Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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MR. DYNAMITE -- James Brown will
entertain more than 7,000 Friday night
in the gym. There are still 50 tickets
available at the Florida Union box office.
Council Tickets Committee
To Solve Ticket Problems?

By MAURY OLICKER
Alligator Staff Writer
Students worrying about tickets
to next years Homecoming game
can breathe a sign of relief
maybe.
A committee of Legislative
Council members, appointed two
weeks ago, has been recognized
by the Athletic Association as an
agent of the student body, and will
begin discussion in January on new
seating plans for football games.
The committee, consisting of
Dave Vosloh, Greg Johnson and
Lou Tally, was first created to
insure that problems similar to
those encountered at Homecoming
do not arise at the UF vs. Miami
game Nov. 26. But, according to
Asst. Athletic Director Percy
Beard, it is too late now to do
anything about this game, since
the arrangements have already
been made. We just hope, said
committee chairman Vosloh, that
a lot of people go home for Thanks Thanksgiving
giving Thanksgiving and stay there.
The athletic department, how however,
ever, however, has agreed to meet with the
Council members and work out
an entirely new seating plan for
all home games, if necessary.
There is a strong possibility, re reports
ports reports Vosloh, that there will be
a greater total number of seats
available next year than now.
Students are urged to submit
plans for the new seating arrange arrangement,
ment, arrangement, in triplicate, to any of the
committee members, so that the
greatest possible number of ideas
can be taken into consideration.
Among the plans that have been
proposed are one to eliminate

assigned seating entirely, making
each game a free-for-all for seats,
and another, requiring each student
to purchase an assigned seat for
the entire season that would not
change from game to game.

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NEW VOTING DEMONSTRATION SCHEDULED FOR THURSDAY
. new IBM machines in Bryan Lounge

Vol 59, No. 55

UF CHANGES IN SEPTEMBER
Quarter System Goal:
More f lntense l Study

By AGGIE FOWLES
Alligator Staff Writer
The basic philosophy of the quar quarter
ter quarter system is that students will
take fewer courses with a more
intense treatment of them, accord according
ing according to Dr. R. L. Lassiter, as assistant
sistant assistant dean of academic affairs.
UF officially switches over to
quarter system operation in Fall
1967. Registration for the fall term
will begin Sept. 18 and lasts for
a week. Each quarter is 11 weeks
long including one week for exams.
One feature of the quarter the
students are sure to like is that
there will be no 7:30 a.m. classes,
Lassiter said.

New Voting Method
Trial Run Thursday

Students will have the oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to try out the new IBM
Votomatic Thursday in Bryan
Lounge when a mock election will
be held to test the new machines.
The Votomatic is a new concept
in voting which utilizes a com computer
puter computer to record votes faster and
cheaper.
The Secretary of Interior's of office
fice office is considering the machines
as a more modern and less ex expensive
pensive expensive way of carrying out stu student
dent student elections.
When using the Votomatic the
voter uses a stylus to punch out
seered blocks in a computer in input
put input card. The choices of candi candidates
dates candidates and issues are listed on a
sheet with arrows pointing to the
blocks on the card. When finish-

The Florida
Alligator

University of Florida

Classes will be 50 minutes in
length and the first hour begins
at 8 a.m.
All courses have been converted
to the quarter-credit system.
Course schedule books and the UF
catalogue will be available to stu students
dents students Feb. 1, Lassiter said.
A semester credit is two-thirds
of the quarter credit now used by
UF. For example, 120 semester
hours are equivilant to 180 quar quarter
ter quarter hours.
There will be some variation in
the number courses a student
takes, dependent on how the in individual
dividual individual departments converted,
Lassiter said. However, the nor-

ed with one sheet the voter turns
to the next sheet and exposes a
new row of blocks on the input
card.
When the voter is finished he
removes the card from the
machines and deposits it into a
ballot box. After the polls close
the cards are assembled and or ordered
dered ordered so they can be fed into
the computer.
The computer can tabulate the
votes for all the candidates and
issues at a rate of about 500
votes per minute. For major stu student
dent student elections the results should
be available in less than 30 min minutes
utes minutes after the cards are fed to
the computer.
The computer can tabulate the
(SEE VOTING PAGE 12)

Wednesday November 16, 1966

mal course load will be 4, he
said.
It is our intent that no student
be penalized by the change,
Lassiter said. Many colleges will
encourage the students to go
to school this summer to avoid
sequence problems, he said*
Lassiter stressed that the coun counselors
selors counselors will be aware of any prob problem
lem problem within a particular college
and will be able to help students
cope with these problems.
Examinations will be two hours
instead of three, he said. No stu student
dent student will be required to take more
than three exams per day.
Classes for the fall quarter end
ception of one comprehensive
course examination on Saturday,
no finals will be scheduled for
that weekend, he said.
Registration is being changed
over to a highly computerized
operation, Lassiter pointed out.
Hopefully, under this new system
students will be counseled for the
entire year, including class sched scheduling
uling scheduling and registering, he added.
Degree requirements are es essentially
sentially essentially the same, except in
Business Administration which
reduced the required credit
hours from 196 to 186, according
to Lassiter.
Registration for the secoiM
quarter will be Jan. 2 and 3,
and classes begin Jan 4. Lassit Lassiter
er Lassiter pointed out that nearly every everyone
one everyone will be registered before
this time.
The second quarter ends March
8 with exams from March 11-16.
Third quarter classes begin March
25 and run through May 31. The
exam period for the third quarter
is June 3-8 with registration
for the fourth quarter taking place
during the same week.
The first quarter-system Uni University-wide
versity-wide University-wide commencement will
be June 9, 1968.
Degrees awarded will be subject
successful completion of re requirements
quirements requirements as final grades will
not be in yet, Lassiter said.
The fourth quarter, including the
exam period, is from June 10 to
August 24.
If the individual colleges wish,
there may be college-wide com commencement
mencement commencement exercises at the end
of every other quarter, Lass Lassiter
iter Lassiter said.
Were trying to get a year yearround
round yearround operation and hope the
same courses will be offered
during the fourth quarter as are
offered during the others, Las Lassiter
siter Lassiter said.
Proposed tuition fees for the
quarter are SIOO per quarter for
Florida students, with an additional
(SEE QUARTER PAGE 12)
Directories
Student Directories will be
distributed at the student in information
formation information booth, across from
the Hub, from 2 til 4 today
and Thursday.
These books are for off cam campus
pus campus students only.



I. The Florida Alligator. Wednesday. November 16, 1966

Page 2

By TYLER TUCKER B I,BBII
Assistant Managing Editor
Gerald Jones, loaded down with cameras, and I made our way
along the hard clay roadside that led to the North Carolina
state fairgrounds. Located on the fringe of Raleigh, the state
capital, the annual fair was in high gear.
The attractions ranged from helicopter rides, to rodeos, to
the fiery madness of racers speeding aroung a soil track. The
flow of people drifted from one attraction to the next, trying to
absorb the color of the activities.
Gerald edged his way through the gate. The sky was beginn beginning
ing beginning to fade as the sun fell slowly behind the Carolina hills. In
another half hour it would be dark.
The dirt path led down a coiling road to the heart of the fair.
We passed small clusters of people and soon found ourselves
in a thick moving mass.
The smell of burning food, the dank smell of popcorn, and
the smoke screens from cigarettes and cigars clouded the at atmosphere.
mosphere. atmosphere. Kids ran haphazardly from booth to booth. Shouts
and screams rose and fell in the wind.
The bronze sky turned to gray and covered the fair with a
cold blanket.
Gerald and I pushed our way through the congested crowds
and headed for the most popular attraction at this years North
Carolina State Fairthe booth of the United Klans Inc.
The booth was a hastily hammered-together, wooden affair
that seemed to lean when a gust of wind brushed by. The white whitewash
wash whitewash had turned to a dingy, pale color. Rising above the booth
was an arched marquee which proclaimed that this was the Unit United
ed United Klans of America, Realm of North Carolina.
The small wooden establishment was decorated with banners,
buttons, and speakers dressed in black shirts. A portrait of
Lurleen Wallace was displayed with the words ** Wallace Country
engraved under the pose. Near the portrait were bumper stick stickers
ers stickers urging Wallace for President.
The booth sold records and pictures and books. For a dollar,
a listener could have a copy of SelmaBefore and After the
Riot, or Riot, Riot, Riot, Riot. v
The speaker wore a black shirt and white tie. His graying
hair was a generous compromise. He continued throating the
philosophy of his organizationevery five minutes breaking his
speech off for a short commercial.
Standing in front of a wall portrait of J. Robert Jones, Grand
Dragon of North Carolina, the speaker tried to sell his biggest
product hatred.
The listeners shuffled restlessly around the booth. The ex expanding
panding expanding crowd was clustering near the phonograph to hear every
word. N
A n is nothing but a n , the voice told them.
Gerald circled the booth, taking pictures. I continued to lis listen
ten listen and take notes. Tben, a small crowd of men gathered behind
the booth and started to dispersein the crowd. Forming a
circle around the crowd, the men began moving in toward the
centerwhere Gerald and I stood.
We found an opening in the confused collection of people
and exited. The voice of the speaker rose to a shout, When you
get to the intersection, you yankees, turn rightthats north.
We made it back to the clay road and headed for our car.
Walking against the bright headlights of the busy road, Gerald
turned to me and said, Thats stupid. I ought to go back and tell
that guy. Im from South Carolina. Thatll give him a shock.
It was dark and cold. We walked the mile to the car and didnt
say a word.
TO ALL STUDENTS I
ygy and university personnel jl
Tv I
I \lkk Lunch vMiviai a Dinner
I 11:30 2:00 CAFETERIA 4:30 8:00|
m^J^AjWSM^ain^on^mpu^Gain^^JJjSjjPPj^^JgJgy
Tb. noit* rw*nw Dm right to ngrtafto Bo typographical toaao< all adrortUomooa and
to r trial or ton mji copy which It ooaalrs objoctloaablo.
MO KSmOM B GUARANTEED, Boogh doslrod position will bo flvoa whoooror poooiblo.
Tho Florida Alligator win not ooaoldar adJaotoMoafpaywoatibr ££££%£
(l)oao day alter adoortiooMot appoaro. ...
Tho noflda wm aotbonopoMtoiarawroaaM^laeorrMtiiiMrttaoa(M|NwUMMot
'nurbOHD* ALLIGATOR B Bo olel otwdaat oiopir of Bo tttoorotty of Florida aadl to
priM 800 Homo wooMyoonopt Otftof May, Jaoa. aod JBywhwino iBBBrt Oaty
JLLrOI aoMMMMI Root 0000 at Goioooolllo.

