciscos exploding community of :
$ psychedelic hippies. He also is a happener, whose ideals :
$ and values are shared by several thousand young people in San
g F rancisco and may be reaching uncounted other youths from here to
the East coast. x
jx Helms manner of dress is not considered particularly ec- J:
j:j: centric by many in a city where a mailmans hair may touch j:
his shoulders, where the delivery boy may look like Abraham :
Lincoln, and where youths walk the streets in 19th Century :
g costumes. :
g Helms believes the citys hippies, centralized in the Haight Haightjjjj
jjjj Haightjjjj Ashbury district, make up the largest, most concentrated and j
wildest of any acid LSD community in the world, with the j
j:j: possible exception of Amsterdams Provos. The area is about j
>: two miles west of downtown San Francisco, amid block after j
jjj: block of boxy, Victorian and post-Victorian frame buildings.
v!
And while the dedicated, 200 per cent members of Helms j
world generally are estimated to number 5,000, their sympath- j
izers windows, identified by posters and colored designs, add :
:§ up to many more. :
g A reliable source in the drug trade is confident that five grams :
g of LSD, many hippies inspiration, is distributed in the San :
Francisco area each week. Thats 100,000 doses. j
The name hippie is the one most often used by the Haight Haightg
g Haightg Ashbury types but it is a bit misleading. In the past, hip j
has been loosely associated with cool, disassociated jazz musi- j:
clans and beatniks, and these late vintage bohemians are the j;
X- exact opposite. :
xj Beat usually means uninvolved in emotion, politics or much
g of anything else. San Franciscos beatniks were cynical, hostile, :
jjj disinterested in clothes and were prodigious imbibers of wine. :
g To a beatnik, the word hippie usually described the phonies
jjjj who hung aroung the fringes. Now it has evolved as a name for
x their successors, mostly under 25, who dont drink, profess to :
be full of love and hope and deeply involved in work, of sorts,
g: as well as communal activities. Feelings are most important j
than logic.
X; l
vi m r i
x| Another name for them is happeners a person who attends j
*j happenings. Happeners seek intense sensual and emotional exper- |
iences as away of widening their awareness of themselves and :
g the world. Some can go on a trip by contemplating the color l
$ of an apple.
g What they call it is mind or consciousness expansion. A favor favorite
ite favorite means is LSD or marijuana, although not all happeners use :
drugs. :
The happeners have strong views. They are against the Viet- j:
nam war, racial segregation, armaments, the draft and various :
virtues such as chastity, thrift and cleanliness not to mention :
g laws against psychedelic drugs.
g They call their parents half-persons. Parents, they say, :
. g mostly have bad marriages, are hyprocritical, cant talk with
g other people without a couple of stiff drinks and are always threat- :
g ening to blow up the world. :

V **

g In the Haight-Ashbury, the happeners provide plenty of exam- j:
g pies of their own psychedelic life, which they are sure is a re- j:
g: volution sweeping the earth. >:
£: Here, LSD seels for $2 a capsule. Special pipes for mari- :
g: juana are displayed in the stores. Just the other day, a stroller :
S carried a potted marihuana plant under his arm.
v! ~ %
.
***** (iC *
g The conflict, says Ralph J. Gleason, jazz critic of the San >:
g Francisco Chronicle may yet come to a battle in the streets. :
Gleason recently wrote, This is the generation which is making :
distillery stock a losing position for long range investment and >:
this is the generation which says it believes in love and acts Qn
S iji
V M
g The cops can clean the Sunset Strip by force and San Fran- S
x* cisco Police Chief Tom Cahills blue nosed blue coats may bust $
g book stores but this thing cant be stopped. iji
g In the war between the generations, the kids are right and ?
j| they will win.
jiil %
% s

Mao To Purge Army ;
-:
'Strikes Bourgeois

TOKYO (UPI) Chinese Com Communist
munist Communist Party Chairman Mao Tse Tsetung
tung Tsetung has moved to wipe out op opponents
ponents opponents within the 3 million strong
army by strengthening the armys
own military purge committee, Ra Radio
dio Radio Peking reported Thursday.
Rusk Unsure
Over China
Civil Strife
WASHINGTON (UPI) Secre Secretary
tary Secretary of State Dean Rusk said Thurs Thursday
day Thursday it was possible that the pow power
er power struggle within Communist
China might lead to civil war,
but it was too early to tell.
Rusk said that no matter who
won the contest between hard line
and moderate elements, he was
not sure of the effect on Chinas
attitude and actions toward Viet Vietnam
nam Vietnam and other critical issues.
He said, however, he would
guess that one of the major bones
of contention among the top 12
or 15 people in Peking was whe whether
ther whether the militant policy of Mao
Tse-tung was in Chinas best in interests
terests interests in the long run.
Rusks remarks on the possi possibility
bility possibility of civil war came shortly
after the Peking government of officially
ficially officially acknowledged that ele elements
ments elements opposing Maos cultural
revolution had cut railroads,
blocked highways and disrupted re reports
ports reports in many areas of the coun country.
try. country.
Mao has ordered a reorgani reorganization
zation reorganization of the Chinese military
high command to make possible
more effective measures to sup suppress
press suppress the efforts of his foes,
Peking Radio said.
Rusk, in a television interview,
said he was not ashamed to ack acknowledge
nowledge acknowledge that he was not sure
what was going on in Peking
because he suspected that Mao
and the others engaged in the lea leadership
dership leadership struggle were not quite
sure themselves at this point.
While acknowledging the possi possibility
bility possibility that the turmoil might
lead to civil war, Rusk said: I
think that we ought to be very
cautious about saying that it is
headed that way at the present
time.
He said it was possible that the
two factions would find ways to
work his out among themselves
through compromise or one group
may find itself in full control at
the expense of another.

IN MEXICO CITY
Snow Falls, Deaths Rise

MEXICO CITY (UPI) The sun
broke through a three-day over overcast
cast overcast in Mexico City Thursday but
snow continued in some areas
and started again in others in the
worst winter storm in a genera generation.
tion. generation.
The nationwide death toll of
weather-caused deaths rose to 43.
President Gustavo Diaz Ordaz or ordered
dered ordered a nationwide emergency plan
into effect, coordinating army re relief
lief relief work with civilian agencies.

There were reports also of other
strong measures taken by pro-
Maoists to crush opposition in the
party and the country. There were
no indications he was succeding;
the official Peking papers under
Maos control admitted his op opponents
ponents opponents would never say die.
Maos call for the purge of an anti
ti- anti Maoist elements within the army
won immediate support from the
official Liberation Army Daily.
But it was not clear whether Mao
had full army support or control controlled
led controlled only its propaganda organ.
We will crush completely all
bourgeoise lines and defend to
the last the proletarian revolution
line represented by Chairman Mao
and the proleterian dictatorship,
the Liberation Daily said.
Two other official newspapers
controlled by Mao hinted at the
possibility of bloodshed. The Pe Peking
king Peking Peoples Daily and the Red
Flag, the partys theoretical jour journal,
nal, journal, said Maos enemies would
never lay down their arms and
surrender of their own accord.
C
Peking Radio said Mao took
his action on the recommendation
of the military committee of the
party central committee which
Premier Chou En-lai has des described
cribed described as the headquarters of
the cultural revolution.
Opposition to the so-called cul cultural
tural cultural revolution and the excesses
of the Red Guard movement spear spearheading
heading spearheading the campaign triggered the
current power struggle in China.
In strengthening the military
purge subcommittee, Mao named

lron Triangle Push-il
Nets Cong Outpost I
ta fiK
SAIGON (UPI) U.S. troops driving in record force through I
the Iron Triangle jungles north of Saigon Thursday uncovered
a regimental-sized Viet Cong base camp that apparently was I
a main headquarters for Red forces harassing the capital area. 9
It was the 10th sizable Communist base camp overrun in the I
sweep. I
As the massive American force pushed through the former 1
Communist stronghold area for the fifth straight day, U.S. Air 1
Force Supersabre jets screamed over at tree-top level to blast I
Communist snipers firing from trees in an attempt to delay the 1
UjS. advance.
The U.S. troops met little large-scale Communist resistance, I
but scattered clashes boosted the Communist death toll in the 1
war's biggest ground operation at least 196 killed, 42 captured 1
and more than 250 suspects detained. 1
In Saigon, a U.S. military spokesman announced that U.S. I
casualties dropped sharply last week when a total of 67 Amer- |
icans were killed in action, 479 wounded and two listed as miss- |
ing. This compared with 128 killed and 634 wounded the pre- 1
vious week. 1
A} ||

