Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Carleto Getting 75 Per Cent Os Card Profit

By GENE NAIL
Editorial Assistant
Dollars For Scholars unauthor unauthorized
ized unauthorized sale of Gator Discount
Cards on campus has been skirt skirting
ing skirting a two-year controversy on the
sale and distribution of items on
campus.
The Gator Cards are the brain brainchild
child brainchild of UF graduate Jim Carleto,
Far from being a settled mat matter,
ter, matter, the present policy of selling

The Florida Alligator

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CHEERLEADER MIRRORS UF REACTION
. . burst bubble of best season ever
No 'Shazam In Bowl
By DICK DENNIS
Alligator Sports Editor
Orange Bowl Committee President John Ring doesnt expect Steve Spurrier to say
shazam and turn into Captain Marvel, but he does expect a top-notch performance
from Floridas super star.
In a telephone interview with the Alligator Sunday, Ring told how he went to the
Gator dressing room moments after time ran out on the teams bid to record the
winningest season in UF grid history.
It was quiet, and I knew the boys minds were still out there on the football field
and they were feeling dejected. I told them the Orange Bowl would be proud to have
them, and had no regrets about asking them.
Ring noted the public loves to make heroes of sports performers, such as Babe
Ruth, Mickey Mantle and Steve Spurrier.
We think the public, both at the game and on television, will watch one of the
finest New Years Day games when Georgia Tech plays Florida. Anybody the public
has read and heard a lot about, theyll love to see in action. Steve Spurrier, as
1966 Heisman Trophy winner, fits the bill, and were delighted to have him.
Many people say the bowl should have waited longer to pick, since Miami has
beaten three bowl teams (USC, Rose; Florida, Orange; and Georgia, Cotton), but
is going to the Liberty Bowl, which has less prestige than the other three.
(SEE SHAZAM PAGE 5)
**** I 11,1,81,88I B I I I ,I,B *** ,B AHAKKAA^KKAAAAAKAmKtKtt^mmm^mwm M wmmmmmam WAAKK^^lW^Akmmm

Vol. 59, No. 61

on campus apparently is enfor enforced
ced enforced as follows:
When it is a matter of sell selling'or
ing'or selling'or distributing literature for
the propagation of ideas or opin opinions,
ions, opinions, its okay. This falls under
the jurisdiction of Dean of Stu Student
dent Student Affairs Lester Hale.
Commercial ventures are ta taboo.
boo. taboo. Approval must come from
Business Office head William El Elmore.
more. Elmore. And these approvals are
rarer than the dodo bird.
Gator Cards have been selling
under the banner of Dollars For

University of Florida

Scholars for a 25 per cent shar sharing
ing sharing of profits with distributor Car Carleto.
leto. Carleto.
The discount cards were sold
on campus at distribution stands
for the first three days they were
available.
After several complaints, Dol Dollars
lars Dollars For Scholars Chairman Tim
Johnson put a quick end to the on oncampus
campus oncampus selling after he checked
on the required permission to sell
the cards.
I knew there was no express
approval, but I thought there was

Reitz Appeals
For Distinguished
University System

By FRANK SHEPHERD
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President J. Wayne Reitz
Saturday appealed to state legis legislators
lators legislators to make the state univer university
sity university system a truly disting distinguished
uished distinguished system.
Reitz, addressing the fifth annual
Legislative Day on campus said,
I know of no other attainment
which would add more to the image
and prestige of the state than to
have a distinguished university
system.
I would be less than candid
however if I did not report that
even though this is a good uni university,
versity, university, it is not a truly distin distinguished
guished distinguished one, Reitz continued.
It takes time to build a dis distinguished
tinguished distinguished univesity. Those who
believe that an educational insti institution
tution institution can be established and a achieve
chieve achieve instant distinction are as assuming
suming assuming something that has not hap happened
pened happened in the history of higher ed education.
ucation. education.
Reitz was echoing a plea of Board
of Regents Chairman Chester H.
Ferguson, who appealed to legis legislators
lators legislators for adequate funds to oper operate
ate operate the university system for the
next biennium. The legislature will
consider the proposed budget of
the state universities when it meets
early next year.
Ferguson told the legislators
We are gaining national pres prestige.
tige. prestige. All we need is a sharp
thrust to propel the state into the
ranks of truly distinguished uni universities.
versities. universities.
He went on to list several areas
of emphasis which he said the new
legislature ought to consider, in including
cluding including sufficient operating funds
;to allow Florida to meet the in intense
tense intense national competition for
faculty and professional adminis administrators
trators administrators and provide for the in increasing
creasing increasing emphasis on higher costs
at upper level and graduate work.
Reitz warned against needless
costly duplication of costly pro professional
fessional professional schools and programs at
the graduate level. But he em emphasized
phasized emphasized that every university
should have a first-rate program
at the undergraduate level.
The Regents have approved a
second state scnool of medicine

tacit approval to sell the cards
on campus, Johnson said.
When Johnson inquired about the
need of express approval, he put
a stop to the stand sale of cards.
Johnson said his action was
only intended to stop the sale at
the stands.
Sorority girls continued to sell
the cards on campus and in the
dorms after stand sales stopped.
We arent going to ask for
approval, Johnson said.
The card project was first ar ar(SEE
(SEE ar(SEE GATOR PAGE 5)

Monday November 28, 1966

at the University of South Florida
and an engineering program at
Florida Technological University,
which will open in Orlando in
1968.
Both Reitz and Ferguson empha emphasized
sized emphasized Florida was at the critical
point in striving for an excellent
university system.
I know of no single facet with withing
ing withing the total social, economic and
institutional fabric of Florida
which could accrue to the greater
advantage of this state than to have
one or more truly distinguished
universities," Reitz said.
Bowl Tickets
Go On Sale
Today
Director of Athletics Ray Graves
announced today UF students and
faculty will be given first oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to purchase tickets to the
Orange Bowl football game, Jan. 2,
beginning Tuesday.
Graves and other Athletic Asso Association
ciation Association officials met with members
of the Student Ticket Committee
and student leaders to set up this
priority system.
Student and faculty tickets will
be on sale this week with all other
tickets to the UF-Georgia Tech
clash going on sale next week.
Assistant Director of Athletics
Percy Beard said students may
purchase Orange Bowl tickets, li limit
mit limit of one per student, at th<§ Stu Student
dent Student Ticket Window at the stadium
on the following schedule:
8:30- Noon, Tuesday and Thurs Thursday.
day. Thursday. Three to six p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Friday.
Faculty tickets, limit of two per
faculty member, will be on sale all
week at the inside ticket window in
the stadium. Hours are 8:30-Noon,
1:30-5 p.m.
"These tickets are intended for
personal use only," said Beard.
"They will be appropriately
stamped and the user should be
(SEE 'BOWL' PAGE 5)



Page 2

. The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 28, 1 )66

Politicians Make UF Scene

LEGISLATORS HERE -- Some
of the legislators attending
this weekends Legislative
Day program are (From left):
Rep. Q.S. Quincy, Sen. L.A.

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HOLLAND TESTIMONIAL -- Fifty years,
packed into one night, were unfolded dur during
ing during the Florida Blue Key testimonial din dinner
ner dinner here Friday night honoring U.S. Sen.
Spessard L. Holland, shown above (sec (second
ond (second from right), reminiscing about the
university and marveling at its fantastic
growth. From left: Karl Chip Block of
Orlando, Florida Blue Key past president;
Barry Sinoff of Jacksonville, president
of Florida Blue Key; Federal District
Judge William A. Mcae Jr., of Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, the principal speaker; Sen. Holland
and Dr. J. Wayne Reitz, UF president.
IBM Voting Machines
To Be Used At UF
Computerized voting machines will be used at the UF in all
upcoming campus elections, Student Body President Buddy Jacobs
announced Sunday.
The new machines, developed by IBM, will increase the speed
and efficiency of campus elections.
Complete final election returns will be tabulated and announced
to the student body 45 minutes after the polls close.
In past elections final returns did not become final until 5
hours after polls had closed.
The final decision was not made until a mock election was
held Nov. 17. The election was termed a success and the final
decision was made to adopt the new system of computer voting.
UF will become the first college in the nation to use the Voto Votomatic
matic Votomatic machines. Twelve states are presently using the machines
in state and local elections.
Fifty IBM Votomatic machines will be purchased for $12,000
and will be financed over a five year period. The annual payments
will equal what is presently allocated for campus election ex expenses.
penses. expenses.
I feel with the purchase of the new voting machines UF will
save on election expenses in the long run, along with the fact the
Votomatic machines should decrease the chance of anyone frauding
a student election/* Jacobs said.
ww. l Ti. l tmarnnm m*w *rn*m*mm

Bafalis, Rep. Gordon Blay Blaylock,
lock, Blaylock, House Speaker Ralph
Turlington and Rep. Sandy D*
Alemberte. (See story page
one).

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International Fair
Underway Today
By NICK TATRO
Alligator Wire Editor
The annual Christmas Fair sponsored by International Commit Committee
tee Committee of the Florida Union begins a sale of international merchan merchandise
dise merchandise in the Social Room of the Florida Union today. The fair
will be open 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. today through Wednesday.
Wooden trinkets, bells, candles, stationery and delicate foods
will be put on sale according to Dr. Delbert Sterrett, Florida
Union activities director. They will represent many foreign coun countries
tries countries including England, Holland, Denmark and Italy.
The Fair was originally brought to the campus by the Inter International
national International Committee to give Florida students an idea of Christ Christmas
mas Christmas abroad, and to promote international good will. The com committee
mittee committee has also sponsored International Dinners such as the recent
Hungarian Dinner and the International Host Committee, both of
which seek to acclimate foreign studens to the UF campus.
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Monday, November 28, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Watkins Named
Extension Dean

By BILL CURRY
Ex Alligator Editor
More than 15,000 university
students have a new permanent
dean this week.
Dr. Marshall O. Watkins, direc director
tor director of the Florida Agricultural
Extension service for a decade,
has been appointed dean of the
universitys Division of Continu Continuing
ing Continuing Education.
Watkins, who has served as act acting
ing acting dean of the division since May,
will continue to act as director of
the Extension Service.
In announcing the appointment,
UF Pres. Dr. J. Wayne Reitz said
Dean Watkins new role will pro provide
vide provide greater coordination between
both programs.
The continuing education pro program
gram program is designed to help adult
citizens keep abreast of their
professional, cultural and civic
fields through off campus in instruction.
struction. instruction.
As dean of the Division of Con Continuing
tinuing Continuing Education, Dr. Watkins will
direct a division which last year
administered to nearly fts many
students as are presently enrolled
on campus at the university.
Enrollment figures show 1,600
students participating in off offcampus
campus offcampus credit courses, more than
7,500 enrolled in non-credit work,
and approximately 6,000 partici participating
pating participating in correspondence study
programs. The 1966 university
enrollment figure is 18,036.
The division also administers

Academic Requirements
Lowered For BSP

By MAUREEN COLLINS
E* Alligator Staff Writer
UFs Board of Student Publica Publications
tions Publications last Monday voted out a long longtime
time longtime standard for student board
members and lowered the quali qualifying
fying qualifying academic average from a
2.5 to a 2.0.
The 2.5 average, higher than that
required for student body presid president,
ent, president, has in the past prevented sev several
eral several students with publications ex experience
perience experience from running for the three
student seats on the Board.
The Boards action came after
arguments from student mumbers
Eunice Tall and Andy Moor, who
contended the 2.5 average re requirement
quirement requirement was too restrictive.
Under consideration at the meet-
Fidelity Life Insurance

TO AIL STUDENTS u |
HflrcKH AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL j|
Rf I
I 'ViJSfMo CAFimtA fitugl
1212 N. MAIN St. (4 min, from campus^G^toMjvUle^opgto|_Cg>MrJ

, Xv
..
M.O. WATKINS
...new dean
the state center for continuing
education, which is located in
Jacksonville the inter-univer inter-university
sity inter-university correspondence study depart department
ment department which offers both credit and
non-credit courses by this method.
Dean Watkins received a bache bachelor
lor bachelor of science degree in agricul agriculture
ture agriculture in 1935 and a master of
agriculture degree in 1948 from
the University of Florida.
Watkins was awarded a doctor
of public administration degree
from Harvard University in 1955.

ing were new conflict of inter interest
est interest regulations which would pre prevent
vent prevent regularly salaried student
publications staff members from
sitting on the Board.
This would prevent anyone with
experience from sitting on the
Board, Moor said, and would
deprive the Board of the bene benefit
fit benefit of this experience.
Now the competent and exper experienced
ienced experienced students will be able to
run, Moor continued, but these
conflict of interest laws would pre prevent
vent prevent the most experienced from
seeking seats on the Board.
Gustafson Said
In Fair Condition
*
Wiley Gustafson, injured Nov.
13 in a freak auto accident on
the UF Drill Field, was listed
Sunday as being in fair condition
and improving. Gustafson is a pa patient
tient patient in the J. Hillis Miller Heal Health
th Health Center with a neck injury.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 28, 1966