(Photo by Gerald Jones)
THE SPEAKER
# . selling hatred
DARK AND COLD
... at the fair

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I THANKSGIVING HAIRPIECE SPECIAL I
I Glamorous, gleaming Dynel # I
I expertly blended to match Small Hairpiece s l6 I
I your own hair. I
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Mandatory Classes
Lenient To Student

By SUSAN FROEMKE
Alligator Staff Writer
Is manditory class attendance
the necessary evil many students
consider it to be?
Rebuked and dubbed ridiculous'
by many UF students, the system
actually is quiet lenient with res respect
pect respect to them, according to'F. A.
Doty, dean of University College.
Whether attendance is required
or not is left up to the teacher,"
said Doty. He controls the roll
call. Generally I try to encour encourage
age encourage teachers to take the class
attendance."
It should be manditory,-" he
continued, especially for the
freshmen. At least half of the
freshmen courses are involuntary.
To this type of harshness' some
will express resistance. It's the
universitys policy to give all low lower
er lower division students a general ed education
ucation education so they will have a basis
to work from. It is required that
they get it and this system, in
the long run, assures them of
receiving it.
The upper division college is
different. Students are in the field
of their choice. They have more
self discipline and personal mo motivation.
tivation. motivation. For younger students,
college is often the first time
tljeyve been away from home and
some need a jolt in to going to
clgss."
Required class attendance has
always been a part of the UFs
routine. In theory, it states that
if a student has an excessive num number
ber number of cuts from class (usually
over three unexcused absences)
or unsatisfactory work, his tea teacher
cher teacher can contact the registar's
office which issues an offical war warning
ning warning letter to both the student and
his parents.
It is then up to the student
to make peace with his profes professor,"
sor," professor," said L. V. Voyles, direc director
tor director of Reconds and Registration.
Once warned, if the student con continues
tinues continues to miss class or show un unsatisfactory
satisfactory unsatisfactory work, he's given an
E-W, meaning he has been drop dropped
ped dropped from the course."
Hie warning .letter is also put
in a students academic folder

for counselors to see. Its never
part of the permanent record
just indicative of certain problems.
When I think about class at attendance,"
tendance," attendance," Doty said, I think of
students from 17-19 and I think
of their parents. Most parents
prefer that we check on atten attendance
dance attendance and warn them when their
childs behaviour approaches de delinquency.
linquency. delinquency.
In summer registration when
parents are required to come,
they applaud our policy. I've re received
ceived received thank you notes from par parents
ents parents who have received warning
letters about thir child."
Carole Messer, lUC, comment commented,
ed, commented, Why should it be required
when some students can learn
the material by themselves. If you
need help, then you can get it
in class but if you can under understand
stand understand it by yourself and get every everything
thing everything out of it that they want
on the progs, then whats the sense
in going to class just to get it
rehashed? When you come to col college,
lege, college, you should have enough re responsibility
sponsibility responsibility of your own and your
parents should know you well
enough to know if youll attend
class or not.*
Anyone can read books," said
Doty, thats not education
just exposure. Weve designed our
classes to be small because we
want to encourage students to talk
and discuss the material, to write,
to use their brains and creat.
Debbie Sweitzer. 3IR- said. I
think class attendance should be
manditory for the C-courses. After
these, I feel that only classes
which require individual partici participation
pation participation should be required. Os
course the exception to all this
is the quality of the professor
and/or grad assistant."
Kit Murray, 4AS, said, Ideally,
on a college level, class atten attendance
dance attendance should not be manditbry.
However on the freshmeVi freshmeVisophomore
sophomore freshmeVisophomore level it should be be because
cause because their courses give them in insight
sight insight as to what college expects
from them. On the average at
UF, they arent mature enough
to know whether to go or not
they skip a class, rationalize
it in their mind and skip more.



tW^).
These people know their business...
But not any better than we do.
|Ph. 378-160T*|
Hg USE
HI TRAVEL
3415 W. Univ. Ave
enter the
mntticrstig jiifyop
r FOOTBALL CONTEST
I PRIZE: $25 in Men's or Ladies' Wear I
I Place an "X" in the box of the team you think will
I win Saturday, Nov. 19 Estimate total yards to be
I gained by Fla. St., which will be the tie breaker.
I Florida State vs. Wake Forest
1 Harvard vs. Yale
I Illinois vs. Northwestern
I Miami (Fla.) vs. lowa
I Kentucky vs. Tennessee
I ALL JEANS 25% to 30% OFF
I Corduroys in Navy Burgundy, Beige Lt.
I Blue, Green and Olive plus Brushed Denims
I in waist sizes 28 to 38. All lengths available.
I Hurry while selection is complete
I Value Now
I jWettS 3 4 f 4 9 9 29ept.
I L.S.U. vs. Tulane
I Mississippi vs. Vanderbilt
I Notre Dame vs. Michigan State
I Ohio State vs. Michigan
I UCLA vs. Southern Cal. I
I Total Yards Gained By FLORIDA STATE
I Winners Signature Must Agree With Name on Entry.
1 Entries must be deposited in U Shop by Fri., Nov. 18
I In case of tie, prize will be divided equally among winners.
I WINNERS NAMES TO BE POSTED IN:
I bp Hmuersity &hop
I 1620 West University Avenue Caroiyr. i,
NAME,
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ENTRIES LIMITED, TWO PER PERSON
i. j J~ira j t t I, w 9 rr ,^r-r

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Hf TO J ft'** U
' JETT ..., ~..

RECEIVES MEDAL --Cadet
Lt. John LaMoyne recently
was awarded a history me medal
dal medal by Army ROTC Profes Professor
sor Professor of Military Science Col.

DRIVER IN CRITICAL CONDITION
2 Studentsln Freak Auto Accident

Wiley E. Gustafson, 2UC, and his The cable had been strung across
companion Jean Maloy of Miami, the lower part of the field to fence
were injured Sunday afternoon in off putting greens from the rest
a freak automobile accident on the of the area. University police
UF drill field. report that the cable was marked
with flags.
Gustafson was driving an Austin-
Healey Sprite around the drillfield. A s Gustafsons car struck the
The convertible struck a cable, cable, his autos windshield was
stretched across th§ field, at wind- pierced and the wire hit the driver
shield level. in the neck. Gustafson is now in

Isririy:
l| This Coupon Worth jj |
IH Toward Your Purchase at | ; JJro9jjPj£
j | KINGS FOOD HOST l[j
| p| Use this to prove that Kings serves the r.
JF r a worlds best hamburgers and shakes!! jl F || |
M/JC (Good through Nov. 30, 1966; AjrHl 1802 W. Univ. Ave.
i 1430 S.W. 13th St.

Wednes^y t Novemberl6 4 1966 | TheFlortd^lliga to r.

Arlo Mitchell. LaMoyne also
received a history book for
his performance in the ROTC
program.

critical condition at the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center. He was rush rushed
ed rushed there immediately after the ac accident.
cident. accident.
Miss Maloy who suffered facial
cuts in the accident has been re released
leased released from the hospital.
According to university police,
Miss Maloy said that neither she
nor Gustafson saw the cable until
it was too late.

Page 3



Page 4

t, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 16, 1966

. ..
.