Officials said an estimated 1,-
200 motor vehicles were marooned
in snow on highways around Mex Mexico
ico Mexico City, and hundreds more along
highways in other parts of the coun country.
try. country.
Tens of thousands of dead birds
were reported spread over rural
areas on the outskirts of the cap capital
ital- capital They were part of the yearly
southerly flights of millions of
birds seeking refuge from the cold
in the United States and Canada.

his wife, Chiang Ching, the solel
adviser to the group whose chair-M
man is Hsiu Shiang-chen, V i J
chairman of the defense commit-B
tee of the Communist Party. I
t ||||
The Japanese Kyodo News Ser-1
vice reported from Peking that I
law enforcement agencies there!
had been given police state powers!
under emergency measures aimed!
At opponents of Maos cultural I
devolution. §
They provide police greater
freedom in dealing with persons
suspected of murder, arson, loot looting,
ing, looting, -disrupting transportation,
supplying information to foreign
countries, stealing national se secrets
crets secrets and subversive activities.
'Groups
Returns
Gator Groups:
Were back again.
The Alligator Society sec section
tion section wants to represent as
many independent and Greek
organizations as possible.
In our Gator Groups well
tell about your weekly acti activities,
vities, activities, elections and special
events.
Help us by bringing infor information
mation information to the Alligator of office
fice office and leaving it in the box
marked Society. Deadline
is Monday of every week.
Stefanie Jarius,
Society Editor

Crop damage in Nuevo Leoal
State alone was estimated at
million. j
The American school suspend suspended
ed suspended classes here along with school
throughout half the country.
An estimated 2,000 persons were
left homeless by floods of two
rivers on the outskirts of the cap capital.
ital. capital. Emergency crews worked,
around the clock to build a
to hold back the flood waters of
the Remedios River.



4 *WOF'* # 1
I M;. BstEKKEt^k^E
j| 111 I I I l A HM|M|W|BW
Last year, thousands
of lawyers, bankers,
accountants, engineers,
doctors and businessmen
went back to college.
. And not just for the
football games.

Wed like to clear up what appears to be a
misunderstanding. It is somewhat popular
on campus to decry a business career oh
the grounds that you stop learning once
you start working for Cliche Nuts & Bolts.
That idea is groundless.
We cant speak for Cliche, but we can
for ourselves-Westem Electric, the man manufacturing
ufacturing manufacturing and supply unit of the Bell Sys System.
tem. System. 6 out of 10 college graduates who have
joined us over the past 10 years, for exam example,
ple, example, have continued their higher education.
Howre these for openers:
W.E.s Tuition Refund Plan lets em employees
ployees employees pursue degrees while work work
work ing for us. Over 6 thousand have at attended
tended attended schools in 41 states under
this plan. We refund more than $1
million in tuition costs to employees
a year.
To name another program: advanced
engineering study, under the direc direction
tion direction of Lehigh University, is con conducted
ducted conducted at our Engineering Research

ITS ELEMENTARY
H-C fl The Most Student-Minded Businessmen
jCjBl advertise in the Florida alligator
" I

Center in Princeton, N. J. Selected
employees are sent there from all
over the country for a years concen concentrated
trated concentrated study leading to a masters
degree.
You get the idea. Were for more learn learning
ing learning in our business. After all, Western
Electric doesnt make buggy whips. We
make advanced communications equip equipment.
ment. equipment. And the Bell telephone network will
need even more sophisticated devices by
the time your fifth reunion rolls around.
The state of the art, never static, is where
the action is.
At Western Electric, whats happening
is the excitement and satisfaction of con continued
tinued continued doing and learning. If this happens
to appeal to you, no matter what degree
youre aiming for, check us out. And grab
a piece of the action.
Western Electric
Wy MANUFACTURING & SUPPLY UNIT OF THE BELL SYSTEM

Friday, January 13, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

Security Seminar
Registration Grows
Registration for the Monday opening of the National Secrrity Sem Seminar,
inar, Seminar, is approaching 900 persons and program officials are urging
anyone intending to register for the 12-day program to do so im immediately.
mediately. immediately.
Applicants may register at the Gainesville Chamber of Commerce,
Mikes Book Store, the Record Bar, the Florida Union Ticket Office
or the Air Force ROIC Department on campus.
Those who do not receive registration kits in the mail by Saturday

should plan to pick them up at
the University Auditorium Monday
morning.
Admission to the opening session
at 9:30 a.m. will be restricted to
those with registration badges. In
view of limited parking near the
auditorium, seminar officials sug suggest
gest suggest participants arrive on campus
no later than 9 a.m., allowing ex extra
tra extra time to acquire registration
kits if necessary.
Late arrivals will not be ad admitted
mitted admitted during any of the 34 se seminar
minar seminar lecture sessions, continuing
through Jan. 27.
Laughlin, Litz
On Open Forum
Open Forum, UFs own open
air show, will launch the new
year with a discussion of the
theme of the upcoming ACCENTS
symposium, The Responsibility
of Dissent.
The program will be aired live
Sunday at 9 p.m. on WGGG radio.
Program Director John La Cam Campra
pra Campra says the fall season of the
program was very successful.
Guests on the Sunday panel will
be Stanley Laughlin, professor of
Law; Ernie Litz, former UF stu student
dent student body presidential candidate
and political liberal; and Wayne
Rich, ACCENT assistant program
chairman.
The format of the show is bas based
ed based on an open-ill ike theme where
all listners are invited to phone
in and ask questions concerning
the panel discussion.
Student Desks
and
Chairs
Both $lO so S4O
TYPEWRITER RENTALS
Manuals & Electrics
KISERS
Office Equipment
604 N. MAIN ST.

WELCOME STUDENTS
GAINESVILLE'S NEWEST CAFETERIA
1/2 Block West Os Florida Theatre
Featuring The Finest In
Fresh Garden Salads *Meat Entrees
Vegetables Homemade Pastries
easy, easy parking
Or A Short Walk From Campus
Friday Night Special Sat. Night Special
FRIED COD FISH with Smothered Salisbury Steak
FRENCH FRIED CQ> and White Rice 49t
POTATOES > tfwl
large slice Os yellow cake 12? Apple Cobbler M
313 W. Univ. Ave.
free parking
On Our Paved Lot

Tax Effect
On Students
Uncertain
By BARBARA GREEN
Alligator Staff Writer
Will University students be af affected
fected affected by the proposed six per cent
income tax surcharge that John Johnson
son Johnson spoke' of in his address to
the State of the U nion?
Dr. Carter C. Osterbind, dir director
ector director of economics and business
research at the UF said Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, Its difficult to determine.
It depends in part on how Con Congress
gress Congress finally decides to implement
this in terms of actual provision.
There should be instead a
smaller personal tax and a larger
corporation tax. Ive heard sug suggestions
gestions suggestions of a 10 per cent corpor corporation
ation corporation surcharge and a five per
cent individual surcharge.
However, personal incomes
under $5,000 would probably not
be taxed. In terms of students
the expectation is not too great.*
Congress has taken a lets letsnot-be-hasty
not-be-hasty letsnot-be-hasty attitude toward John Johnsons
sons Johnsons proposal.
They will want to know more
about several factors before de deciding
ciding deciding whether to tax individual and
corporate incomes for an es estimated
timated estimated $4.5 billion more in the
first year of a tax increase.
The Florida delegation expres expressed
sed expressed general opposition to a tax
increase.
Many congressmen believe as
the Florida legislature does
that a tax increase should not
even be considered until after a
close study of the full budget pro proposals.
posals. proposals.
Students should not be very
greatly affected. There will be an
affect on the price level, howev however.
er. however.
The real danger confronting
us is the inflationary element. This
would take more away from the
student and the public than the
tax element would.

