Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
(Photo by Marquis Baes/.lei;
HEAD COACH RAY GRAVES SMILES
o after accepting bid to Orange Bowl

Vol. 59, No. 59

We will continue to run the following petition today and Wed-v
nesday. All interested students male or female are urged;*;:
to sign. This petition will speak for the UF student body before :
the next Board of Regents meeting.
Petitions may be returned to the Alligator distribution points
and placed in the cardboard boxes. Or bring petitions by the AT ATligator
ligator ATligator office in the basement. Or send them to room 9, Florida *;
Union. v. ;
We the undersigned members of the student ;
body protest the action by the Board of Regents
in overriding the Faculty Senate on the matter
of compulsory ROTC.
We also urge that the Board of Regents,
when it is considering matters affecting curri curriculum
culum curriculum and not involving new programs or new
large scale expenditures, give due weight to
the deliberation of the faculty representative
assembly (the Senate) which is most closely
familiar with curriculum matters.
Signed:



l :
v -
\ £>
l
**

The Florida
Alligator

University of Florida

*
-

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

TEPS. APPIS LEAD
Dollars For Scholars
\
Nets Record Collection

Bv JEAN MAMLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Tim Johnson, chairman of Dol Dollars
lars Dollars for Scholars, reports that
a record breaking $32,912.64 was
collected during the Dollars for
Scholars campaign which conclud concluded
ed concluded this past Saturday.
Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity led
all other campus organizations
collecting $1,271.00 Alpha Delta
Pi sorority came in second with
$1,109.08.
The goal was set for $18,039
which represents SI.OO per stu student.
dent. student. Os the $32,912.64 collected,
approximately $26,000 goes as
pure profit. Os this.total the gov government
ernment government will pay nine dollars for
every one making the total earned
approximately $260,000.00.
The biggest seller was the spirit
hat which brought in $7,100.
In organization competition the
winners were the TEPs for over overall
all overall and fraternity competition;
Miami Tickets
Still Available
Tickets for the UF-Miami game
can still be obtained at the sta stadium
dium stadium t)ox office this afternoon and
Wednesday afternoon beginning at
1.30 p. m.
Assistant Business Manager
Charles Goodyear reported, Last
week 18,000 tickets were avail available
able available to the student body, and sales
indicated good school spirit.
This week all tickets go on sale
to the student body and general
public alike. Prices for the gen general
eral general public are $6.00 and student
date tickets are $3.00.
The only information available
concerning tickets for the Orange
Bowl game is there will be 11,500
tickets available and two different
ticket prices: $6.50 for sideline
seats and $5.00 in the end zone.

Youre Fightin A Hungry Gator!

_ UPI TOP TEN
1. Michigan State 2. Notre Dame via) 8-0-1 315
3. Alabama 2) 8-0-0 270
4. Nebraska ( 3) 9-0-0 237
5. GEORGIA TECH (1) 9-0-0 210
6., UCLA ( 1) 9-1-0 171
7. Georgia ( 0) 8-1-0 104
8. Purdue ( 0) 8-2-0 98
9. FLORIDA (0) 8-1-0 79
10. Southern Cal ( 0) 7-2-0 30

ADPi in sororities; Tolbert area
with $468.00 in mens dorm com competition;
petition; competition; Broward with $261.50 in
womens dorms; and Broward with
$136.00 in campus pacs compe competition.
tition. competition.
Johnson said, I'm glad every everyone

More Courses
Under Quarter
A UF Failure

By JACK LUZZO
Alligator Correspondent
The College of Education's as assistant
sistant assistant dean for undergrad undergraduate
uate undergraduate counseling believes that the
University of Florida has failed
already to achieve one of its main
goals in switching to the quarter
system next fall.
Dr. Bert L. Sharp said the
quarter system supposedly would
enable the student to spend more
time on fewer subjects through throughout
out throughout a term.
One of the main ideas behind
the quarter system is to have
fewer courses in greater depth,
Sharp said.
This would entail a student
taking three five-hour courses
rather than five three-hour
courses as is the case with the
present trimester system.
But the U of F has not kept
this in mind. A student will still
have to take about five courses
per quarter, stated Sharp.
Sharp gave the planned revi revisions
sions revisions for HY 245 and HY 24C
sequence as an example.
Instead of having two three-hour
courses to be taken in two tri trimesters,
mesters, trimesters, this sequence will be

one everyone worked so hard, and I ap appreciate
preciate appreciate all the efforts made by
the various organizations. Groups
winning trophies can come to stu student
dent student government offices from ZT:00
to 5:00 this afternoon to pick up
their trophies.

divided into three two-hour cour courses
ses courses to be taken in three quarters.
With the courses so arranged,
Sharp feels the student will still
have to take the same number
of courses as under the trimes trimester
ter trimester system.
I really think the quarter sys system
tem system gives the student the break if
he is allowed this greater depth
with the course and its professor,
said Sharp, who taught under the
quarter system at Auburn Univer University.
sity. University.
(SEE QUARTER PAGE 10)
Inside Todays
\
Alligator
Tyler Tucker Page 2
Beta Nu Frat ..... Page 3
Singing Gators .... Page 4
Phi Beta Kapoa Page 10
Bowl Games Page 12



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 22, 1966

'
People t Yes I
By TYLER TUCKER* l^l *- >
Assistant Managing Editor /
A jet thundered above the car. The silver plane glided smooth smoothly
ly smoothly down onto the runway and, bridled by a parachute, came to
a stubborn stop.
The car pulled off Roosevelt Boulevard in Jacksonville and
headed for a pale green building. The wooden building crouched
just inside the security gate of the Naval Air Station.
A half dozen young men stepped from the auto and made their
way down a narrow path to the green structurethe U. S. Army
Recruiting Center.
"THE STREET SOUNDS TO THE SOLDIERS TREAD,
AND OUT WE TROOP TO SEE:
A SINGLE REDCOAT TURNS HIS HEAD,
HE TURNS AND LOOKS AT ME . .
Once inside, they clustered around an information booth.
"Upstairs* they were told. "Upstairs and to the left you will
find station number one.
They filed up the wooden stairs to the second floor and gath gathered
ered gathered around "Station 1. Standing nervously around the door doorway,
way, doorway, the group of ROTC cadets started sporadic small talk,
beginning with the absurdity of waking at 5 a.m.
"MY MAN, FROM SKY TO SKYS SO FAR,
WE NEVER CROSSED BEFORE;
An army sergeant came loudly down the cramped hallway.
He passed the cadets.
"Keep it quiet and back against the wall, he said. "Stand
in a straight line.
The first station started a long procession of examination
points. The different phases judged different physical and men mental
tal mental abilities of the ROTC candidates. The eighteen station posi positions
tions positions marked the tests of acceptanceacceptance into the UJS.
Army.
The half dozen young men are students. But, they are also
citizens of the United States and subject to the selective service
laws. According to these laws, these men must serve in the
military for two years and in some instances "for the duration.
"SUCH LEAGUES APART THE WORLDS ENDS ARE,
WERE LIKE TO MEET NO MORE . .
"Station 1 is a montage of paperwork, answers, and the val validation
idation validation of papers which constitute each cadet as an individual.
Then, the long process of observation begins.
The cadets are directed into a large square room and are
ordered to remove everything but fingernails. From this room
the naked cadets are funneled through an adjacent doorway.
In the next room a needle is plunged into each arm, to
blood samples.
"On this scale, a large Negro private bellows. "And keep
it quiet. Dont make me tell you again.
It was almost 7 a.m. and the frame building was still dark
and cold. The cadets stood in a straight line, trying to ignore
the morning chill. They shuffled around silently, occasionally
erupting in conversation.
"WHAT THOUGHTS AT HEART HAVE YOU AND I
WE CANNOT STOP TO TELL ...
An officer came through the door and gave additional direct directions.
ions. directions. A group of enlisted men had entered and had swelled
the group to the rooms capacity.
"You men stand back, the officer said, "And let these en enlisted
listed enlisted men through first.
Nearly fifty men headed through the doorway and proceeded
to the next station. The cadets followed.
The wooden building was cold.
For the following hour, the Army cadets stood in line. They
stood before Navy and Army doctors for inspection. The medical
specialists probed ears and eyes, listened to chests and hearts,
and checked for flat feet.
The cadets who passed the rigorous inspection were approved approvedto
to approvedto become lieutenants. They would go through more intensified
training. And they would fill the ranks of the Army as officers--
commanding forces in America, in Europe, and in Viet Nam.
In a years time, some of the men would be back in the United
States for the festive holidays. Some would still be in Europe.
Some still in Viet Nam. And some probably dead.
"BUT DEAD OR LIVING, DRUNK OR DRY,
SOLDIER, I WISH YOU WELL . .
Florida ? vs. Miami ?
Have you heard about
JERRYS PICK THE FINAL SCORE CONTEST?
SIOO.OO in CASH PRIZES
No purchase required get your entry blanks at
JERRYS RESTAURANT jj.W. 13th Street
1505 N. W. 13th Street
MO MOTION GUARANTIED, too** toctrwd b* glvM MlllWf poMtbl*.
1U nor!* AliifMor will aot oowttor adjwtMto at pojmoot tor uqr MnitlirMat tovotwiag typo typoimMeil
imMeil typoimMeil MTora or oitommi iaoorttoa Mtoaa aottoo to ttrm to too Mwrtliln Maaocor within
(1) oao toy otoor otoocttooaoat oppooro.
TW norito AUliotor wIQ oot horoapoMtotolor man too* aoo looorvoot tooorttoo at oo otoorttooaoot
otoototfoi to no oovoral tteoo. NaOeoo tor oorrooMoa omm! ho gtoto totooo ooto tooorttoo.
Ttot FLOOD* ALLIGATOR to too oMKtol otototo MMRopor ot too Mrottoty of Ftortto oto to
ptoltototo tto Mo woOy oseO tortaf (toy, Joo^oto ioty rtoMtotoPMtohoiOMWwMltor. Oito
MM mi

University Employment
Available To Students

By DOUG WILKINSON
Alligator Correspondent
For a student in need of extra
money and one who is willing to
work hard, there may be a job
for him right here on campus.
The UF presently employs over
1600 students in may different
facets ranging from typists and
office assistants to library work workers
ers workers and student assistants in the
various departments and labora laboratories.
tories. laboratories. Students seeking work are
BANQUET
HONORS
HOLLAND
A cross-section of past UF
"greats former student body
presidents, Florida Blue Key pres presidents
idents presidents and Blue Key legislators
will honor U.S. Sen. Spessard L.
Holland Friday.
The occasion is the 50th anniver anniversary
sary anniversary since Sen. Holland served as
president of the Universitys stu student
dent student body.
Still growing, the list of special
guests planning to participate in
the testimonial dinner to Floridas
senior U. S. senator includes 18
former student body presidents and
the same number of former Flor Florida
ida Florida Blue Key presidents.
Also on the list are five members
of the Legislature who are mem members
bers members of Florida Blue Key, 15 mem members
bers members of Sen. Hollands Bartow law
firm, Alachua County friends of the
senator, University faculty and ad administration.
ministration. administration.

f UNIVERSITY FOOD SERVICE \
/ WOULD LIKE TO WISH EACH AND \
I EVERYONE A HAPPY THANKSGIVING \
' WE OFFER YOU OUR SPECIAL \
THANKSGIVING DINNER
l FULL COURSE TURKEY DINNER
\ With All The Trimmings I
\ O 7t
\ X W y PLUS TAX /
UNIVERSHY FOOD SERVICj.

handled by Mrs. Stechmiller,Room
183 in Building E.
Applicants must meet certain
requirements before they are con considered
sidered considered for employment:
1. No full-time student shall
work more than an average of
fifteen (15) hours per week with without
out without an overall B average.
2. No full-time student shall
be permitted to work more than
a maximum of twenty (20) hours
a week.
3. Students carrying 6-8 hours
may work a maximum of thirty
hours a week.
4. Students carrying 9-11 hours
may work a maximum of twen twenty-seven
ty-seven twenty-seven hours a week.
5. No student shall work un unless
less unless he has a 2.0 average for
both overall and previous tri trimester
mester trimester work.
According to Mrs. Stechmiller,
average earnings for university
employed students is $60.00
a month. Earnings vary with

[r |e[dTdlo~|g i |tTeTlTi~|e|
O R.J_O_L LpL Ly_JL R_LsME EIIC utqE;
D aTh pleTrMa R E N 0 S ei NSEUEI
AIJCUfED TH E T nJTm itf S 1
ANbWtK IU
ROM AlNimr A T UTRpr L plisj A I BBt |R j I
IS |K |u N K ojs L E SllL A CMIT E iBjR A vT
Kamila. rAJe VlErj
I 1 Nj EM A RMfnrnipMrS T N S E RITA N| G RJM
Vff TFItlVi V)f |cla|n[7|dUMh|eJflt sets e slg e 1 nM
Tn I r Kim T \ Is II |L [L |Y ]B [o YMAfiIE T SjO VER LAN D
Ul|i IlUsla w m i IlilUtiailUn IT due
COVE plgr A E RjrnjMlyGpr W
PUZZLE
Wp R NjW6[ojspiY 0 eMmIeIhWO P Els
pgr L O CIAITIEBKiAiR A C [hi I Me OB A L T
icTo" M P u|t|eire|v|i N c|e|selh|T g M Aj
nlilnE T E R E T E stn

the job Mrs. Stechmilier said.
Most students earn in the range*
of from SI.OO to $1.50 an hour.
As a general rule it i s best
for a student to have several
weekday afternoons or mornings
free for work. Many employers
insist on three or more consec consecutive
utive consecutive work hours at least four
days a week by the student to be
employed.
We try continued Mrs.Stech Mrs.Stechmilier
milier Mrs.Stechmilier to place the student in
some job area that is consistent
with his field of study.
At this time the number of
part-time jobs available approa approaches
ches approaches the number of students seek seeking
ing seeking employment. Job opportunities
are constantly opening up,
however, and the chance for em employment
ployment employment is usually good.
Typists, for example, are now
in very great demand. Other open openings
ings openings may be obtained in IBM com computer
puter computer work and part time students
are needed during lunch hours at
the Hub and Bookstore.