f FROM THE
\ WIRES OF
International
TRAVEL AGENT ARRESTED . WASHINGTON . An American
travel agent, riding on a Soviet airliner, has been arrested in
Czechoslovakia where the plane made an unscheduled landing,
U. S. officials reported today.
He was identified as Vladimir J. Kazan-Komarek, 42, president
of the Harvard Travel Service, Cambridge, Mass.
On Nov. 3, Prague Radio accused Kazan-Komarek of having
helped set up an anti-state organization in Czechoslovakia in
1948. It claimed that as an agent of a foreign intelligence service,
he provided the group with arms, a radio transmitter and money.
ATTACKS COLLABORATION . HONG KONG.. Communist China,
launching a new, bitter attack against U. S. Soviet collaboration,
today promised to continue developing its nuclear arsenal at top
speed despite worldwide condemnation.
Peking accused the Russians of trying to stymie Chinese arms
development and in a crowning blow to its former ally said capital capitalism,
ism, capitalism, graft and corruption were rampant in Russia.
ACCUSES JORDAN . BEIRUT, Lebanon . Damascus Radio
said Tuesday Jordanian police and troops fired on demonstrators
protesting the collusion of Jordanian authorities with zionistGangs
in the border village of Hebron near where Israeli troops struck
Sunday.
It was the second day of Syrian state-run radio attacks on King
Hussein of Jordan. Syria's socialist regime has long been hostile
to the Hashemite refusal to press the Arab campaign of harassment
against the Israeli border.
PROMOTERS ARRESTED . TOKYO . Five members of an
entertainment promotion group were arrested Monday and charged
with exporting teen-age girls to Okinawa to perform as exotic
dancers and strippers.
Police said most of the girls had their travel permits secured
through forged papers and false documents. They said the promoters
siphoned off most of their earnings.
National
FINAL BILL SIGNED . WASHINGTON . President Johnson
today completed work on the final bills sent him by Congress and
dealt with other matters prior to a mid-afternoon check-in at
Bethesda Naval Hospital where he will undergo surgery Wednes Wednesday.
day. Wednesday.
Working late Monday night and Tuesday morning, Johnson com completed
pleted completed signing of legislation passed by the 89th Congress before ad adjournment.
journment. adjournment. The President vetoed three bills, making a total of 22
measures he has rejected this year.
BISHOPS PROTEST . WASHINGTON . America's Roman Cath Catholic
olic Catholic Bishops strongly protested government welfare programs early
this week as tending to coerce poor families into practicing birth
control.
The bishops also elected liberal Archbishop John F. Dearden of
Detroit as their first president and created a new organization to
act on many church issues which previously had been referred to
Rome.
One big question the newly organized bishops will decide this week
is whether to modify the mile of meatless Fridays for American
Catholics.
The bishops' statement, approved unanimously, said the government
seemed to be moving rapidly from merely providing information
about birth control on request toward an aggressive effort to per persuade
suade persuade and even coerce the underprivileged to practice birth control.
GIVEN REPRIMAND . TREASURE ISLAND, Calif. . Dapper
Navy Capt. Archie C. Kuntze early this week was given a reprimand
for his Saigon affair with an Asian beauty.
A court martial board of three admirals and six senior captains
handed down the relatively light punishment after fining Kuntze guil guilty
ty guilty of three of 18 specifications that stemmed from his alleged love
for the young Chinese Nationalist who has since disappeared.
The reprimand included dropping Kuntze 100 numbers on the pro promotion
motion promotion list.
Florida
TAX OVATIONS . TALLAHASSEE ... A Democrat and two Re Republicans
publicans Republicans escorted GOP Gov. elect Claude Kirk to the Senate ros rostrum
trum rostrum today.
The senators and galleries, dominated by Democrats, gave the first
Republican governor of Florida in nearly a century not one but
two standing ovations.
Kirk smiled:
It is with deep appreciation that I join you here in the chambers
of the Florida Senate for this historic organizational session ,
he said in a 182-word address that took less than two minutes to de deliver.
liver. deliver.
Next April, Kirk will outline his program of legislation to the law lawmakers,
makers, lawmakers, including a number of things that might or might not sit well
with the Democrats.
TAX RELIEF . TALLAHASSEE . Sen. Ben Hill Griffin of
Frostproof and Rep. Terrell Sessums of Tampa were handed the
assignments today of heading up special committees to recommend
legislation to provide tax relief for property owners.

.AND 3 MILES OFF TARGET
Astronauts Home Safe

SPACE CENTER, Houston (UPI)
Gemini 12 astronauts James
Lovell and Edwin Buzz Aldrin
splashed into the Atlantic today
after a 1.5 million-mile, four fourday
day fourday orbital journey 4 closing out
Americas two-man Gemini
flights.
Lovell and Aldrin fired their
braking rockets 250 miles north
of Canton Island, high over the
Pacific, streaked in a flaming
arc across the United States, and
plopped into the Atlantic under
a big orange and white parachute.
Behind them was a four-day
mission plagued by equipment
troubles but marked by magnifi magnificent
cent magnificent astronaut performances. The
ACLU Wants
New Election
ATLANTA (UPI) A federal
court was asked Tuesday to void
the Georgia election for governor
and start the election process over
again.
The American Civil Liberties
Union asked a three-judge feder federal
al federal court to order the state to hold
a special election, opening the
doors to anyone who wanted to
run, and then hold a runoff bet between
ween between the two top candidates if
no one received a majority.
The federal tribunal tentatively
ruled last week that the state
legislature could not elect the
governor. The situation arose when
neither Republican Howard Bo Cal Callaway
laway Callaway nor Democrat Lester Mad Maddox
dox Maddox received the required clear
majority Nov. 8.
The Write-in Georgia movement
immediately filed a motion to in intervene
tervene intervene in the ACLU action ask asking
ing asking that any new election allow
write-in votes.
If the court agrees with the
ACLU and Write-in Georgia mo motions
tions motions the two major parties would
have to reopen qualifications for
governor, possibly holding new
primaries, then face write-in and
independent candidates in a gen general
eral general election.

RISE IN TERRORISTS OUTBURSTS
Down Two U. 5. Copters

By RICHARD H. GROWALD H
United Press International
SAIGON Viet Cong
groundfire Tuesday shot down at
least three U.S. Army helicopters
carrying up to 33 crewmen and
troops into jungle battle north northwest
west northwest of Saigon. The new losses
brought to at least five the num number
ber number of UJS. helicopters shot down
in Viet Nam in two days.
Each of the Army UHID heli helicopters
copters helicopters carried a four-man crew
and had space for seven ground
soldiers. The exact number of cas casualties
ualties casualties was not immediately dis disclosed
closed disclosed but another helicopter in
the area whirled back to base with
some dead and wounded.
Reports from the battle area
said some other helicopters may
have been hit by Viet Cong fire
as they came in for an assault
near the Cambondian border 55
miles from Saigon in the wars
largest operation that has taken a
toll of nearly 1,000 Communists.
The downing of the Army heli helicopters
copters helicopters came after Communist
forces shot down two U.S. Marine
helicopters Monday on another
sector near the Marine base at
Da Nang, killing three Americans
and wounding two others.
The shooting coincided with new
outbursts of Communist terrorist
attacks around Saigon in which
Viet Cong bands, hitting with mor mortars,

mission gave Aldrin all the space spacewalking
walking spacewalking endurance records in the
book, Lovell the all-time record
for time spent in orbit, and the
United States nearly 2,000 man manhours
hours manhours in space, compared with
507 for the Soviet Union.
Lovell and Aldrin used an au automatic
tomatic automatic re-entry piloting system
after firing their braking re-en re-entry
try re-entry rockets.
They drifted down slowly under
their orange and white striped ny nylon
lon nylon parachute, visible to millions
on television, with helicopters

Court Decisions
Turn Conservative

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Su Supreme
preme Supreme Court Monday turned down
an appeal of a father who was
denied custody of his 8-year-old
son on grounds he was arty,
Bohemian and . either an ag agnostic
nostic agnostic or atheist.
The high court acted without
comment in refusing to review an
lowa Supreme Court decision
awarding custody of Mark Wen Wendell
dell Wendell Painter to his maternal grand grandparents.
parents. grandparents. Hie father, Harold W.
Painter, 36, is a Brookdale, Cali California,
fornia, California, free lance photographer.
The lowa Supreme Court ruled
in the Bannisters' favor, saying
Painters household was unsta unstable,
ble, unstable, unconventional, arty, Bo Bohemian
hemian Bohemian and probably intellectually
stimulating. It added that Pain Painter
ter Painter is either an agnostic or ath atheist
eist atheist and has no concern for for formal
mal formal religious training.
The Bannisters, an elderly farm
couple, were seen as stable,
conventional, middleclass, who
could provide a solid founda foundation
tion foundation and secure atmosphere for
Mark. Hie lowa court observed
that Bannister regularly teaches
a Sunday School class.
Hie case was a feature of a
busy Supreme Court day. In oth other

tars, mortars, machine guns and grenades,
killed four Vietnamese soldiers,
their wives and three of their child children
ren children as well as wounding at least
20 other civilians. The civilians
were hit when Communists attack attacked
ed attacked a series of government out outposts
posts outposts in the capital area.
In the air, giant UJS. 852 bomb bombers
ers bombers for the sixth straight day hit
elements of the Viet Cong 9th
Division who are fighting a mas massive
sive massive UJS. force in the jungles
northwest of Saigon. Other 852
stratoforts pounded a Communist
supply area farther north in sup support
port support of UJS. forces in the central
highlands.
The Army helicopters shot down
by Communist gunners hiding in
the jungles crashed right onto a
landing zone that had been hacked
out for them in the Operation
Attleboro area 55 miles north northwest
west northwest of Saigon.
The downed helicopters were
among a bevy of Ist Infantry Div Division
ision Division choppers that flew 61 sor sorties
ties sorties flying soldiers into battle.
The helicopter downing came as
the UJS. Ist Division, providing
the bulk of the manpower for
Operation Attleboro, began an as assault
sault assault on still another sector of
the jungle where they have taken
a heavy toll of Communist dead
in a 12-day campaign. In addi addition
tion addition thy have captured 39 Com Communists
munists Communists and 82 guerrilla suspects.

from the carrier Wasp hovering
around them. Gemini 12 went into
three-foot swells at 2:21 p.m.
EST.
The spacecraft is rolling quite
a bit but the astronauts are O.
K., H a spokesman on the Wasp
said.
Rough estimates put them about
three miles from the Wasp. The
closest any spacecraft has come
was Gemini 9, which landed just
300 yards off target.
Ahead were the three-man Ap Apollo
ollo Apollo missions, starting this win winter
ter winter and culminating with Amer Americans
icans Americans on the moon by 1969 if
all goes well.

er other major action:
-By a 5-4 vote, the court up upheld
held upheld the conviction under Florida
law of 32 Negroes arrested for
trespass when they refused to
break up a 1963 demonstration on
the jailhouse lawn at Tallahassee,
Fla. This was a departure from
some recent decisions in which
the court overturned convictions
of civil rights demonstrators char charged
ged charged with violating local law.
Survival Lessons
CLARK AIR BASE, Philip Philippines
pines Philippines (UPI) Members of an
aboriginal pygmy tribe in the
Philippines are playing a vital
role in this sprawling America n_
air base north of Manila.
Two of the aborigines, called
Negritos, are instructors in the
Clark jungle survival school
while some of them are secur security
ity security guards around the base.
The kinky-haired Negritos,
who stand no taller than five
feet, are considered among the
worlds greatest game stalkers
and can often move unnoticed
within two feet of their prey.