Page 5



Page 6

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 13, 1967

The Florida Alligator
'A -MojMJjjj. It Out fkw. PUHtTkA
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR 808 BECK
' Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not necessarily reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is the editorial in the left
column.
The New Curfew
* It's pretty hard to increase efficiency
in a given operation and still keep the
people who administer it happy.
But when you can satisfy the adminis administrators
trators administrators of the operations and the persons
affected by it at the same time, youve
done something.
But thats exactly what the Womens
Student Association and the Dean of
Womens Office have managed to do with
their revision in curfew hours for women.
By abolishing the late permit and mak making
ing making curfew hours more reasonable for all,
WSA and Dean of Women Betty Cosby
have managed to eliminate a big bottle bottlenect
nect bottlenect (the late permits) and with a mid midnight
night midnight curfew, and given sophomore and
junior girls several new advantages.
Now, for instance, all but the freshmen
girls will have full use of the library,
long an argument for extending womens
hours. Too, they,, will be able to attend
programs on campus without having to
leave before the end or being forced to
rush on their way home.
More important, it indicates that the
University is willing to recognize women
students as adults capable of making their
own decisions concerning their own lives.
In the past, we have supported aboli- 1
tion of womens curfew for all but fresh freshmen.
men. freshmen. We have argued that the women
students have as much right to inde independent
pendent independent decisions as the men.
Although extension of hours is not
abolition, we feel it is a step in the right
direction and we laud WSA and Dean
Cosby for paving the way.
URA: A Good Job
In the past three months, Jack Zucker,
through his Forums program and Charles
Shepherd, through ACCENT, have manag managed
ed managed to lure more big-name, controver controversial
sial controversial speakers to campus than ever be before.
fore. before.
Zucker and Shepherd have both receiv received
ed received a lot of credit for a job well one.
And rightly.
But the job of Ron Lanier in setting
up Religion-in-Life Weeks 1966 program
has gone almost unnoticed.
University Religious Association Pre President
sident President Lanier and his helpers have lined
up what is undoubtedly the best program
the week has ever had.
Highlighting the show is Bishop James
A. Pike, the controversial Californian who
has been called everything from a heretic
to a saviour, depending on who one talks
to.
Bishop Pike will speak on The Real
Conflict Between Science and Religion in
a Jan. 24 program no ne should miss.
In addition to Pike, other name speak speakers
ers speakers from faraway places such as New
York and Virginia will be on hand.
We congratulate the URA on setting
up a fine program.

Get Off Rhodesias Back

By WAYNE BOYNTON
Alligator Columnist
Monday's editorial page cartoon
of the KKK member collecting
coins for Rhodesia is an example
of how Great Britain, with the help
of the American press and Pre President
sident President Johnson, has distorted the
opinions of many Americans of the
Rhodesian situation. I would like
to present lan Smiths point of
view as I interpret it.
Rhodesia is a small country in
southern Africa that just a little
over a year ago declared its inde independence
pendence independence of Britain. Hie country
is ruled by lan Smith and 220,000
whites while the majority of the

f / VL MBS a vlsp;
w S'" .*7 \
Podnuh! Welcome Ba Hooooooooo! That Grip!"
Our Man Hoppe
By ART HOPPE

There appears growing doubt
that well ever win the war Not
that war. The War on Poverty.
To help clarify the situation, I
have another report from the front
by that seasoned combat veteran,
Mr. Jud Joad of Appalachia Corn*
ers. Mr. Joad has been fighting
poverty, man and boy, for nigh
on 60 years.
Im smack in the thick of it
now for sure, Mr. Joad begins
proudly. I never did see so much
action ever before.
It all started when I marched
down to volunteer. Maude, I says
to my wife, *1 got to do my duty.
Theyre going to need us veterans.
So keep a stiff upper lip and put
a tallow candle in the window.
Well, I see the mayor and I
tell him Imay be getting a mite
old but I want to do my bit.
Jud, says he, lhe one thing
I want is maximum feasible parti participation
cipation participation by you poor folk in run running
ning running this here war. As long as
you run it the way I tell you to.*
Mayor, says I, I just aim to
be a private in the ranks and fol follow
low follow orders like a good soldier
should.
Jud, he says, patting me on
the back, youre precisely the kind
of poor folk Im looking for.
So he puts me on the local
board and this young fellow comes
down from Washington to make
us a speech. Friends, he says,
poverty is dreadful. We want you
to think about the problem, come
up with a solution and well give
you what you need to lick it.
Well, I think about the prob-
lem for several seconds. ln my

people are the 4,000,000 blacks.
Now the whole world is out to get
lan Smith and Rhodesia back under
English rule.
GET OFF RHODESIAS BACK!
England, and especially the United
States, has no right to any claim
on Rhodesia or any right to block blockade
ade blockade the country. England is using
the guise of doing it for the
blacks to actually cover for the
loss of face it has suffered.
The main gripe is that Rhodesia
is ruled by the white minority while
the blacks are the majority of the
population. Britain wants to retake
the country so that it may re receive
ceive receive the prestige that comes with
granting a country its inde independence.
pendence. independence.

long experience/ I tells him,
theres one thing, and one
thing alone, that can lick pover poverty.
ty. poverty.
Whats that? says he.
Money, says I.
Good.thinking, says he.
lcould use about sso, says
I. Plus $2.98 for a new dress
for my wife, Maude. If*n you dont
think Im being greedy.
Well, says he, you folks
draw up an appealing pilot project,
conduct the proper feasibility sur surveys,
veys, surveys, submit the necessary forms
and well see you get some. If
we decide you need it.
Thats when the action got
hot. Since then, we fired our exe executive
cutive executive director three times, hired
him back twice, filed 13 law suits,
moved to impeach the mayor and
one faction now aims to recall the
city council. I never knew war
could be so exciting.
To tell the truth, I aint posi positive
tive positive whether were winging or los losing.
ing. losing. But were sure putting up one
whale of a battle.
Course, like most womenfolk,
Maudes none too happy about me
being away most of the time, fight fighting
ing fighting in caucuses, meetings and ral rallies.
lies. rallies. She says I ought to be to
home (cq), hoeing the yams out
back.
Maude, I keep telling her,
you got to tighten your belt. Aft After
er After all, theres a war on.*
But shes coming arouna. Just
the other day, after hearing about
one of our foot-stomping, fist fistwaving,
waving, fistwaving, ten-hour meetings, she
said I sure was right about that.

I would have nothing against in independence
dependence independence coming from Britain
Instead of the revolt by Smith
but the revolt was the only way
to maintain the law and order that
is present now.
Why? Because Britain is bound
by a Commonwealth Conference
agreement that would not allow it
to give Rhodesia its independence
until Black Majority Rule" takes
effect. lan Smiths white gov,
ernment revolted to prevent this
from happening.
Why do I support lan Smiths
position?
He is trying to prevent another
Congo, Ghana, Nigeria, Zanzibar,
etc., etc. He will, if left alone,
continue Rhodesias climb to one
of the most prosperous and civil civilized
ized civilized countries in Africa.
That will mean for the blacks not
only a continuation of the rise
from the primitive existence Cecil
Rhodes found them in, in 1890,
but a rise to the highest standard
of living of all the blacks in Af Africa.
rica. Africa.
Smith recognizes the fact that
centuries lie between the civiliza civilizations
tions civilizations and ways of life of the blacks
and whites in Africa. He also
recognizes the fact that the blacks
of Africa have no concept of de democracy.
mocracy. democracy.
They do not believe in the white
mans form of government or do
they accept our systems of ach achieving
ieving achieving this government. To turn the
country over to them would be to
allow it to degenerate from its
present state of a highly indust industrialized
rialized industrialized and agricultural nation.
What about the massacres of
.. black against black in Zanzibar
and the Congo after these count countries
ries countries gained independence with
black majority governments? Ni Nigeria
geria Nigeria was supposed to be the model
of African democracyit is now
in a state of turmoil and poli political
tical political unrest. I would bet that the
passengers on the plane that land landed
ed landed in Nigeria just to refuel would
support lan Smith if they could.
They were all escorted off the
plane and machinegunned to death.
What about the new African nations
such as Ghana that are now Com Communist
munist Communist and avowed enemies of
world democracy. You cannot hand
over the government to people who
less than two generations ago were
still having tribal wars (the same
as they did 100,000 years back).
All of*those happenings in
Africa seem fairly remote to you
I am sure. But, they weigh heavy
on lan Smiths mindthose events
were within just hundreds of miles
of his country.
The whites have only been in
* Rhodesia since 1890 and the blacks
already have a standard of liv living
ing living not to be excelled by any
in Africa. When the whites arrived,
there were only 400,000 blacks.
Why no more than 4,000,000 in
just 76 years? Because advances
of the white mans civilization rid
them of diseases, epidemics and
famine. The whites taught them how
to use more than just a stick to
till the soil.
Smith is doing more for the
blacks than was done before the
break away from Britain. Smith
is not going to make slaves of
them. He knows he stands about
a snowballs chance in hell of
surviving with his army of only
4,000 men if he pushed the blacks
to the point of civil war.
Greak Britain is trying to bring
lan Smith to his knees by economic
sanctions. It has not had the hoped
for effect yet. Britain is losing
face. So, first they get permission
from the U.N. (as if the U.N.
really has the right to give it)
to blockade the country and then
permission to prevent other coun countries
tries countries from trading with Rhodesia.
You must believe that Smith
is truly doing what he is for the
good of both black and white in
Rhodesia.
'(More on Rnoaesia included in
my next column.)