B
A
T
M
A
N

Hci DON'T MOVE NARY AV AND HE LETs\/ EASY, CHUM l
* MUSCLE, ME OUCKOS' IfIGESrfTMEAN | /?L/S/V V NOTHING TO GAIN

Florida ? vs. Miami ?
Have you heard about
JERRYS PICK THE FINAL SCORE CONTEST?
SIOO.OO In CASH PRIZES
No purchase required get your entry blanks at
JERRYS RESTAURANT S.W. 13th Street
1505 N. W. 13th Street

mmmKmm mmmmmm m wmmmmmm mm i mmmmmmmmmmmmm i mmmm mmmmmmmmmmmmmm i
GET WITH MM
THE A
*' f *' * *3*&-*
...IN THE HEATHER-TONED LOOK OF SUPER SHAG BY
Another fine product of J Keyter-Roth
. ,v>>> .-. y . '
, .... . .r
-

No UF Gentlemen Belong
To Beta Nu Fraternity

By MATTHEW SCHNEIDEI
Alligator Correspondent
Beta Nu is a University of Flor Florida
ida Florida fraternity that no man would
want to belong to.

Tuesday, November 22, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

GOLLY, BATMAN,
I NEVER THOU6MT
IVEy

The Greek letters represent the
first letters of the words bad
news," and Beta Nu members"
are men at Florida who have in
some way displeased a resident
of Rawlings Hall.

Curfew Extended
For Thanksgiving
Curfew over the Thanksgiving
weekend has been extended to
twelve oclock for Nov. 23, 24,
and 27. Friday and Saturday nights
will observe normal curfew.
Women Students Association
voted unanimously to extend the
curfew this year at their last
meeting Nov. 14 due to the large
number of coeds remaining on
campus for the MiamiFlorida
Game.

A freshman coed who chose
to remain anonymous was asked
if she liked the men at the UF.
In general, theyre 0.K., she
said, but a quick look at the
BJN. list by each phone will tell
a girl if a guy she is talking to
has given some other girl some
trouble.
About 50 per cent of the boys
I've gone out with have ended up
on the list for various reasons.
What are some of the major
reasons for a boy to be listed?
If a guy is too fast, if he
gets so drunk at a party that
he can't take his date home, if
he stands a girl up, if he has
a nasty mouth, and if he in gen general
eral general has a nebbish type personal personality.
ity. personality.
. The pretty coed from Miami
thought the list was fair, that hav having
ing having the list by the phone, helps
a girl watch out for those dates
she really doesn't need,
Another coed from Rawlings ad added
ded added that the name was not the
only thing listed.
Usually what the guys have
done to deserve having their names
listed, the fraternity he is in; if
he is in one, and an adjective to
describe him. The adjective is used
as a nick name, like Octopus
or Lightning.
The second coed (she didnt
want her name printed either)
continued: I guess the best
excuses for turning down a date
are, you are going home for the
weekend, you will be studying for
the test you have on Tuesday,
youve got another date, and youre
sorry but you are not feeling well
and probably wont be better by the
weekend.
Jennings Hall has similar lists
in some sections although the ti title
tle title of the Rawlings list doesnt
hold a candle to the unprintable
name given to the one in Jen Jennings.
nings. Jennings.
A Jennings resident said that,
like Rawlings list, theirs includes
name, fraternity and the offense.
What happens if a guy you turned
down finds out that the list was
the cause of your refusal or ex excuse?
cuse? excuse?
It really doesnt bother most
girls, because being on the list,
the guy isnt worth the worry,
she said.
llb§
with
GATOR
ADS 1

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 22, 1966

International
BIRTHDAY . PARIS ... President Charles de Gaulle will follow
an oldjiabit, a hard days work, on his 76th birthday today.
The French president was pronounced by doctors to be in top
physical condition, according to officials. They said he will spend
much of his time Tuesday working on his latest grand design-im design-improving
proving design-improving relations with Russia.
Gen. Vladimir Shcherkolov, chief of the Soviet security services,
flew in from Moscow Monday with a team ot sleuths of the Soviet
secret police to prepare security precautions for Alexei N. Kosy Kosygin,
gin, Kosygin, the Soviet premier, who will be De Gaulle's official guest Dec.
1-9.
NEW HOME ... PARIS ... The North Atlantic Treaty Organization
(NATO) council will decide formally today whether to accept the Bel Belgian
gian Belgian government's offer of a Brussels skyscraper as the organiza organizations
tions organizations new headquarters.
Informed sources said the council would accept the building, at
the Namur Gate (Porte de Namur) as its new headquarters. West
Germany, which earlier had balked at the cost of the building, now
has been brought around to the majority point of view, the source
said.
SEIZED . NOVARA, Italy . The French film The Warm Vic Victim"
tim" Victim" starring Jane Fonda and directed by her husband Roger Vadim,
was seized by police Monday on orders from the Novara prosecutor
who found it obscene.
The seizure caused surprise in Italian film circles because "The
Warm Victim" was shown at this years Venice Film Festival and
drew no protest from legal authorities.
But the prosecutor said that after receiving a complaint from the
Novara policewomen's division he saw the film Sunday and found it of
obscene content."
MORE RAIN . VENICE . Intermittent rains fell on the flooded
Po River Delta Monday while emergency crews resumed the job
of repairing sea walls battered by a storm-tossed Adriatic Sea.
The Adriatic was calm for the third straight day and the winds
that had whipped it into a boil Friday remained quiet.
The sea tore huge holes in the dikes and barriers that protect
Venice and Italys eastern coastline from its wrath during violent
storms.
Several thousand soldiers and delta residents hoped for two
more quiet days needed to finish the emergency repair job.
COUP PLANNED ... BEIRUT, Lebanon ... Arab nationalist news newspapers
papers newspapers reported today that dissident Jordanian army officers are
plotting to overthrow King Hussein of Jordan and drive the Jews
out of Isreal. Jordans Amman Radio itself reported demonstrations
in the city of Nablus.
The national newspaper Al-Moharrer, organ of the Arab national nationalist
ist nationalist movement, reported the alleged plot as general unrest was
reported sweeping Jordan, following the Israeli tank and jet raid on
Jordanian border villages eight days ago. This weekend King Hussein
ordered the government to deal mercilessly" with dissenters.
STUDY OKAYED . UNITED NATIONS, N. Y. . Italy and fivo
other nations Monday formally submitted a General Assembly resol resolution
ution resolution calling for a committee to study the two China" question and
report next year.
Ambassador Arthur J. Goldberg said the United States would sup support
port support the study proposal, while voting against a resolution to seat
Communist China and oust the Chinese Nationalist this year. It
also would vote for a resolution requiring a two-thirds majority
for approval of the pro-Peking move.
EPIC STAND ... SAIGON ... A surrounded platoon of 30 men from
the U. S. Army Ist Air Cavalry Division stood off an entire North
Vietnamese battalion of 400 regular troops today in a four-hour
battle that wrote another new chapter of valor in the Vietnamese war.
The platoon suffered heavy casualties in the epic stand in the jungles
near the Cambodian border against Communist assaults that some sometimes
times sometimes came from four directions simultaneously. But when rein reinforcements
forcements reinforcements broke through to the platoon they found 102 Communist
dead.
SPY ESCAPED .. LONDON . Soviet masterspy George Blake,
whose daring prison escape last month embarrassed British security
and led to demands for a government inquiry, was reported Monday
to have reached asylum in East Berlin.
Scotland Yard and the Home Office refused to confirm or deny
the reports.
However, British security officials were said to be studying Blake's
escape route out of Britain. He apparently fled the country only
90 minutes after his sensational Oct. 22 escape.
Blgke-who had served five years of a 42-year sentence, the long longest
est longest imposed by a British court this century-reportedly was met by
Communist agents as he scrambled over a wall of London's gloomy
Wormwood Scrubs Prison.

FROM THE
WIRES OF
XJPI
Electrical
'New Cars
Planned
WASHINGTON (UPI) The elec electric
tric electric car, jilted by the auto in-
dustry years ago, is being wooed
again. Whether the courtship will
lead to the showroom is up to a
third party the scientist.
What brought the electric car
off the museum floor is the tech technical
nical technical improvements in the auto automobile
mobile automobile battery. Ford and Gen General
eral General Motors both claim they have
made advances that make them feel
it is worthwhile to build prototypes
of electric cars.
The auto firms dont visualize
the electric car as replacement for
the gasoline engine car. Their
idea is to build a car that might
appeal the driver who wants a
house- to-train- station vehicle.
Or the short haul city driver.
There was a time when the
electric car was expected by some
to be king of the highway. In
the early 1900s there were thous thousands
ands thousands of them on the road, and
they were a particular favorite of
women. Their manufacturers fav favored
ored favored overstuffed upholstery with a
great variety of shades and tassels.
The cars were simple to operate
and had no problem with fumes
and few mechnical troubles, a uni universal
versal universal problem with gasoline cars
of the period. Usually, the old
electric car had a tiller for steer steering,
ing, steering, a simple brake pedal and an
electrically operated bell for a
horn.
Battery
But as the demand to cover
greater distances grew, so did the
size of the battery until it reach reached
ed reached a point where the battery alone
weighed nearly a ton. As a result,
the last commercially produced
electric car was made in this
country in 1938. With the exception
of a few electric trucks still being
made, it faded into obscurity.
Development of a super battery
could give the electric car a se second
cond second life.
Ford Motor Co. scientists re recently
cently recently outlined their progress in
reviving the electric car to the
Federal Power Com mission (FPC)
They are cautiously optimistic
about a new sodium-sulphur bat battery,
tery, battery, although not claiming it would
trigger an automotive revolution in
its present state.
Special Purpose
Edward D. Marande, director of
Ford's research laboratory,
told the FPC the electric car
could find a place in the nations
transportation system, particu particularly
larly particularly as a special-purpose,
short-haul car.
The first protoype is expected to
be completed in the spring. The
car is only 5 feet long and will
have a top speed of 40 miles an
hour. But Ford thinks its newly newlydeveloped
developed newlydeveloped sodium sulphur battery
is already far superior to the
battery planned for the city car.
The sodium-sulphur battery can
store 15 times as much electrical
energy as the lead storage battery
to be used in the city car. This
could extend the city cars range
up to 200 miles.