Until the helicopters came in,
the Viet Cong 9th Division and a
regiment of North Vietnamese in
the region had shown little sign of
life for days.
But U.S. officers believed the
attack on the helicopters did not
mean the Communists were trying
to mount a new major offensive.
They said, however, it showed
there were many more Commu Communists
nists Communists left in the War Zone C area,
the Cambodian border region
where the Viet Cong's headquar headquarters
ters headquarters are reportedly located.
Right Track?
PARIS 'UPI> For anyone
whos ever ridden a New York
commuter train, the French
railroads look pretty good.
But its all on the surface.
Despite the seeming modernity
of the railroads, and the jos jostling
tling jostling crowds who use them, the
state-run network is facing a
deficit of 1.6 billion francs
cit deficit is likely to increase.
The head of the SNCF So Societe
ciete Societe National des Chemjns de
Fer Francais*. Roger Guibert.
estimates that 30 per cent of
the network's lines are losing
money.



Orange

Address All Campus Calendar
Notices To Public Functions
Office, Florida Union

Campus Calendar

Wednesday, November 16
European Club Film: Cyrano de Bergerac,* MSB
Aud., 7:30 p.m. 25$ admission charge
Sigma Alpha Eta: Movie and Lecture, guest speaker,
Dr. Pollack, FLU Aud., 7:45 p.m.
ALA Film Series: Henry Moore,** 103-B AFA, Bp.m.
Childrens Concert: Choral, Univ. Aud., 12 p.m.
Pharmacy Dames: guest speaker, Mrs. Mary Sue
Gann, Utility dept., 555 S.E. sth Ave., 8 p.m.
Spanish Conversation Club: Party, 7:30 p.m. All
interested speakers of Spanish are invited to an
informal party. Meet at FLU Johnson Lounge at
7:30 for directions.
Engineering Dames: Meeting, Univ. Womens Club,
8 p.m. Remember to bring your dried foods and
dolls.
Speleological Society: Group meeting, 212 FLU, 7 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: Auditions, 1826 W. Univ.
Ave., 8:30 p.m. Every kind of talent wanted.
Placement
Notices
Students must be registered with the Placement
Service to interview. Sign-Up sheets are posted two
weeks in advance of the interview date at Build Building
ing Building H. All companies will be recruiting for Dec December,
ember, December, April and August grads unless otherwise
indicated. indicates hiring juniors for summer em employment.
ployment. employment.
NOV. 17: BURDINESAcctg, Gen. Bus, Ind. Rela,
Ind. Mgmt, Mktg, Fin, Lib. Arts. FIRESTONE TIRE
& RUBBER CO.Acctg. STAUFFER CHEMICAL CO.
ChE, ME, Chem. U. S. NAVAL SHIP MISSILE
SYSTEMS ENGINEERING STATIONEE, ME, Phys.
U. S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICELib. Arts.
ROHM & HAAS CO.Chem, ChE, ME, AE, CE,
Physics, NE, Eng. Mech, Math, Met. LEVITT &
SONS, INC.CE, Arch. MAAS BROTHERS, INC.
Fin, Econ, Acctg, Mktg, Bus. Ad, Lib. Arts. PRATT
& WHITNEY AIRCRAFTAcctg, Econ, Fin, Mgmt,
Mktg, Gen. Bus. VIRGINIA DEPT, OFHHIGHWAYS OFHHIGHWAYSCE.*
CE.* OFHHIGHWAYSCE.*
NOV. 17, 18: UNION CARBIDE CORP.Chem,
ChE, Physics. AMERICAN ENKA CORP.ChE,
ME, IE, EE, Chem. IBMPhysics, Met, EE.
NOV. 18: DEPT. OF INTERIOR, FEDERAL WATER
POLLUTION CONTROL ADMIN.Chem, Bio Chem,
Biol. REPUBLIC STEEL CORP.EE, ME, ChE,
MetE. DEPT. OF COMMERCE, MARITIME ADMIN.
CE, ME, EE, Acctg, Gen. Bus, Naval Arch.
MAGNAVOX CO. OF TENN. EE.IE. ME. EASTERN
ENGINEERING CO.ChE, CE, EE, ME. THE AUS AUSTIN
TIN AUSTIN CO.Arch, CE, EE, ME, Bldg. Construe.
SCOTT PAPER CO.Bus. Ad, Acctg, ME, ChE,
Chem.

I MONTHLY DEPOSITS ARE NO LONGER LIMITECnI^OUF^REDr^JNIOI^^^i
1 Building J Radio Road I
Dividend Rate __ No Increase
I s'/r. Serving Vof F Employees Since 1935 'Z!ToTL, I
B Paid Semiannually Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union Loans!!!

BLUB BULLETIN

Thursday, November 17
Trends in Theology: Lecture-Discussion, Bonhoeffer
Symposium, Wesley Foundation, Univ. Methodist
Church, 8 p.m.
Craft Shop: Creative Stitchery Class, 215 FLU,
9:30 a.m.
Painting for Fun: 215 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
European Club Film: Cyrano de Bergerac,
MSB Aud., 7:30 p.m. 25? admission charge
Food Science Club Meeting: Continental Can Company,
Food Scientists in the Container Industry,* 130
McC, 7:30 p.m.
History Dept. Lecture: Prof. Harold Hyman, The
Three Rs, Readin, Writin, and Race: The Radical
Republican and the Negro, 1864-1870,* 105-B AFA,
8:15 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club; Movie, Hi Speed Sailing,* 121
FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Naval Officer Recruiting: Hub, 8:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
Wrestling Club; south end of the Gym floor, 4 p.m.
Administrative
Notices
ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES
AND GENERAL NOTICES TO OFFICE OF
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES
SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS: Scholarship funds for Fall
Trimester, 1966-67, are now available for State
Teacher and State Nursing Scholarship Loan Hold Holders.
ers. Holders. Contact Scholarship Section. Student Service
Center.
i
PRE-MED STUDENTS: Interviews with Dr. Lewis,
admissions officer, Medical School, University of
Miami, will be held through Friday, Nov. 18 in
Leigh Hall, Room 426. Students who have not made
an appointment may do so with the secretary in
the Pre Professional Counseling Office, 111 And Anderson
erson Anderson Hall.
ID CARD PHOTOS: Students will be photographed
for lost or stolen ID cards on Friday, Nov. 18,
8 a.m.-12 noon at Photographic Services, Building l.
Cards will be available later that afternoon.
STATE TEACHING SCHOLARSHIPS: Dec. 12,1966,
is the deadline for completing General Scholarship
Loan continuance forms. Each scholarship holder
must complete this form if he expects to continue
his scholarship beyond the current trimester. Com Completion
pletion Completion of this form assures the student that scholar scholarship
ship scholarship funds will be reserved for his use in the fu future.
ture. future. Forms are available inNormah Hall, Room 124.

Wednesday, November 16, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship: Prayer meeting,
4th floor of the Library, 5 p.m.
Adult Ceramic Class: FLU Craft Shop, 7:30 p.m.
0 ' -' -
Christian Science Organization: Group meeting
121 FLU, 5:15 p.m.
Circle K: Group meeting, 212 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Student Branch of the Society of Automotive Engi Engineering
neering Engineering Charter Meeting. Speaker: G. E. Burke,
vice-president of the Caterpillar Tractor Co. and
President of SAE, 270 Engineering Bldg., 1:00 p.m.
Friday, November 18
Florida Forensics Workshop: FLU, 8 a.m. 11 p.m.
IFC Fall Frolics: James Brown, Fla. Gym, 8:15 p.m.
Chess Club: Chess Games, 215 FLU, 7 p.m.
Movie: Fate is the Hunter, 7 & 9:05p.m. MSB Aud.
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE: Tickets now on
sale for Our Town.
- V
General
Notices
EUROPEAN CLUB: The award-winning film Cy Cyrano
rano Cyrano de Bergerac will be shown Nov. 16-17, at
7:30 p.m., Medical Center Auditorium, in an at attempt
tempt attempt to assess the campus interest in foreign and
classic films. An added short feature is The Tell-
Tale Heart, an impressionistic color cartoon. Ad Admission
mission Admission is 25£.
Progress Tests 1
PROGRESS TEST: (Students in the following
courses are expected to take the following tests.
Each student must bring a No. 2 lead pencil and
will be required to use his SOCIAL SECURITY
NUMBER.)
CET 141 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Nov. 17,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with; (A)
report to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Peabody
1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11: (C) report to Leigh 207;
(D) report to GCB 121, 125 or 127; (E) report to
GCB 113; (F) report to Matherly 213, 216 or 219;
(G) report to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; (H)
report to Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209; (I
J) report to Flint 110 or 112; (K) report to Walker
301, 303, 307 or 308; (L) report to GCB 201, 203,
205 or 207; (M) report to GCB 213, 215, 217, 219,221,
223, 225 or 227; (N) report to GCB 233 or 235;
(O) report to GCB 237 or 239; (P Q) report to
Flint 101 or 102; (R) report to Floyd 108; (S) report
to Walker Auditorium; (T V) report to GCB 101
or 109; (W -z) report to Walker Auditorium.