Kudos From Peanuts
y
CHARLES M.SCHULZ
eorrn lani
IIAITOPOL, CAUrODNIA
Deoemoer 12, 1966
' 1
Newt Slmnona
Thy Florida, Alligator
Uniyaraity of Florida
Galnaavllla, Florida
Dear Mr. Sinmons,
A reader reoehtly mailed me a copy of
your Interview with the Great Pumpkin
on Halloween. It la one of the most
olever stories anyone has ever done on
the strip, and I am flattered that you
think highly enough of "Peanuts" to do
an artlole about one of the^charaoters.
(Linus thought It was great that you were
alnoare enough to get a visit from the
Great Pumpkin.)
* s


Tigert A Parking Lot?
EDITOR:
Well, dearly beloved, back again.
Although we feel the greatest reluctance in saying we told
you so, we did, indeed, attempt to open the eyes of all to the
diabolic implications of Memo #2lB.
Alas, you have chosen to ignore our cry.
Furthermore, as of 11 a.m. Monday morning, there wasnt
even a crummy Volkswagen parked in the vast corridors of
Tigert Hall.
Cmom, we thought this was an action paper!
JOSEPH NEUSTEIN, 3AS
JOHN ANDREW BURGESS, 2UC

u| Work...
PI %#
| | \j|
gBBWPWWB JW
'' ; : VWiK?'''' s:

Doubts Boyntons Knowledge

EDITOR:
I must state my surprise at
finding the Alligator changing from
letters written by Col. Boaz to
the column by Wayne Boynton for
the presentation of righteous half halftruths.
truths. halftruths. At least Col. Boaz does
not set himself up as a reincar reincarnation
nation reincarnation of a Civil War officer.
Two outstanding statements
were made by Mr. Boynton, the
first regarding the bombing of
Hanoi.
The statement that we were us using
ing using anti-personnel bombs in Hanoi
was made by one of two women
touring Nort Vietnam, neither of
the two women are reporters for
the NEW YORK TIMES, as Mr.
Boynton implied.
The second statement amounted
to Mr. Boynton assuming that he,
from a distance of 1000 miles,
was a more capable judge and jury
than the one selected by the state
J>
Rawlings Social
Slated Tonight
Rawlings and Murphree Halls
will hold a social Friday, from 8
to 12 p.m. The featured band
will be the Epics. All students
dfe invited to the dance, which
will be held in the Rawlings Re Recreation
creation Recreation Room.
'dance
TO
BANDS
WEDNESDAY & FRIDAY
GATORLAND

Friday, January 13, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

of New Jersey. The woman who
made the claim that Dr. Coppo Coppolino
lino Coppolino had strangled her husband,
also claimed that Dr. Coppolino
had held her in an hypnotic
trance since that time.
It certainly is nice to have in infallible
fallible infallible people, like Mr. Boynton,

On Camp* Max Shulman I
ws. (By the author of Rally Round the Flag, Boys!,
u Dobie Gillis, etc.)
ITS A NORTH WIND THAT BLOWS NO GOOD
Crushed between the twin millstones of January
weather and final exams, you are saved from total des despair,
pair, despair, poor devils, only by the knowledge that winter vaca vacation
tion vacation will soon be here.
Where will you go this year? Will it be Florida again,
or are you tired of jails? Then how about Puerto Rico?
A most excellent notion, say L A balmy and bounteous
island with long white beaches and blue, blue skies and
green, healing seas. And, most pleasant of all, the warm
and gracious people of Puerto Rico! You dont even have
to know Spanish to communicate with this friendly folk.
Just learn three simple phrases and youll get along
splendidly: Buenos dias which'means Good morning,
Gracias which means Thank you, and Que sera
sera, which means Your llama is on my foot.
In order to help you enjoy the fabled land of Puerto
Rico it would be well for me to supply a bit of historical
background. (It would also be well for me to say a few
words about Personna Super Stainless Steel Blades be because
cause because the makers of Personna Super Stainless Steel
Blades pay me to write this column and they are inclined
to sulk if I omit to mention their product. Os course, they
dont stay gloomy long, for they are kindly, cheery men
fond of Morris dancing, spelling bees, and temperance
punchfine, upright types, as true and gleaming and
durable as the blades they make. And if youve tried
Personnas, you know how true and gleaming and durable
that is! And if you havent tried Personnas, poor devil,
youve cheated both your pdrse and face, for Personnas
last and last, shave after luxury shave, close, clean, nick nickless,
less, nickless, hackless, tugless, gougeless, scratchless, matchless.
Personna Super Stainless Steel Blades come in Double
Edge or Injector style and are made only by the makers
of Personna Super Stainless Steel Blades.)
But I digress. Back to the history of Puerto Rico. The
island was discovered by that popular discoverer Chris Christopher
topher Christopher Columbus. Incidentally, considering Columbus
popularity, its odd we know so little about him. What do
we really know? Only this:
He was born in Genoa on August 25, 1451, the son of
Ralph T. Columbus, a knee-cymbal vendor, and Eleanor
(Swifty) Columbus, a low hurdler. He was an only child
except for his five brothers and eight sisters. From early
childhood he was an avid reader and spent all his waking
hours immersed in a book. Unfortunately, there was only
one book in Genoa at the time Care of the Horse by
Aristotle and after 18 years of reading Care of the
Horse, Columbus grew restless. When rumor reached
him there was another book in Madrid, off he ran as fast
as his little fat legs would carry him.
Disappointment, alas, awaited him there. The only book
in Madrid was Cuidar un Caballo, which proved to be noth nothing
ing nothing more than a Spanish translation of Care of the Horse.
Then one day Columbus heard from a traveller that
there were millions of books in India, and he was in instantly
stantly instantly ablaze to set sail. Off he ran on his little fat legs
to the court of Ferdinand and Isabella (Columbus, though
more than six feet tall, was plagued with little fat legs
all his life) and, as we all know, he persuaded the Span Spanish
ish Spanish rulers to outfit him with three stout ships, the Flopsy,
the Mopsy, and the Cottontail, and the rest is history!
Well sir, now you know all about the origins of Puerto
Rico. So get packed and get going! Youll love it! Stroll the
beaches, swim the coves, breathe the fragrance of hibiscus
and bougainvillea. And remember always that the friendly
Puerto Ricans are delighted to show you their
teach you their language. Why, Ill wager youll soon khow
far more Spanish than the three basic Youll know
Hastala vista which means Seeyou later .Porf&vor
which means Please, andEl tren se paro en las esta estacion
cion estacion which means Your llama has eaten my passport.
* * 1966, Max Shulman
Gracias from the makers of Personna for giving our
blades such a cordial reception and, por favor how
about trying another of our luxury shaving products
Burma Shave, regular or menthol?

to do all of our thinking for us.
However, I would like to know
how Mr. Boynton did on the Na National
tional National Current Events test, or did
he make up his own answers as
he went along?
JOHN SULLIVAN