National
NO PLANS . WASHINGTON . Commerce Secretary John
T. Connor says he has no present plans to resign, despite
a persistent Washington rumor that broke into print Sunday.
The denial was issued through an aide who dismissed the latest
report as a revival of an old rumor that has been kicking around
for a long time.
NORMAL DAY . AUSTIN, Tex. . President Johnson spent
a strictly routine Monday culling intelligence and military
reports and talking to cabinet officials in Washington by telephone.
The Texas White House said Johnson would spend the day
working at the LBJ Ranch at a more relaxed pace, sleeping
later and doing some reading and paperwork in bed.
Press Secretary Bill D. Moyers said the Chief executive had
no present plans for summoning officials from Washington for
ranch conferences.
NO STRIKE . NEW YORK . Tentative agreement between
the networks and radio and television performers on a contract
cleared the airwaves of a strike threat Monday pending ratifi ratification
cation ratification by 35,500 union members across the nation.
The agreement was reached Sunday night a few hours before
a midnight strike deadline. The American Federation of Tele Television
vision Television and Radio Artists and the Screen Actors Guild originally
had set a strike deadline last Tuesday midnight but this was
deferred in order to continue negotiations.
PERFORMANCE GOOD . PASADENA, Calif. . Scientists
Monday were delighted with the performance of Americas Lunar
Orbiter 2, as it continued to return high quality pictures of
possible Apollo landing sites on the moon.
Everything is exactly as it should be, a Nation- xutics
and Space Administration spokesman said. T1 been
a surprise in the whole thing, but we like it that
SELL SCHOOLS . ATHENS, Ga . An Athens minister Sun Sunday
day Sunday urged the Baptist Church to sell all its colleges in Georgia
rather than allow them to become second-rate institutions.
The Rev. Claude Mcride, of the Millage Avenue Baptist Church,
said the decision reached by the Georgia Baptist Convention to
refuse to accept federal loans destined Baptist schools to become
second-rate.
BOBBY BAKER . WASHINGTON ... A federal judge Monday
postponed a ruling on a defense move to call FBI Director J.
Edgar Hoover as a witness at a pre-trial hearing on an indictment
against Robert G. (Bobby) Baker.
U. S. District Judge Oliver Gasch agreed to a request by Bakers
attorney to withhold a ruling until he had a chance to review all
the material involving FBI eavesdropping on telephone conver conversations
sations conversations involving Baker.
WAITING FOR REPLY . PITTSBURGH .. .Negro comedian
and civil rights advocate Dick Gregory waited Monday for a
reply from the North Vietnamese government on his proposal
to discuss with the Communists the possibility of entertaining
American prisioners of war during the Christmas holidays.
Gregory said he sent a note to President Ho Chi Minh through
the office of English philosopher Bertrand Russell In London seek seeking
ing seeking permission to enter the Southeast Asian nation to meet with
the North Vietnamese leader.
HEARINGS ... WASHINGTON ... The Supreme Court Monday
scheduled formal hearings on hhe Georgia governorship con controversy
troversy controversy for Dec. 5, putting off settlement of the dispute until
it can hand down a subsequent ruling.
In setting a timetable for the contesting parties to submit
preliminary briefs and written arguments, the court stayed a
lower federal courts declaration that it would be unconstitu unconstitutional
tional unconstitutional for the state legislature to decide the deadlock between
. Democrat Lester Maddox and Republican Howard Bo Callaway.
: .vV > v
ON STRIKE . YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio . About 300 teachers
in Youngstown and nearby Hubbard went on strike Monday i n
disputes over salaries and union recognition. Classes for 40,700
pupils were canceled.
Picket lines were set up at 32 Youngstown schools and a school
bus garage and at four schools operated by the Hubbard School
system.
The Youngstown School Board said letters would be sent to
all striking members of the Youngstown Federation of Teachers
as a first step in invoking Ohios Ferguson Act, which prohibits
strikes by public employees.
NO NEW TAXES . NEW YORK . House Republican leader
Gerald R. Ford said Monday a tax increase next year could
prove to be a tragic mistake from the standpoint of both
business and labor.
Ford said congressional Republicans would do everything in
their power to cut unnecessary federal spending to avert a
tax hike.



CAMPUS BRIEFS

Sunday, at 5 in Norman Auditor Auditorium,
ium, Auditorium, the Florida Players will
pledge up 10 new members.
The people eligible lor Florida
Players after earning a set num number
ber number of points by working with the
organization are : Claude Pink Pinkston,
ston, Pinkston, Sherry Warren, Fred Wint Winter,
er, Winter, Barbara Gibson, Nancy Klores,
Pris Ogle, Ron Fick, Gordon Hurd,
Sara Rosenburg and Bill
Driesbach.
A short meeting will be held
after the pledging ceremony to
discuss designs for the new Flor Florida
ida Florida Player pins, stated President
Jim Norman.
The International Committee is
sponsoring a Christmas sale of
imported goods to be held Nov.
28, 29 and 30. A Christmas
Fair with an International Flair
features goods from the Philip Philippines,
pines, Philippines, Japan, India, Scandanavia,
Yugoslavia and Greece which have
an estimated value of $2,500.00.
The variety of merchandise ran ranges
ges ranges from Yugoslavian bookmark bookmarkers
ers bookmarkers to Philippine beer mugs. In International
ternational International students and commit committee
tee committee members are involved in set setting
ting setting up booths for each country
and will be on hand to offer ex explanations
planations explanations concerning some of the
more foreign items.
The Food Science Club will meet
Thursday night, Nov. 30, at 7:30
p.m., in the McCarty Hall Con-

STOP LOOK

PONDEHOSi I
STEAK HOUSE
CHUCK WAGON I
JpT#l PRAIRIE SIZE *2 CORRAL I
Jjr SIZZLIN' STEAK SIZZLIN' STEAK I
ly Baked Potato French Frie* W
/ or French F,ie CfAQ Tossed Salad All( I
I igr * 77 I
a #3 SIZZLIN' #4 GOLDEN FRIED I I
% CHOPPED SIRLOIN FISH FILLET B I
% French Fries French Fries #
% Tossed Salad Tossed Salad M
\ or Cole Slaw U|l % M
\ Western Toast J J M
% Toast ~ Tartar Sauce m m m
Hours 11 A.M. 9 P.M. ~ / I
WESTERN-STYLE 1
Como As You I
westgateShopping ffllrJgU/ I
SW 34th & UNIVERSITY AVE. I

ference {loom 130. The Maxwell
House Division of General Foods
will present a program on the
applications of the computer to
food processing. Interested stu students
dents students are invited to attend.
The three-day fair will take
place in the social room of the
Florida Union where gifts may
be purchased from 1 p.m. 9p.m.
All goods sell for $5.00 and under.
A UJ3. Army recruiting team
interviewing interested senior men
and junior and senior girls will be
on campus today and Wednesday
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the In Information
formation Information Booth across from the
Hub.
The team will give tests for Of Officer's
ficer's Officer's Candidate School for men.
There is no obligation after tak taking
ing taking the test. The junior women
can receive information on attend attending
ing attending a month long summer camp.
Senior women can receive a direct
commission in the WACs.

Experimental Computer System
Will Aid In Teaching ln67

By JOEL GARIKS
Alligator Correspondent
By early next spring the De Department
partment Department of Statistics will be us using
ing using an experimental CAI system.
CAI, computer assisted instruc instruction,
tion, instruction, is intended as an educational
tool to supplement lectures. The
system will not replace lectures
or textbooks, said Dr. William
Mendenhall, chairman of the De Department
partment Department of Statistics.
CAI, Dr. Mendenhall said, is an
educational concept that is intend intended

'Singing Gators Seeking
Increase To 40 Members

By RICHARD D. SHELTON
Alligator Correspondent
The Singing Gators, UF Glee
Club, is recruiting members for
the winter trimester, according
to Dr. Bertram Gable, club direc director.
tor. director.
The concert group, which
consists of a 15-member mens
glse club and a 30-member
womens glee club, hopes to in increase
crease increase its membership to 40 men
and 40 women for the upcoming
concert season.
According to <- Larry Lancit,
president of the mens glee club,
the membership is open to all
interested students, and the ma majority
jority majority of members are not music
majors.
The primary requirement is a
desire to sing, Lancit said, and

ed intended to accommodate the ever in increasing
creasing increasing student population.
The IBM computer with four
typewriter consoles will be used
for a group of 40 to 60 students
in STA-320. The purpose of this
program, Dr. Mendenhall said,
is to test the CAI system.
The program will run for about
18 months and the Board of Re Regents
gents Regents will then decide whether or
not to expand the system.
The method is similar to a
programmed text used with a lec lecture
ture lecture course, Dr. Mendenhall ex explained.
plained. explained. This system, he said,
has the advantages of allowing

LOOK
END-OF-YEAR
CLEARANCE SALE
I WHOLESALE
I PRICE'S TO OUR RETAIL CUSTOMERS
I 1962-88 Olds, 4 dr. Sedan, Air Cond. Auto. Trans. P.S.
I P.B. R& H. Was SI2OO Now $995.00
1 1963 Ford; 2 dr. Hardtop Galx. 500 Auto. Trans., Air. Cond.
I P.S. P.B. R& H. Was $1495 Now $U45.00
r
1 1964 Plymouth Fury, 4 dr. Sedan, Air. Cond., P.S. P.B.
1 R& H, Elec. Seat, Auto. Trans. Factory warranty
I X-Clean. Was $1895 Now $1595.00
I 1964 Pontiac, 4 dr. Starchiet New Air-Cond., R& H P.S.
I P.B.Auto. Trans. A
I Was $2050 Now $1595.00
I 1964 Chysler Newport R & H Auto. Trans. Factory Air. Lt.
| Blue, Low Mileage, One Owner. $1950 Now $1595.00
I 1964 Ford Wagon, Country Squire, R& H, Auto. Trans.,
I Factory Air, loaded, Extra Clean. W as 1995 Now $1595#00
1 1964 Ford Wagon, Country Sedan, R&H Auto Trans., Factory
1 Air, Extra Nice Value. was $1745 Now $1595.00
I FRANCHISED DEALER FOR:
TRIUMPH FIAT VOLVO
I FORD CORTINA ANGLIA [
I 2201 North Main St. Call
at 23rd Blvd. 372-4373
CRANE Mr-Burke Mr-Burke|
| Mr-Burke| Mr. Grant,
I Lincoln and Mercury or Mr. Bradley
~ IMPORTS & USED CARS
Specialist In Foreign Car Repaiis"

Tuesday, November 22, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

attitude is as important as abil ability.
ity. ability. All prospective members must
audition, however, and must have
some beginning talent.
Rehearsal is conducted fifth
period each weekday and mem members
bers members receive one credit hour per
trimester, Lancit noted. Since
it is an accredited activity, mem members
bers members must register for the tri trimester,
mester, trimester, he added.
Our performances are gener generally
ally generally seasonal, Lancit said, and
we perform locally and on tour.
Our spring tour usually runs
around nine days and this season
will include several major cities
in South Florida and also Puerto
Rico.
According to Lancit, the Sing Singing
ing Singing Gators toured the New York

for easy modification and up-da up-dating
ting up-dating of the program and automa automatic
tic automatic progress records.
The computer would also test
the student and automatically re record
cord record a grade that can be checked
instantly. This will save time for
other work, Dr. Mendenhall said.
CAI will help the faculty eval evaluate
uate evaluate their teaching methods.
Though the effects of the compu computer
ter computer will be difficult to separate
from other materials lectures
and tutoring it is the over overall
all overall effect that is improtant, Dr.
Mendenhall said.

Worlds Fair in 1965 and Jamaica
in 1966.
We usually perform for high
schools and universities, Lancit
noted, and this spring, will in include
clude include the Dade County Vocal Fes Festival,
tival, Festival, the University of Puerto
Rico and the Conservatory of Mu Music
sic Music in Puerto Rico.
All our performances are
free, Lancit said, and besides
spreading enjoyment of singing,
they are also good will efforts for
the University. Although we per perform
form perform about 15 to 20 concerts
on the tour, we still have time
to enjoy the travel and scenery,
he added.
According to Lancit, students
interested in joining the Sing Singing
ing Singing Gators should contact Dr.
Gable In room 120 of the music
building for an audition. He will
authorize registration for the one
credit hour membership.
We are hoping to get a large
turnout this registration period,
Lancit said, as we are planning
a busy schedule for the winter
and spring. We are working now
on our Christmas program and
certainly can use new members.
LIBRARY
SCHEDULE
University Libraries will tak<
a holiday with the students an*
faculty for Thanksgiving. Excep
for the Law Library, all branche:
will be closed Thursday.
Several branches will observe
partial schedules for Friday, Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, and Sunday, while othe;
branches will be closed for the
entire weekend.
The Main Library will be opei
during its regular hours for aL
days, except for Thursday, as will
the Agricultural Experiment Sta Station
tion Station Library, the Health Centei
Library, and the Law Library.
The Education Library in Nor Norman
man Norman Hall, and Engineering anc
Physics Library will be open Fri Friday
day Friday and Sunday. All library bran branches
ches branches but the Journalism and Com Communications
munications Communications and Health and Phy Physical
sical Physical Education Reading Rooms
and certain areas of the Main
Library will be open Sunday.
Polio Can't Stop
Courageous Youth
ST. LOUIS a wheelchair isnt stopping
Samuel Alongi of St. Louis.
Along!, 19, is an accomplished
musician, and also is in his
second year at Massachusetts
Institute of Technology.
Stricken with polio, Alongi
found it all the more reason
to get the most out of life.
Music is a wonderful out outlet
let outlet and means of expression,
Alongi says, but science and
research provide the opportun opportunity
ity opportunity to do lasting, interesting
and meaningfuly work.
He recently won a scholar scholarship
ship scholarship to attend Berklee School
ot Music in Boston to study
iazz. Alongi also won a renew renewable
able renewable scholarship at MIT.
WE RENT FORMALSj
GATOR SHOP