Italians Go To Polls

By ZANDER HOLLANDER
ROME (UPI) ltalians voted
Sunday In 311 local elections being
watched for signs of public dis dissatisfaction
satisfaction dissatisfaction with the handling of the
national flood catastrophe.
Results in balloting for 309
municipal councils and two pro provincial
vincial provincial councils also may indicate
the popularity of the recent unifi unification
cation unification of the Socialists and possible
weakening of the Communists by a
breakaway, pro-Chinese Marx Marxist-Leninist
ist-Leninist Marxist-Leninist party.
Voting will continue until 2 p.m.
Monday, 8 a.m. EST, with 1.5 mil million
lion million voters eligible. Complete re returns
turns returns were not expected before
Tuesday.
Leaders of the government
parties Premier Aldo Moros
Christian Democrats, Vice Pre Premier
mier Premier Pietro Nennis Socialists and
the small Republican party
feared a small turnout would mean
voter discontent for the govern governments
ments governments slow, sometimes fumbling
response to the flood disaster.
Communist candidates hoped to
gain in Trieste, where the issue
is the port's slow economic death.
Trieste once was Italy's main port
and shipbuilding city of the Austro-
Hungarian Empire.
Government parties have held a
bare majority on the 60-seat city
council, but the Communists hoped
to win out because of worker riots
earlier this year over the closing
of a shipyard.
A strong Socialist showing
throughout the country would mean
approval of last month's merger
of the Socialists and Social Demo Democrats
crats Democrats into a United Socialist Party
which ended a 19-year quarrel.
Socialists gains would augur well
for the new party in scheduled 1968
national elections. Party leaders
say they will challenge the Chris Christian
tian Christian Democrats for the support of
the middle class and the Commu Communists
nists Communists for the workers and farmers
at that time.
Attention also was focused on
a handful of Sicilian and South

NATIONAL NEWS
BITTER EXECUTION . DETROIT . The bullet-riddled bodies
of two men were found in the back seat of a burning car Sunday, in what
police termed a bitter execution.
Det. Charles Schlachter identified the men as James Forester, 21,
and his brother-in-law, Douglas Ward, 20, both of Detroit.
Schlachter said, We dont know if it was a gangland murder or not.
But its sure no ordinary murder. Neither had records.
Police said the victims both died instantly from bullet wounds to
the chest and head. Schlachter declined to say how many bullets were
found in each man. There were several, he said.
BUS OVERTURNED .. SAFFORD, Ala. . A Greyhound bus
overturned on rain-slick State Highway 22 a mile south of here Sunday,
throwing several passengers from the vehicle and injuring at least 24.
A state trooper said the possibility of fatalities was likely.
Troopers said the bus hit a slick spot on a long, level stretch of the
highway and rolled over one and a half times. Witnesses said most of
the passengers aboard the Birmingham-to-Mobile bus were thrown
clear of the vehicle. Extent of injuries was not immediately known.
FIGHTING DWINDLES . SAIGON . Ground fighting dwindled
off to scattered skirmishing Sunday as South Vietnamese and Ameri American
can American commanders studied a Viet Cong order for a ceasefire during the
Christmas and New Years holidays.
Communist North Viet Nam confirmed the Viet Cong order in a
broadcast heard in Tokyo Sunday, but there was no im mediate re reaction
action reaction from either the Saigon government or the U. S. military
command.
.. i
DOUBLE SUICIDE .. NEW YORK ... A young mother
friendless, destitute and suffering from cancer plunged from a
window of her fifth floor apartment before dawn Sunday with her
young son in her arms. Both were killed.
Police tentatively identified the victims as Maria Jessurun, a
Venezuelan in her late 20s, and her 6-year-old son San Diego.
The woman apparently wrapped her child in a blanket and jumped
utfih him in her arms from the windowof her Bronx apartment shortly
after 3:30 a.m. EST, police said. Their fall to a paved back yard killed
thcKteatanUy.

Flood-Handling Major Issue

Italian villages where the pro-
Peking Marxist-Leninists" were
running their first candidates.

EX-NAZI AN ISSUE

Dems Balk At Merger

BONN (UPI) A revolt by
Social Democrats opposed to any
political partnership with the
Christian Democratic Union and
Bavaria's Franz Josef Strauss
threatened Sunday to cancel a bar bargain
gain bargain that promised to end West
Germanys month-old government
crisis.
Telegrams from district organ organizations
izations organizations protesting a merger be between
tween between the two political parties
poured into Social Democratic
headquarters in Bonn, Many of the
objectors said they would try to
call a special party convention to
consider the partnership.
A 10-hour meeting of Social De Democrats
mocrats Democrats in the West German Par Parliament
liament Parliament ended just before midnight
with between 30 and 40 per cent
of the 202 deputies voting against
a partnership with the Christian
Democrats.
West Berlin Mayor Willy Bran Brandt,
dt, Brandt, who is the party's national
chairman, told newsmen he con considered
sidered considered that the majority that sup supported
ported supported him on the merger was
convincing.
Most of the protesters accused
Brandt and Deputy Chairman Her Herbert
bert Herbert Wehner of betraying Social
Democracy by striking a bargain
with a party it had fought for 17
years.
Some objected to Kurt Georg
Kiesinger, the Christian Democra Democratic
tic Democratic choice for chancellor, because
he had been a member of the
Nazi party.
But the main attack centered on
the possibility that Kiesinger would
bring Strauss, the Christian De Democratic
mocratic Democratic leader in Bavaria, into
the government.
Strauss was never a Nazi, but

If the splinter party candidates
do well, the Italian Communist
Party will be in deep trouble.

' s x /g|
-mm
Wtt' m
KEISINGER
...some object
as West Germanys defense min minister
ister minister from 1956 to 1962 he car carried
ried carried through a program of rearm rearmament
ament rearmament opposed by the Social De Democrats.
mocrats. Democrats.

Riots In Jordan;
Navy Readied

JERUSALEM (UPI) New anti antigovernment
government antigovernment riots erupted Sunday
in the town of Nablus as advance
elements of 20,000 Saudi Arabian
troops were reported to have
crossed into Jordan to support
King Hussein against threats from
Arab extremists at home and
abroad.
The Saudi troop movement was
reported by Syrias Damascus Ra Radio
dio Radio which also claimed Hussein
expected urgent military help from
the United States.
A U.S. Navy spokesman said
the Sixth Fleet in the Mediter Mediterranean
ranean Mediterranean was ready to intervene in
the potentially-explosive Middle
East crisis if orders came from
Washington.
Nablus is on the west bank of
the River Jordan formerly part
of Palestine and has been the
scene of violent demonstrations by
Palestinian Arab refugees and
other anti-Hussein elements.
The riots were broken up by
police and troops, the town of
Nablus sealed off to outsiders and
the round-the-clock curfew lifted
earlier in the day reimposed.
There was no mention of causal causalties.
ties. causalties.
The leftist Syrian regime has
spearheaded the anti- Hussein
campaign in the wake of the Is Israeli
raeli Israeli raid on Jordanian border vil villages
lages villages two weeks ago. Radios in
Damascus and Cairo have repeat repeatedly
edly repeatedly called for the overthrow of
Hussein, accused by other Arab
leaders of being too soft towards
Israel.
A Damascus broadcast said the
Saudi troops offered by fellow
Arab monarch King Faisal and
promptly accepted by Hussein
had moved into positions at Maan,
Amila and Bader in southern Jor Jordan
dan Jordan to protect the collapsing re regime
gime regime of King Hussein.
It also claimed that radio re reports
ports reports from Amman said the Jor Jordanian
danian Jordanian government expects the ur urgent
gent urgent delivery of American fighter
planes and tanks.
There was no official confir confirmation
mation confirmation in Amman or elsewhere
of the Syrian reports.

Two Quints Die
Others Listed
'Poor Condition

PITTSBURGH (UPI) Two of
the Aranson quintuplets died Sun Sunday
day Sunday exactly 12 hours apart
and doctors feared two of the other
three also would not survive.
The quints, all girls, were born
2-1/2 months premature Saturday
to Mrs. Patti Aranson, 22, a former
kindergarten teacher, and her law
student husband, Michael.
The births occurred between
2:41 a.m. EST and 2:51 a.m. at
McGee Women's Hospital.
Shortly after their birth, doctors
said the infants, who weighed from
one pound seven ounces to one
pound 12 ounces, had only a one in
10 chance of survival.
Susan, the third born, died at
2:15 a.m. of respiratoryfailure
and prematMrity." Amy Beth, se second
cond second born, died at 2:15 p.m. of
brain and lung hemorrhage.
Doctors said the prognosis on
Kimberly Ann and Marci Jill, the
fourth and fifth born, was poor.
Marci Jill was placed in a respir respirator
ator respirator to aid her troubled breathing.

The Israeli tank-and-plane raid
into Jordan Nov. 13 in retaliation
for Arab terrorist forays inside
Israel triggered the current crisis
in the Middle East. The U.N.
Security Council censured Israel
for the attacks on three border
villages which the Israelis claimed
were bases for the Arab Infiltra Infiltrators.
tors. Infiltrators.

WORLD NEWS
RETURNS TO CAIRO . CAIRO . Egyptian Vice President Ab Abdel
del Abdel Hakim Amer returned home Sunday from a five-day visit to Moscow
where he discussed military and economic aid with Kremlin leaders.
It was believed Amer asked the Soviets for additional arms to meet
commitments under Egypts joint defense pact with Syria aimed at
countering Israeli military strength.
FLIES TO PARIS . PARIS . Soviet Premier Alexei N. Kosygin
flies to Paris this week for a 10-day visit both Russia and France are
hoping will strengthen the growing commercial and scientific ties
between the two nations.
But prospects of any political alliance between France and the Soviet
Union emerging from the visit are dim, political sources said Sunday.
The French, despite President Charles de Gaulles differences with
Washington, remain firmly in the western camp.
Despite the probability that little of lasting political value will emerge
from it, the visit is being invested by the French with considerable
pomp and circumstance.
HOPE FOR SUMMIT . VIENNA ... The Kremlin Sunday served
notice on Communist leaders gathering in Budapest for the ninth
congress of the Hungarian party that it has not given up efforts for a
world Communist summit on the China problem despite previous
rebuffs.
On the eve of the congress opening Monday, the Soviet Communist
Party unleashed one of its strongest attacks thus far on Red China in
an obvious effort to rally support for a summit to drum Peking out of
the world movement.
Among other things, it accused Peking of undermining Communist
unity on Viet Nam, dealing under the table with the United States and
trying to impose on the Communist bloc a policy thatwould lead
ultimately to war.
CLIMBERS KILLED . TOKYO ... Six mountain climbers were
reported killed Sunday in attempts to scale the gale-swept slopes of
Mt. Fuji in Japan.
About 100 climbers attempted the feat during the weekend, police
said. Two died Saturday and four early Sunday. A danger warning had
been issued to alpinists. j

Roni Sue, born first, was given
a fair chance to live. Doctors were
concerned over the immediate
possibility of brain damage to
Kimberly, Marci and Roni and the
later threat of jaundice.
Dr. Lee Bass, pediatrician for
the babies, said he was disap disappointed
pointed disappointed at the death of the two."
Mrs. Aranson was reported to
have spent an uneasy night" and
was not told of the first death
until Sunday was
also informed of the second child's
death.
HOLIDAY TOLL
NEW RECORD
Motorists lured onto dry high highways
ways highways at the start of the 102-
hour Thanksgiving holiday found
them hazardous in many areas
when homeward bound Sunday and
the four-day week-end traffic toll
raced toward a new record.
Rain, snow and fog made driv driving
ing driving a nightmare in much of the
northern half of the nation. In parts
of the southwest,dust storms plag plagued
ued plagued holiday drivers in the final
hours of the holiday period, end ending
ing ending at midnight Sunday.
A United Press International
tabulation at 4 p.m. EST showed
at least 617 persons killed in
traffic since 6 p.m. local time
Wednesday.
California led the nation with
47 traffic deaths. New York had
35; Texas 33; Pennsylvania 32;
Ohio, Michigan and Illinois 26
each; Florida 25; Indiana and Ken Kentucky
tucky Kentucky 23; North Carolina and Mis Missouri
souri Missouri 22 each.



mmm \
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1

Monday, November 28, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

ranged by summer Chairman Gene
Peek with Carleto. Peek said SG
President Buddy Jacobs approved
the arrangements.
Carleto offered to give 25 per
cent of the proceeds after expen expenses
ses expenses to Dollars For Scholars.
After delivery of the cards,
Carleto gave the group an even
better percentage of the profits
25 cents on the dollar for all cards
sold by Dollars For Scholars.
Chairman Johnson, after inher inheriting
iting inheriting the project from the summer
chairman, said he was anything but
happy with the project.
It's nothing but a headache/'
Johnson said.
If the commercial venture*
policy was followed to the let letter,
ter, letter, it would outlaw the Dollars
For Scholars sale of both Gator
Cards and the notorious Spirit
Hats which gave SG so much
trouble last year.
Bowl Tickets
On Sale
(FROM PAGE 1)
prepared to show proper identifi identification
cation identification at the gate.
Price of each ticket is $6.50 and
ID cards and bfown cards will have
to be shown at the time of purchase.
All tickets for faculty and students
will come from UFs allotment of
sidelines tickets, none will be in
the end zone.
Beard said a cross section of
seats will be offered for sale each
day so those who are not able to
purchase tickets until late in the
week will have an opportunity to
get as good a location as those
purchased early in the week.