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
1965 VESPA 150 Motorscooter./
Extras, 4,600 miles. Excellent
cqndition. Originally $470.
$250 or best offer. Call 378- e
2193 evenings. (A-69-st-c)
FOR SALE: 300 cc. Honda Super
Hawk, 1966 model with Pirelli Uni Universal
versal Universal tires, custome pipes $550.
Call 378-3277 after 5 p.m. (A-70-
3t-c)
1963 Allstate motorscooter. $l5O.
Call 372-1355 after 7 p.m. (A-70-
st-p)
HALICRAFTERS Shortwave rad radio,
io, radio, model S-120, 1 1/2 years old,
plus 8-ohm earphones. Excellent
condition. Both for $70.00 Call
378-6335 (A-72-st-pj
1966 Bridgestone, 175 cc Motor Motorcycle,
cycle, Motorcycle, 1000 miles. Excellent condi condition.
tion. condition. Must sell $470. Still under
warranty, Call 372-9420. (A-72-
st-nc)
1957 30* Airstream, air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, wall to wall carpet. Ex-*
cellent condition. Phone 378-4318
evenings. (A-72-st-p)
1967 Honda 50, Won in contest,
has 25 miles on it. Make offer,
call 376-0667. (A-72-3t-c)
NORMAN three speed bicycle,
$35.00 Brand new condition. Call
376-7692 after 5:30 p.m. (A-72-
st-c)
TWO bedroom, 10 x 55 Marlette
*6l model. For sale at sacrifice.
Extras include TV with out side,
antenna, automatic dishwasher,
10 x 30 fold down aluminum patio
cover, wall to wall carpeting
throughout, central heating and
A-C. Phone 376-9820 after 6 p.m.
(A-72- st-p)
1966 Honda, CA-100, 50cc., excel excellent
lent excellent condition, $195.00 Ca11;378-
6552 after 5 p.m. (A-72-3t-c)
1964 Vespa Scooter, like new. 931
West University Ave. Crosbys
Gulf Service. (A-72-2t-c)
BMW, R-27, excellent condi condition,
tion, condition, $550. Can be seen at Cyc Cyclerama.
lerama. Cyclerama. Ask for Art. (A-72-
3t-c)
TRIUMPH BONNEVILLE, 650
cc., $550 or best offer. Call Fred
378-4596.
AIR CONDITIONER, 15000 BTU,
4 years left on warranty. Used
only 4 months. Call 376-0207.
(A-72-2t-c)
1964 LAMBRETTA SCOOTER,
125 Li, good condition, call Carl
at 378-6696. (A-72-3t-p)
FOR SALE: Hotpoint electric
range, like new, used less than
one year. Call 376-3356 after 6
p.m. (A-72-st-c)
MOTORCYCLE: *66 Jawa 35 o cc.
Includes Luggage rack* Avery solid
bike. 6,800 miles. $500.00. 372-
9992 (A-72-3t-c)
FOR SALE 35 mm Tower cam camera,
era, camera, lightmeter and flash attach attachment
ment attachment plus leather cases for them.
Contact Ed Rodriquez. Phone 378-
4444. (A-72-3t-p)
2 SMALL refrigerators. Work
perfectly. CHEAP! Call: 378-6502
(A-72-2t-c)
" 111 V
1959 HOUSE Trailer K> x 45, good
condition. 378-3051 after 6 p.m.
(A-72-st-c)
1966 VESPA 150 Motorscooter.
Like new, 5 weeks old, only 500
miles. $325.00 Call: Ron in room
632 at 372-9280 (A-72-2t-c)

for sale
i
TR3, 1961, red, radio, heater, white
. walls. $625. Honda Super,9o, 1965,
like new. s2sd 1405 SW 10th Ter Terrace,
race, Terrace, Apartment % 18. (A-70-3t-p)
ALL from Saks Fifthsize 39
Tux jacket s2O;
Brown suit ss
Sweater ss
Green plaid sport coat $10;
Call 378-5518.
(A-73-3t-p)
.22 CALIBER Llama automatic
pistol, $25. Call 378-3591 after
6 p.m. (A-73-2t-c)
DUCATI Motorcycle, 125 cc., ex excellent
cellent excellent condition. Under 2000
miles, $290 or best offer. Call
372-7164 ask for Judy. (A-73- 3t-p)
SPEED equipment for Chevy 327.
Aluminum intake manifold, slicks,
cams, many other parts. 378-4981
after 6 p.m. (A-73-2t-c)
FOR SALE: 1963 VESPA Scooter.
125 cc.. excellent condition, must
sell $l5O. Call Jerry after 6 p.m.
* 378-6551 (A-73-st-p)
FOR SALE: Female German She Shepard
pard Shepard puppy, five weeks old. Call
376-0365 (A-73-3t-p)
TV antenna: Like new, twin-driv twin-driven
en twin-driven Sky blazer Channel Master an antenne
tenne antenne (List $19.95) and 10 mast.
sls or best offer. Call 372-7805.
(A-73-lt-p)
WANTED:
Good portable or electric type typewriter.
writer. typewriter. Phone: 378-4505 after
4 p.m. (A-73-2t-c)

ENDS SAT i cr ize i
W CANNES FILM f Hlllilml
SUITE
PLUS 'INTERVIEW 1 1 -3-5-7-9jjjUiUM
next week
SySS 3 FLICKS
i M I 'WRONG ARM OF I
1 THE LAW I
| WED THURS 1
I'ARMOROUS GENERALI
, FRI SAT____
rDRSTRANGtiSvn
ON SALE NOW THRU TUES
ALL 3 FOR $2.50
GO AHEAD Wli/fIWH
TCI I TLIC IP* I N.W. 13th St at23rdoad|
| CLL IML Kp v y, | Telephone 378-2434 |
fIND -I but please
DONT TELL THE
BEGINNING!
_ B SHIRLEY
m MacLflINE
MICHAEL
IL CAINE
4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 13, 1967

Page 8

for rent
TWO bedroom furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, downstairs, three yeafsold.
Could accomodate 3 or 4 people
comfortably. Air conditioned pri private
vate private entrance and patio. Call 376-
3179 or 372-0565. (B-72-3t-c)
FIFTH FLOOR La Fontana apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Adjacent to University Post
Office. Can accomodate up to 4
occupants. $l4O per month, Call
376-7534 or 372-3576. (B-68-lOt (B-68-lOt_c)
_c) (B-68-lOt_c)
BUTLER Gardens Apartment for
rent. Lease until April, two bed bedroom.
room. bedroom. $155 per month. Call 378-
6213. (B-70-3t-p)
WISH one male roommate to share
expenses in French Quarter two
bedroom apartment. 378-5146 or
372-0910. (B-70-3t-c)
NEAR --Walk to all important Uni University
versity University requirements. Two room
furnished, ground floor, private
entrance, quiet area, good for
grades. Reasonable rates. 376-
6494. (B-68-st-c)
TWO bedroom furnished apart apartment.
ment. apartment. 220 S.E. 7th Street S9O per
month. Call 372-0481. (B-68-3t-
Q)
WHY live in a traffic jam? Walk
to classes and be relieved of your
parking problems. Fully furnished,
spacious, one bedroom apartment,
air conditioned gas heat, fully
equipped kitchen including washing
machine. Call 372-3357. (B-68-
lOt-c)

for rent
. I I l
COLLEGE Terrace Dormettes.
For discerning women. Adjacent
to University of Florida. Air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, controlled heat, swim swimming
ming swimming pool, off street parking,
carpeted, efficiencies. Call 378-
2221 1225 S.W. First Avenue. (B (B---
--- (B--- st-c)
ONE LARGE unfurnished apt. bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, kitchen equipped, seperate
entrance, one block from campus
109 N.W. 21st Street. CALL 376-
6112. (B-70- 3t-c)
-- II
ROOM in private home for mature
male student. Central heat linens
and maid service. Seperate en entrance,
trance, entrance, off street parking. Call
376-5360. (B-68-10t-c)
EFFICIENCY Apartment (No. 2)
Private bath, entrance. Utilities
furnished except-gas. 320 N.W.
3rd St. $55 per month. Call 372-
0481. (B-68-3t-c)
FOR THE SERIOUS
MINDED STUDENT
The Best Apartment Value
in Gainesville
SHUTTLEBUS- HANDBALL
POOL STOCKED LAKE
Economical Rates
University Gardens Apartments
376-6720
708 S. W. 16th Avenue
GATOR CLASSIFIED ADS
GET FAST RESULTS
CALL UNIV. EXT. 2832
FLORIDA STATE THEATRES
Ocee''oof'occ--oooc "cor ouooou
TttEATr^lfs:3o 7:30
o HQQQnHSQBDQBBIH >
8 30 9*30
Sex' l ""
IS HERE TO
SLAY!
A |
tu. jMggm
lARRIVEDERCiri
TONY GWIIS
DOWNTOWN i
|JB, ,ii*H mat!
2pm :
VE -
I ROOGERS HAMMERSTKJNS j? PM i
* ROBERT WISE V
\***&\
U.M I
tin. I Ilf

for rent
APARTMENT for rent, one bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment built in kitchen,
air condition and heat. Three
closets and swimming pool. $95
per month. Call 372-3826. (B (B---7
--7 (B---7 3-lOt-c)
HOUSE for rent, three bedroom,
two bath, central heat, built in
kitchen, carport and storage area.
$125 per month. Call 372-3826.
(B-73-iOS c)
I SALESMAN I
I WANTED I
i Display Advertising §
I Salesman Needed 1
I To Service I
I *5 I
I The Florida Alligator 1
I Call Univ. Ext. 2832 I
MiJgliiwjrMf snow I
EVIAY I
|n,W. 13*fc ST. 371-MH^NjTl^
e-.-rii punui "I* !PH|
5 ALL-TIME... I
L-COLOR GREAT M
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RROR CLASSICS I]
MASTERS n
IF TERROR! U
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P*IHfCOIM PmAYISIQK