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 16, 1966

The Florida Alligator
'A AAiyyilfy It o*l*u*PbTUTk*'
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR DICK DENNIS
Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecessaniy reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is the editorial in the left
column.
Infirmary: Going Foward?
*
The news that the infirmary plans to
open satellite clinics in the new twin
dorms is encouraging. These clinics have
been in the planning stage for some time
now and it is pleasing to finally see
some concrete detail proposed.
The idea of connecting the clinics with
the infirmary by closed circuit television
is also a step in the right direction.
This has the markings of a true space
age setup that will certainly be an aid
to the students and the infirmary.
Also the proposal to move inpatients
to the med center is not a new idea.
But it is nice to see it in writing.
One thing that we still believe would
be a mistake would be closing down the
present infirmary and moving the entire
operation to the med center. Unless these
clinics could substitute for the infirmary
operation, we feel this would be an in inconvenience
convenience inconvenience to the students.
Looking back over the infirmary series
there are several things that stand out.
The most interesting perhaps is the
fact that the type of individual we would
prefer in the infirmary is Dr. Kent
Bradley.
Dr. Bradley stands out in our minds
as a courageous and admirable person.
It is too bad, as we contended in the
first place, that one single phone call
to the Board of Medical Examiners was
not made before he was hired. If it had
been made, Dr. Bradley could have waited
two months (without pay) and then started
working at the infirmary.
But holding on to a man like Bradley
would still have been difficult. The doc doctors
tors doctors are simply not paid enough. Bradley
went on to a much higher position (also
higher pay) at another university.
We feel that the infirmary has also
taken a step forward in allowing an Al Alligator
ligator Alligator reporter to attend the Student
Health Evaluation Committee meetings.
We feel that in turn the Alligator can
relay plans and ideas to the student body.
_ w t
The infirmary is starting to make pro progress.
gress. progress. It will be hard to judge this pro progress
gress progress for perhaps a year -- but there
is a distinct movement. And most people
will agree it is a move that is needed.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
accepts all letters to the editor Due to
space limitations however we ask that
letters not exceed 350 word Typewrit*
ten and double-spaced letters are prefer preferred,
red, preferred, and all must be signed Names will
be withheld upon request Editors reserve
the right to select or reject letters for
p Plication.

F /11l a \ ft lAuilV
RONALD
Our Man Hoppe
By ART HOPPE 1
Alligator Columnist i

Howdy there, folks. How yall?
Time for another tee-vee visit
with the rootin-tootin Jay Family,
starring ol* Elbie Jay an
energetic feller ready to travel
half way round the world to
make friends. Ifn he -cant make
any at home.
As we join up today with ol'
Elbie, he and his pretty wife,
Birdie Bird, are sitting amid a heap
of souvenirs. That's their cute
tad, Myna Bird, asking 'em
questions. Shes on her lunch
hour.
* *
Elbie (with a happy sigh): I
guess that was just about the most
interesting, rewarding, enriching
trip anybody ever took. My, we sure
did learn a heap and get a heap
done.
Myna Bird: I want to hear all
about it, Daddy, minute by minute.
In about (glancing at her watch)
37 minutes.
Elbie: Well, now, we started
out in . Whered we start
out, honey?
Birdie Bird: Honolulu, dear.
Elbie: That's right. Then we
went on down to .. Well,
I know we went to Australia, cause
thats where your ma had a pas passle
sle passle of fun digging up old pots
and things.
Birdie Bird: No, dear, that was
in the Philippines. Australia's
where they threw paint on our
car. Elbie: You sure? Well, any anyway,
way, anyway, Malaysia was mighty nice,
excepting it rained a lot so
we couldnt do much but sit
around the lobby writing post postcards
cards postcards and .
Birdie Bird: Excuse me, dear.
But I think it was Thailand where
it rained. And a little bit in New
Zealand.
Elbie: New Zealand? You certain
we . Oh, sure enough,
thats where I took that farmer in
a funny hat for a helicopter ride.
Fine place, New Zealand.
Birdie Bird: South Korea, dear.
Elbie: Yep, and then I snuck
off from there for the afternoon
to visit our boys in Vietnam.
Come home, I told them in
my ringing words, with that
coonskin on the wall.
Myna Bird (puzzled): I thought
our soldiers called them gooks.
Birdie Bird: That was Manila,
Elbie.

Elbie: What do you mean? Our
boys are 'fighting in Vietnam.
Or is it Thailand? Or is it both?
Its hard to think straight.
Birdie Bird: I mean you
snuck off from Manila. Remember,
thats where you had your confer conference?
ence? conference?
Elbie: Conference? Say, I plumb
forgot! Thats where I got a real
lot done and made a heap of
fine friends Ill never forget,
like ... Like . Hand me my
address book there, Birdie Bird.
Birdie Bird (sighing wearily):
You know, Elbie, Im not saying
it wasnt a great trip, seeing all
those countries. But, my, all
that traipsing around! Next year,
lets just pick the country we
like best and spend the whole
two weeks in one place. Seems to
me, youd accomplish just as
much.
Elbie (snorting): Accomplish
what? You think I could keep
those Republicans off the front
pages by spending two weeks in
Texas?
* *
Well, tune in again, friends.
And as you mosey down the wind windin
in windin trail of life, remember what
Elbies old granddaddy used to say:
When skies are grey, when
you haven't got a friend, when
the whole worlds down on you
look busy.

Florida Alligator Staff
TYLER TUCKER NEWT SIMMONS GENE NAIL
Assistant Managing Editor Editorial Assistant Editorial Assistant
NICK ARROYO CAROL HEFNER NICK TATRO
Photo Editor Society Editor Wire Editor
STAFF WRITERS Susan Froemke, Barbara Gefen,
Maury dicker, Harvey Alper, Jean Mamlin, Kathie
Keim, Frank Shepherd, Aggie Fowles, Justine Hartman,
Jimmey Bailey.
ASSISTANT EDITORS -- John Briggs, Margie Green,
Jo Ann Langworthy, Joe Torchia, Bob Beck.
LAB ASSISTANTS JoAnn Gerard, Diann Devine, Jerry War Warren,
ren, Warren, Laura Brown, Peggy Sneider, Dave Reddick, Brady Farris
Joe Varon, Marie Varon, David Weiss, Greg Borden, Richard
Irwin, Carol Summers.
In order to better cover campus events the Alligator uses
reporters from the School of Journalism and Communications.
Their bylines are followed by Alligator Correspondent

Stupidity
Backlash
Stings
By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Columnist
Tuesday, November 8, 1966.
It will be a long time before
America will forget that date. It
was election day ... the day of
the stupidity backlash."
Politicians have long suspected
the existence of this stupidity. They
preyed on it at every opportunity.
This year they didn't have to work
very hard. It came natural .
like disease and death.
Americans struck out. Some call
it anti-Johnson," others anti-
Viet Nam" or just plain it's time
for a change." It could be any
or all of these factors. But the
ignorance of the voters rises above
all excuses. In state after state
the backlash struck, and what may
have been bad was turned much
worse.
Florida. We now have a gover governor
nor governor who promises magical money.
Yes schools, more money but no
more taxes. Sure, Mr. Kirk.
We had the opportunity to free
our state from the greasy grip of
the pork-choppers. We could have
elected a governor with exper experience;
ience; experience; logical and defined pro programs
grams programs for taxes, road con construction,
struction, construction, education, bringing in industry
dustry industry to the state and free of
all northern Florida small in interest
terest interest domination.
The stupidity backlash" stung.
Georgia The contest be between
tween between the hatchet swinging rest restaurant
aurant restaurant owner and his right-wing
conservative opponent is .being
taken to the Federal courts.
Whatever their decision, the
voter's stupidity backlash"
pushed Georgia one giant step
back.
Alabama Lurleen Wallace
was elected governor while
blatently admitting that it was
her power-hungry, segregationist
husband who would rule the state.
Forget the state constitution.
California The stupidity
backlash" delegated an actor
with no experience and big am ambitions
bitions ambitions to be governor over a
man who served well in that
position during the eight years
that witnessed unparalleled
growth and progress for Cali Californians.
fornians. Californians. Now there is the
question: What will the new
actor-governor do .. without
a script?
The people voted. The stupid stupidity
ity stupidity backlash" will sting for
years.
God bless America.



He Doesnt
Appreciate
Academics
EDITOR; v
I dont think Col. Boazs argu argument
ment argument was all that it might have
been. In the first place, I feel
that the Alligators coverage has
been excellent. Whether an article
discusses the SD6 or FBK, the
goal should be to inform the read reader
er reader so that he may reconcile the
proported position of an organiza organization
tion organization with its real position and its
activity. This is good Journalism.
If the editor feds that opinion
is needed, he goes to the edi editorial
torial editorial page. Freedom of the press
is the editors right to editorial editorialize
ize editorialize or not.
Let me say that I felt the Fa Faculty
culty Faculty Senate action on compulsory
ROTC was unfortunate, and as a
result, I am in agreement with
the Board of Regents decision. The
basis for my feeling is the be belief
lief belief that the American public
has entirely too little understand understanding
ing understanding of the importance of a
military establishment. On the
other hand, I dont think Col.
Boaz appreciates the function or
the importance of the academic
establishment. The difference is
this: The quality of the mil military
itary military establishment depends on
its intellectual discipline. Martial
dicipline is essentially the sub subservience
servience subservience of consideration to
decision. The goal is action. (Re (Remember
member (Remember Billy Mitchell?) Intellect Intellectual
ual Intellectual discipline is the subserv subservience
ience subservience of decision to prolonged,
careful, and exhaustive consid consideration.
eration. consideration. The goal is understand understanding.
ing. understanding. Thus clear thinking is
quite relative.
Now in terms of Col. Boaz
proposed campaign, respect for
constituted authority (other than
law), clean shaves, decent hair haircuts,
cuts, haircuts, and at least occasional baths*
are present martial concerns.
A Civil War Album will show that
they have not always been. How However,
ever, However, they are rightly matters of
concern in a military establish establishment.
ment. establishment. But they are not civilian con concerns,
cerns, concerns, unless you relish the idea
of the JCS holding Everett Dirk Dirksen
sen Dirksen down while the JCS Chairman
cuts the senators hair.
If I may address Col. Boaz
directly for a moment: I think,
Sir, That you are pandering to the
American public, the same people
who demobilized the US mil military
itary military establishment almost to
impotency at the end of WWH,
and then set the Doolittle Board
upon it. The people who sent our
forces into Korea with obsolete
weapons. The same people who
today wont call up its reserves,
and further, wont even make a ser serious
ious serious effort to modernize them.
Face it, Colonel, the menace
to American today is the citizen
who will wave the flag, but doesnt
want to fight for it. And you know
as well as I do that most of
those citizens have shaves, baths,
and haircuts. I am aware that any
man in a responsible public pos position
ition position such as yours is somewhat
limited in his public expression,
but for Gods sake, you dont
have to pander to all the citizens
who would be delighted to draft
all the beatniks, agitators, and
malcontents (in short, anyone
who isnt middle class and happy
to be) so their sons wouldnt have
to face death in the defense of
their country.
G. R. STRASENBURGH, 3AS
TYPEWRITER RENTALS
Manuals & Electrics
Student Chairs $1 to $5
500 Sheets Paper SI.OO
KISERS
Office Equipment
604 N. MAIN ST.