POHDEBOSA |
STEAK HOPSE
J&r CHUCK WAGON I
JgT *1 PRAIRIE SIZE *2 CORRAL 1
Jr SIZZLIN' STEAK SIZZLIN' STEAK m I
4ff+*oktd. FmiKh Frist
|J *^ r Frie (i|Q Tot~4 U\o6 1
T 9 9# ]|
II #3 SIZZLIN' *4 GOLDEN FRIED I I
I % CHOPPED SIRLOIN FISH FILLET § I
% Frist a Freh trim M I
Vsr 99* ;hl99/
I Hours 11 A.M. 9 P.M. J l
l /
I CASUAL I
WESTERN-STYLE WNING/^\
Sir
I st'rar Com As You Ar# jl|p I
I wCftlsili IN THE NEW W Hrtj X I
I Rfe ¥iW WESTGATE SHOPPING l i/SLoG I
I tLnBUP CENTER
SW 34H. & UNIVERSITY AVI. C|gJffi| 1
I *"' rJ|

GATOR CARDS

(FROM PAGE 1)

Student government spent a
whopping sum for the purchase of
Spirit Hats* to resale them and
hand profits over to Dollars For
Scholars.
But the Hats didnt sell as ex expected.
pected. expected.
Neither have the cards. But
at least there is no investment
in the Gator Cards except the use
of the organizations good name.
Not only does the question of
what is a commercial venture still
loom over campus selling; there is
even the question of who derives
the benefits.
Since most projects for Dollars
For Scholars involve some pur purchasing
chasing purchasing and reselling, there is still
the commercial venture aspect of
the supplier of the goods.
The hat company no doubt made
profits on the student government
purchase.
Carleto is making 75 per cent
of the profits on the cards
despite the fact he is selling with
the Dollars For Scholars banner.
Shazam
(FROM PAGE 1)
We have two fine teams, who
are well-matched, desirable op opponents,
ponents, opponents, Ring said. On Nov. 21,
when we picked Florida and Tech
(who lost to Georgia 23-14, for a
9-1 slate) we knew Miami and
Georgia would offer stiff
challenges.
But we couldnt wait, someone
else would have taken these two
fine teams. Miami and Georgia
may be physically strong teams,
but they dont offer the fans as
much in excitement as Tech and
Florida.*

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 28, 1966

The Florida All igator
j\ AA : ijb
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR DICK DENNIS
Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecessanly reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is the editorial in the left
column.
Evaluation
Thanksgivings over. Lets talk turkey.
The loyal taxpayers of Florida pay a
pretty penny against their wills some
recent bond elections have indicated --
for quality education in the state.
Much of this money goes to hire the
best administrators and teachers avail available
able available for state education.
Does student government think several
hundred dollars from its kitty will re revolutionize
volutionize revolutionize the quality of teaching at UF?
Were referring, of course, to the
soft-stepping doles being made to es establish
tablish establish a pseudo-professor evaluation pro program.
gram. program.
Operating as a student government
and with the expenditures allocated from
student fees, SG is planning a popularity
poll for UF professors and courses.
And it will be little more than that.
After this gross expenditure of funds
for research and publication of the re results
sults results -- available only to concerned pro professors
fessors professors -- the students will know noth nothing
ing nothing of its results, or be able to evalu evaluate
ate evaluate them.
How can the Student Government justify
the large expenditures if there is no
benefit to the students?
How can it justify keeping the infor information
mation information of the professors performance
from the students who rendered the opin opinions
ions opinions in the first place.
The only rationale for student fees be being
ing being spent on the professor evaluations is
that it serves the purposes of the students.
Or is it that student government --
wanting to keep the good offices of the
faculty more than of the students -- pre prefer
fer prefer to dodge the issue in a skimming
exercise and hope the faculty members
evaluated will take cognizance of the un unpublished
published unpublished student opinion.
Professors are public figures -- many
do not hesitate to offer personal opin opinions
ions opinions on matters outside the subject area.
They are subject to criticism.
Freedom of speech still prevails.
If student government insists instepping
into projects outside its realm, the least
it can do is account to the students
and give them credit for having the
same fine judgment SG gives itself credit
for.
Is it a government of, by and for the
students, or just ABOVE the students?
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
accepts all letters to the editor Due to
space limitations however we as hr that
letters not exceed 350 word Typewrit
ten and double-spaced letters are prefer preferred,
red, preferred, and all must be signed Names will
be withheld upon request Editors reserve
the right to select or reject letters for
publication

""J '*^*^"*"
Our Man Hoppe
By ART HOPPE .l
Alligator Columnist

The following press release has
been received in the mail.
At a time when our country
is struggling side by side with
the freedom-loving people of a
small nation beset by revolution revolutionaries
aries revolutionaries and invaders, it is well
to recall the part played by ano ano"
" ano" ther nation in our early history historya
a historya part strikingly similar to the
role we play today.
At the time of the so-called
American revolution, the King of
France, although at odds with the
English king, had the wisdom to
see that Englands struggle with
the rebel hotheads in America
was in truth Frances also.
Let them win in Concord,
the French King told fiis minis ministers,
ters, ministers, and we will one day fight
them in the boulevards of Paris.
Without his wholehearted sup support,
port, support, the authorities in the Col Colonies
onies Colonies might not have been able
to pacify,the rebellious rabble and
crush their renegade intellectual
leaders Washington, Jefferson,
Adams and other followers of the
dangerous doctrines of Locke and
Rousseau.
Had these power- mad traitors
seized control in the Colonies,
no duly-constituted government
would be safe from their ruthless
international crusade to convert
the world to anarchy and mob rule.
Under the Domino Theory,
Canada would have fallen next,
then Louisiana, Texas, Mexico and
the French West Indies.
Thus France entered the war
in 1775, landing 100,000 advi adviseurs
seurs adviseurs militaires in Nova Scotia
and Quebec. Their famous cher cherchez
chez cherchez et destroyez campaign,
starting at Lake Champlain and
culminate in the cap! re of the
demago*- ae, Washington, as he at attempted
tempted attempted to cross the Delaware riv river
er river in an open boat poled by wild
Indians, spelled the turning point
in the conflict.
And so the war came to a
speedy end. The exiles and re refugees,
fugees, refugees, including the rightful Col Colonial
onial Colonial Government, returned from
Canada to their great plantations

LBJ Wont Run In 6B

where they energetically undertook
to repair the ravages of Washing Washingtons
tons Washingtons rag-tag army of undisciplined
irregulars.
At a splendid triumphal ball,
the deeds given landless farmers
by the revolutionary government
were burned amid cheers of
God Save the King.* Soon, peace,
dignity and justice were again se secure
cure secure under a stable government,
sanctioned and protected by the
British Crown.
How we have grown and pros prospered
pered prospered in these past 190 years.
Thus it is appropriate that we
join with our neighboring coun countries
tries countries the French Automonous
Republic of Louisiana, the Crown
Colony of Canada, Spanish Mex Mexicali,
icali, Mexicali, and the Free State of Rus Russian
sian Russian Indians in saluting the
wise French King whose fateful
decision did so much to preserve
our precious heritage of colonial
allegiance and to make the world
safe for monarchy.*
SIR HOMER T. PETTIBONE,
Governor of Columbia

Florida Alligator Staff
TYLER TUCKER NEWT SIMMONS GENE NAIL
Assistant Managing Editor Editorial Assistant Editorial Assistant
NICK ARROYO CAROL HEFNER NICK TATRO
Photo Editor Society Editor Wire Editor
STAFF WRITERS Susan Froemke, Barbara Gefen,
Maury Olicker, Harvey Alper, Jean Mamlin, Kathie
r rank Shepherd, Aggie Fowles, Justine Hartman,
Jimmey Bailey.
ASSISTANT EDITORS John Briggs, Margie Green,
Jo Ann Langworthy, Joe Torchia. Bob Beck.
LAB ASSISTANTS JoAnn Gerard, Diann Devine, Jerry War Warren,
ren, Warren, Laura Brown, Peggy Sneider, Dave Reddick, Brady Farris
Joe Varon, Marie Varon, David Weiss, Greg Borden.
t 0 tter cover campus events the Alligator uses
. rorn ,s School cf Journalism anti Communications.
eir bylines are followed by Alligator Correspondent.

By GENE NAIL
Editorial Assistant
All the way with LBJ has
taken something like a downhill
run since the glorious days of
*64. Then the new president en enjoyed
joyed enjoyed a whopping approval of near nearly
ly nearly 80 per cent by political poll
calculations.
And *hat was a long time ago,
too.
Earlier this year, the same polls
indicated the President's percen percentage
tage percentage of approval had dropped to a
sagging 45 per cent.
What does this mean? A hello hellofalot
falot hellofalot when you consider the recent
GOP election gains and their early
plans in the mill to capture the
presidency in 6B.
Something the polls do indicate
and it is most terrifying in LBJs
heart, is the trends of the per percentages
centages percentages of electorate approval.
For three successive years there
has been a steady decline now
bouncing on the majority danger
level with two years to go be before
fore before re-election time.
Dont be surprised if Johnson
doesnt run for re-election in the
6B race.
Something of an egomaniac like
our French friend, Johnson highly
values the image of grandeur he
would like to have in the public
eye.
Unlike the ostrich and De Gaulle,
Johnson hasnt buried his head in
the sands of time and ignored the
gaping poll indications.
Look at the recent elections.
Knowing the Viet Nam War was
one of the thorns in his throat,
and that the operation was yet to
come, he tried to offset its in influence
fluence influence on the elections.
There was the Manila Confer Conference
ence Conference which turned out to be a
bomb.
There was the late announcement
by Defense Secretary McNamara
of decreasing draft calls because
the war needs were leveling off.
This was probably taken with a
grain of thought because too many
voters recalled the persistent
statements in 63 thru 65 that
the war was all but won, and the
troops would soon be home.
This usually came about Christ Christmas
mas Christmas time.
After his return from the Man Manila
ila Manila get-together Johnson was
careful not to show too much sup support
port support for the campaigning Demos.
An albatross about their neck was
enough, but to have it squawking
at the same time would be di disastrous.
sastrous. disastrous.
The excuse used his capri capricious
cious capricious health will most likely
(SEE LBJ PAGE 7)



Tolbert Incinerator
Dirtying Up Area
EDITOR:
I feel compelled to express my displeasure on a topic concerning
the soot and dirt floating around the Tolbert Area during the past
week. Ejection from the incinerator is the cause of this dilemma.

For some reason, the flume
connected to incinerator has
been removed" and all the would wouldbe
be wouldbe trapped soot is settling on the
surrounding scenery, and mainly,
on the cars parked in the vici vicinity.
nity. vicinity.
It is absolutely disgusting, and
downright disgraceful to wake up
in the morning to a filthy car
which was brilliantly clean the pre preceding
ceding preceding day.
Why cant something be done
about it?
One or maybe even two days of
neglect is understandable, but why
let it linger on for almost a week?
If the Tolbert Area officials
would like to organize cleanup
committees (at their own expense
of course), and proceed to re remove
move remove the accumulating dirt from
the cars, then let the incinerator
keep up the good work. Untii they
are prepared to take such mea measures,
sures, measures, something should be done
to curb rhis flood of soot.
present there is only one
Protests
Distribution
EDITOR:
I would like to protest (Boo!
Hiss!) the shoddy, inept handling
of ticket sales for the Florida
Tulane game. Tickets were to be
on sale at 1:30 p.m.; no action
was taken until 1:45. Then, in
order to accommodate a long line
of over' 100 students, one window
was opened, which meant that sales
were transacted with arthritic
speed. I think it unnecessary to
wait in line from 1:30 to 2:45
(Holy 2:30 Class!) to get a pair
of tickets. This understaffing is J
also evident at the pathetic lib-1
rary, where librarians" ignore/
students and bookworms acquire!
white hair while trying to check
out a book.
DAVID MILLER, 2UC