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

wanted
FEMALE roommate wanted. Two
bedroom, modern, unfurnished air
conditioned apartment. SSO per
month plus utilities. Call 372-
2429 after 5 p.m. (C-68-st-c)
ar a "" ",li f
WANTED: One or two male room roommates
mates roommates to share apt. Approximate Approximately
ly Approximately SSO per month. Contact Joe,
French Quarter. Phone: 376-8317.
(C-72-4t-p)
FEMALE Roommate wanted. Pri Private
vate Private room, a/c, washer, Hryer.
Call: 372-8840 after 5 p.m. (C (C---72-3t-c)
--72-3t-c) (C---72-3t-c)
MALE roommate wanted: Butler
Apts. SW 16th Ave. $38.75 per
month plus tuilities. Air con conditioning
ditioning conditioning and Carpeting. Call Tom,
372-7649. (C-72-2t-p)
MALE roommate wanted to share
modern one bedroom apartment.
$47.50 per month plus utilities,
Call 378-3946 after 5 p.m. (C (C---tfo-3t-p)
--tfo-3t-p) (C---tfo-3t-p)
30X OFFICE OPEN 6:301
I
I
Tony Curtiss I
ViniaLisi
AT 7:07 & 11:29 J
PLUS^^^H
Excitement I
at Newman
9:23 ic lbmcr s

"**"*** mm
wanted
1 <
NEED two male roommates for
French Quarter Apt. Call 378-S9&
after 7:30 p.m. (C-70-3t-c)
STUDIOUS m ale room mate want wanted
ed wanted to share apartment with two
others. Two bedroom, two blocks
from campus. $31.00 plus utilities.
372-6294. (C-72-3t-p)
Ski Lodge atmosphere, one block
from campus. WE NEED A FOUR FOURTH.
TH. FOURTH. Any interested coed please
call 378-3189. (C-72-3t-c)
""
FEMALE roommate wanted. Two
bedroom house, three blocks from
campus, modern, furnished, air
conditioned, television, $45 per
month. No Utilities. Call 376-
6145 and leave message. (C-70-
lOt-c)
FEMALE roommate wanted to
share one bedroom apartment at
Summit House. Call between 5-7
p.m. at 372-5019. (C-70-3t-c)
WOULD like to buy tape recorder
with 1 7/8 speed. Call 372-5269.
(C-70-3t-c)
FEMALE roommate wanted to
share 1/4 rent and utilities,
French Quarter, Apartment 20.
Call 372-0317. (C-72-3t-c)
FEMALE roommate wanted to
share two bedroom apartment at
Landmark Apt. $43.75, will pro provide,
vide, provide, ride to campus if necessary.
Call 378-6367. (C-72-2t-c)
ONE GIRL to share Village Park
apartment with three others. S4O
per month plus 1/4 utilities. Call
378-4222 after five p.m. (C-70-
3t-c)
WANTED: One male roommate to
share two bedroom French Quar Quarter
ter Quarter Apt. with two law students and
Psychology major. Law or Grad
student preferred. Call Bill or Kirk
378-5409. (C-70-3t-p)
MALE roommate needed S3O per
month. Old spacious apartment,
seperate bedroom. Call 372-1162
from 6:30 thru 9:00 p.m. or see
411 A N.W. 15th St. (C-70- 3t-p)
WANTED, female roommate for
large one bedroom apartment, 1524
NW 4th Avenue, Apt.). Call Ger Gerri
ri Gerri 378-3835, Trimester lease.
(C-73-lt-p)
MALE roommate wanted to share
two bedroom apartment, two blocks
from campus, air conditioned. $25
per month. Call 378-1243. (C-73-
lt-c)
NEEDED one or two girls to share
two bedroom apartment one block
from campus. Call 378-5601. (C (C---73-2t-c)
--73-2t-c) (C---73-2t-c) ~
PRIVACY own room in four bed bedroom
room bedroom house for male. Central heat
and air, cabelvision, SSO per
month. Call 378-4051. (C-73-3t (C-73-3tc)
c) (C-73-3tc)
help wanted
FEMALE Students wife, young,
neat, attractive, ex experienced
perienced experienced in retail
selling. Apply Person Personnel
nel Personnel Manager, Wilson
Department Stores,,
Inc. 22 E. University
Ave.
MALE Student for part parttime
time parttime work in Mens
clothing Dept. Must
be trained in fitt fitting
ing fitting mens suits,
sportscoats and
slacks. Neat, attract attract-4
-4 attract-4 ive, and energetic.
. Apply Wilsons Dept.
Stores, Inc. 22 E.
University Ave.
(E-68-st-c)

Friday, January 13, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

- i
help wanted
WANTED: Accounting major with
at least 6 hours of accounting.
For Assistant Business Manager,
Student Publications. Apply Room
9, Florida Union, between 1 a.m.
and 5 p.m. (E-72-tf-nc)
CHALLENGING INTERESTING
JOB
in field of copy preparation and
layout for offset printing. Must be
good typist, speller, and have
good sense of proportion. Veri Verityper
typer Verityper experience desireable, 5 day
week, salary dependant upon ex experience.
perience. experience. Ewing Photo Print 305
N.E. First Street, 378-2436. (E (E---72-lOt-c)
--72-lOt-c) (E---72-lOt-c)
HELP WANTED
Couple for security work and desk
:leVk job in exchange for apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Exclusive Apartment Build Building.
ing. Building. Call 378-2221. (E-68-st-c)
autos
1964 Olds Vista Cruiser, 8 cylind cylinder,
er, cylinder, power brake, steering and rear
window: three seat, automatic
shift, air conditioned 30,000 miles,
just overhauled, tires excellent,
uses regular gas. Call 378-5402.
(G-70- 3t-c)
1964 VW, one owner, extra clean,
R&H, white side walls, seat belts,
see at 705-A N.E. 10th Place or
call 376-5594. (G-70-st-c)
FOR Sale: 1965ImpalaSuperSport.
Air conditioning, very good shape.
Call 378-1710. (G-70-3t-p)
1966 TRIUMPH Spitfire, red, wire
wheels, tonneau cover, heater and
windshield washer, 10,500 miles.
SIBSO. Call 378-5660 after 7 p.m.
(G-70- 3t-p)
1964 Sprite Mark 111, radio and
heater, tonneau cover, luggage
rack, excellent condition. $1095.00
Phone 378-5948. (G-70-3t-cl
MG TD 53 Classic Condition.
Must sell S9OO or best offer. 1113
SW First Ave. after 4 p.m. (G (G---7
--7 (G---7 2- 3t-c)
1962 Tempest, R&H, four door,
automatic shifts, four cylinders,
low mileage, very clean, a good
buy. Call 372-6900 or 376-0564.
(G-72-st-p)
1963 Chevrolet IMPALA con convertible.
vertible. convertible. Air conditioned, heater.
Power window, brakes and steer steering;
ing; steering; radio. Excellent condition,
one owner. $1,275.00 Call 378-
4613. (G-72-2t-p)
1964 TRIUMPH Spitfire conver convertible,
tible, convertible, R&H, fully carpeted, low
mileage. Must sell this week. sllsO.
Call 378-4280 after 5:30 p.m.
(G-68-st-p)
1960 AUSTIN HEALEY SPRITE
11, 091 miles -- original tires,
spare never used, new battery,
never had any repairs, A-l condi condition,
tion, condition, one owner, $750.00 South Southside
side Southside Gulf Station, 2216 S.W. 13th
372-9302. (G-73-st-c)
1961 AUSTIN 850, very clean,
engine overhauled, new brakes.
S2BO. Call 372-7805. (G-73-lt-p)
1957 FORD, $l5O. Call 378-1568
or 376-3261, ext. 2360 ask for
Mason Hughes. (G-73-3t-c)
1963 CHEVY, Bellalre, 6 cylinder,
automatic transmission, extra
clean, power sterling and brakes,
$950. 1966 Mustang, 6 cylinder,
Cruiseamatic, like new. $1,950
376-1073. (G-73-st-c)