(EDITORS NOTE Because of an extra extraordinary
ordinary extraordinary amount of letters we have received
concerning the Friday letter of Air Force
ROTC Head Col. William N. Boaz, Jr., we

Charter Makes
EDITOR:
People who have been here longer than I tell
me that Col. Boazs letters to you have become
something of an institution at UF. Recognition,
of whatever kind, tends to entrench an institu institution;
tion; institution; so it is with mixed feelings that I write
this letter in rebuttal of Col. Boazs remarks
about your coverage of the activities in Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville of Students for a Democratic Society.
Col. Boaz says that SDS is not a student or organization,
ganization, organization, does not have a charter for the Uni University,
versity, University, and in fact is not for a democratic
society. The first and third charges are not true,
and the first two are irrelevant. I hope the Al Alligator
ligator Alligator will not refuse regular and frequent space
to other newsworthy groups on the foolish prin principle
ciple principle that only chartered organizations composed
of students deserve mention in its pages. Any Anyhow,
how, Anyhow, SDS is as much a student organization as
many others are, including, say, Florida Blue Key,
which Col. Boaz mentions in another connection.
Col. Boaz quotes Director Hoover of the FBI
in support, presumably, of his third charge: the
SD6 is a militant youth group, which receives
support from (and in turn supports objectives and
tactics of) the Communist Party, UJS.A. That
a group is youthful and militant does nothing to
establish that it is not for a democratic society,

Society Deifies Boaz Decency

EDITOR:
While I am not much inclined by
temperament to public debate,
Ido feel impelled to set down
some thoughts on the recent
letter of Col Boaz (Alligator,
Nov. 11) not so much in defense
of the SDS ( of which I am not
a member) as in the name of
a somewhere forgotten dialogue
among generations. Col. Boaz
calls for a crusade against
the riff-raff who have invaded
our campus and in favor of clear

SDS Not Marxist-Controlled
EDITOR:
All right, Boaz, I give up.
I thought that anyone who had reached the rank of Colonel
in the service in which my old man won the Croix de Guerre
must have at least one molecule of intelligence in his brain;
I now publicly recant and abjure false doctrine.
So J. Edgar says were Communists in SDS, does he? J.
Edgar wasnt at Clear Lake, lowa, this September; according
to Bonni Greenspan, who was there, things happened which make
this idea of J. Edgars very questionable . the CP certainly
did not control the SD6 convention. Either Hoover is being
misinformed or he is deliberately misinforming others.
At least in Gainesville, Colonel, SDS is controlled by non-
Marxists. The Marxists are in the Socialist Union, mostly.
(Note to Garrett and Fine: I dont hate you, you just dont swing)
Most of us here are not really followers of anybody. We
acknowledge the good work of Bakunin, Kroptkin, Berkman and
Read; we deify no one, least of all Marx. We prefer, that is,
to look at reality rather than to expect pie-in- the-sky after the
Revolution. We are equally appalled by the Palmer Red Raids
of 1919, the Bolshevik suppression of the Kronstadt Soviet in
1921, the put-down of the Budapest uprising in 1956, and the
forcing of the National Liberation Front of South Viet-Nam into
the arms of the Communists during 1963-1966.
I am a democrat GSmall d), an Individualist, and therefore
opposed to all state coertion of law-abiding citizens, of inno innocent
cent innocent people, including the military draft, social regulation of
personal morality, and compulsory discipline and physical train training
ing training ROTC. Col. Boaz, ARE YOU A DEMOCRAT? Do you
not believe in the ability and the right of mature human beings
to run their own lives without hurting others? If not, dont
palm the label undemocratic* on SDS. YOU it fits -- not me.
B. R. ASLEY, 3AS

Delight is the Law
of the Lord.
The Christian Science
Organization
at the
University of Florida
Presents
Mrs. Arden Evans,C.S.
Wednesday, Nov. 16
7:30 pi.m.
Room 215, Fla. Union
Reception and Questioning
Period Will Follow
OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS
AND FACULTY

Backlash At Boaz

thinking, respect for constituted
authority, clean shaves, decent
haircuts and at least an occa occasional
sional occasional bath. But crusades are not
the answer to the basic mis misunderstanding
understanding misunderstanding that exists between
a portion of my generation and
those groups and values of which
Col. Boaz is representative. Per Permit
mit Permit me to briefly state my per perception
ception perception of one side of this tension
in the hope of a bit more real
understanding and dialogue.
We have been born into a soc society
iety society that deifies decency; that

have decided to run as many as possible
today and drop the matter. No more letters
pertaining to Boaz Friday statements will
be printed.)

No Difference
hence that much of the quotation does nothing to
help Col. Boazs charge. Support from the CPUSA,
such as it is, does nothing to damage SDS; bad
support does not damage a cause, for otherwise
all that would be needed to discredit a randomly
picked organization would be praise of it in the
pages of The Worker. So far as SDS support of
objectives and tactics of the CPUSA goes, this
does no harm unless either of two things is true:
SDS support all objectives and tactics of the
CPUSA, or all objectives and tactics of the CPUSA
are bad. But neither of these is true.
The business about haircuts in Col. Boaz's
letter is simply silly. I hope my own head is
sufficiently glabrous that no one will accuse me of
bias on this count. But the remark about baths
is just a disaster. Col. Boaz has misjudged those
people whom he calls the decent youth of our
time. An Alligator campaign for the establishment
of a bath-of-the-week club is not what we need,
and it is surely an affront to another kind of
decency to infer a mans politics from the fra fragrance
grance fragrance of his armpits. The correctness of a mans
political objectives is not a function of his groom grooming,
ing, grooming, and no amount of plain or fancy dunking and
shaving is going to change this fact.
DAVID R. KURTZ MAN,
Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Wednesday, November 16, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

considers deviance obnoxious; that
presses every protest into the
mold of subversion and commun communism.
ism. communism. We have been asked to
pay homage to rationality and pro progress
gress progress and dean living, to salute
with pride the anniversary of a
war that was to make the world
safe for democracy. And we are
exhorted to comply with the honor honored
ed honored traditions of this society on
the basis of slogans and isolated
quotations from the Bible.
But this call to conformity
seems to us to squeeze from
life the subtleties and nuances of
meaning which we need to renew
our energies; it ignores the chaos
and the pain of which our feel feelings
ings feelings speak so clearly. We call
to mind our knowledge of that
November 11 now almost 50 years
past, and we shudder to feel
the quicksands to which ration rationality
ality rationality can lead us. We sense an
emptiness and superficiality in the
ordered and coherent world, the
Inevitable progress and the smil smiling
ing smiling satisfaction which our elders
hold before us. This model clashes
with the world of our experiences
and feelings. We also sense very
vividly, but can explain only vague vaguely,
ly, vaguely, an irony and tragedy in human
existence that clean shaves, de decent
cent decent haircuts and baths cant seem
to erase.
We dont claim to understand
life completely; we do often
disagree with the dominant culture
around us; and we are groping
for those values and directions
which make sense to us. But most
of all we despair of a nation
that considers our struggle with
life obnoxious, and answers our
often incoherent wanderings with
crusades.
RICK BOWMAN, 7AS

An apple a day...
A tradition in schools all over the world.
Although not practiced very often, it is
well remembered.
Some traditions aren't so easily remem remembered
bered remembered after the school days are past. So
to bridge that gap, school yearbooks
came into being to preserve those pre precious
cious precious days for years to come.
Your Florida Yearbook captures the spir spirit
it spirit of your Alma Mater while you're here.
It is a treasure no alumnus would be with without.
out. without. Buy your 1967 Yearbook today...at
locations all over campus.

Further
Discussion
Wont Help
EDITOR:
So UFs beloved Col. Boaz,
Jr., has sounded off again!
And on what a variety of sub subjects.
jects. subjects. Many will be tempted to
refute his arguments, not
having learned that dialogue is
irrelevant in cases such as this.
For what we are really being
presented with is a morality play:
the forces of Right are engaged
in a death struggle with those
of Evil, and we the audience are
being asked to forsake our spir spiritually
itually spiritually damning ways and join
the ultimately victorious armies
of Truth. So since we cadnot
rationally contend with faith, let
us ask instead, why is the Col Colonel
onel Colonel (and others like himboth
on the Left and on the Right
too well known to mention)
so fervently committed to this
dichotomous conception of human
activity? Because without sup support
port support by some grand organization
or idea to direct him on a mis mission
sion mission in life, he would feel alone
and worthless in the world.
Thus despite his intentions to
win us over, which are unmistak unmistakably
ably unmistakably sincere; despite the fact that
he constitutes a political and
intellectual menace; and des despite
pite despite the self-righteousness we
find so irritating, further dis discussion
cussion discussion with Col. Boaz, Jr., will
be profitable neither for us nor
for him. BLAIR TURNER, 7AS
Say VP hat
%/
You Mean CoL
EDITOR:
As a lowly freshman and as
an uninformed nonmember of
SDS, 1 feel that I should inform
Col. Boaz of the reasons for at attention
tention attention to Students for a Democ Democratic
ratic Democratic Society, SNCC and other
such groups.
Col. Boaz states that SD6 is not
recognized -by the University.
This is true, but the students
and non-students within it re represent
present represent part of the responsible
conscience of the University com community.
munity. community. Do the Vice President
of these United States, a Justice
of the UjS. Supreme Court, the
Governor of our great state,
the Board of Regents and Blue
Key feel embarassed when honest honestly
ly honestly criticized? Why, cant they face
criticism? Disheveled or not,
any group has the right of hon honest
est honest criticism without being heckled
by social, political or mili military
tary military leaders.
It is unfortunate that Col.
Boaz continues to assign the de descriptive
scriptive descriptive stereotype of the un unwashed
washed unwashed and unshorn rebel to
anyone who opposes his views. Why
does the colonel deny that a
person with long hair, a beard
or black skin is a part of the
the decent youth erf our time?
Quit making every group you
dont like into Communist fronts,
Colonel: Say what you mean,
if you know what you mean.
KURT GARRETT, lUC