He Doesnt Like New Voting

EDITOR:
On Thursday, UF students had the opportunity to participate
in a mock election to try out IBMs voting machines, the Voto Votomatics.
matics. Votomatics. The student government is presently considering the pur purchase
chase purchase of these computerized machines for use in future student
elections, citing both speed and efficiency of voting and tabulating
returns as points in their favor.
The purchase of these machines would also, in the long run,
save thousands of dollars for UF students. Yet has anyone
stopped to consider the disadvantages of these machines? Those
disadvantages are threefold and all concern the problem of main maintaining
taining maintaining the integrity of the elections, by far, I feel, a more im important
portant important consideration than speed, efficiency, or money.
(1) Using a traditional voting machine, the voter has ample
opportunity to change his mind about his vote or to correct any
voting errors he might accidentally make simply-by pull ing up
the erroneously depressed lever and pulling down the correct
one. This is possible because votes are not registered until
the voter finishes voting and opens the curtains. With the Voto Votomatic
matic Votomatic machines, however, once the voter has accidentally punched
the wrong spot on his ballot, his vote is recorded and can be
changed only by receiving another ballot and starting again from
scratch.
(2) The Votomatic machines, in addition, can show only 20
names simultaneously. To see other names on the ballot it
is necessary to turn over a page in the machine, in off-campus
Legislative Council elections, for example, where a voter is asked
to vote for 10 candidates, there are often more than 20 persons
seeking office. This means that a voter would not be able to see
the names of all the candidates for a single office at one time
but instead would have to flip pages back and forth.
(3) Still using Council elections as an example, a voter may be
asked to vote for 10 of 30 candidates. In the machines now in use,
after a person had voted for ten candidates for that office, it

attribute which can accurately de describe
scribe describe this situation. That word,
to employ an over-used Florida
term, is gross."
HENRY R. UFFMANN, 3JM

Col. Boaz Misunderstands

EDITOR:
No, Colonel Boaz, you have missed the point.
The young men who disagreed with you did not
object to your quoting J. Edgar Hoover out of
context; they objected to your quoting St. Paul
out of context. They objected to your quoting
Hoover at all. You do not escape the charge of
witch hunting by quoting, in or out of context, the
man who was considered the greatest witch hun hunter
ter hunter of them all.
Hoover has been a very good and successful
police dog, but when people start asking his opin opinion
ion opinion about God and the New York Yankees I am
not surprised to hear him bark. Actually, he has
been shadow boxing Communist conspiracies for
so long he has gotten to sound a little like Dick
Tracy.
As for you, Col. Boaz, your opinions will begin
L to be taken seriously when you stop referring to
\ those who disagree with you as a vociferous
(element" and can find another argument against
them than their supposed lack of cleanliness.
Such name calling reduces you to about the level
ff an eight-year-old. It is undignified, it is not
true, and it is not the issue.
/ If it were important I should merely point out
/that the students I saw picketing the Blue Key
(banquet were all dressed very well (black coats
/ and ties) and were much better behaved than the
/ crowd which tossed vulgar comments at them and
than the young man who wrenched a sign away
from the girl who was carrying it I suppose
to demonstrate the character and physical fitness
he had had developed for him in compulsory ROTC.
Personally, if I were a Communist conspirator
I would take advantage of an American behavior
pattern most commonly seen among grade school
boys the inability to back away from a fight or
dare for fear of being thought chicken" but
which persists into late middle age as evidenced

jpangling^
EDITOR:
Whats a guy like Spurrier
doing agreeing to join Blue
Key? Isnt this reserved for
politico finks who cant prove
themselves in any other way?
There must have been some
real wangle dangling going on
in there somewhere. I would
suggest to such true campus
leaders as Spurrier that status
leading can go too far.
A SENIOR

would be impossible to depress any more levers for candidates
seeking that office unless one of the depressed levers was first
raised. With the Votomatics, however, a person could accidentally,
or by design, vote for say eleven rather than ten candidates.
In either case his ballot would be rejected by the computer during
tabulation and his votes in that race, and perhaps in others, would
be voided. Considering the ease with which a person could ac accidentally
cidentally accidentally punch too many holes, particularly if all candidates for
an office were not represented on a single page, this could
serve to disenfranchise many students.
One could argue that a person accidently voting for too many
candidates would notice his mistake and simply ask for a fresh
ballot. This need with the Votomatics to provide replacements
for spoiled ballots introduces many problems in keeping accurate
tally of voters and ballots. It would make it easier, for example,
for a dishonest election official to intentionally defraud the elec election
tion election if rigorous control were not exerted over spoiled ballots.
Understanding these deficiencies in the operations of the Voto Votomatics,
matics, Votomatics, Ido not see how Student Government could justify
spending $12,000 for their purchase. The savings in time and money
could not compensate for the loss in control over elections which
would occur.
Since the Chancellor of the Honor Court has the primary re responsibility
sponsibility responsibility for maintaining the integrity of the elections, I
respectfully ask him to reply to these three points, indicating
what steps the Honor Count would take to prevent irregularities
from occuring should these machines be purchased.
I would also ask that before appropriating money for their
purchase, the Student Government hold public hearings, announced
well in advance, so that persons on both sides of these issues
can express their views.
RICHARD MELSON, 3AS

by Spaniers observation that the Communists are
testing our ability and willingness to fight a long,
inconclusive war.* The question is not whether we
are able to but whether we are stupid enough
to stay there and bleed to death slowly and
suffer the gradual corruption of our morality un until
til until we can dismiss the napaiming of mothers and
their babies with its a complex war and they
got in the way or permit the government to
creep into our private lives with Mr. Hoovers
files and wiretaps (a bit more sinister than the
T.V.A., hey, Ayn?) . while the communists
win the friendship of the world by their martyr martyrdom
dom martyrdom at our hands. There may be a conspiracy,
Col. Boaz, but it is likely a bit more subtle than
can be dealt with effectively by your name-calling
or Johnsons stoicism with other peoples blood.
What I am saying is that the Communists may
very well want us to stay in Viet Nam, and there
is some question as to just who is the dupe.
The international thing, though, scares me, not
because it is Communist but because it is old oldfashioned
fashioned oldfashioned militarism threatening fire and the
sword. (There are those who would say, though,
that it is that American imperialists are protecting
their interests by example in Viet Nam, so ...)
The only way to stop that is with love thats
a Christian concept, and no matter what anyone
says water puts out more fires than fire does.
American economics and American technology
(many scientists are more imaginative than the
representative from the UF physics dept, who would
leave it all up to the politicians and ultimately
to the army) can convince these people they have
more to gain by working with us than by killing
us (and vice versa) ... at least until the babies
catch up to us at which point we must either all
tighten up our Malthusian belts or pray to God
the hole in the universe we are going to have to
stuff them into is not as black as our fears.
DALE COBERLY

Monday, November 28, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Alabama Deserves
National Title
EDITOR:
After reading your article in last Mondays Alligator, I could not
help but wonder how anyone as ignorant and prejudiced as you could
ever become the sports editor of any newspaper.

If there is any team in the
country that deserves a bowl bid
and the national championship, it
must be Alabama. After all, Ala Alabama
bama Alabama does have .the longest win-

ning streak of any major college,
19 games.
Also, Barna has been a par participant
ticipant participant in a bowl game in each
of the last eight years three
of the last four were Orange Bowl
bids (that coveted bid the Gators
are raving about because they got
it this year).
Ask any major college football
coach (including Ray Graves) which
team he had rather beat than any
other and I am sure that they
would unanimously choose the
Crimson Tide.
Whenever the Bear plays a
team, you can rest assured that
his opponent will have to play
20 miles above its head just to
stay on the field with Bama.
To beat Alabama is the dream
of many.
What seems like an easy sch schedule
edule schedule for the Tide is a lot tough tougher
er tougher schedule than any other team
in the top ten pis . Especially
when you rememh that every everyone
one everyone is out to get *Ba..ia.
So, I would greatly appreciate
it if you would show a little more
consideration for Americas
Finest Football Team Alabama.
After the dust of the post-season
bowls has settled, there is no
doubt that Alabama and the Bear
will have their third straight na national
tional national championship.
FOUR NORTHWEST FLORIDA
BOYS
(EDITORS NOTE: Did you hear
the score of the Notre Dame-
USC game yet?)
LBJ
(FROM PAGE 6)
be the same escape come conven convention
tion convention time in OB. He will, pull up
his shirt, op?n his mouth and show
the scars.
With many Republicans confi confident
dent confident of a defeat for LBJ in 6B,
his abstinence cau produce an even
more exciting race tor the top
office.
It looks like another fireworks
convention for the GOP since the
grassroots are still controlled
by the conservative twig of the par party.
ty. party. Yet the moderates are out
already beating the bushes for
support come talking time in 6B.
With a moderate nominee, the
GOP presidential chances are
highly precarious facing a new
image from the Demo bunch. Our
friend in Alabama has also pro promised
mised promised to steal a few presidential
votes if neither party puts up
whatever George determines to be
a conservative.
To make indications hairier,
LBJs abstention, meaning a likely
GOP victory, could put sufficient
fear in the souls of front-run front-running
ning front-running liberal Demos Bobby and
Hubert to keep them out of the
role as the sacrificial lamb.
With a year-plus and counting
since everyone will forget
here is how it looks NOW:
LBJ wont run.
Reagan will, Romney will. And
maybe others.
A conservative will get the GOP
tapping, and that war-roongering
party of Demos will pull a dark
horse moderate out of the bag
as the aforementioned lamb.

Page 7



IGfITOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
VOICE OF SIC 1 pe record recorder
er recorder 4-track takes 5 inch reels,
S7O or best offer. C all Mike Fer Ferris
ris Ferris 376-9229. fA-59-st-nc;.
AUTOMATIC 4-track stereo tape
player for car plus tapes, cheap.
Call 378-5778. (A-56-st-c).
19G6 HONDA 50 Super Sport, black,
excellent condition, excellent
means of transportation and
perfect for student use. Call
378-5647 ask for Steve. (A-58-
IQt-c)
STEROS, H.C.A., MOTOROLA,
ADMIRAL, Portables and con consoles.
soles. consoles. Good selection, easy terms,
Lay-away now for Christmas.
VOVLES APPLIANCE CENTER
419 NW Bth Ave. Phone 372-
5303. (A-58-llt-c)
5 AIL FISH (Super) fully equip equipped
ped equipped $200; boat trailer, 3501 b. cap capacity,
acity, capacity, fully equipped, $65. Call 372-
1014 (A-60- 2t-c)
VINCHESTER .243 model7o,Bau model7o,Bau>ch
>ch model7o,Bau>ch and Lomb, 8x variable; pad
ding, 2# trigger. Retail over S3OO.
ipotless, $225. Harry Beckwith,
166-3340. (A-59-lt-c).
.961 PACEMAKER mobile home,
10x55, two bedroom fully carpeted,
ilr conditioned, on a lot. Call
178-2982 after 5 p.m. (A-61-st (A-61-st).
). (A-61-st).
wanted
"EMALE ROOMMATE wanted
or next trimester. Colonial Manor
tpartment, 378-3878. (C-60-10t-c)
JEED ONE roommate to share
uxurious apartment with three
;uys S4O a month, Fredericks
Vpartments, Call Howard or Larry
it 378-6774 (C-60-st-c)
)NE BLOCK FROM MAIN LTB LTBary
ary LTBary Roommate for complete completey
y completey furnished modern apartment,
jiving room, bedroom, kitchen kitchentte,
tte, kitchentte, A-C and heating. $42.50/
nonth, 378-6074. (C-61-2t-c).
A ALE roommate wanted to share
wo bedroom furnished apartment
or next trimester. Call Bob, 376-
'569. (C-60-3t-c).
WANTED: FEMALE roommate to
hare choice poolside one bed bedoom
oom bedoom apartment at University Gar-
ens. $65 per month plus 1/2
tillties. Available Jan. Ist. Call
(argaret, 378-5431. (C-61-3t-p).
EVERT I
DOUBLE COLOR ACTION SHOW

for rent
ro SUBLET new modern, twobed twobedroom
room twobedroom apartment near campus,
.'ompletelj furnished, an condi condiioned,
ioned, condiioned, swimming pool on premise,
'rom Dec. 17, 1906. Phone 378-
024. (B-5.'-st-pl.
APARTMENT OVERLOOKING
POOI.. Two bedroom furnished,
CAC, laundromat, one block from
campus. Available Jan. 1. SUM SUMMIT
MIT SUMMIT HOUSE APTS. 376-7873. (B (B---58-Bt-c;.
--58-Bt-c;. (B---58-Bt-c;.
WHY live in a traffic jam? Walk
to classes and be relieved of
your parking problem. Fully fur furnished,
nished, furnished, spacious one bedroom
apartment, air conditioned, gas
heat, fully equipped kitchen in including
cluding including washing machine. Call 372-
3357. (B-57-10t-c).
FREDERICK APARTMENTS
1130 S. W. 16th Ave.
ONE & TWO bedroom apts.,
furnished, including range & refri refrigerator,
gerator, refrigerator, wall to wall carpet, rad radiant
iant radiant hear, air condition, extra out outside
side outside storage, coin-operated laun laundry,
dry, laundry, and heated pool. Office hours:
9-5 weekdays, 1-5 Sundays
(B-58-10t-c)
COOPERATIVE Living Organi Organization
zation Organization announces openings for next
trimester. Room and Board, S6O
per month, one block off campus.
Inquire 117 NW 15th St. or call
376-6203. (B-50-st-c).
SUBLEASE modern two bedroom
furnished Fredericks apartment,
call 378-6920. (B-56-st-c).
TWO BEDROOM apartment with
wall to wall carpet, air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, laundry facilities, pool
and Bar-B-Que area, free parking,
Call 372-1272. (B-60-3t-c)
TWO BEDROOM French Quarter
Apartment for rent. Available Dec December
ember December or January. Must know by
November 28th. Call 378-5228.
(B-53-10t-c)
ONE BEDROOM furnished modern
apartment for rent. Air condi conditioned
tioned conditioned and swimming pool priv privileges.
ileges. privileges. Call 378-5878 afterap.m.
18-60-Dt-c)
MASTERPIECE!
Wolf, CueMagcmm
/ Y
Hh J rngmm
1:45-4:15-6:45-9:15
iK***
I the QospeL
faccodlmj
to st. Matthew

Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 28, 1

for rent
RANCH HOME for rent. Two bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, unfurnished, central heat,
air condition unit. Built in Stove
and o.f;. 11 miles from Univer University,
sity, University, SIOO a month. Call 493-
2597. (B-61-2t-c).
AIR CONDITIONED Efficiency
apartment for two or three peo people,
ple, people, close to campus, swimming
pool, SBS and SIOO. University
Apartments. 376-8990. (B-61-lOt-
FURNISHED, one bedroom apart apartment
ment apartment available Dec. 1. Air Con Conditioned,
ditioned, Conditioned, spacious, with swimming
pool on premise. Perfect for two
students. Call 376-2029 after 5
p.m. (B-61 3t-p).
SUBLET two bedroom air con conditioned
ditioned conditioned heated apartment. Two
blocks from campus. Call 378-
5445 or see at 1123 NW Ist Place,
Apartment 10. (B-61-3t-c).
ROOM IN private home for mature
male student. Separate entrance,
central heat, linen & maid service.
Call: 376-5360. (B-57-ts-c).
| personal
THREE kittens free. Have had
all their shots. 1 grey and white,
1 yellow and 1 black. Will deliver.
Call 466-3353. (J-59-3t-c).

DOWNTOWN .1
| 4 l t ] 3rd I
I^* THEATRE Week I
MATINEES 2 PM I
ON WED SAT SUN |
EVENINGS AT 8 PM I
+ WINNER OF 6 I
I ACADEMY -J&L
AWARDS! jttn
:sumi prooucton
DAVID LEAN'S
"doctor I
ZHIVAGO I
iNPANAVISION ANOWETROCOIOt |
C K'NS C H I
|S^USlkls:ll / 7:14 I
L H J-L1 E ._ 9-|4
LEE MARVIN
The I
PROFESSiOMIS j|

lost-found I
IOS r denial- Shepherd, 6 mo.
cld female, black with fawn
markings, wearing chain collar.
If found, please call I)r. Sidney
Jourard Ext. 2661 or 372-2173.
reward:: u.-58-st-c)
LOST: Grey wallet, return no
questions asked, keep the money.
Call 372-9303 <;l.-00-2t-c)

I [ryill lAillll l A BRAND NEW
I FIRST RUN HIT
MwnNoDtiSl EXAS fICROSStiw
BSp Fok?thJ Tut Rt 4
.-, lii i p I
:.~SS'K&S&Sihziw^mS^BUaLy//j^j9kLr\^ :::: y,j& wCTpWw>p)WbflPO|y ~ \
IJS&, ,/>** ; 111 "mimi iiiin^
- IWWl l JiJt*.ooo^^^MM^^^MtK^SlfU^ l
'tr|| ~ k ? *IL
**# ******^2B
"TEXAS ACROSS THE RIVER" (2-E)
I PARDON ME Dean Martin lifts his hat in apology to an angry
1 Rosemary Forsyth who he has just dunked in Universal's hilarious
I Western spoof, Texas Across the River, 7*07 &11 *P/W
L
KS: 9 f
IBwMWjiwfo H- S' a ;>'. Xv '*
1 .|mPg&..f K ? j* ;s. "^v
I THE FAMILY

j lost-found
f
LOST GIRL'S STERLING SI!,.
VER BRACELET THURSDAY
NOV. 17, IN WALKER All)
GREAT SENTIMENTAL VAI n
IF FOUND CALL 376-93:V'
376-9176. (I jto- 2t-c)
GATOR ADS SELL



CLASSIFIEDS

Monday, Novemner 28, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

help wanted
LEGAL Secretary needed Immed Immediately.
iately. Immediately. Must be proficient in short shorthand
hand shorthand and typing. Send resume to
Managing Partner, Post Office,
DrawerO;, Gainesville, Fla. (E-
J)6-ft-c).
Experienced legal secretary wan wanted
ted wanted beginning Dec. 5. Must be
proficient in shorthand and typ typing.
ing. typing. 376-5242. (E-49-ts-c).
NEEDED Immediately! An aver average
age average typist who can qualify for
work study program to work in
Dept, of Psychiatry (ext. 5129,
J. Brown). Work now 15 hours
per week, arranged in any man manner
ner manner for your convenience. Exam
week off, you may elect to work
full time during Christmas and
continue part time thru April.
Go to Office of Student Finan Financial
cial Financial Aid for processing. (E-59-
3t-c).
PART TIME EVENINGS 6-9 p.m.
Permanent position, attractive
young lady with regular drivers
license required. Car necessary.
Must be neat' and faave-abjdlty to
meet people. Call Mr. Bridle for
Interview. 372-1447. (E-61-3t-c).
TIME Young lady forsur- \
vey work, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Car
necessary. Permanent position.
Call Mr. Bridle for interview,
372-1447. (E-61-3t-c).
TO SUBLEASE efficiency apart apartment
ment apartment in Lakeshore Towers for
Winter trimester. Available Dec.
20. Call 378-6890. (E-61-2t-p).
ONE BEDROOM, modern, furnish furnished,
ed, furnished, Colonial Manor Apartment for
rent. Swimming pool privileges
Included. Available Dec. or Jan.
Phone 372-6235. (E-61-lt-c).
WANTED apartment manager be beginning
ginning beginning Jan. 1. Free apartment
and utilities and some compensa compensation.
tion. compensation. Graduate Student only, cou couple
ple couple preferred. Call 376-4353 even evenings.
ings. evenings. (E-61-10t-c).
HELP WANTED Students who
type and students eligible for work
study program. For further in information
formation information report to room 183,
Bldg. E on campus. (E-46-6t (E-46-6tnc).
nc). (E-46-6tnc).
WE DID THE MAKE UP for
your Homecoming Queen and
Sweethearts. Why not let us do
yours. Free make up demonstra demonstrations,
tions, demonstrations, and skin analysis. No Ob Obligation.
ligation. Obligation. International Beauty
Counselors has organizational and
sales openings. Excellent oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity No canvasing, flexible hours
for full and part time. Call 376-
1529 for interview. (E-57- st-c)
A STUDENT SECRETARY is
needed to fill a part time job.
Job consists of typing and fil filing.
ing. filing. Typing experience requir required
ed required only. Contact by calling 372-
4or '6 or 372-4257. (£-55-Bt-c)
CAMPUS GENERAL
INTEREST MAGAZINE
X X"RELEASE"
"RELEASE" X"RELEASE"
IS ON SALE
r
EVERY DAY
ROOM 9 FLA. UNION

autos
WORLDS UGLIEST CAR"
1959 six cylinder Plymouth. Good
running condition, $75, 466-3353.
(G-59-3t-c),
1964 THUNDERBIRD convertible.
All power, and extras, air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, excellent condition. Call
376-4694 before 5 p.m. and
378-4379 after 5 p.m.(G-60-st-c)
1932 FORD, 5 window coupe, 331
cu. in. Chrysler Hemi power,.eng power,.engine
ine power,.engine is completely rebuilt, Wleand
Drag Star Manifold, super full
cam, body is channeled over
custom tubular frame. Call 378-
12' 7 4 Price S3OO firm.(G-54-10t-c)
1963 FORD, two door, V-8, ex extra
tra extra good tires and paint, real
clean only $750. Student must sell,
372-3251 after 6 p.m. (G-56-1 Ot Otc).
c). Otc).
1960 FORD, 4-door, power steer steering,
ing, steering, automatic transmission, radio
and heater. Call 378-6478. (G (G---56-st-c).
--56-st-c). (G---56-st-c).
i
1963 VW, $950, very clean, very
good condition, new tires and ser service
vice service bookley, AM-FM radio. Heat Heater,
er, Heater, headrest, seat belts. Original
Owner: 378-3886. (G-52-lOt-c).
V
SIMON TEMPLARS VOLVO 1963
P* 1800 GT model. At least a
look alike! Below book price, sl,-
865. See at 2818 NE 12th Street
Or arrange 202 Building D. (G (G---61-3t-c).
--61-3t-c). (G---61-3t-c).
t
$325 BUYS A 1960 FORD IN
PERFECT SHAPE. FOUR DOOR
MUST SACRIFICE NOW. CALL
376-9205 AND ASK FOR ROOM
814. (G-61-lt-p).
1964 CHEVY 2 Nova Super Sport.
Good condition, some equity and
assume payments. Call 376-3143:
after 5:30 p.m. (G-61-st-c).
1961 Chevrolet, $495; 1962 Chev Chevrolet
rolet Chevrolet Convertible, $1,095; 1966
Chevrolet, $2,195; 1964 Falcon,
$995. Call Dave Bowman, 376-
7581, ext. 48. (G-61-st-c).
1959 CORVETTE, Hard and soft
tops, new engine, 6,000 miles,
3/4 cam, 1-4 barrel, good tires.
Call Pepe, 372-5332 anytime. (G (G---61-3t-c).
--61-3t-c). (G---61-3t-c).
1 l i
services

IN A HURRY? PASSPORTS, AP APPLICATIONS,
PLICATIONS, APPLICATIONS, CHILDRENS PHO PHOTOS,
TOS, PHOTOS, COMMERCIALS ANDSPEC ANDSPECIAL
IAL ANDSPECIAL PROBLEMS. WESTLEY WESTLEYROOSEVELT
ROOSEVELT WESTLEYROOSEVELT STUDIOS, 372-0300,
909 NW Gth Street. (M-52-lOt-c).
SPECIAL. WITH KATHY' ..
offering a $35.00 permanent for
the amount of $17.50 Across from
Ramada Inn. Agne's Beauty Salon,
16 NW 13th Street. 376-9922 (M- 56-
st-c)
TWO SIAMESE CATS, THREE
MONTHS OLD, HOUSEBROKEN,
WITH DISTEMPER SHOTS. CALL
372-8855 BEST OFFER.
(M-60-2t-c)

: )
SALES
i A,

0
C
K
E
T
WITH
GATOR
ADS

Page 9

rz^r Musical Scene =l j
Vy WITH REID POOLE J
I Chairman. Department of Music j
Three concerts within the next six days bring to a climax the
musical offerings of the Fall Trimester. UFs combined choral
groups including the University Choir and Mens and Womens
Glee Clubs with Elwood Keister and Bertram Gable conducting,
present their annual Christmas program Tuesday in University
Auditorium at 8:15.
Fiesta Mexicana, a brilliant carnival of costume, dance,
song, and instrumental music starring Javier de Leon and Princess
Teo Xochitl with a total company of 30, will be presented Friday
at 8:15 in University Auditorium, under the auspices of Lyceum
Council.
For this attraction, the usual Lyceum Council prices prevail.
Tickets for the general public are $2; UF faculty, staff, school
students, and children, $1; UF students may obtain tickets on
their I.D. cards. Tickets are available at the Florida Union Box
Office, the Record Bar and Belk- Lindsey's.
On Sunday, Elwood Keister will conduct the University Sym Symphony
phony Symphony Orchestra, the University Choir and Choral Union in two
contrasting settings of the Gloria that of the Italian baro baroque
que baroque master, Antonio Vivaldi, and the 20th century French com composer,
poser, composer, Francis Poulenc. Soloists are Julianne Belger, soprano,
and Lenore Bierbaum, contralto.
The presentation of the two Glorias is also in UFs tradi traditional
tional traditional Christmas pattern. In recent years, Handels Messiah
has been presented every other season at Christmas time, with
other works appropriate to Christmas being given in alternate sea seasons.
sons. seasons.
For Tuesdays program, the Mens Glee Club will offer a
group of traditional selections, including the old Irish carol,
Ivy and Holly, arranged by E.J. Moeran and a setting of Now
is the Time of Christymas, with Sarah Vories playing a flute
obligato, as set by the British composer, Arnold Bax.
The University Choir will include in its group the sprightly
setting of Hbdie Christus Natus Est,' by Sweelinck, Salva Salvation
tion Salvation is Created, by Tschesnokoff and two Christmas Spirituals
as set by Dawson: Mary Had a Baby and Behold a Star.
The Womens Glee Club will offer In Natili Domini, by
Praetorius and a short Christmas cantata by Luebeck with
instrumental accompaniment by Barbara Abersold and Madeline
Spen, violins, and Marie Henderson, cellist.
For a finale, all of the groups combine in What Cheer, Good
Cheer, by Warlock; Then Shall a Star from Jacob, by Men Mendelssohn;
delssohn; Mendelssohn; Christmas Day, by Gustav Holst and O Clap Your
Hands by Ralph Vaughan Williams.
The Lyceum presentation of Fiesta Mexicans on Friday
night should prove to be one of the highlights of the musical
season. The program includes dances from the Mayans and the
Aztecs, songs and dances of Veracruz, the Tehuana wedding dance,
and Viva Jalisco. In addition to the vibrant dancing, there
will be musical selections and a feast for the eyes in the bril brilliant
liant brilliant costumes.
The production had its beginning in 1952 in Mexico City.
Since that time, it has played to continuing acclaim throughout
Mexico and in numerous cities all over the world, including
London, Milan, Amsterdam, Madrid, Berlin, Naples," Honolulu and
Tokyo.
A ft l if Jfl
. Will m
MAYAN DANCER* INVOKES MUSIC GOD
. . part of Fiesta Mexicana



Page 10

' The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 28, 1966

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

Campus Calendar

Monday, November 28
AIIE: Meeting, 324 FLU, 7:30 p.rn. All Engineering
students welcome
Block and Bridle: Meeting, 254 McC, 7:30 p.m.
Election of Officers
FLU International Christmas Fair Sale: FLU Social
Room, 1-9 p.m.
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics:
Election meeting, 334 Eng., 7:30 p.m.
U.S. Marines: Recruiting, 123 FLU and 118 FLU,
8 a.m. 5 p.m.
Mensa: Daily Luncheons from 11 -1 for faculty,
students and staff members. Reserved table in
west wing of Main Cafeteria
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship: rayer meeting,
4th floor of the Library, 5 p.m.