Page 5



, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 22, 1966

Page 6

The Florida Alligator
\A h Out
EDDIE SEARS 808 MEN AKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR DICK DENNIS
Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecessaniy reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
oice of the Alligator staff is the editorial in the left
column.
*
High Hop es
Open letter to Gov. elect Claude Kirk
High hopes of the candidate of the same name were dashed
by your statewide landslide, Mr. Kirk, reaped out of discon discontent
tent discontent with the federal government.
High promised a sound, progressive program for Florida Floridayou
you Floridayou promised a great deal, Claude, but didnt really explain
how you proposed to do it.
Its your move, Claude.
Four years is a long timebut not very long for a gover governor
nor governor who has promised to perform near miracles. Our only
hope is that our own predictions prove wrongand you suc succeed,
ceed, succeed, magnificently.
We have examined the Kirk platformthe so-called white
papers which were introduced and then rarely referred
to againand found a great deal that is meritorious. We
found in these proposals a great deal that would be good for
Floridamay they come to pass.
If there was one thing that won you the election, Claude,
it was faith. The force of thousands upon thousands of people
who said, I believe this man.
Dont disappoint them, Claude. They believe youre going
to clean things up in Tallahassee. We hope so, but Claude,
what are these rumors we hear about the Haydon Bums
crowd unpacking their suitcases for another four-year
stay? Thats not the way to keep the faith, Claude.
You dont owe Haydon Burns anything, Claude. Your duty
Is to the people of Florida. Theyve already shown what they
think of Burns & Company.
Boot out the whole bunch, Claude. If you never do any anything
thing anything else, youll have won the undying gratitude of the voters
for that alone.
As for your programwere looking forward to it,
Claude. We have our doubts, but more important, weand
people throughout Floridahave our hopeshigh hopes.
Dont let us down.
A Lost Tradition
Inflation has reared its ugly head on campus.
Honor apples, which for years have sold for 10 cents each
have gone the way of the five cent cigar and other assorted
American memorabilia.
They are now 15 cents each, no mean bargain at that price.
And while we dont suggest anything as drastic as a boycott
or a picket against this move, we are saddened that this
campus tradition will be no more.
The taste will be the same, but at that price a little piece
of campus tradition will be gone.
Speaking of tradition, whatever happened to honor bikes?
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
accepts all letters to the editor Due to
space limitations, however we askr that
letters not exceed 350 word Typewrit Typewritten
ten Typewritten and double-spaced letters are prefer preferred,
red, preferred, and all must be signed Names will
be withheld upon request Editors reserve
the right to select or reject letters for
publication 7

Recognize Student Power

By DAVID MORRIS
Alligator Columnist
The UF Dean of Women states

P 4sk. ;;
ip jt
Campus Mirror
By 808 MENAKER
1 Alligator Managing Editor

The Blue Key tapping session
Sunday confirmed something
which, up until now, has only
been a rumor: look out for Rob
Blue.
Blue, who certainly qualifies
for membership in that organiza organization,
tion, organization, which tapped 37 men, didnt
apply for membership. If he did,
he probably would not have been
rejected, so it looks like he just
didnt apply.
The rationale behind this is
that it is not too good to be Blue
Key and run for president of the
student bodyat least not this
year. With all the adverse publi publicity
city publicity over the Bloc Seating Bill,
which certainly cast the Keys
in a bad light on campus, Blues
best course of action is not to
belong.
Blue is building up a lot of
support and reportedly has sever several
al several houses from Student Party ready
to jump as soon as the time is
ripe. Blues group wanted for
the Decision vice-presidential
spot last year but held out on
the promise that he would get
backing for this years race.
If all the houses jump accord according
ing according to plan, this would give Blue
approximately 1,300 bloc votes.
Theres that nasty word, bloc.
Seems like it always pops up dur during
ing during elections in some manner,
shape or form.
The big question then arises.
Who will run under the banner of
the decimated rertinants of Student
Party?
Many names have been ban bandied
died bandied around; Fred Breeze,
Charles Shepherd, Dick Thomp Thompson
son Thompson and others. The latter two
want to run and the former, who
is eminently qualified, would
rather concentrate on keeping
his grades up and getting his
masters degree in physics.
Assuming that neither Shepherd
nor Thompson, a man who knows
the St. Joe Paper Co. and Ed
Ball well, will run, that ul ultimately
timately ultimately leads to this question:
who will be the second major
candidate?
Right ( now it looks as though
the only chance to beat the

that girls need curfews, that there
would be a public uproar if
curfews were eliminated. The
Board of Regents decides that

monster Blue bloc lies with a
dark horse. You know what a
UF dark horse is. Hes a
goodlooking (usually), sincere,
smiling chap who can speak
like Daniel Webster and put
himself over like Ronald Rea Reagan.
gan. Reagan. The last time a dark horse
won was back in the 1961 elect election
ion election when a fellow named Bruce
Bullock, whom no one had heard
of, came out of the woodwork,
orated like Edward Everett and
won a squeaker.
Yes, right now it looks as
though a dark horse is the only
boy who can win the president presidential
ial presidential sweepstakes for the battered
forces of Student Party. The
men I mentioned earlier are
good men but are too much
associated with the Jacobs ad administration
ministration administration to be desirable can candidates
didates candidates for the this years elect election.
ion. election.
Question of the week: What bud budding
ding budding young campus politico had
bags under his eyes after
all night waiting up for a Blue
Key tapping committee which
passed him by. Ah well, skip
it until next trimester. -*

feM **
Florida Alligator Staff
TYLER TUCKER NEWT SIMMONS GENE NAIL
Assistant Managing Editor Editorial Assistant Editorial Assistant
NICK ARROYO CAROL HEFNER NICK TATRO
Photo Editor Society Editor Wire Editor
STAFF WRITERS Susan Froemke, Barbara Gefen,
Maury dicker, Harvey Alper, Jean Mamlin, Kathie
Keim, Frank Shepherd, Aggie Fowles, Justine Hartman,
Jimmey Bailey.
ASSISTANT EDITORS John Briggs, Margie Green,
Jo Ann Langworthy, Joe Torchia, Bob Beck.
LAB ASSISTANTS JoAnn Gerard, Diann Devine, Jerry War Warren,
ren, Warren, Laura Brown, Peggy Sneider, Dave Reddick, Brady Farris
n \ o arle Varon David Welss Greg Borden, Richard
Jrwin, Carol Summers.
rpnJ>rtarc ei f. t 0 cover cam Pus events the Alligator uses
Their hvi m SctUK)l * Journalism and Communications.
Their bylines are followed by Alligator Correspondent.

the student body needs a little
discipline and overrules a fa faculty
culty faculty decision to abolish compui
sory ROTC. The faculty decision
to abolish compulsory rotc is
based on an intensive study 0 f
almost everything but student
opinions on the subject. The
University holds a referendum
on whether the students want
to maintain the trimester system
The students vote yes, the uni university
versity university decides to abolish the
system anyway, and institute
a quarter system, without so
much as an open forum to ex explain
plain explain its reasons to the student
body.
And all this in an insti institution
tution institution which proudly displays
its Honor System," a tradi tradition
tion tradition supposedly based on the
assumption that students are res responsible
ponsible responsible enough not to cheat
when there is no proctor in
the room.
Why is it that the students
at this, and most other uni universities,
versities, universities, are treated so cavalier cavalierly?
ly? cavalierly? There seem to be two answers
to this question. First is the ready
acceptance of the young adult of
the values of his parents, thus
denying the reason for a change
in the in loco parentis pract practice.
ice. practice. The second is the belief
current in American society that
one becomes a mature adult
upon leaving the university. Age
seems to have no bearing on
ones maturation process; neith neither
er neither does education, nor intell intelligence,
igence, intelligence, nor wisdom. The basic
premise of our society is that
one acquires the trappings of
maturity when he begins to
earn a living (and in most
cases this means leaving the
academic environment).
Well, the first reason is be beginning
ginning beginning to break down. Students
in the 1960s are a far differ different
ent different breed than their counterparts
of the early 19505. They are
questioning, but even more,
they believe that there are some
things incontestably wrong with
our society, and these things are
changeable. Above all they believe
that the viewpoint of the young
should be considered since the
adults have done a pretty poor
job in certain major areas
(e.g. Civil Rights) and have tot totally
ally totally ignored others (e.g. abor abortion
tion abortion laws, draft laws, birth
control laws).
The universities have often
believed that students would not
be responsible If given some
semblance of authority. The evi evidence
dence evidence does not bear this out.
At Cornell University the women
were permitted to decide wheth whether
er whether they wanted curfews. The sen senior
ior senior and junior women voted
(SEE STUDENT," PAGE 7)



Questions
Gators
Editing
EDITOR:
I question your ability to edit
news from editorials. What is your (
policy for putting editorials and
value judgments on the front page
and not labeling them as such?
Friday appeared the story Ha Havens
vens Havens Was Shot During Dorm
Game. This story was nothing
but a value judgment on the part
of the reporter for which you are
responsible. It was an interpreta interpretation
tion interpretation and an opinion about the event
which degrades the standards and
ideals of good objective reporting.
Granted the event was a grave
matter and a life was involved,
this is not my point. You passed
off as news a story with such
phrases as a good humored fel fellow,
low, fellow, . he'll never let any anyone
one anyone know it hurts." Concerning the
event, This means a lot.lt means
that irresponsible play with guns
is bad. It means that rules are
made for a reason,to protect the
community and the individual."
Is this news or emotional senti sentiment?
ment? sentiment? Do you really rate your
college reading audience so low
as to think they do not realize
what happened and cannot make
a value judgment for themselves?
My conclusion is this. Keep edi editorials
torials editorials on the editorial page and
print whatever you please. This is
your prerogative as editor. But
in the name of whatever stand standards
ards standards you have, put news on the
front page without corrupting it
with personal judgments or at least
label them as such if you must.
Such instances only make sneers
and doubts for the content of stories
which actually can be taken for ac accurate
curate accurate good reporting.
JEANIE MARCY, 4AS
Student
Power
(.FROM PAGE 6)
to abolish curfews, the sopho sophomores
mores sophomores voted to keep them. (Inci (Incidentally,
dentally, (Incidentally, senior womens aver averages
ages averages went up when curfews
were eliminated.) Many institut institutions,
ions, institutions, including USC, Cornell,
and Harpur, under student pres- s.
sure, are beginning to do away
with grades, certainly a boon
to the educational environment.
At the University of Michigan
last week the Student Govern Government
ment Government voted to sever relations
with the University. At City
College in New York 150 students,
led by the president of student
government, sat in to demand
some power in the decision-mak decision-making
ing decision-making process. At Cornell the stu students
dents students sat in, in order to get
an explanation from the admilu admilustration
stration admilustration as to why it was giving
grades to the draft boards.
The leaders of these move movements
ments movements are not communists, though
they are, indeed, trying to und undermine
ermine undermine the existing institution.
At the same time these move movements
ments movements usually emerge in spite
of, or because of, a stagnant
student government, which usual usually
ly usually means that their leaders are
the campus radicals.
Undoubtedly few of the UF stu students
dents students are overly concerned with
their lack of power. On the other
hand so few of these people have
really exercised meaningful pow power
er power that their apathy is one of
ignorance, not indifference. Per Perhaps
haps Perhaps it is up to the Faculty
and the Administration to take
the first step and include stu students
dents students on the various decision decisionmaking
making decisionmaking organs at this univer university.
sity. university. The result may be refresh refreshing.
ing. refreshing.

k
\ BLACK PEARUM
\*
D. £3^*
* *
..* .
. .* .
*. * .. *. .
4

Non-Academic Totalitarianism

EDITOR:
No one can deny the truth
or fail to observe that there
has been a perceptible shift from
a semi-state-of-academic-free semi-state-of-academic-freedom
dom semi-state-of-academic-freedom to a state-of-non-acad state-of-non-academic-totalitarianism
emic-totalitarianism state-of-non-academic-totalitarianism in our uni university
versity university community. The Board
of Regents initiated this shift
when it imposed a new operat operating
ing operating code of campus rules which
are more befitting a prison than
a university community. The sit situation
uation situation was further aggravated by
the unprecedented action of the
Board of Regents in overriding
the Faculty Senate to re-in re-institute
stitute re-institute compulsory ROTC.
As far as I am concerned,
Compulsory ROTC totally re reverses
verses reverses the traditional concept of
the state as protector and ser servant
vant servant of the citizens and replaces
it with the 4 collectivist idea of
citizens being servants of the
state. Although compulsory ROTC
is not the most clear cut and
dangerous infraction of Civil
Liberties in America today,
the moral and ethical question
is whether any human being should
be held in bondage to another.
But, the underlying question is
not should ROTC be compul compulsory,
sory, compulsory, voluntary or completely
eliminated? The more basic
question is should faculty mem members
bers members and students change the in institutions
stitutions institutions on this campus to meet
their own needs and desires
or should they just be auto automatons
matons automatons shaped through the
existing institutions to meet the
needs of those in power as is
now the case.
It seems that professors and
students are not to be trusted
to make their own decisions in
certain areas of direct concern
to themselves alone. It has been
argued by the Regents that stu students
dents students cannot make the RIGHT
decision about what they ought
to read; therefore, we (the
Regents) must regulate the con content
tent content of their reading matter. Thus
the Board of Regents insinuates
that it will protect the students
and professors, especially the
professors, against making the
WRONG 1 choice. In reversing
the decision made by the Fa Faculty
culty Faculty Senate the Regents have
insulted many members of the
faculty by implying that they do
not have the ability nor the
sense to make the RIGHT
choice.
I for one have failed to real realize
ize realize that I need compulsory*
protection against my own actions
and feel that I have the ability
and the sense to make decisions
which affect myself. I want to
make it clear to Chester H.
Ferguson and the rest of the
Regenteers that Ido not need
to be surrounded by laws design designed
ed designed to involuntarily cushion me
against the consequences of my
own actions. In other words I
know that I have the intelligence
and ability to decide for myself
whether I should take ROTC or
not. I also feel that members
of the faculty have enough sense
to make a decision as to whether
ROTC should be compulsory,

voluntary or eliminated from the
campus.
But one cannot begin to real realize
ize realize the seriousness of this sit situation
uation situation until he knows what the
phrase Board of Regents
means. Following is a partial
meaning of that phrase:
CHESTER H. FERGUSON:
Chairman of the Board of
Regents, Director, Lykes
Brothers Inc., Exchange
National Bank of Tampa,
Lykes Steamship Company,
Pasco Packing Company,
and Supertest Oil and Gas
Company.
WAYNE C. McCALL: A
founder of PROJECT ALERT
which Senator Fulbright has
exposed as Radical Right-
Wing Activity.
HENRY KRAMER: President,
FoodFair Stores, Inc., Food
City of South Carolina