Page 7



£Cfje sappp i?olitiaj)
psggCTg mk
HHHiMHIKS v
s?** iBFH^^HEnKn
v : a^E
m -i' |
university city bank
THERELL BE NO BLIZZARD of bills for Peggy HPP^H|H|j^^^^^HSEj2fcj||
Glovey to contend with next January, because shes > |
joining University City Banks Christmas Club now. yT^^^jsSjMg^H^^^BHy%^^''' r ;*
They have a Club plan just for youwhatever your
Christmas or budget.
NOT ujmLY ARE the holidays coming,
but so is graduation. What better way
to bring holiday cheer to someone, or
to preserve the memories of your col college
lege college career than with a portrait by the
folks at Johnston*s Photography? All
the photos on this page were taken by
Sam Johnston.
v _^B
iib dfl .nmM
r';. i



W &re Almost Here
i v ?Sg'^- : : ,< S?-" prepared for the festiv-
,sAt?jSSSSgfe^ffi^' ities of the holiday sea season
son season m a Howard Wolf
cocktail dress of black
crepe /rora Silvermans*
I liny i|||t jts%m
BLJE
Hfc > -Sfs* S@SS|£
js-ij: i,.,., # sssspr
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tropical pontiac
I BE LIKE Linda Rowland. Dont wait for the
holiday season to come. Roar off to meet it
in a *67 Pontiac from Tropical Pontiac £/*e
record bcir car with aerodynamic styling.
v
for holiday music for both personal X V t
mjoyment and as special gifts. A-



IGATOR CLASSIFIEDS!

for sale
FOR SALE, one and one hall bed bedroom
room bedroom mobile home with cabana and
storage. Permanently located in
Archer Road Vilg. Furnished $895.
Phone 372-3573 (A-50-st-c)
FOR SALE: High quality stereo
camera, F 3.5 lens, flash light
meter, filters, makes wonderful
slides-first reasonable offer. Call
378-6024. (A-52-st-p)
ONE PORTABLE drawing table
$10; assorted sets drawing in instruments
struments instruments $5 and down. Call 378-
1292 after 6 p.m. (A-53-2t-c)
1965 DUCOTTI DIANA MK HI,
must sacrifice, best offer over
$385. takes it. Call 372-3755
before 10 a.m. (A-53-3t-c)
TWO BEDROOM mobile home for
rent for sale. Call 372-7584. (A (A---54-3t-c)
--54-3t-c) (A---54-3t-c)
SCUBA complete outfit only one
year old. Best offer- call Rick
Fey 376-9208 or 372-9427.
(A-54-4t-c)
COMPLETE SET of Wilson
golf clubs, minus 7 iron, for only
RCA cartridge tape recorder,
only S3O? IPs true at 1209 NW
43rd Ave. (A-55-2t-p)
1965 HONDA 65 Super Sport,
excellent condition, Call 378-6919
(A-55-st-c)
0
FOR SALE: Set of Great Book
of the Western World** Excell Excellent
ent Excellent condition, very reasonable.
Call 372-6645 (A-55-3t-c)
1964 HONDA 50, good condition,
lee James Mutta Room 333
McCarty Hall after 6 p.m. (A-55-
2t-p)
MUST SELL Vox Knight Amplifier,
:win ten model with Vibrato
md normal channels. Call Bill
3aldwin 378-2125. (A-55-2t-c)
SELL 500-x crash Helmet. Size
7, New condition with face shield.
'22.50 378-3007 (A-55-lt-p)
IU TAPE RECORDER, 4 track
none, with tapes SBS; one set
teadphones (monostero) $lO Call
.76-9229 Ask for Mike Farris.
A-53-3t-p)
IREAT CADILLAC 1959 4 door,
ower brakes, power steering,
adio and heater, good mechanical
ondition, SSOO. Call 376-8198
fter 6 p.m. (A-55-2t-c)
BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
THE CITY THAT BECAME
A TORCH-THE TORCH
THAT FIRED THE WORLD!
SHOWN AT 9:25
Pf-HS
| rA./fm/iMi

for sale
SAILFISH (SUPER); fuUy equip equipped
ped equipped $200.00; boat trailer. 350
lb. capacity, fully equipped, $65.
Call 372-1014. (A-53-3t-c)
for rent
COOPERATIVE LIVING Organi Organization
zation Organization announces openings for next
trimester. Room and Board S6O
per month, one block off campus.
Inquire 117 NW 15th St. or call
376-6203 (B-50-st-c)
TO SUBLET new, modern, two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment near canpus.
Completely furnished, air condi conditioned,
tioned, conditioned, swimming pool on pre premise
mise premise From Dec. 15,1966 Phone
378-6024. (B-52-st-p)
WHY LIVE IN A traffic jam?
Walk to classes and be relieved
of your parking problem. Fully
furnished, spacious, one bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, air condition conditioned,
ed, conditioned, gas heat, fully equiped, kit kitchen,
chen, kitchen, including washing mach machine.
ine. machine. Call 372-3357
(B-46-10t-c)
AVAILABLE NOW spacious one
bedroom furnished apartment,
large living room and kitchen,
lease required. S9O monthly. Cou Couple
ple Couple or two graduate students
preferred. 923 NE 3rd Ave. 378-
2436. (B-54-10t-c)
AVAILABLE DECEMBER 1, furn furnished
ished furnished garage efficiency apart apartment
ment apartment for quiet couple or two
gentlemen. Across from campus,
no car needed. Apply 321 SW
13th St. (B-lt-55-c)
awlwlPjfaT show \
Htl'i p!l4n rIVCiaH iem j
mjsa]

WoOdYAIJ eN
rrs A HILARIOUS FILM FOR FARSIGHTED PEOPLE WITH 36-24-36 Visual
imMmi!HIRI.UMUJIR-|J|||lH|l||||.j M IsiRICTLY ADULT FNTFBTAINMFNtI

Page 10

f The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 16, 1966

for rent
SUBLEASE UNFURNISHED two
bedroom apartment. University
Gardens. Occupancy Dec. 17 one.
Call 372-3035 (E-53-st-c)
TWO BEDROOM French Quarter
Apartment for rent. Available
December or January. Must know
by November 28th. Call 378-5228.
(E-53-10t-c)
SUBLEASE furnished one bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment. University Gar Gardens
dens Gardens Available Dec. 1 378-6771
Ask for Claire. (B-55-2t-p)
CHOICE APARTMENT for four,
five blocks from campus. Two
bedrooms, spacious living room
and study, attractively furnish furnished.
ed. furnished. Call 372-7343 Available Jan. 1
(B-55- st-c)
ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT,
heated swimming pool, new $125
a month. Available Dec. 15. Call
378-5502. (B-55-3t-p)
FURNISHED APARTMENT for
rent) married couple preferred.
Water furnished, Call 376-3261
ext. 2287 or 376-0979 (B-55-3t-c)
wanted
POETRY WANTED for antho anthology.
logy. anthology. Include stamped envelope.
Idlewild Publishing Company,
543 Frederick Street, San Fran Francisco.
cisco. Francisco. California 94117
(C-53-st-p)

nOWMTQWN FLORIDA STATE THEATRES
I j R1:l I yl tnnAY at 2 PM & BPM
1 WINNER OF R ACADEMY AWARDSI jBK
MOB(MX]UWYNMWffIimAOTOPOWIFfiOOUCIION
DAVID LEANS FILM OF BORIS PASTERNAKS |
DOCTOR ZHUAGO
IN PANAVISION* AND METROCOIOR t
MATINEE TODAY $1.50 EVE,SI.7S
Tffi AGONY AND
"S 1 IHEECSmST

wanted
WANTED 1 or 2 roommates to
share apartment. S3O a month plus
utilities. 1017 SW 7th Ave. 378-
6019 (C- 55- 3t-p)
WANTED TWO or three respon responsible
sible responsible guys to share large house
in North East area of Town.
378-5506 or 376-7664. (C-55-
st-c)
UF STUDENT NEEDS THREE
TICKETS TOGETHER FOR MIAMI
GAME. RELATIVES ARE TRAV TRAVELLING
ELLING TRAVELLING 800 MILES TO SEE
THE ORANGE BOWL BOUND
FIGHTING GATORS. CALL RICK
AT 376-0333 or 376-3261 EXT
2519. (C-55-6t-nc)
help wanted
OPPORTUNITY UNLIMITED
Make as much money as you
wish. A few openings left, for
information call Doris Moore
372-8354. Between 9-12 a.m. and
5-6 p.m. (E-54-st-c)
HELP WANTED Students who
type and students eligible for
work study program. For fur further
ther further information report to room
183, Bldg. E on campus. (E-46-
6t-nc)
A STUDENT SECRETARY is
needed to fill a part time job.
Job consists of typing and fil filing.
ing. filing. Typing experience requir required
ed required only. Contact by calling 372-
4256 or 372-4257. (E-55-Bt-c)