Administrative Notices
ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

GRADUATE RECORD EXAM: Nov. 29 is the dead deadline
line deadline date to apply for the Graduate Record Exam Examination
ination Examination to be given Saturday, December 17, 1966.
All applications must reach Princeton, New Jersey,
on or before this deadline.
LANGUAGE EXAMS: Nov. 28 is the deadline
for the Spanish and all functional examinations to
be given Saturday, Dec. 3. All applications must
be in on or before this deadline date for students
wishing to take one of the examinations.
STATE TEACHING SCHOLARSHIPS: Dec. 12, 1966
is the deadline for completing General Scholarship
Loan continuance forms. Each scholarship holder
must complete this form if he expects to continue
his scholarship beyond the current trimester. Com Completion
pletion Completion of this form assures the student that schol scholarship
arship scholarship funds will be reserved for his use in the
future. Forms are available in Norman Hall, Room
124. :
FINANCIAL AID: Applications for student finan financial
cial financial aid including scholarships and all long term
loans repayable after graduation for all or any
part of the 1967-68 academic year beginning in
September 1967 may be obtained at Room 182, Build Building
ing Building E. Deadline for returning completed applications
Is Feb. 38, 1967.

I MONTHLY DEPOSITS ARE NO LONGE^IMITE^^YOU^CREDI^UNIOI^^^I
I Building J Radio Road I
I Dividend Rate C* TT / wi n N l ncrease u
j m Serving Uof F Employees Since 1935 I
| Paid Semiannual I y Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union # Loans!!! I

BLUE BULLETIN

Tuesday, November 29
U.S. Marines: Recruiting, 123 & 118 FLU, 8 a.m.
5 p.m.
Lambda Gamma Phi: Lecture-demonstration', 2 McC,
7:30 p.m.
Christmas Concert: Combined Choral Groups, Univ.
Aud., 8:15 p.m.
FLU International Christmas Fair Sale: FLU Social
Room, 1-9 p.m.
Wrestling Club: south end of the Gym floor, 4 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi: 118 FLU, 7 p.m.
Tuesday Evening Supper Club: Presbyterian Student
Center, 6:30 p.m. Non-denominational, everyone
single and over 21 invited
Union Board: Bridge Lessons, 215 FLU, 7 p.m.
Student Finance Association: Group meeting, 212
FLU, 7 p.m.

HELP AND REVIEW SESSIONS: Help sessions in
American Institutions will be held weekdays at 2:30
p.m.; biology sessions at 7 p.m. Meeting places are:
Mondays -- Hume Hall Conference Room; Tuesdays
Rawlings Hall Conference Room; Wednesdays Tol Tolbert
bert Tolbert Hall Lounge; Thursdays Jennings Hall
Recreation Room; Fridays Mallory Hall Recreation
Room.
CAMPUS JOBS Jyping, library and
miscellaneous calling for HELP! Jun Juniors
iors Juniors or Senior in chemistry or related fields or
equivalent to assist in research wanted. Draftsmen
numerous vacancies, Building. E, Room 183.
GENERAL AND STATE NURSING SCHOLARSHIP
LOAN HOLDERS: Students receiving assistance for
the Winter Trimester 1966-67 should obtain a note
from the Scholarship Section of the Student Ser Service.
vice. Service.
SHORT TERM LOANS: Students requiring short
term loans for University of Florida registration
fees for the winter trimester should make appli application
cation application now to the Dean of Men and Dean of Women.
Students must have their registration and fee cards.

Wednesday, November 30
Veterans Club: Meeting, FLI Aud., 8 p.m.
International Committee: 118 FLU 4 p.m.
FLU International Christmas Fair Sale: FLU Social
Room, 1-9 p.m.
Childrens Concert: Christmas Choral, Univ. Aud.,
12 p.m.
AIA Film Series: Durer of the Renaissance,**
103-B AFA, 8 p.m,
Fla. Players: John Browns Body, Norman Aud.,
7:30 p.m.
Latin American Colloquium: 324 FLU, 8 p.m.
Spanish Conversation Club: Informal Gathering, FLU
Johnson Lounge, 8 p.m. All Spanish speaking stu students
dents students invited
Young Republican Club: Group meeting, 218 FLU,
7:30 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: Auditions, 1826 W. Univ.
Ave., 8:30 p.m. Every kind of talent wanted
Speleological Society: Group meeting, 212 FLU, 7 p.m.
U.S. Marines: Recruiting, 123 & 118 FLU, 8 a.m.-
5 p.m.
FLORIDA UNION BQX OFFICE: Tickets now on
sale for FIESTA MEXICANE & JOHN BROWNS
BODY.
General
\
Notices
i
\
\
FLORIDA PLAYERS: Students in CEH courses and
others who are required through their courses to see
John Browns Body are urged to obtain tickets
for the Wednesday and Thursday (Nov. 30 Dec.
1) night performances (7:30), as Friday and Satur Saturday
day Saturday performances are always filled to capacity. Tic Tickets
kets Tickets are available att the Florida Union Box office
from 12:30 4:30 p.m. daily, and are 25? with
student ID cards. \
CHRISTMAS ON CAMPUS: The University Reli Religious
gious Religious Associations annual Christmas on Campus
program featuring Dr. J. Wayne Reitz Christmas
message and the Mortar Board Tree Lighting Cere Ceremony
mony Ceremony will be held Dec. 4, 4:30 p.m. in the Univer University
sity University Auditorium.
ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA: Initiation ceremonies will
held Dec.l, 4:30 pjn., Johnson Lounge, Florida
Union. Pins and certificates will be distributed at this
time.



JM Fields
NOW
HAS
Q
Pharmacy#
YOU DESERVE THE BEST OF
SERVICE, SKILLS; MEDICATION

I and J. M. Fields gives you all three in
I their new Pharmacy Dept.
I Our Pharmacist will bring you the finest drugs
I available, at the lowest prices possible, using the
I benefit of his knowledge & trained skill, and
I you can count on J. M. Fields Pharmacist to keep
I abreast of the latest development in Pharma-
I ceuticals & dispense it accurately.
f 1409 N.W. 23rd BLVD. AT 13th ST.
maa-|BICM j* NKT W d P^Vt M
**' 1 *' SUNDAYS 12 TO 7 f

Monday, November 28, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Engineering Dean
Sawyer Dies
William Lincoln Sawyer, assistant dean in the College of
Engineering since 1964, died unexpectedly Friday afternoon of
an apparent heart attack suffered at his residence, 411 N.W.
21st Street.
Dean Sawyer, prominent in scholarship, counseling and pub publications
lications publications activities for IF, came here in 1929 after his graduation
from the University of Illinois.
As head of the department of engineering mechanics (now
engineering science and mechanics) since 1949, Dean Sawyer
developed a program leading to masters and doctor of philosophy
degrees in engineering mechanics.
Only this year he was commended by the university's Division
of Alumni Services for his part in developing a joint alunini aluninifaculty
faculty aluninifaculty committee to inform Florida high school students about
engineering through working engineers participating in the com committee
mittee committee program.
Dean Sawyer edited Engineering Facts from Gatorland** and
a series of counseling publications on junior colleges and high
schools. He also was in charge of the colleges scholarship
committee and worked with the counseling program in University
College.
He was a member of Sigma Tau, student honorary engineering
fraternity.
A World War II Navy veteran, Dean Sawyer recently retired
from active duty with the U, S. Naval Heserve holding the rank
of captain.
In addition to his wife, Janis F. Sawyer, he is survived by one
daughter, Mrs. Thomas Pyles, Jr., Baton Rouge, La., and three
grandchildren.
Gator Band To Perform
At Orange Bowl Game

The Gator Band will perform at
the Orange Bowl game,: according
to Director Richard W. Bowles.
We have always performed at
bowl games in which the Gators
played,* Bowles said. We are
looking forward to our first ap appearance
pearance appearance at the Orange Bowl.
Although we havent decided on
a particular program as yet, we
are planning a salute to Florida
theme,* he noted.
The band will meet in Miami
Liz
bites
Burton
Elizabeth Taylor bites Richard
Burton. She pulls his hair,
screams at him and spits in his
face. This is the way Shake Shakespeare
speare Shakespeare wrote The Taming of
the Shrew, and this is the way
Liz plays it in the movie the
Burtons are making in Italy.
Get an.intimate, on-the-set
peekwatch the tempers flare
and feathers fly in Russell
Brandons piece in the current
issue of The Saturday Evening
Post. Is Liz, the shrew, really
overpaid, overweight and un undertalented?
dertalented? undertalented? Study her picture
on the cover! Also read John
Pfeiffers account of his Afri African
can African visit to Drs. Louis and
Mary Leakey, who are digging
for traces of our pre-human
ancestors of 15 million years
ago. (This article is a short
course in Prehistory and Pale Paleontology.)
ontology.) Paleontology.) Follow navy flier
Lt. j.g. Dieter Dengler in his
22-day escape from a Vietnam
prison camp. Wind up with
the story of Joe Namath, the
$400,000 Alabama quarter quarterback
back quarterback of the N.Y. Jets, who at
age 23 is thinking of retire retirement.
ment. retirement. All this and more in the
December 3 issue of the Post.
Buy your copy today.
A CULTS MAGAZINC
IPTCTB
ON SALE NOW

on Thursday, Dec. 29,*' Bowles
said, and will stay at the Di-
Lido Hotel through Monday.**
According to Bowles, the Gator
Band will march in the Orange
Bowl parade Saturday, will give an
alumni concert Monday morn morning
ing morning and will march at the game
Monday night.
We also have several rehear rehearsals
sals rehearsals scheduled during our stay, so
we should be quite busy,** Bowles
added.
We were particularly pleased
with the Orange Bowl bid, as a
majority of our members are from
the South Florida area, Bowles
noted. Os the 181 members in
the band, 102 are from cities
south of Orlando and 79 are from
cities north of Orlando,** he add added.
ed. added.
FBK /wore
Diversified,
Sinoff Says
Barry Sinoff, President of
Florida Blue Key, stated Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday that Blue Key tappees now
come from a wider selection of
colleges at the university.
Sinoff said that since Blue Key
has eliminated its requirement
for three extracurricular fields of
participation and changed this to
but one area of leadership and
service,* in one area, the local
chapter has had a tremendous
response.
Weve never had as good a
response in the history of the
chapter as far as turning in
applications goes,** Sinoff said.
Although Blue Key does not ac actively
tively actively tap students for member-
ship, Sinoff said it invited students
to apply.
Sinoff said Blue Key seeks qua qualified
lified qualified persons from all colleges,
and that this year*s tapping class
was the largest in recqqt years.
Sinoff charged that the new look
in Blue Key, with lower require requirements
ments requirements and people from several
colleges, is not in response to
University Circle or Alligator
editorials. This is substantiated
by chapter minutes, Sinoff said.