Page 9

personal
NEW ADDRESS? Get handy address
labels, inform your corres correspondents.
pondents. correspondents. Never write return ad address
dress address again. 1000 $1 postpaid.
Send name, address, zipcode.
Labels, 1700-E2 SW 16th Court,
Gainesville, Florida. (^-72-2t-P)
START the new year right with
adorable kittens. Call 376-7502
after 5 p.m. (J-68-3t-c)
lost-found
LOST: Key chain with Volvo and
VW keys, Jan 5 on Campus Please
call 378-2756. (L-70-3t-p)
LOST: Black Parker 45 pen in
campus bookstore. REWARD
must find-part of set. Call Jerry
378-5018. (L-73-2t-p)
LOST
1965 High School Class Ring, ini initials
tials initials SHD Please contact 378-
5480 after 5:30 p.m. (L-73-lt-p)
services
IN a hurry? Passports, applica applications,
tions, applications, childrens photos, commer commercials
cials commercials and special problems. West Westley
ley Westley Roosevelt Studios, 372-0300,
909 NW 6th Street. (M-68-ts-e)
ALTERATIONS of all kinds on
mens and womens clothing. Mrs.
Dora Manookian, 35 years of ex experience,
perience, experience, 24 hour service on
R.O.T.C. Uniforms. Phone 376-
1794, or see at 1824 N.W. First
Avenue. (M-70-l Qt-c)
RUBYS Alterations; 1238 SW 3rd
Avenue. 376-8506 (M-72-lt-c)
GET acquainted Special with Joe or
Shirley from Louisville, Kentucky.
Free haircut with price of shampoo
and set. Rames Hairstylist, 319
University Avenue. Free parking in
L. W. lot. t:all: 372-5549. (M (M---72-st-c)
--72-st-c) (M---72-st-c)
DRESSMAKING and Sewing: suits
skirts, dresses, etc. Call 376-
0748. (M-70-10t-c)
TREAT rugs right, theyll be
a delight if cleaned with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
sl. Lowry Furniture Co. (M-73-lt (M-73-ltc)
c) (M-73-ltc)

FRIDAY
SPECIAL
FISH
DINNER
7 9{
M4* fned
Md ttmerim Hospitak/ Dish...
3 Locations: 214 NW 13th St. 376-6472
114 NW 34th St. 372-3649
207 NE 16th Ave. 378-2959

services j
ACADEMIC Despair? Call Florida
Tutoring Agency for tutors in all
subjects. 6-8 P.M. Sunday thra
Thursday. 378-5518. (M-73-2t-p*
ALL KINDS OF ALTERATIONS,
MENS, WOMENS
Zippers, pockets, hems, sleeves,
tapering, and dressmaking. Call
372-2986. (M-73-llt-c)
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Fla. Union
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i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 13, 1967

Page 10

Orange and

Address All Campus Calendar
Notices To Public Functions
Office, Florida Union

LOW
INTEREST RATES
ON LOANS.

ADDRESS ALL ADMISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

Friday, January 13
Hillel Foundation: Torah Dedication Service. To
be held jointly with members M Bnai Isreal
Congregation. Hillel Foundation, 8 p.m.
Fla. Players: Tryouts for "A Touch of the Poet,
357 Tigert, 4:30 & 7:00 p.m.
Physics Colloquium: Dr. Kenneth L. Vander Sluis,
Holography, Bless Aud., 4 p.m.
Psi Chi: Banquet and Installation of officers, guest
speaker, Dr. Harper, Univ. Inn 7:15 p.m.
Union Fine Arts: Print Sale, Union Social Room,
1-6 p.m. J>
Baptist Student Center: Annual Winter Retreat, Olino
State Park, Fri. Eve Sun. Noon, sign up at BSU
Catholic Student Center: Dance, Catholic student
center, 8 p.m.
Chess Club, 215 Union, 7 p.m.
Movie : The King and I, MSB Aud., 7 & 9:25
p.m.
Saturday, January 14
Basketball: Fla. vs. Kentucky, Fla. Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Panhellenic Rush: 324 Union 9-11 a.m.
Movie: Seance on a Wet Afternoon, MSB Aud.,
7 & 9:05 p.m.
Sunday, January 15
UF Dames: January Tea, sponsored by the Agri Agri~~
~~ Agri~~ cultural Science Dames, Univ. Womens Club.
3:00 p.m.

PRE-MED AND PRE-DENT STUDENTS: Register
with the Pre-Professional Counseling Office, 111 And Anderson,
erson, Anderson, Jan. 16-27. Please bring with you the correct
name and spelling of all your instructors. This
registration is important. The medical and dental
schools rely on this information when selecting their
applicants.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAM: Jan. 20 is the dead deadline
line deadline for applying for the Spanish and all functional
examinations to be given Feb. 4. Application should
be made in the Department of Foreign Languages,
3 Anderson Hall.
ETS GRADUATE RECORD EXAM: The ETSGRE will
be given Saturday, Jan. 21, 8:45 a.m. in Walker Aud Auditorium.
itorium. Auditorium.
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING COURSE: An intro introductory
ductory introductory session for the Computing Centers non-

Students roust be registered with the Placement
Service to interview Sign-up sheets are posted two
weeks in advance of the interview date at Building
H. All companies will be recruiting for April and
August grads unless otherwise indicated. indicates
hiring juniors for summer employment.
JAN. 13: ARMY MEDICAL SPECIALIST CORPS
Biology, Phys. Ed, Physical Therapy, Dietetics,

Serving U of F Employees Since 1935
PROGRAM OF THRIFT, CREDIT, LOANS
#
Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union
Building J Extension 2973

BLUE BULLETIN

* Campus Calendar

Administrative Notices

Placement Notices

Newman Club: Meeting, Catholic Student Center,
after 11 a.m. Mass.
Lutheran Student Association: Social, Lutheran Stu Student
dent Student Center, 6:30 p.m.
First Lutheran Church: Student supper, 50?, 6 p.m.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship: Focus 67, Bob
Letsinger, Whos Got the Answer? Union John Johnson
son Johnson Lounge, 7:30 p.m.
Panhellenic Rush, 1-4 p.m.
Accent: Display, Union Social Room, 9 a.m.
11 p.m.
Union Board: Duplicate Bridge, 215 Union, 1:30 p.m.
Monday, January .16
Basketball: Fla. vs. Tennessee, Fla. Gym., 7:30p.m.
Forestry Club: Lecture, Mr. Ernest P. Davis,Union
Johnson Lounge 7:30 p.m.
National Security Seminar, Univ. Aud., 8 a.m.
4 p.m.
Union Fine Arts: Photography Class, 121 Union,
7:15 p.m. /
Film Classics: Romeo and Juliet, MSB Aud.,
7 & 9:15 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club: Movie, High Speed Sailing,
324 Union, 7:30 p.m. Everyone welcome.
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE: Tickets now on
sale for PORGY AND BESS and the FLORIDA
CINEMA SOCIETY

credit course in computer programmed language
(FORTRAN) will be held Jan. 18, 7:30 p.m. in Mc-
Carty Auditorium. Interested persons are invited to
attend.
GENERAL NOTICES
STUDENT JOBS: Student lab assistants wanted to
assist in research. Contact Dr. S. S. Block, 405
Reed Laboratory, Ext. 2512.
INDEPENDENT LEAGUE INTRAMURALS: Jan. 17
is the deadline for signing up teams for intramural
basketball. Competition will begin on Monday, Jan. 23.
Anyone who is not participating in fraternity or dorm dormitory
itory dormitory leagues and has not earned a varsity letter
in basketball is eligible to participate in the In Independent
dependent Independent League. Sign up in Florida Gym, Room
229, or call Ext. 2912.

Occupational Therapy. DOW CHEMICAL CO. Ag Agriculture.
riculture. Agriculture.
JAN. 16: TARRANT COUNTY JUNIOR COLLEGE
DlSTlCTfaculty personnel in all areas, both aca academic
demic academic and technical.
JAN. 17: MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITYBach,
in bus. interested in MBA program. GILLIAM,
GILLIAM & WILTSHIREAcctg.
JAN. 17-18: COOPERATIVE COLLEGE REGISTRY
Lib. Arts interested in teaching.

AUTO LOANS
OUR
SPECIALITY



Bulldogs Prove No Match For Gators

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SETS TWO RECORDS Bruce Page (front) breaks two Florida Records in the 1,000 and 500 meter races.