Resents 'Stupid Label
EDITOR:
There are two things I would like to discuss in this letter.
Unfortunately I have neither the time nor the space alotted to
give as complete a discussion as I would like.
First I would like to discuss the stupidity backlash. I
suppose I had better clarify one point first and that is that I
am not a racist. I feel that all men are entitled to the same free freedoms
doms freedoms as myself, NO MORE and no less.
Admittedly there were some mistakes made at the polls on
Nov. 8. However, there were some authenticated appeals for
conservatism and moderation in all phases of government. I
consider it a personal affront, as well as a majority of the voters
probably do, to be labeled stupid because of a conservative posi position.
tion. position.
What in the hell is wrong with you people? Do you honestly
believe that to be intelligent you have to be liberal or to be liberal
makes you intelligent?
In your opinion a lot of the winning candidates were elected
out of stupidity because you do not agree with the results. If
you and the rest of the losers are so intelligent and the rest of
the populace is so stupid, what would you suggest?
Personally I agree that there were some wrong candidates
elected but if we all agreed there would be no need for elections.
The second issue I would like to discuss is the SDS position
on the individualistic democratic society. I am a republican (with
a small r) and live in a republican society.
I agree with individualism and feel that it is one of the corn cornerstones
erstones cornerstones of our society. However, this individualism should be
kept within the restraints of society. To quote ah old maxim,
Your freedom ends where someone elses begins.
A Society is a group of people living together under a struct structure
ure structure of morals governing various phases of existence. Without
structure there would be no society but just a group of indiv individuals
iduals individuals running around doing as they pleased.
If the individual is not pleased with the present society he can
do one of two things leave or change it. Since I am not advocat advocating
ing advocating gapping out everyone who is against the present society
that leaves one choice; change it.
This is the sign of the real individualist, one who sees a
phase of society that he does not like and sets about to change
it. However, you must remember it is not eliminating the struct structure
ure structure you should be in pursuit of but modifying it.
A second point to remember in restructuring society is that
it must be accomplished within the tenets of the present society
or you will be ostracized, and rightly so. The present structure
was established by the majority as right for that society and
if you want to live in that society as a member in good standing
you must operate under the present structure, otherwise you
will be wrong. It naturally follows if you succeed in your re restructuring
structuring restructuring you may then operate under your new set of morals
and be right, as far as society is concerned.
* RICHARD HASSELL, 4BA
(EDITORS NOTE: Conservatives have yet to be labeled stu stupid
pid stupid by this newspaper. In fact some of our best friends are
conservatives.)

shallA Jw
r *. **. .*7

>
and Florida, Jacksonville
Hockey Inc.
The important point Is not that
these men are famous** or
very wealthy men, But that
in these men you find substant substantial
ial substantial ownership and control of the
vital raw materials and service
industries in the South; virtually
enough power to make or break
five governors and ten univer university
sity university Presidents. The important
questions that everyone on this
campus must answer in view
of certain actions recently taken
by the Regents are WHAT DO
THEY DO? AND WHY? AND
IN WHOSE INTEREST? Only
then will we know thereal* rea reasons
sons reasons behind the recent shift from
a semi-state-of-academic-free semi-state-of-academic-freedom
dom semi-state-of-academic-freedom to a state-of-non-acad state-of-non-academic
emic- state-of-non-academic totalitarianism.
JOEL M. STARKEY, 3BA

Tuesday, November 22, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

U I
\ '


Opening
Raifords
Doors?
EDITOR:
In regards to Bruce Gibbs letter
in last Thursdays Alligator (Nov.
3). Now, theres an idea! Lets
open the doors at Raiford and let
the prisoners go fight in Viet
Nam. Right!! Let me make some
further proposals along this line
and establish rank among the
troops.
The ranks of Private and Cor Corporal
poral Corporal could be filled by those
first offenders who have com committed
mitted committed minor crimes* such as
robbery, manslaughter and arson.
The Non-Coms could be second
and third offenders for the
same crimes. Field officers could
be drawn from the contingent of
embezzlers and mall frauders,
the rank of Major being reserved
for kidnapers. Generals could
come from that select group
of murderers and rapists, the
highest offices going to those
living on Death Row and the
lower ones going to lifers.**
I know this sounds ridiculous, but
so is Mr. Gibbs proposal. What
do we do when the boys come home?
Turn them loose on society again
for services rendered? Accord According
ing According to statistics over half of
those freed would be back in
North Florida before very long
at the expense of life or pro property.
perty. property. And just how many con convicts
victs convicts constitute the large group
of men** who want to go to Viet
Nam in the first place. I
cannot; imagine a regiment of
disgruntled convicts fighting for
the society they have rejected.
As for the matter of students
having to fight while the con convicts
victs convicts just put a burden on the
tax-payer, a differentiation has to
be made. A student is a mem member
ber member of our society, a convict
is not. It is the duty of members
of a society to defend it, not
the duty of those a society
has protected itself against. Be Besides
sides Besides that, Mr. Gibbs has pro probably
bably probably not heard of the 2-S de deferment.
ferment. deferment. Let us not believe that
the government runs rip- shod
through a campus yanking stu students
dents students from their desks and
- pressing them into service. Those
students in Viet Nam did
not meet set requirements enabl enabling
ing enabling them to remain students or
were drafted after graduation
when they took the role of a
common citizen.
Finally, if we are to rely on
the words of General MacArthur,
can we not also quote, Old sold soldiers
iers soldiers never die? What a rosy
thought ... a regiment of
veteran convicts eternally plag plaguing
uing plaguing our society. Right?!!
RICHARD VRABCAK, 4AS

Page 7



I6ATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
1965 HONDA 65 Super Sport,
excellent condition, Call 378-6919
(A-55-st-c)
AUTOMATIC 4-track stereo tape
player for car plus tapes, cheap.
Call 378-5778. (A-56-st-c).
REFRIGERATOR full size, ex excellent
cellent excellent running condition, S3O. For
information, call after 7 p.m. 378-
6625. (A-58-3t-nc)
FOR SALE: Underwood portable
typewriter in good condition very
cheap. Call Ed after 5 p.m. 376-
4062. (A-58-3t-p)
1966 HONDA 50 Super Sport, black,
excellent condition, excellent
means of transportation and
perfect for student use. Call
378-5647 ask for Steve. (A-58-
lOt-c)
STERO'S, R.C.A., MOTOROLA,
ADMIRAL, Portables and con consoles.
soles. consoles. Good selection, easy terms,
Lay-away now for Christmas.
VOYLES APPLIANCE CENTER
419 NW Bth Ave. Phone 372-
5303. (A-58-llt-c)
1964 TRIUMPH Spitfire, red, new
tires, like new condition, 912 SW
7th Avenue, Apt. 4, Afternoons.
(A-59-2t-p).
MUST SELL! Excellent condition,
nylon string guitar. Best offer
accepted. Call 376-7791. (A-59-
2t-c).
VOICE OF MUSIC Tape record recorder
er recorder 4-track takes 5 inch reels,
S7O or best offer. Call Mike Fer Ferris
ris Ferris 376-9229. (A-59-st-nc).
a
WINCHESTER .243 model 70, Bau Bausch
sch Bausch and Lomb, 8x variable; pad
sling, 2# trigger. Retail, over
S3OO. Spotless, $225. Harry Beck Beckwith,
with, Beckwith, 466-3340. (A-59-lt-c).
HEAD SNOW SKIIS (YES! SNOW
SKIIS), CUBCO BINDING, SKI
BOOTS, SIZE 10 1/2, INCLUDES
ALUMINUM SKI POLES, CALL,
378-4886. (A-57-2t-c).

for rent
FURNISHED, One bedroom apar apartment
tment apartment available Dec. 1. Air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, spacious, with swimming
pool on premise. Perfect for two
students. Call 376-2029 after 5
p.m. (B-59-lt-p).
TO SUBLET new modern, two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment near campus.
Completely furnished, air condi conditioned,
tioned, conditioned, swimming pool on premise.
From Dec. 17, 1966. Phone 378-
6024. (B-59- st-p).
FOR RENT! 2 bedroom, CBhouse,
furnished, A/C, W/W carpeting,
carport, paved drive, many ex extras.
tras. extras. Yearly lease only. $l3O mo.
Call: 372-5446. (B-58-3-c).
*
APARTMENT OVERLOOKING
POOL. Two bedroom furnished,
CAC, laundromat, one block from
campus. Available Jan. 1. SUM SUMMIT
MIT SUMMIT HOUSE APTS. 376-7873. (B (B---58-Bt-c).
--58-Bt-c). (B---58-Bt-c).
WHY live in a traffic jam? Walk
to classes and be relieved of
v our parking problem. Fully fur furnished,
nished, furnished, spacious one bedroom
apartment, air conditioned, gas
heat, fully equipped kitchen in including
cluding including washing machine. Call 372-
3357. (B-57-10t-c).

for rent
CHOICE APARTMENT for four,
five blocks from campus. Two
bedrooms, spacious living room
and study, attractively furnish furnished.
ed. furnished. Call 372-7343 Available Jan. 1
(B-55-st-c)
SUBLEASE modern two bedroom
furnished Fredericks apartment,
call 378-6920. (B-56-st-c),
AVAILABLE NOW spacious one
bedroom furnished apartment,
large living room and kitchen,
lease required. S9O monthly. Cou Couple
ple Couple or two graduate students
preferred. 923 NE 3rd Ave. 378-
2436. (B-54-10t-c)
ROOM IN private home for mature
male student. Separate entrance,
cei. ral heat, linen & maid service.
Call: 376-5360. (B-57-ts-c).
ONE OR TWO females to share
apartment 5 blocks from campus.
Spacious living room and study,
attractively furnished. Call 372-
7343. Abailable January 1. (B-58-
3t-p)
FREDERICK APARTMENTS
1130 S. W. 16th Ave.
ONE & TWO bedroom apts.,
furnished, including range & refri refrigerator,
gerator, refrigerator, wall to wall carpet, rad radiant
iant radiant hear, air condition, extra out outside
side outside storage, coin-operated laun laundry,
dry, laundry, and heated pool. Office hours:
9-5 weekdays, 1-5 Sundays
(B-58-10t-c)
COOPERATIVE Living Organi Organization
zation Organization announces openings for next
trimester. Room and Board, S6O
per month, one block off campus.
Inquire 117 NW 15th St. or call
376-6203. (B-50-st-c).
wanted
UF STUDENT NEEDS THREE
TICKETS TOGETHER FOR MIAMI
GAME. RELATIVES ARE TRAV TRAVELLING
ELLING TRAVELLING 800 MILES TO SEE
THE ORANGE BOWL BOUND
FIGHTING GATORS. CALL RICK
AT 376-0333 or 376-3261 EXT
2519. (C-55-6t-nc)
WANTED: one female graduate
student to share a one bedroom
apartment. Phone 378-6058 for
more information. (C-59-2t-c).
L1 11..
BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
THE CITY THAT BECAME 1
A TORCH -THE TORCH I
THAT FIRED THE WORLD I |
SHOWN AT 9:25
PLUS
ml
I Iwtmn tkt

Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 22. 1966_

wanted
ARE YOU TOUGH? HAVE LONG
HAIR? LIKE THE STONES? CAN
YOU SING LEAD OR PLAY BASS
GUITAR? HAVE OWN EQUIP EQUIPMENT?
MENT? EQUIPMENT? THEN YOU MIGHT
QUALIFY FOR THE GREAT
NEW BAND, SOUL BLUES."
CALL TOM AT 372-3043
(C-57- 3t-p)
help wanted
NEEDED Immediately! An aver average
age average typist who can qualify for
work study program to work in
Dept, of Psychiatry (ext. 5129,
J. Brown). Work now 15 hours
per week, arranged in any man manner
ner manner for your convenience. Exam
week off, you may elect to work
full time during Christmas and
continue part time thru April.
Go to Office of Student Finan Financial
cial Financial Aid for processing. (E-59-
3t-c),
SUBLEASE unfurnished two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment. University Gar Gardens.
dens. Gardens. Occupancy Dec. 17 on. Call
372-3035. (E-53-st-c).
TWO Bedroom French Quarter
Apartment for rent. Available De December
cember December or January. Must know by
November 28th. Call 378-5228.
(E-53-10t-c).
Experienced legal secretary wan wanted
ted wanted beginning Dec. 5. Must be
proficient in shorthand and typ typing.
ing. typing. 376-5242. (E-49-ts-c).
SELL NEWSPAPER subscriptions
partime, male or female. Liberal
commission. 372-7500 (E-58-
10t-c) A
DOWNTOWN
2nd
/jj WEEK
MATINEES 2 PM
ON WED SAT SUN
EVENINGS AT 8 PM
i WINNER OF 6
ACADEMY
awards!
WGOLWYNMAYER fcL'jjJj
PRODUCTION
DAVID LEANS
Os BORIS PASTERNAKS f
DOCTOR
ZHiIAGO
IN PANAVISION AND METROCOLOfI
![^!o c k l H c C M A i Xg
J 1:05 3:08
* 5:11 7:14
TWIH 9;17
LEENAWIII
ftal
foOFESSiOHfIIS

help wanted
WE DID THE MAKE UP for
your Homecoming Queen and
Sweethearts. Why not let us do
yours. Free make up demonstra demonstrations,
tions, demonstrations, and skin analysis. No Ob Obligation.
ligation. Obligation. International Beauty
Counselors has organizational and
sales openings. Excellent oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity No canvasing, flexible hours
for full and part time. Call 376-
1529 for interview. (E-57- st-c)
LEGAL Secretary needed immed immediately.
iately. immediately. Must be proficient in short shorthand
hand shorthand and typing. Send resume to
Managing Partner, Post Office,
DrawerOj, Gainesville, Fla. (E (E---56-ft-c).
--56-ft-c). (E---56-ft-c).
A STUDENT SECRETARY is
needed to fill a part time job.
Job consists of typing and fil filing.
ing. filing. Typing experience requir required
ed required only. Contact by 'calling 372-
4256 or 372-4257. (E-55-Bt-c)
autos
XKE ROADSTER, 33,000 miles,
excellent condition, will trade
Phone 372-4979. (G-55-st-c)
1960 RED CORVAIR coupe, good
condition, new tires, new bat battery
tery battery automatic transmission,
price $450 firm. See 1506 NE
30th Ave. 372-4144 (G-55-st-c)
SJlpllwSjK^UTii
show I
|KW. lJtfc ST. 372-9523
raniifl
AT 8:40 I
I
BRIDESO^RACUU^TIOdoI

THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MATTHEW is certainly
the best life of Jesus ever placed on film and it i$ prob probably
ably probably the finest religious film ever made as well. Indeed,
it may come to rank, as the years add to our perspec perspective,
tive, perspective, among the great movies of all time, regardless of
subject! Richard Schickel. LIFE MAGAZINE
AN EXTRAORDINARY FILM! THE IMPACT IS OF SUCH
remarkable feelingi of being in the MAGNITUDE THAT IT RAISES
presence of truth! A crescendo of DACMiAIIC iflfttfic iklTfl TIIC
excitement and involvement! IRECOM- rHaULIIII o MU VIC I rail! IDC
MEND IT! Boiler Crtwfker N> TIMfS REALM OF 6REATNESSr
PRESBYTERIAN LIFE
A MASTERPIECE THAT THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO
TOWERS OVER EVERYTHING ST. MATTHEW IS THE GREAT GREATTHAT
THAT GREATTHAT HAS GONE REFOREr EST FILM ON THE LIFE OF
CHRIST EVER MADE!"
DIRECT, PROVOCATIVE AND .** " s ~
ELOQUENT, NORLE AND
TOUCHING. .the film is as violent mmJrn/
Lesion N Y DAILY NEWS
the qospeL
accoftfonq JSSb
* un vnci g.
to St MAtthew;
a ku b, PIER PAOLO PASOLtNI CMMM*
1:45-4:15-6:45-9:15 vMVI
w L 7-

autos
1950 FORD, great shape, SIOO or
best offer. Ask for Bob at 378-
4324. (G-59-lt-c).
1963 VW. Low mileage. Spotless,
sacrifice $875; Jim, 376-3986. (G (G---59-2t-c).
--59-2t-c). (G---59-2t-c).
1963 VW, $950, very clean, vary
good condition, new tires and ser service
vice service bookley, AM-FM radio. Heat Heater,
er, Heater, headrest, seat belts. Original
owner: 378-3886. (G-52-10t-c).
>
1960 FORD, 4-door, power steer steering,
ing, steering, automatic transmission, radio
and heater. Call 378-6478, (G (G---
--- (G--- st-c).
1932 FORD, 5 window coupe, 331
cu. in. Chrysler Hemi
ine is completely rebuilt, Wieand
Drag Star Manifold, super full
cam, body is channeled over
custom tubular frame. Call 378-
1274 Price S3OO firm.(G-54-10t-c)
1963 FORD, two door, V-8, ex extra
tra extra good tires and paint, real
clean only $750. Student must sell,
372-3251 after 6 p.m. (G-56-10t (G-56-10tc).
c). (G-56-10tc).
SIHTE



CLASSIFIEDS

Tuesday, November 22, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

autos
WORLDS UGLIEST CAR
1959 six cylinder Plymouth. Good
unning condition, $75, 466-3353.
[G-59-3t-c).
1961 TR3, wire wheels, Lucus
road lights, good tires, radio and
heater rebuilt engine, new top,
S9OO. Call 378-6015 after 6:30
p.m. (G-56-4t-c).
lost-found
LOST! German Shepherd, u
old female, black with iawu
markings, wearing chain collar.
If found, please call Dr. Sidney
Jourard Ext. 2661 or 372-2173.
REWARD!! (L-58-st-c)
LOST: 1 pair glasses in case,
on Wednesday. If found contact
Sage Viehe, room 996 Weaver Hall.
REWARD. (L-58-3t-p)

ES TODAY WOODY MIENS /
Lsliptigerlily?
wrtld,:
fl*
\ Jjy flfcnM t
utug
U£idl
McMjOIL
u,
introducing JUDI WEST
- 5:20 7:30 9:45
- NOTICE- I
Student Publications Offices I
Will Be I
CLOSED
To Normal Business I
Thurs. & Fri., Nov. 24 & 25 I
ALL ADVERTISING FOR MONDAY AND I
TUESDAY'S EDITIONS, NOV. 28 & 29, I
MUST BE IN BY 5 P.M. TOMORROW I
WATCH FOR
OUR SPECIAL
CHRISTMAS GIFT GUIDE
STARTING DEC. 2 I

services
SPECIAL WITH KATHY .
offering a $35.00 permanent for
the amount of $17.50 Acrossfrom
Ramada Inn. Agnes Beauty Salon,
16 NW 13th Street. 376-9922 (M-56-
st-c)
IN A HURRY? PASSPORTS, AP APPLICATIONS,
PLICATIONS, APPLICATIONS, CHILDRENS PHO PHOTOS,
TOS, PHOTOS, COMMERCIALS ANDSPEC ANDSPECIAL
IAL ANDSPECIAL PROBLEMS. WESTLEY WESTLEYROOSEVELT
ROOSEVELT WESTLEYROOSEVELT STUDIOS, 372-0300,
909 NW 6th Street. (M-52-10t-c).
! personal
I
TO THE MEN OF DELTA
TAU DELTA. MUCH LOVE AND
APPRECIATION! SISTERS OF
THE IRIS. (J-59-lt-c).
THREE kittens free. Have had
all their shots. 1 grey and white,
1 yellow and 1 black. Will deliver.
Call 466-3353. (J-59-3t-c).

CAMPUS CUTIE -- Todays Gator Girl is
lovely Marsha Goheen, a sophomore from
St. Petersburg. Marsha won the Florida Sun
Goddess contest held in St. Pete last year
and was on the Miss Seminole court. She
is a Chi Omega.

Page 9

$33 Million Being Spent
On New UF Buildings

By STEPHEN BOSCH
AHigato Correspondent
Over $33 million worth of new
buildings, ranging from a laundry
building to the new Florida Union,
are in various stages of constuc constuction
tion constuction on the bulging UF campus.
According to the office of the
Architect to the University, there
are more than 10 construction
companies working on more than
14 different projects, erecting
new buildings and renovating old
ones.
The cost is shared among many,
but the state and federal govern governments
ments governments are bearing the bulk of
the expense.
Over $6 million is being spent
on the new engineering complex
which will consist of five fields
of engineering.
The Mechanical Engineering
building is across from Graham
Hall on North-South Drive. The

| ROBBIES
For The Best In Steak
QiSandwiches
11718 W. University Ave.
I *On The Gold Coast

other four engineering fields,
chemical, electrical, aerospace
and bio-environmental, are
located just south of Radio Road
next to the sewage treatment plant.
The electrical engineering
building is scheduled for com completion
pletion completion in September of 1967
while the other four should be
completed by June of 1967.
The huge new Florida Union
that has just been completed cost
over $5 million. It will house
student government offices, a
469-seat theatre, bowling alleys
and a bake shop, among other
things. It is scheduled to be in
use by this January.
The $2.8 million Research Li Library,
brary, Library, on University Ave., will
be moved into over the Christmas
holidays. It will contain stacks,
offices, seminar rooms and
storage areas. '*
Two tower dormitories that will
have 200 four-student suites are

Fla. Players
Rehearse Epic
Os Civil War
John Brown's Body," a theatre
epic based on Be nets poem of
the Civil War, is now in re rehearsal.
hearsal. rehearsal. Actors, singers, and
dancers are working in units to
build their individual parts into
a vast dramatic panorama of
action, music, poetry and motion.
The version of the poem to be
staged Nov. 30-Dec. 4 in Norman
auditorium was adapted for the
stage by Dr. Gil Lazier, profes professor
sor professor of theatre.
The three principal characters
oj narrators who initiate the act action
ion action as well as assuming various
roles (R. E. Lee, Lincoln, John
Brown), are played by Jerry
Rhodes, Jim Richardson, and
Carol Nurenberg. The Northern
couple is played by Robert Hef Hefley
ley Hefley and Sherry Penn; the South Southern
ern Southern couple by Jim Mooty and
Patty Fielder.
An important part of the epic
presentation is the chorus, which
will speak and sing comments
and mood elements of the drama.
The chorus includes Carl Strano
(choral leader), Lon Winston,
David Edwards, Clifford Wood,
Terry Daugherty, Susan Lane,
Linda Tarler, Toni Giliberti,
Carol Cohen, and Alice Sch Schweyer.
weyer. Schweyer.
Hie dance ensemble, under the
direction of Sherry Penn, in includes
cludes includes Sherry Atherton, Debby
Penick, A1 Pinan, Claude Pinkston,
Barbara Thomas, and Jim Thomp Thompson.
son. Thompson. Understudies are Mary Dun Duncan
can Duncan and David Wright.
Tickets for John Brown's Body
go on sale Monday at the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union Box Office.

expected to be finished by August
of 1967. They are being built on the
corner of 13th Street and S.W. 8
Avenue and will cost close to $4
millionmostly in federal money.
The new Law Center will cost
close to $3 million, most of which
will be state funds, and will be
completed by August of 1968. There
will be a moot court area along
with lecture halls and faculty
offices.
The National Aeronautics and
Space Administration (NASA)
is footing the bulk of $1.2 mil mil.
. mil. lion for a new space sciences
research building that is sch scheduled
eduled scheduled for completion in Jan January
uary January of 1968.
It will have a large computer
area along with 38 labs and
54 offices a>nd will be located
across Hub.
The Chemistry Departmental Departmentalready
ready Departmentalready has its new $1.7 million
research unit in use. It is across
from the Florida Union and lodges
labs and seminar rooms.
By February of 1968 a $2.6
million part of the life sciences
complex should be completed. It
will house offices and labs and is
situated south of Radio Road by
Center Drive.
Associated with the move movement
ment movement of the Plants and Grounds
Department is the construction
of a new laundry building that
will cost about $260,000 one
of the less costly projects.
There is also to be a large
utilities service expansion cost costing
ing costing over $3 million. It is aimed
at l>etter electrical and water dis distribution
tribution distribution and more sewage treat treatment
ment treatment facilities throughout the
campus. This project is sche scheduled
duled scheduled for completion around July
of !" 7.



Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 22, 1966

Phi Beta
Kappa Taps
New Members
Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's
oldest Greek letter fraternity, has
just announced the election of ele eleven
ven eleven University of Florida seniors,
eight of them candidates for de degrees
grees degrees in December and three for
degrees in April.
Seven of the eight December
candidates are women. The eight
are: Mrs. Margot Brooks Castle,
Miss Barbara Cooley, Miss Can Candice
dice Candice Hampton, Mrs. Janice Her Hernandez,
nandez, Hernandez, Mrs. Marilyn Masling Mc-
Ennan, Miss Jane Malinoff,
Charles Oliveros HI, and Miss
Antonia Pleterski.
A new departure in local Phi
Beta Kappa practice was marked
by the election of three students
on the basis of the work comple completed
ted completed at the end of their junior
year. They are Stephen Fuquay,
Miss Patricia Mitchell, and Theo Theodore
dore Theodore Steger Jr., who are sched scheduled
uled scheduled to graduate in April.
Requirements for Phi Beta
Kappa specify that those elected
must rank within the top fifteen
percent of their class, and must
be enrolled primarily in courses
having to do with liberal" learn learning,
ing, learning, as distinct from professional
or pre-professional training. Or Ordinarily,
dinarily, Ordinarily, those elected to Phi Beta
Kappa have over-all and upper upperdivision
division upperdivision averages over 3.5. In
recent years, no more than six
per cent of the graduating seniors
in Arts and Sciences have been
elected.
Among those just elected, four
have upper division averages of
4.0.
In addition to the eleven sen seniors,
iors, seniors, several students graduated
during the spring and summer
were also elected. They are: from
the April graduates, Barbara Alex Alexander,
ander, Alexander, Raymond Gilbert, Linda
Bussey Griffin, and Jon Runge.
The June graduates elected to Phi
Beta Kappa are Terry Gandy, Kath Kathryn
ryn Kathryn Harry, and Katherine Murray.
Eight August graduates were elec elected:
ted: elected: Robert Bailey, Paul Colbert,
Tom Freijo, Jane Mucke Johnson,
Dennis Jowaisas, Mary Mitchell
Brye, John Rice and Lewis Shelley.
Three graduate students were j
also elected: Carlos Bunge, John
Connoly, and John Corbet.
Founded on December 5, 1776,
Phi Beta Kappa will celebrate its
190th Anniversary next month. O Originally,
riginally, Originally, mainly a society of
congenial spirits", it has become
more an honor society, recogni recognizing
zing recognizing students of special intellectual
capacity and attainment in the
liberal arts and sciences. The Uni University
versity University of Florida Chapter was
founded in 1938.
Requirements for membership
include not only superior achieve achievement
ment achievement in ones field, but also in interest
terest interest and ability in other areas
as well, the five different areas
are humanities, social sciences,
biological sciences, physical sci sciences
ences sciences and mathematics. It is us usually
ually usually considered that weaknesS in
any of these areas in lower di division
vision division work should be off-set by
further and improved work in such
areas in upper division electives.
University of Florida students
have also been elected in pre previous
vious previous years from the colleges of
agriculture, business administra administration,
tion, administration, education, engineering, and
law.
(XEROX copies
I 1-19 Copies, 10$ ea.
20 & Over, 9$
Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a_ m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE

% X
I After Turning 18 i
V ,v
IWatch Draft Status!
!v !>
* &
£ By DAVID ROPES &
; v!
Alligator Correspondent
**
**
At 18 you are of legal age to drive a car, allowed to drink if £|j
x you're in some states, but most significant, it means that you g
£ are eligible for the draft.
& Many freshmen at the UF have to face the problem of signing £
up for the draft at the local board here in Gainesville. The law £
£ requires that each boy has to register with the selective service £
£ board within five days after his birthday.
£ Many students are under the wrong impression that if they £:
>: sign up with the Gainesville board it will become their local £:
| board.
£ When the student first comes in to sign up he has to sign a tally £
sheet which indicates his home town. From this tally sheet g
the Gainesville board sends the student's registration papers to g
£ his local board. This is usually the first and last time that the :j£
£ Gainesville board sees the student.
In order for the college student to obtain and keep a 2-S £
£ classification he must stay in phase (complete the equivalent £
;£ of one year of school each year); the criteria for this requirement £
:£ varies with every local board. £:
£ All undergraduates must score a minimum of 70 on the college g
deferment exam. Freshmen must rank in the top half of their g
£ class, sophomores in the top two-thirds and juniors in the top g
£ three-quarters. g
Some students are under the misconception that in order to be :£
exempt from the draft they must fulfill only one of the preceding £
£ requirements.
£ Each individual board sets up the determining criteria for a £
£ 2-S classification. If the student fails to meet any one of the £
£ qualifications set up by his local board he is eligible to be drafted. ££
: If a student receives a 1-A classification while he is still g
:j in school then he should immediately appeal to his local board £
: to be reclassified l-S(C).
To qualify for the l-S(C) classification the student must be :£
enrolled as a full-time student at the time he recieves his induct- £
j: ion orders. :£
j: A reclassification of l-S(C) allows the student to continue £:
: in school for the rest of the year, provided he does not leave
school for any reason.
During this period of time, if the student can pull up his :£
grades, make up the lost hours, or pass the draft exemption £
test, he might qualify to regain his 2-S status when his l-S(C) ;i£
:j classification expires. g
Another alternative for the student classified l-S(C) is to join g
a reserve unit or some other service branch before time ex- £
: pires on his l-S(C) status. g
If you havent received this years 2-S deferment, and are g
lacking any one of the draft board requirements, then you should £
check with your local board. £
: If you have already received your 2-S deferment, then rest £
assured that your draft board wont bother you providing you stay £
: out of trouble and dont drop out of school.
STEAKS I
AT STUDENT PRICES
Clm khM. 1c VihdlM.
LONDON BROIL $1.15
K.C. STRIP STEAKS
$1.50 $1.95 $2.35
(8oz.) (120 z.) (140 z.)
J
All the Above Served with Large Bowl
of Chopped Salad /' ~
Choice of Italian, French, or Thousand 3 ST
Island Dressing
French Fried, Mashed, or Baked
with Sour Cream I
All the Rolls and Butter You Want y
Second Coffee or Tea Free
WONDEh HOTJSE
RESTAURANT jU
14 sw First SI. (Ask Any Old Timer) 372- 2405
i ..... -

SORORITY TROPHY
NEEDS A NAME

By CHERI WAX
Alligator Correspondent
This year sororities may
compete among themselves for
a trophy awarded by the Greek
Council for outstanding ser service
vice service to the campus and com community.
munity. community.
In the past, both sororities
and fraternities nave competed
for the Klein H. Graham Service
Award, but only fraternities had
the manpower to win.
Last year, Greek Council recog recognized
nized recognized Delta Phi Epsilon sorority
for its outstanding contribution of
service and awarded the sorority
a plaque.
David Wilson, Greek Council
president, felt that sororities
werent being recognized for
their service merely because
their membership is smaller than
the fraternities.
So to add incentive, start starting
ing starting this year, sororities can
cofnpete for a large rotat rotating
ing rotating trophy to be awarded in
the spring.
The newly created award is
as yet unnamed, however. Wilson
urged students and faculty mem members
bers members to submit names of out outstanding
standing outstanding female alumnae, either
living or dead, to the council for
selection.
Klein H. Graham was business
manager of the UF for 41 years.
Wilson explained that Graham was
selected because we felt that
his long list of services to the
community, the university and to
the state of Florida qualified him
as the best possible example for

I See Whats New Inj
I The Browse Shop
I CRC MATH TABLES CHEMICAL RUBBER CO. I
I VALLEY OF THE DOLLS JACQUELINE SUSANN I
I NOTES FOR A YOUNG PAINTER I
I HIRAM WILLIAMS I
I JOY OF COOKING IRMA S. ROMBAUER I
I GUERRILLA v CHARLES THAYER I
I THE COMMON SENSE BOOK OF PUPPY & I
I DOG CARE HARRY MILLER I
I VIET NAM IN PHOTOGRAPHS & TEXT I
I FELIX GREENE I
I CHRISTMAS IS TOGETHER TIME
I CHARLES SCHUTZ 1
I YERTLE THE TURTLE DR. SEUSS I
I THIS IS MY BELOVED WALTER BENTON I
I Store Hours 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. I
I Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 I
I Compos Shop 4 Bookstore |
: 6 ;
Florida ? vs. Miami ?
Have you heard about
JERRYS PICK THE FINAL SCORE CONTEST?
SIOO.OO in CASH PRIZES
No purchase required get your entry blanks at
JERRYS RESTAURANT 13th Street
1505 N. W. 13th Street

a service trophy.
This is the type of person we
want to name this new award for,
Wilson said.
Suggestions and a brief essay
explaining why the person is worthy
of having the trophy named for her,
should be sent to room 209,
Florida Union, by Dec. 7.
Quarter Brings
More Courses
( FROM PAGE 1 )
The extra courses this new
system will add will necessitate
more classroom space and facil facilities,
ities, facilities, Sharp said.
Education students have little
to worry about in transferring
trimester credits to quarter cre credits,
dits, credits, said Sharp.
In most instances we have been
able to work any problems out.
We dont want to penalize the stu student
dent student at all. We are trying to avoid
making any set rules, said Sharp.
As a counselor, Sharp doesnt
see much difference between the
two systems.
It seems the quarter system
will be no worse than the trimes trimester
ter trimester as far as numbfer of regis registrations
trations registrations go. It seems that the
counseling department is always
stopping and starting, stated
Sharp.
Sometimes I wish we were
under a unimesterj system so
there would only be one regis registration
tration registration a year, mused Sharp.



Spartans Get Nod
Edge ND For No. 1

NEW YORK (UPI) Defending
national champion Michigan State
energed a winner from its 10-10
tie with Notre Dame by unseating
the Irish Monday from the No. 1
position in the United Press In International
ternational International major college football
ratings.
UF Billiards
Tournament
Successful
The fall 66 billiards tournament
sponsored by the Florida Union
Board Recreation Committee was a
success with 22 entrants in
the straight pool tourney and four
in the carom contest.
John Kirkland took the carom
play hands down. In the straight
pool semi-finals, right-hander Bill
Ploss, 4AS, beat Richard Trapp,
last fall's winner, 50-49. Ploss
left-handed younger brother,
Mark, lUC, beat John Kirk Kirkland,
land, Kirkland, last winters champ, 50-42.
In the finals, Mark, who has been
playing two and a half years,
had a solid 100-65 win over Bill,
who has been playing four years.
Engraved trophies were award awarded
ed awarded to the winners.
Erv Meeth, Games Area
Manager for the Florida Union,
said another tournament will be
held in January.By that time the
new union should be opened and
there is a good chance that Wil Willie
lie Willie Mosconi or some other big
name in billiards will make an
appearance.
The winner of that tournament
will go to the regional tournaments
on Feb. 17-16, which will be held
in the new union if it is finished
on time. Meeth has been appoint appointed
ed appointed Tournament Director for
Region 5, which includes Florida,
Georgia, Alabama, and Miss Mississippi.
issippi. Mississippi.

UF Judo Club Wins State-
Throws All Competition

The Gators of the UF Judo
Club captured the team champ championship
ionship championship in state-wide competition
with several of Floridas univer universities
sities universities and colleges.
The Gators 24 points doubled
the 12 points of second place
Miami Dade Jr. College.
The 4th annual collegiate tourn tournament
ament tournament under the direction of Coach
Richard Reisinger attracted over
50 contestants including some of
the states finest competitors. Sev Seven
en Seven of the 14 Gators on the team
received places.
First place winners included
Jack Haney (150 lb. div.) and
David Frisby (165 lb. div.); se second
cond second places went to Martien Car Carroll
roll Carroll (180 lb. div.), Mike Powell
(unlimited div.) and Jerry Nghiem
(165 lb. div.); third places were
captured by Paul Desroches (135
lb. div.) and Chuck Hogg (unlim (unlimited
ited (unlimited div.).
David Frisby, a brown belt and
assistant instructor, demonstrated
his fine technique in the overall
competition by stoning the two
black belt winners of the 135
and 150 pound divisions
Other Gator judoists showing fine
spirit were Elmer Posick, Bruce
Hinshelwood, Steve Rottblatt, Tom
Freigo, Adrian Fasardo and Clyde
Killer.