Page 11



Page 12

, The .Florida Alligator. Monday, November 28, 1966

B
A
T
M
A
N

Levin Has Permit To Sell Pamphlet

By MARGARET OBRIEN
A'ligato r Correspondent
The Student Democratic Society
is the publisher of Alan Levins
pamphlet "Political Meddling and
the Florida Board of Regents,
but only Levin has been issued a
permit to sell the literature on
campus.
According to Dean of Student
Affairs Lester L. Hale, a permit
was issued to Levin, an SDS mem member
ber member and a former Freedom Par Party
ty Party member, to sell the 11-page
pamphlet for 10 cents.
"The Student Democratic So Society
ciety Society has not been approved to
sell anything, Hale stated, add adding
ing adding that the SDS is not a re recognized
cognized recognized campus organization.
Hale said the fact that the pamp pamphlet
hlet pamphlet was published by the SDS
is irrelevant because Levin is
the author and the only one au authorized
thorized authorized to sell it on campus.
Hale said permits are granted
to individuals to distribute litera literature
ture literature "in order that a person is
not denied his freedom of expres expression
sion expression rights under the First
Amendment.
Main Library
Open Late
The Main Library will be open
from 11 p.m. to 12 midnight as v
a study hall beginning Thursday
through the finals examination per period.
iod. period.
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T > PROPELLANT USED IN POWER. WE / STRAIGHT FOR
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The permit procedure is nec necessary,
essary, necessary, he explained, because the
university doesnt allow commer commercial
cial commercial sale on campus.
Hale said, "Its my job as ad administrator
ministrator administrator to determine whether
it is personal advocacy. Then I

I GET WITH M\
THEACnON^H;
ml
X ;o9Bov>>>
fS "AS
...IN THE SPORTY LOOK OFVELOU^TRIPES^^i
I Esquire Socks* I
Another fin, prtxiuet of Kaiu r Roth

grant the permit for the purpose
of letting the student express him himself.
self. himself.
Because Levin had to charge
a dime for the literature does
not mean that the venture was
commercial, Hale said.

Permits are granted to speci specified
fied specified persons for specified pieces
of literature and Hale emphasized
that the granting of a permit does
not mean that university approves
of the views expressed in them or
recognizes their accuracy.

Sounds
LIKE A
KOOKY
KAPER!
WILL IT
WORK??
81/y
TOMORROWS
PAPER
AND
CM./

Could Face
Charges
Campus police said Tuesday that
the alleged assailants of Tom Ha Havens,
vens, Havens, shot in the shoulder last
Wednesday at Graham Area, face
possible criminal charges.
If Havens father, a Trenton,
Fla. physician, so desires either
he or the university police may
charge Tom Havens alleged as assailants
sailants assailants with criminal misde misdemeanors
meanors misdemeanors punishable with SSO and
SIOO fines.
The charges under consideration
are discharging firearms in a pub public
lic public place and reckless display of
firearms.
Excluding these possible crimi criminal
nal criminal charges, campus police have
concluded their investigation in the
matter and have handed the case
over to the office of the dean of men.



WHIP GEORGIA TECH 23-14

Can Beat Any College Team--Dooley

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
ATLANTA (UPI) Georgia
coach Vince Dooley thinks his
Bulldogs are capable of beating
any other college football team
in the country.
A bit rash? Perhaps.
But the Bulldogs certainly looked
like champions Saturday when they
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The REMINGTON 200 Selectro
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Position number one is designed to
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Another part of the Remington
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After you've saved your neck, posi positions
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When you turn the dial, the cutters
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whipped. sth-ranked, previously
unbeaten Georgia Tech, 23-14.
Whipped is the word.
The 7th-ranked Bulldogs were
simply too strong for Georgia
Tech, especially in the line where
tackles George Patton and Bill
Stanfill gave all-America perfor performances.
mances. performances.
For the Cotton Bowl-bound Bull Bulldogs,
dogs, Bulldogs, probable co-champions with
3rd-ranked Alabama of the tough
Southeastern Conference, it was
their ninth victory against a sin single
gle single loss.
That loss, in mid-October, was
by a single point 7-6 to Miami

beard. Because the new REMINGTON
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There's a special position just for
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REMINGTON 2200
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SPERRY RAND CORPORATION"*
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(Fla.) which Saturday beat 9th 9thranked
ranked 9thranked Florida 21-16.
Only Alabama Perfect
Alabama, now the only major
unbeaten, untied team in the coun country,
try, country, won its ninth straight with
ease sweeping past Southern
Mississippi, which had led the na nation
tion nation in yardage defense, 34-0.
The Crimson Tide, which will
play Nebraska in the Sugar Bowl,
plays Auburn next Saturday in the
only regular season game remain remaining
ing remaining in the South.
Alabama must win that game t^

Monday, November 28, 1966, The Florida Allierator,

tie Georgia for the conference
title. Alabama and Georgia did
not meet this year.
In other Saturday action:
12th-ranked Tennessee, headed
for a Gator Bowl date with Sy Syracuse,
racuse, Syracuse, trounced Vanderbilt 28-0;
16th ranked Mississippi, which
plays Texas in the Bluebonnet
Bowl, beat Mississippi State 24-
0; Florida State, which meets Wy Wyoming
oming Wyoming in the Sun Bowl, outslugged
Maryland 45-21; and Memphis
State upset 11th-ranked Houston
14-13.
Georgia, which plays Southern
Methodist in the Cotton Bowl, could
claim two bowl championships.
The Bulldogs have beaten both
Orange Bowl entries, belting Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, which meets Georgia Tech in
the Miami classic, earlier this
month.
Sophomore speedster Kent Law Lawrence
rence Lawrence had a greater day Saturday
than the record shows.
In addition to a 71-yard return,
Lawrence had two other touch touchdowns
downs touchdowns called back. A 26- yard scor scoring
ing scoring run was discounted by a hold holding
ing holding penalty and a sensational pass
catch in the Tech end zone was
disallowed because Georgia was
charged with illegal motion.

Spurriers Big Asset:
Willingness To Work

JOHNSON CITY, Term. (UPI)
Kermit Tipton, head coach at
Science Hill High School here said
one of Steve Spurriers greatest
assets as an athlete was his will willingness
ingness willingness to work.
Tipton said Spurrier, who was
named winner of the Heisman Tro Trophy
phy Trophy Tuesday, was not a perfect
athlete.
He had defects, Tipton said,
but he worked in the off-sea off-season
son off-season to improve and thats one of
the things that have made him the
tremendous athlete he is today.
In his junior high days and
even until he was a sophomore
here in 1960, Steve was a big,
gawky boy, Tipton said. He
was slow, so slow in fact he
couldnt get to the quicky hole
when he had a fast halfback.
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Georgia Defense Shines
But the day really belonged to
the Georgia defense which made
three pass interceptions, re recovered
covered recovered a fumble and generally
harassed the Tech attack through throughout
out throughout the afternoon. Those three in interceptions
terceptions interceptions gave Georgia 25 for
the season.
Miami, which plays Virginia
Tech in the Liberty Bowl, jump jumped
ed jumped off to a 21-3 lead over favor favored
ed favored Florida but Heisman Trophy
winner Steve Spurrier almost pull pulled
ed pulled the Gators through.
Spurrier completed 26 or 49
passes for 224 yards and had the
Gators headed Upward a possible
winning touchdown when the clock
ran out.
Spurrier wound up the season
with three SEC passing Records
as he completed 179 of 291 for
2,009 yards.
His 2,074 yards in total offense
gave him 5,296 for his three threeyear
year threeyear career far more than any
previous SEC player.
Tennessee quarterback Dewey
Warren, who wound up with 1,-
716 air yards this -season, com completed
pleted completed 12 of 23 passes for 118
yards and one touchdown and ran
for two others in the easy win
over hapless Vanderbilt.

He was a fine boy to coach,
he added. We always thought
hed make a fine college football
player and possibly an all-Amer all-American,
ican, all-American, but, personally, I never
thought of the Heisman Trophy.
An assistant coach at the
school said Spurrier was the rea reason
son reason Science Hill switched to a
pro-type offense.
We kind of fell into it with
him and went on from there,
he said. Weve been known as
a passing team ever since.
Henry Jenkins, sports writer
for the Johnson City Press-Chron Press-Chronicle,
icle, Press-Chronicle, called Spurrier probably
the best high school player to
come from upper East Tennessee
since Kingsport produced Bobby
Clfers in the late 19305.
I think he deserved the award,
Jenkins said. Certainly no player
has done anything more to win
the award. He was an outstand outstanding
ing outstanding player in high school and he
is the same today,
Just the greatest thing that
ever happened was the comment
of Spurriers brother, Graham Jr.,
who works as a television cam cameraman
eraman cameraman at WJHL-TV here.
I think its one of the most
wonderful things that could hap happen,
pen, happen, said Graham, who is three
years older than Steve.
I knew he should get it. Hes
gotten lots of awards, but this
is just the greatest.
WE RENT FORMALS
GATOR SHOP

Page 13



Page 14

i. The Florida Monday, November 28, 1966

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MIAMIS MILLER COCKS
... as Steve Heidt dives

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... as Larry Smith scores

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MMM||||p RED ANDERSON RED DOGS CANE
... as Bill Miller unleashes one of 28 attempts

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MAMMOTH DEFENDER TED HENDRICKS
. . puts rush on Spurrier

Photos By
p
Gerald
Jones
And
Don
Federman

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.DEFLECTED PASS STILL CAUGHT
. . Steve Smith makes it 14-3
" TIGHT END JACK COONS
. . sets up first TD



Florida Comeback Scares Miami

By JIMMEY BAILEY
Alligator Sports Assistant
Saturday was a long, hard day--
especially for Floridas Fightin
Gators. But, it ended just a little

Millers Run Turning Point;
Game Tires Miami Coach

By DICK DENNIS
Alligator Sports Ed tor
Someone asked Miami Head coach Charlie Tate
if he enjoyed the game.
Im enjoying it now, Tate blurted out, as he
huffed and puffed and smoked his cigar in the
visitors dressing room.
But he didnt act happy. Cranky and exhausted,
he still felt the games tension.
I thought I was going to talk to the press, not
the whole school, Tate said angrily as a student
(obviously from Miami) wearing a fraternity sweat sweatshirt
shirt sweatshirt brushed past the press reporters to con congratulate
gratulate congratulate Tate.
The spectators must have really enjoyed the
game; but it was kind of hard on the coaches,
Tate said in his rapid-fire delivery while tapping
his rubber-soled shoes.
This was a day of big plays, and we just
happened to come up with one more than Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, Tate believed. Millers (Bill) option run
was the difference in the game.
Miamis junior signal caller outgained his op opposite
posite opposite number, Heisman Trophy Winner Steve Spur Spurrier,
rier, Spurrier, both through the air and in total offense.
Miller completed 15 of 28 passes for 199 yards
and one touchdown. He ran for 52 yards, includ including
ing including his 40 yard TD romp early in the third quar quarter.
ter. quarter.
Spurrier (Steve) is everything they say he is,
Tate said sincerely. But our defense played well.

I
I
I
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/? s ee o ur New Modern Store
Floridas Largest Jewelry Store
8 So. Main St.

too soon for Steve Spurrier and
the Mighty Mites.
The Gators scared us a little,
said Jimmy Dye, Miami right
safety. We knew they had made

DIAMOND RINGS

TIME SAVED CANES-

and really put the pressure on him. He and
Trapp- '"Richard) are quite a combination. Trapp
lined up a.-, a flanker part of the time, but also
came out as a split end. This really caused a
quick shuffle in our defensive alignments, since
we double-covered him as a split end.
Tate admitted that Floridas best play of the day
was tailback Larry Smiths 30-yard scoring sprint
on a draw play. The tally brought the Gators
within 5 points with 12:30 remaining in the game.
Smiths touchdown run was only the second
time someone has scored on the ground against
us this year, Tate emphasized.
Coral Gables product Jack Card, a 5-6, 158
pound linebacker, impressed Tate with his ability
to diagnose the plays.
Card played an outstanding game against us.
He was constantly stunting, and was in our back backfield
field backfield much too much to suit me. He saved one touch touchdown
down touchdown for Florida, pulling Miller down on the op option
tion option play when Miller had an open field in front
of him.
Tate repeatedly praised his defense, rated fifth
in the nation. He felt his men made the clutch
plays in the second half, such as stopping UF on
downs at the Miami 35-yard line with less than
two minutes to go.
We were fighting for our lives after Florida
closed the gap to 21-16, Tate concluded. We
fumbled, the Gators fumbled right back, then Flor Florida
ida Florida blocked our punt, and the ball was bouncing
from team to team like a yo-yo.