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BLASTING OFF (above) -- Speedy Blanchard
Tual takes off on the first lap of the 200
meter backstroke, while (below) Andy Mc-
Pherson shows good form in the 200 meter
style. Both Gators won.
*

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Story By
Harold Kennedy
Photos By
Nick Arroyo
Pit a Gator and a Bulldog against one another in
the water and you have some idea of what happened
Thursday afternoon, when the UF swimming team
chewed up Georgia, 62-41, at the Florida pool.
Bruce Page, Tom Dioguardi, and other Florida
swimmers set five new meet records and two pool
records, and trounced Georgia in 10 of the 12 events.
Page was unbelievable," Coach Eddie Reese ex exclaimed.
claimed. exclaimed. The UF sophomore from Chicago swam the
1000-yard in 10 minutes and 59.2 seconds, to
knock 24 seconds,, off his own record, early in the
meet. Then in the 500 yard individual freestyle, he
really came unglued," as Reese put it, and whipped
out a time of 5:12.9, beating the old UF varsity record
of 5:26.8.
Team Captain Tom Dioguardi, swimming the 50-
yard freestyle, knocked three seconds off his old
record with a new low of 21.5 seconds.
Dioguardi admitted that his nearest opponent, Char Charley
ley Charley Holwell, had worried him at first. But, after
about halfway through, the tall Dioguardi said,
I knew I had him.
Barry Russo, who knocked 3.8 seconds off the old
record ior the 200-yard butterfly, could have been
swimming for joy.
He had just been told that he had awarded the 16th
best time in the nation for the 200 meter butterfly.
Russo said of Thursdays 200 fly, It was tight,
referring apparently to some difficulty with timing.
What ever the trouble was, he obviously overcame
it.
Andy McPherson, who racked up a new record of
1:52.3 for the 200 yard freestyle, was singled out
by team captain Didfeuardi. Andy was great in both
the 200-yard freestyle," he said, and the 400-yard
relay.
The only event in which Georgia truly
ed the Gators was diving.
Bulldog Billy Ray Schmidt, who dove like he had
gills, compiled a total of 277.65 points, while Flor Floridas
idas Floridas Dave Bentley claimed second place with 191.89
points. /
How about the meet here a week from Saturday
against Florida State? That ought, Reese said
with a gleam of anticipation in his eye, to be a
good game.
v Aa-

Friday, January 13, 1967, The Florida Alligator,

JM
ALL AMERICAN -- Team Captain
Tom Dioguardi watches Gator di divers.
vers. divers.
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GOING, GOING, GONE -- Barry
Russo begins his record breaking
200 meter butterfly run.


Page 11



SPORTS

Page 12

More Home Games
For Gtitor Basketball

With a 10-1 record in a sport
in which the home court advantage
is rather pronounced you might
think Florida's basketball team has
seen a great deal of its student
body thus far.
Gator Track
Records Fall
Two Gator records fell during
the Senior Bowl track meet on
December 22, as Dieter Gebhard
won the indoor 880 in 1:53.4 and
Frank Lagotic captured the two
mile run in 8.57.4.
Both Lagotic and Gebhard es established
tablished established new Senior bowl records.
Florida's Frank Saier broke the
senior bowl record in the high jump
at 6'9.5 while frosh Ron Jourdan
was close on his heels, jumping
6*6 for a second place tie.
Frosh Barry Handberg sprinted
the 50 yard dash in 5.3 seconds
to finish close behind George And Anderson,
erson, Anderson, the 1965 AAU champion.
Intramural Sports
Begin Next Week
The fraternity and dormitory
leagues are set for action to begin
next week as the winter trimester
sports competition begins.
Bowling will be the frats' init initial
ial initial sport with the draw being held
today in room 229 of the Florida
Gym* Tau Epsilon Phi currently
leads Sigma Alpha Epsilon in the
Orange League, while Phi Gamma
Delta holds down the top Blue Lea League
gue League position with Tau Kappa Ep Epsilon
silon Epsilon second.
The last day for registering
a dormitory volleyball team will be
Tuesday, January 17, at 5:00 p.m.
The competition will begin Monday.
January 23.
Hume, Graham, and Tolbert may
check out their jerseys at the Gra Graham
ham Graham Area check-out counter. Mur Murphree
phree Murphree may get theirs at the check checkout
out checkout counter of the Florida Gym.

jTfi J I
1 Madeleines jp
Hairstylist j|
IN THE RAM ADA NN ARCADE j|f
Expert Hairstyling Coloring Setting
ALL WORK DONE BY TRAINED OPERATORS w
ALVA HARTFORD LOIS HOLTZ
MAUDE TANNER CHERYLON QUINCEY
MADALEINE LANCASTER, OWNER & OPERATOR
CALL 378-6811 FOR APPOINTMENT g
OPEN 7 AM TO 9 PM DAILY fe

' The Florida Alligator, Friday, January 13, 1967

Nothing could be further from the
truth. Tommy Bartletts club has
played in front of the friendly
student body at Florida only one
time, December 7 against FSU.
The Gators have played two
other home games, both coming
over the holidays when virtually
the entire student body was gone
from campus.
Still, the Gators have run up
10 wins plus an exhibition victory
over Yugoslavia's World Champ Championship
ionship Championship amateur team. The lone
loss came to Vanderbilt in Nash Nashville,
ville, Nashville, Tenn.
You'll never know what a plea pleasure
sure pleasure it will be to play in front
of our spirited student body, says
Bartlett. Tlie road is a lonely
place in athletics and we have al almost
most almost forgotten what its like to
play in front of our folks.
Monday night Bartlett faces his
ex-boss for the first time when
Coach Ray Mears and Tennessee
invade Florida Gym.
The well-balanced Gators, with
four players scoring in double fi figures
gures figures and another only a fraction
away, have relied on rebounding
strength and the offensive and de defensive
fensive defensive leadership of captain Skip
Higley heavily in the last few
games.
This has proven to be a good
combination with Gary Keller, Neal
Walk, Gary McElroy, David Mil Miller
ler Miller and Jeff Ramsey doing good
work on the boards and Higley
proving to be one of the best
guards in the SEC.
Interested Freshmen
Wanted For Tennis
Any freshmen with competitive
tennis experience are invited to
try out for the Baby Gator tennis
team. Those interested should see
Coach Chafin today through Friday
at the Perry Field tennis courts
from 3 to 5 p.m.

Gators To Face Kentucky
A'Must Win For Florida

By JIM BAILEY
Alligator Sports Assistant
The Florida Gators, riding atop
a wave of success, come face-to face-toface
face face-toface with the Kentucky Wildcats in
Florida Gym this Saturday.
The Wildcats, number iwo in the
nation last year, are off to their
worst start in four decades, but
have lost some tough contests to
extremely good competition.
Kentucky was edged by Vander Vanderbilt
bilt Vanderbilt last Thursday night, 91-89. The
Commodores were able to pull out
with the close win despite a late
onrush by the Wildcats.
Louis Dampier, Kentuckys All-
American guard, literally shot
himself into the SEC scoring lead leadership,
ership, leadership, as he hit for 30 points
in the game.
Kentucky, who has won the NCAA
four times, has a team built of 10
returning lettermen. Along with
Dampier, the Wildcats have Pat
Riley, 1966 All-American, Most
Valuable Player in the SEC and
the teams leading scorer and re rebound.
bound. rebound.
Thad Jaracz, SEC Sophomore of
UF Soccer Team
To Begin Practice
The UF Soccer Club will begin
practice lor the second half of the
season at 10 AM this Saturday on
Fleming Field.
Members from 18 different coun countries
tries countries make up a team that is 5-2-3
for the first half of the year.
Anyone interested in playing is
asked to report on Fleming field,
north of Florida Field, with plenty
of desire and some experience
this Saturday.

4 Before you
plan your
honeymoon
check in with
~rl.
MODERN
bride
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BRIDE
The big Spring issue of MODERN
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AVAILABLE THROU6H COLLEGE BOOKSTORES

the Year in *66 and third team
All-American, is the regular Ken Kentucky
tucky Kentucky center. Jaracz started all
29 Wildcat games last year and
was the number three scorer and
rebounder on the squad.
Florida topped the Wildcats in
Lexington on Dec. 17.
Kentucky has had a strange sea season
son season this year, record-wise. The
Cats have lost five of eight games
that they have played on their own
floor, but have won the only two
that they have played away from
home.
The Gators were defeated by
Vandy, 77-69, as was Kentucky,
91-89. The Commodores are the
only team that both the Gators and
the Wildcats have played so far
this season.
The Gators were rated dark
horse candidates for the SEC
championship this year and have
gained the top berth because of
the consistent play turned by a pair
of forwards, Gary Keller and jun junior
ior junior Dave Miller.
Junior guard Gary McElroy has
turned in some spectacular play
in leading the Gators to several

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victories. Guard Skip Ifigley, a
senior, has provided the court
leadership that has made the Ga Gators
tors Gators jell.
An overflow crowd of over 8,000
is expected to be packed into the
Florida Gym. Game time is
7:30 p.m.
I BNAI I
B IRTH
HILLEL FOUNDATION
Torah Dedication
Service
To Be Held Jointly With The
Bnal Israel Congregation
at the
HILLEL FOUNDATION
16 NW 18 St.
A|]_Members_Are_jnvited