In one of the closest races in
the history of the ratings, the 35-
man UPI Board of Coaches
awarded the Spartans the top spot
by the slim margin of three points
- 318 to 315.
The sudden shift in the ratings
thus puts Michigan State in pos position
ition position to win its second consecutive
and third overall national title.
Although the Spartans have
completed their season with a 9-
0-1 record, they will have to
sweat out the final edition of
the ratings next week.
~ Notre Dame, which drew critic criticism
ism criticism for running out the clock in
the final 1 1-2 minutes of the game
last weekend, nevertheless man managed
aged managed to receive more first place
votes than the Spartans.
Notre Dame drew 14 for the top
spot, State earned 12 outright and
two coaches pegged it a tie for the
top between the two Midwest
powers.
As a result, each team receiv received
ed received two half votes for first for tot totals
als totals of 15 and 13, overall.
Stronger overall support,
however, swung* the balance of
power in favor of State, which
led the ratings until mid-Oct mid-October
ober mid-October when the Irish surged ahead.
The Spartans received 16 votes
for second, one for third, three
for fourth and one for fifth.
The Irish had 11 votes for se second,
cond, second, three for third, three for
fourth and two for fifth.
Alabama, Nebraska and Georgia
Tech, the nations three other un undefeated
defeated undefeated teams in the major
college ranks, continued to rank
third through fifth.
Alabama and Nebraska, who will
meet in the Sugar Bowl on Jan.
2, drew two and three first place
votes, respectively, while Georgia
Tech, set for the Orange Bowl
against Florida, received one.
The final first place nomination
went to sixth-ranked UCLA,
Florida, which hosts Miami Fla.
this weekend for the Florida State
title, was ninth.

I
BWW
i t % fwr i m TjHHp..
tm 3V jf >
££§|[ iJPi^
Hr 4 % y *"' 40-
F &W. .. JF- a
Bfe *vv 4c
l|
I I Jl
Bhkto*MtiK .if
l
UFs HANEY THROWS FOR
... a tough match

ALLIGATOR
SPORTS

Tuesday. November 22, 10G6

SPURRIER GOES FOR HEISMAN
. o the highest honor

HURRICANES ARE HUGE

Mighty Mites Meet Miami;
Like David Vs. Goliath

By BUDDY MARTIN
Today Sports Editor
MIAMI Well, sighed Gene
Ellenson, Id sure like to borrow
the Green Bay Packers defensive
line next Saturday.
Floridas defensive chief likes
to joke. But this time he wasnt
kidding. There is nothing funny
about the task facing Ellenson.
Between now and Saturday at
2 p.m., Ellenson must muster
the personnel to stop Miami.
Its like putting Willie Hartack
in the ring to fight Sonny Liston.
Well show up, said Ellenson
who was a spectator at Friday
nights Miami-lowa game along

with Ray Graves and his Gator
contingent.
Well just have to stick Brian
Jetter and Don Giordano in there
and go with the rest of the Mighty
Mites.
When Miami stepped off the two
buses which carried them to the
Orange Bowl Friday night where
they pulverized lowa, 44-0, it
looked like the San Diego Chargers
instead of the college team.
Their two wideouts must weigh
240 pounds each quipped one
awed writer.
Richard Trapp (Florida wing wingback)
back) wingback) will have to run end around
to get downfield and run his
patterns, said Florida assistant
Bubba McGowan.
Graves had planned to bring his
quarterback, Steve Spurrier, to
help scout the Hurricanes. Its
a good thing Spurrier didnt come.
He might have nightmares all
week of being chased by Miami
linemen Ted Hendricks (6-7, 267),
Bob Tatarek (6-4, 229) and Gene
Trosch (6-6, 247.).
They are not just big and strong.
Theyre big, strong fast and
good.
On one play against lowa, Hend Hendricks
ricks Hendricks got knocked to the ground.
But his arms are so long, he
reached up while laying on his

UF Club Captures
Karate Tournament
UF won seven of 12 trophies in the 1966 Invitational Karate
Tournament. Competing again c : UF were Chi Do Kwan Karate
schools from Jacksonville and Ocala and Tae Kwan Do Karate
School in Sarasota.
The winners in the brown belt division were: first place,
Mike Bryant of Chi Kwan; second place, Richard Morris
of Chi Kwan; third place, Larry Levin of UF.
Winners in the white belt division were: first place, Ted
Satcher of UF; second, Richard Nichols of Chi Kwan; third,
Rich Claohe of UF.
Form exercise winners in the brown belts were: first place,
Peter Haddad of UF; second place, Ted Powers of UF; third,
0 Don Collyen of UF.
Winners in the white belt division were: first, Steve Harris
of Tae Kwan Do; second, Ted Satcher of UF; third, Scott Chest Chestnut
nut Chestnut of Tae Kwan Do.
This is the first year that UF has had so many high-ranking
Karate black belts. This also represented the most successful
Karate tournament held at UF.

belly and made the tackle.
If they get to Spurrier, there
might be two big events in the life lifetime
time lifetime of the Gator quarterback next
week winning the Heisman
Trophy and his funeral.
True, lowa has to be one of
the countrys worst major college
football teams. But the Hawke yes
took worse punishment physically
than they did on the score scoreboard.
board. scoreboard.
If Florida is to beat Miami and
establish the best record in the
schools history (9-1), itll be the
biggest upset in the big vs. the
little contests since David brought
down Goliath.
Frankly, over lining up against
Tatarek, Hendricks and Troschj Id
prefer going to Viet Nam.
Tennessee/ Miami
Accept Bowl Bids
Compiled From UPI Sources
Two more Southern teams have
accepted post-season bowl bids.
Tennessee accepted a bid today
to play Syracuse in the 22nd an annual
nual annual Gator Bowl football game in
Jacksonville, Dec. 31.
Miamis Hurricanes, whom the
Gators meet this Saturday, today
accepted a bid to play in the
Dec. 10 Liberty Bowl game in
Memphis, Tenn.

Page 11



Page 12

:, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 22, 1966

J \
Ga. Tech
Record
Won Nine, Lost 0
38 TexasA&M 3
42 Vanderbilt 0
13 Clemson 12
6 Tennessee 3
17 Auburn 3
35 Tulane 17
48 Duke 7
14 Virginia 13
21 Penn State 0
Nov. 27 at Georgia
Florida Tech Series:
Tech, 22 wins
Florida, 6 wins
Ties, 5
use Purdue

ATLANTA (UPI) Bowl bids
flowed like holiday wine Monday
with only one real surprise in
the post season games lineup.
The biggest exception was the
Rose Bowl where the Pacific-8
Conference bypassed once-beaten,
sixth-ranked UCLA and chose
instead twice-beaten, 10th- ranked
Southern California to face Purdue.
UCLA ended its season Saturday
by beating Southern California 14-7
and apparently winning the Rose
Bowl berth.
But the Conference voted in favor
of the Trojans who play ranked

Graves Delighted
About Orange Bid

By SKIP PEREZ
Alligator Sports Writer
Its official now, Floridas foot football
ball football Gators are going to the Orange
Bowl where theyll meet fifth fifthranked
ranked fifthranked Georgia Tech the evening
of Jan. 2.
We certainly are delighted to
be in the Orange Bowl Classic
against Tech, head coach Ray
Graves happily announced. Pm
sure itll be an offensive game that
the fans will enjoy.
Graves reminded that his old
buddy Georgia Tech head coach
Bobby Dodd is ahead of him in
victories and he hopes to catch
up in this meeting. Graves was
assistant head coach under Dodd
at Tech before he came to Flor Florida.
ida. Florida.
I think most of the boys wanted
to go to the Orange Bowl because
a lot of them are from Florida and
it makes it a lot easier for their
families to see them play, the
head Gator said. Also weve never
been there before.
VISIT
Uton
Where Everyone
Meets

Gators GetOrangeowl Bid,
Meet Georgia Tech at Miami

MIAMI (UPI) Unbeaten Geor Georgia
gia Georgia Tech and once-beaten Florida
accepted bids to the Jan. 2 Orange
Bowl Monday.
But you can bet they wont.be
caught looking past their sepa separate
rate separate grudge bowls* on Satur Saturday.
day. Saturday.
Georgia Tech is unbeaten in
nine games and Florida, led by
Heisman Trophy candidate quar quarterback
terback quarterback Steve Spurrier, is 8-1
for the season.
Those records, however, are
in double jeopardy this weekend.
Tech takes on Cotton Bowl
bound Georgia and Florida plays
Miami, headed for the Liberty
Bowl, in the season windup for
the four teams.
Miami and Georgia won these
games last year.
The Orange Bowl is the only
night game among the big bowls
and will be played before a crowd
of more than 70,000 at Miami.
It will be Floridas first ap appearance
pearance appearance and the fourth for Geor Georgia
gia Georgia Tech, which is 3-1 in the
classic.
Alabama Nebraska

Notre Dame this coming Saturday.
We thought Arkansas was
a sure bet that upset really
caught us by surprise,** said Cot Cotton
ton Cotton Bowl committeeman James
Stewart who was at Athens, Ga.,
to extend an invitation to South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference co-champion
Georgia. We traditionally give the
host berth to the Southwest Confer Conference
ence Conference winner.*
The Big Ten has a ruling that
its teams cant go to the Rose
Bowl two years in a row.
Thus giving second-place Pur Purdue
due Purdue the nod instead of champion

The Gators hit the practice field
hard yesterday, donning pads. It
was the hardest Monday workout
the team has had all year, accord according
ing according to Graves.
Jim Yarbrough, the 6-6, 240-
pound giant from Arcadia, is now
running first team tight end by
virtue of his sterling perform performance
ance performance against Tulane two weekends
ago. Punjab moves up to the
slot previously occupied by Jack
Coons.
Even with all the commotion
about the Orange Bowl at the Ga Gator
tor Gator camp, sights are firmly set
on Miami, whom Florida will host
here Saturday afternoon. It is the
last game of the season for both
bitter rivals.

7 r George Corl Mel Ward I
Dan s I
VI 1636 W. Univ. Ave.
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 376-1208 I
FULL AVIATION COVERAGE I
DEFERRED PREMIUM PAYMENTS I
(Until Your Earnings Increase) M
Tb Collup Pirn Tin Tb Cotltfit -Mo/ti |

Steve Spurrier

Georgia SMU

Michigan State.
Despite the NCAA ruling, many
of the bowl pairings have been
known for weeks.
This is especially true of the
Orange and Sugar bowls.
The NCAA had said bowls which
made commitments prior to
Monday would be in danger of
Official Bowl
Announcements
The formal announcements pro provided
vided provided the following card: Dec. 10:
Liberty Bowl, Memphis, Tenn.
Miami, Fla. vs. an opponent to
be named next week.
Dec. 17: Bluebonnet Bowl, Hous Houston,
ton, Houston, Tex. Mississippi vs. either
Arkansas or Southern Methodist,
depending on which goes to the
Cotton Bowl.
Dec. 31: Cotton Bowl, Dallas,
Tex. Georgia vs. Southern Meth Methodist
odist Methodist or Arkansas. SMU must beat
or tie Texas Christian Saturday
to earn the berth.
Gator Bowl, Jacksonville, Fla.-
Syracuse vs. Tennessee.
Jan. 2: Orange Bowl, Miami
night Georgia Tech vs. Flor Florida.
ida. Florida.
Sugar Bowl, New Orleans Al Alabama
abama Alabama vs. Nebraska.
Rose Bowl, Pasadena, Calif.
Purdue vs. UCLA.

. the quarterbacks

Kim King

Syracuse Tennessee

losing their sanctions, but this
warning obviously was ignored.
The Southeast annually dom dominates
inates dominates the bowls, and this year
is no exception as the region
made off with seven of the
11 available berths and could

CHICKEN
I DINNER I
I Tuesday Only I
I hot fried chicken, a heaping order of tasty french
H fried potatoes, and hot rolls, all in a cute toy
B Red Barn box. fl
C 59
I RED BiLRH I
J 2029 N.W. 13th St. Across from Gainesville High School I
Florida ? vs. Miami ? I
Ha-ve heard about 1
JERRYS PICK THE FINAL SCORE CONTEST? I
SIOO.OO in CASH PRIZES I
No purchase req ired get your entry blanks atl
JERRYS RESTAURANT 2310 S.W. 13th Street I
1505 N. W. 13th Street!

Orange Bowl President John
Ring went to Atlanta to issue the
invitation to Georgia Tech, rank ranked
ed ranked sth nationally by UPI.
Florida is 10th on the list.
, Jack Baldwin and Bill Gaither
traveled to Gainesville to make
the Florida plea and were im immediately
mediately immediately rewarded with an
okay" from school president J.
Wayne Reitz.
This is a historic occasion
for the University of Florida/'
said head coach Ray Graves.
I personally think that two
offensive-minded teams such as
Georgia Tech and Florida will
put on a great show.*
Tech head coach and athletic
director Bobby Dodd said he was
happy to accept the invitation.
But its a wonder Tech can
get excited over a bowl when
the Yellow Jackets are steeped
in post-season tradition, having
won 12 and lost five in 17 bowl
appearances.
Georgia Tech beat Texas Tech
31-21 in the Gator Bowl last year
while Florida bowed 20-18 to Mis Missouri
souri Missouri in the Sugar Bowl.
The Sugar Bowl loss left Flor Florida
ida Florida with a 3-2 bowl record.
The teams other four appear appearances
ances appearances were in the Gator Bowl.
Florida's only loss during the
regular season this year was to
Georgia, 27-10.

make it eight by grabbing the
open Liberty Bowl spot.
This will be the 20th bowl
appearance for Alabama, which*
hasnt missed a bowl since 1958.
Its the 18th appearance for
Georgia Tech.