,\
CHATELAINE FROM $l5O

comebacks before and they were
driving on us.
We stopped them from getting
the long one. They had to have a
TD to win, so we were willing to

W A |1
ATHENA FROM $125

Monday, November 28, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

. give up the short pass and let the
clock do the rest for us.
This was the general feeling of
Miamis players about the final
Florida drive.
' 0
The game ended with the ball
resting on Miamis 30-yard line.
Yes sir, that was a great col college
lege college football game, Miami Head
Coach Charlie Tate commented.
A real thriller. The spectators
sure must have enjoyed it. And
so did the Miami players.
Florida has a real good team.
We have a good team and we
beat Florida. But they went down
fighting, said Tom Beier, Miami
left safety. That Spurrier is
everything that he is said to be.
He is one of the best quarterbacks
in the game.
John Tucek, middle guard for
the Canes, said Florida has a
real good offensive line. They
really gave Spurrier some good
pass protection. We didnt have a
good rush and that did hurt our
game some.
Spurrier is great, Tucek con continued.
tinued. continued. He really deserved the
Heisman Trophy. He can look at
your defense and call plays at the
line that hurt you. Spurrier is one
of the best.
Spurrier is unbelievable,
echoed Bob Tatarek, Miami tackle.
And that guy Smith (Larry) is a
hard runner. I cant believe that it
took so many men to bring him
down. He is going to be one of the
best backs that ever played ball
in the South.
Florida has the best blocking
back weve seen all year, was
Ted Hendricks comment about
Graham McKeel. McKeel hit me
a couple of times and knocked me

GENEVA .... FROM $125

out of the play. He knows how to
set you up for a block and exe executes
cutes executes them well.
Spurrier is good. He really is
and he truly deserved the Heisman
Trophy. If someone else had gotten
it, everyone could be sure that it
was rigged. Hes just as good as
they say he is, Hendricks added.
Trapp (Richard) is one of the
best receivers Ive ever seen,
said Hal Carew, left center back.
He has good moves and real good
speed. He gets into the open real
fast.
You know, Trapp reminds me
of a deer; the way he moves with
such ease and swiftness. Tl>atfake
he gives after he catches the ball
is really something.
Trapp relies on a lot of the
same moves Drake (Ron) of
Southern Cal uses, but Trapp is
a little faster. With a guy like
Spurrier throwing, Trapp is a little
more dangerous, continued
Carew, a Corpus Christi, Texas
product.
Yes sir, that Trapp moves just
like a deer.
Florida has a real tough de defense,
fense, defense, Doug McGee, Miami full fullback,
back, fullback, said. Those Florida guys
hit as hard as any other team that
we have played this year. They
were up for the game and played
hard. We got some good breaks
and they helped.
That guy Card (Jack) hits hard harder
er harder pound-for-pound than anyone
weve played. He is a player that
lacks size, but has more desire
than whole teams. He played a real
fine game and was in our backfield
the whole game.

Page 15



, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 28, 1966

Page 16

Spurrier Raps Officials

'Fumble Was Definitely Ours

By 6KIP PEREZ
Alligator Correspondent
Although it was a nerve-shatter nerve-shattering
ing nerve-shattering battle to the final seconds,
Gator Head Coach Ray Graves
remained calm and poised. His
Florida squad dropped their final
game of the regular season, 21-16,
to the No. 1 spoiler in the nation,
Miami.
Graves praised the strength of
the Hurricanes, but he was more
impressed with the determination
his Orange Bowl-bound Gators dis displayed
played displayed throughout the hard-fought
contest.
The heart our kids showed was

Spurriers Big Week Ends;
Loss To Miami Sours Icing

This week was a good one for Steve Spurrier as far as honors go.
On Monday, he learned he was going to play his final collegiate
game in the Orange Bowl.
Tuesday he was named winner of the Heisman Trophy.
Saturday they retired his jersey (No. 11) from future use.
But Spurrier still wasnt happy. Amidst a mob of reporters
and admiring kids, the record-breaking quarterback expressed
his displeasure with (1) the 21-16 loss to Miami and (2) the
officiating therein.
The awards dont mean that much when you lose, Spurrier
said. But things just didnt go our way.
Spurrier, not one who has been known to complain about offici officiating,
ating, officiating, had lots to say about Saturdays.
I was racked up twice while watching my receiver make the
catch, Spurrier said.
These were both obvious roughing the passer violations.
Spurrier as well as several other Florida players
questioned the call made on the recovery of a Larry Smith fumble
at midfield with seven minutes left.
Ewaldsen (senior end Paul) fell on the ball, Spurrier said.
There were a lot of Miami players waving first down the other
way.
The ref just motioned first down Miami without even looking
at the pile.

Crossword by B. A. Heimbinder
Bit of Americana ..
Across

1 Woodworker. 47 Woven.
7 As before. 49 Cultivator
12 Den. attachment.
16 Newts. 51 Had ascended.
20 Minerva. 52 Scotlands
21 Portuguese learned
Jentleman. society: Abbr.
ar. 53 Charge
23 Butchers against
concern. property.
24 Swoons. 54 Energy unit.
25 Mister 57 Ancient Greek
Dooleys townships,
creator. 59 Cob:
28 High pitched. Connecticut.
29 Chevron 60 Famous cape,
wearers: 61 Typewriter
Army slang. bar.
31 Ripen. 64 Soft drink.
32 Saliferous. 67 Firm.
33 Rodents. 69 Pitcher.
35 Placid. 71 A topical
36 Deduce. head.
38 Domesticated. 72 Negligent.
39 Os a part 74 Memo.
of the skull. 76 Duncan,
41 Cotton fiber. for one.
42 of Sharon. 78 Tart.
43 Literary 79 Detective
monitors. story writer.
45 Hurry. v ,83 Work.

1 Journeys. 16 Imitate.
2 Golden apples 17 James .
princess. 18 Leather
3 Barbara worker.
Frietchies 19 Chargers,
creator. 21 Elan.
4 Phrygian 26 Fleming, et al.
lunar god. 27 Coconut
5 Busy ones. relative.
6 Cozy places. 30 Coats anew.
7 Extend 34 Flavorous.
down. 36 formation.
8 Aims. 37 Dream: Fr.
9 Yonder. 40 The
10 Peaks. vanquished.
11 Yellow ide. 42 James .
12 Author "Tales 44 Caves.
of a Wayside 46 Relentless
Inn. avengers.
15 couverte. 48 Variable.
14 Island: Fr. 60 Philosophical
16 forms.

overwhelming and typical of what
they have shown all season,
Graves said in the silent dressing
room following the game.
We were outmuscled by a team
which was superior physically,but
we were not outfought.
Graves had no words of criticism
for the officiating. Sometimes you
get the breaks, sometimes you
dont, he said.
I have no criticism of the offi officials,
cials, officials, he replied when asked to
comment on Larry Smiths contro controversial
versial controversial fumble on a crucial fourth
. quarter drive when the score was
21-16, and still plenty of time left.

PUZZLE

84 Pacifist 116 Placids
propaganda. bottom.
86 Medieval 118 Masc. name,
daggers. 120 Pertaining to
87 A Dicyclic the grape,
hydrocarbon. 122 Verb form.
89 Romantic 123 Soul, life,
composition: 124 Sound wave
Mus. device.
90 Let it stand. 126 Spider mon mon-93
-93 mon-93 Designed to key genus.
be used once. 128 Sighs.
95 lndian. 129 InDorn.
96 Sober. 131 Possessive
98 Beverage. pronoun.
99 An 132 Set into a
Algonquian. crown.
100 Home of 134 Make lace,
the Fuzzy- 135 Little Big
Wuzzies. Horn.
102 16th Cent. 138 Perceive
date. intuitively.
103 Appraise. 140 Agalloch.
105 Sulky mood. 141 Regretful one.
106 Magazine 142 Cement
story. substances.
109 Skull. 143 Charm.
112 Additionally. 144 Jenny .
114 Pennsyl- 145 Agile,
vanias 146 Walked.
Governor. 147 Niche.

Down

55 Trim anew, 80 Medical
as a tree. degree: Abbr.
56 Lubricated. 81 Catch.
58 Musical 82 Greek letters,
composition. 85 Devotee:
59 Cheaper. suffix.
60 Whale genus. 88 Noahs perch.
62 School auxil- 91 Giant
iary: Abbr. armadillo.
63 Intensity. 92 First
64 Attachment principles,
to a Middle 94 Sinewed.
East culture. 97 Sea eagle.
65 Unscrambled. 101 Baseball
66 Amherst teams,
recluse. 104 Succors.
68 African worm. 105 Couple.
70 River. 107 Never.
73 In logic, 108 California
fallacies. city.
75 Kites. 110 Matched
77 Quitter. anew.

Heisman Trophy-winning quar quarterback
terback quarterback Steve Spurrier and split
end Paul Ewaldsen felt differently
though.
In all my four years of playing
college football Ive never criti criticized
cized criticized the officiating, the usually
reserved Spurrier said, but that
fumble by Larry Smith was de definitely
finitely definitely ours. That Miami boy
never had it.
Spurrier made it clear that he
wasnt crying and wasnt saying
it would have affected the final
score, but he was emphatic, even
calling Ewaldsen over for his com comment.
ment. comment.
I had the ball, I know I did.
I dont see how the ref called it for
Miami, Ewaldsen affirmed.
Maybe it was the screaming
and yelling by the Miami guys,
Spurrier broke in, but Herbie
(Ewaldsen) was on the bottom and
there is no doubt in my mind about
him having complete possession
of the ball.
Graves dismissed the contro controversy
versy controversy as breaks of the game but
he did concede that it was a play
that hurt his inspired Gator troops.
The Gator mentor thought the
overall consistent play of Charlie
Tates Hurricanes was the differ difference.
ence. difference.
We played extremely well in
the second half, but Miami played
a bit better overall and was so
strong, he commented.
Gator defensive coach Gene
Ellenson considered the Bill Miller
roll-out play a big weapon for Mi Miami
ami Miami and said he expected the Hur Hurricanes
ricanes Hurricanes to play more conserva conservatively
tively conservatively than they did.

P p p p p p aaaf E p [Tir~nT~M|r 111 111 mm\ |l Ini In
~ HP - H~ H
_______ a 27 ~
28 829 30.' BEI pT
33
-55 mm n Mj
46 H 47 48 H 49 50
sl aKi 55
57 tapT 63
64 65
mfr Wmr 77
78 pK? 80 81 82 pp3
84 85 HBHp6 K B 8
19 rrclap Ki
_ jaiTno
H 104 JJIOS 107 10^J
HTo? no- 111
116 m nr H 9 am 121 T22
I LI
m
135 136 jams
no 1 jaam mpz
144 IhT Bn ia^an?

11l Subside. 115 Birds.
113 Antiquate. 116 Pertaining
114 Dinner to the
menu items. non-clergy.

'jSgHkg&lL
iMk
B
3BBH
j§ip sppp^^--
GENE ELLENSON
surprised us
Graves said this was the best
hes ever seen Miller play and
praised their tough defensive end,
6-7 Ted Hendricks.
Hendricks stretched out that
6-7 frame of his many times and
forced Spurrier to either loft the
ball too much or attempt to throw
around him, Graves said.
Both Graves and Ellenson made
it clear that they were in no way
disappointed with this years Gator
squad.
Gosh, I never dreamed wed be
8-2 at the beginning of the season,
the weary Graves added.
This was an inexperienced
team that pulled out some big ones
and were proud of them.

117 Rings. 125 Lubricator.
119 Considerable 126 Caper.
size. 127 Paaaover
121 Streaked. ritual.
i

Post Season
Bowl Gaines
Appear Set
Pairings for major college foot football
ball football bowl games:
LIBERTY BOWL at Memphis,
Tenn. Saturday, Dec. 10 Miami,
Fla., 7-2-1, vs. Virginia Tech,
8-1-1.
BLUEBONNET BOWL at Hous Houston,
ton, Houston, Saturday, Dec.* 17 Missis Mississippi,
sippi, Mississippi, 8-2, vs. Texas, 6-4.
SUN BOWL, at El Paso, Tex.,
Saturday, Dec. 24 Wyoming,
9-1, vs. Florida State, 5-4.
GATOR BOWL at Jacksonville,
Fla., Saturday, Dec. 31 Syra Syracuse,
cuse, Syracuse, 8-2, vs. Tennessee, 7-3.
COTTON BOWL at Dallas, Tex.,
Saturday, Dec. 31 Georgia, 9-1,
vs. Southern Methodist, 8-2.
SUGAR BOWL at New Orleans,
La., Monday, Jan. 2 Alabama,
9-0, vs. Nebraska, 9-1.
ROSE BOWL at Pasadena, Calif.,
Monday, Jan. 2 Purdue, 8-2,
vs. Southern California, 7-3.
ORANGE BOWL at Miami, Fla.,
Monday night, Jan. 2 Georgia
Tech, 9-1, vs. Florida 8-2.
Driving in $$
NEW YORK i UPl>Drivers
Ralph Baldwin and Prank Erv Ervin
in Ervin won five of the 10 SIOO,OOO
races in North American har harness
ness harness racing in 1965.
Baldwin won two with the
trotter Dartmouth and one
with the pacer Race Time.
Ervin won the sports two rich richest
est richest races, the $151,252 Messen Messenger
ger Messenger Stakes and the $125,236
Cane Futurity, with Bret Han Hanover.
over. Hanover.

130 Strays. 136 Eat at
132 Island: Sp. evening.
133 Underground 137 Kind of dance,
workshop. 139 Hindu goddeaa.