help wanted
EXPERIENCED LEGAL secretary
wanted beginning Dec. 5. Must be
proficient in shorthand and typing,
376-5242 (E-49-ts-c)
lost-found
LOST gold mans watch with ini initial
tial initial V on clasp. Lost at Satur Saturdays
days Saturdays game. Great sentimental
value and of great importance
to owner . Reward of SSO,
return if found. 378-2704 ask
for Victor. (L-55-3t-c)
kmi\
r THE SILENCE I
/ PORNOGRAPHY OR 1
1 MASTERPIECE? I
1 There are few films that I
I lend credence to the view I
1 that the cinema is a ere- (
I ative art; THE SILENCE 1
1 is indisputably one of these. |
I Some scenes will provoke 1
1 moral indignation. This f
I committee does not wish to I
I minimize any such possible I
I objections, but feels that I
I the revealing harshness of I
1 those objectionable scenes 1
I excludes any appeal to pru prurient
rient prurient interest.
We were rather troubled by
a completely opposite feel feeling
ing feeling how it was possible
that such shameless scenes
within the continuity of the
whole work do not provoke
any objections whatsoever. 1
The answer lies in the pur purity
ity purity of the films intentions
and form and for this
reason the highest commen commendation
dation commendation has been-granted,
immediately, and without
reservations of any kind.
Heinz Beckman*
Deputy, Film Eyaluatlee
I (Government Censer) Bureau
GERMANY
THE SHEIKE
Is now at
SHITE]
1-3-5-7-9
OUT 10:40



gator classifieds

Wednesday, November 16, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

autos
He ROADSTER, 33,000 miles,
|Kellent condition, will trade
Hone 372-4979. (G-55-st-c)
SHiO RED CORVAIR coupe, good
Hndition, new tires, new bat batry
ry batry automatic transmission,
.|Bce $450 firm. See 1506 NE
Hth Ave. 372-4144 (G-55- st-c)
62 T-BIRD, university pro proflssor,
flssor, proflssor, 32,000 miles, like new,
Hr and all power, see 2036
Hv 18th Lane after 6 p.m. 378-
42. (G-53-st-c)
63 VW, $950, very clean,
ry good condition, new tires
ftrvlce booklet, AM-FM radio.
Beater, headrest, seat belts. Ori Orinal
nal Orinal owner: 378-3886
K-52-10t-c)
53 PLYMOUTH, excellent
nechanical condition, must sell
l4O. Call 376-9252 after 6 p.m.
sk for Tom. (G-st-53-c)
i 960 METROPOUTAN, $175; fair
Condition, radio and heater, good
Economical transportation. Call
872-8832 after 6 p.m. (G-54-3t-c)
BIMON TEMPLAR'S VOLVO 1963
>-1800 GT model. At least a
ook alike! Good condition, AM AMFM
FM AMFM radio, air conditioned. Below
>ook price. $1,895. See at 2818
tfE 12th Street or arrange 202
Building D. (G-54-4t-c)
1962 Karmann Ghla good con condition
dition condition $650.00. 372-3734. (G-51-
st-c)
1932 FORD, 5 window coupe, 331
cu. in. Chrysler Hemipower,, eng engine
ine engine is completely rebuilt, Wieand
Drag Star Manifold, super full
cam, body is channeled over
custom tubular frame. Call 378-
1274 Price S3OO firm.(G-54-10t-c)

Lonely? buy HELEASE
farry
A.
und
your
*uch
TODAY AT
1, Main Library
2. General Classroom Building
' 3. Hub
4. Campus Club
. 5. Peabody Hall
v * ' .{

services |
PILE IS SOFT and loftycolors
retain brilliance in carpets clean cleaned
ed cleaned with Blue Lustre, Rent elect electric
ric electric shampooer sl. Lowry Furniture
Co. (M-55-lt-c)
IN A HURRY? PASSPORTS,
APPLICATIONS, CHILDRENS
PHOTOS, COMMERCIALS AND
SPECIAL PROBLEMS. WEST WESTLEY-ROOSEVELT
LEY-ROOSEVELT WESTLEY-ROOSEVELT STUDIOS, 372-
0300, 909 NW 6th Street. (M (M---52-10t-c)
--52-10t-c) (M---52-10t-c)
personal
RIDE DESIRED to and from New
York. To leave any time after
Dec 14 and to return before
Jan. 7. Harold L. Asch, 376-
3211 ext. 5580 and leave message
with secretary. (J-55-st-c)
RIDE TO NEW YORK CITY;
two people desire to leave Dec December
ember December 22; will share expenses.
Call 372-6466 5-7 p.m.
(J-53-3t-c)
HELP Need two tickets for
Miami game for my parents (Not
in the end zone) Please Call
378-6010. (J-54-3t-c)
WEIGHT PROBLEMS? Getting
a little broad in the beam? We
can groom you down with our new
vibrating machine. Its helpful,
invigorating and absolutely free
Come in, talk to Toby and have
coffee with us at the Gator Groom Groomer
er Groomer where friends meet and romance
blooms. (J-54-st-c)

H
Bk
g||! fig
NEW TELEVISION FOR FOOD SERVICE
... with installation man?
New Hours Scheduled
For UF Food Service

Page 11

The UF Food Service will adopt
new hours at the main cafeteria
in the near future. The Campus
Club and the west wing cafeteria
will close at 11:30 p.m. instead
of 10:30 p.m.
Robert Overton, director of food
service, stated that the new hours
have been adopted in connection
with a request from the Mur Murphree
phree Murphree Area Council.
Overton explained that the Food
Service has purchased a color tel television
evision television for the use of Murphree
Area residents.
Overton said that the newhours,
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gerboard fingerboard with bound edges and pearl
position markers. 2 sensitive pick- DMt 311
ups with adjustable magnetic poles, 9 Grand Concert sire classic guitar,
separate volume controls for each Hand rubbed mahogany finish, nat natpick-up
pick-up natpick-up plus tone control, rocker ural rosewood fixed bridge, steel
switches for each pick-up, adjust- reinforced neck.
able metal bridge, steel reinforced
nech nrrc*> n,.,nn < un - Others from $17.95 to $59.95
Others from $44.95 to $119.95 DtCCA almiswi w MCA lac

and the color T.V., are only a
small part of general service im improvements
provements improvements initiated by the pri privately
vately privately run Servomation food oper operation.
ation. operation.
We are meeting with various
area councils their food corn cornmi
mi cornmi tees concerning food prob problems
lems problems and complaints," Overton
said.
This, he stated, is opening a
channel to the student. The stu student
dent student can now get the improve improvements
ments improvements he wants by talking with
managers of individual Food Ser Service
vice Service units scattered throughout
the university, Overton said.
In January Food Service will
serve students in style with a
fourth floor restaurant complete
with wall to wall carpeting, de
luxe furnishings and table service
in the new Florida Union. Prices,
Overton says, will hopefully be
competitive with those of local
restaurants.

CAMPUS
BRIEFS
Sigma Tau Engineering Honor Honorary
ary Honorary Fraternity will climax this
trimesters activities with a ban banquet
quet banquet Sunday evening honoring the
fall initiates. The guest speaker
will be John R. Whitford, man manager
ager manager of the Sperry Electronic Tube
Division.
Whitford joined Sperry in 1949
and has advanced through ai
series of sales positions to his
present position as division man manager.
ager. manager. He earned his masters de degree
gree degree in Electrical Engineering
from Massachusetts Institute of
Technology in 1949.
All Sigma Tau members are
reminded to sign up on the ST
Bulletin Board in the Engineering
Building.
* *
Fifty additional tickets for the
IFC sponsored Fall Frolics fea featuring
turing featuring James Brown will go on
sale today at noon at the ticket
office in the Florida Union.
*
The Forestry Club of UF will
hold its annual meeting Thursday
night in Rolfs Hall. The purpose
of the meeting is to vote on the
revised constitution.
* *
The Student Branch of the Soc Society
iety Society of Automotive Engineers will
hold a charter meeting open to
the public on Thursday at 1 p.m.
in room 270 of the Engineering
Building.
The guest speaker will be G.
E. Burks, National President and
Vice President of the Research
and Engineering,CaterpUlarTrac Engineering,CaterpUlarTractor
tor Engineering,CaterpUlarTractor Company. The meeting will
consist of the presentation of the
Branch Charter and a technical
talk Doing the Worlds Wort."



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 16, 1966

Pipkin Heads
Engineer Fair
Jesse E. Pipkin has been named
Chairman of the 1967 UF Engin Engineers'
eers' Engineers' Fair according to J. Pa Patrick
trick Patrick O'Donoghue, President of
the Benton Engineering Council.
Each Spring in March the En Engineers'
gineers' Engineers' Fair
opens the doors
§F ylof the College
lof Engineering to
I\ -C? jr the university and
r-A m presents exhibits
students, in in-W
-W in-W J|||JMdustry and gov gov[
[ gov[ I -tal agen-
I m The new fair
UHchairman came
PIPKIN to UF last fall af af/>
/> af/> ter resigning his
Air Force commission. He has
advanced to the top of his Sen Senior
ior Senior Class in Electrical Engineer Engineering,
ing, Engineering, having earned a perfect 4,0
for the past three trimesters. His
other activities include Vice Pre President
sident President of Sigma Tau Engineering
Honorary Society, Treasurer of
the Institute of Electrical and Elec Electronics
tronics Electronics Engineers, and Assistant
Business Manager of the Florida
Engineer.
"The Fair has grown into a
major University activity," com commented
mented commented Pipkin. "We need indus industrious
trious industrious people from all schools on
campus to help put on the Fair.
It's not too surprising how much
planning is required to accom accommodate
modate accommodate 50,000 visitors in a sin single
gle single weekend."

Anything goes when you wear "IT'S CRICKET"
Exceptional Men's Toiletries. Try it and see. (Girls, give it and find out!)
After-shave, 4 oz., $3.50. Cologne, 4 oz., $4.50.
Available in drug stores and cosmetic departments of department stores.
Another tine product of [$ Koyser-Roth.

MAYBE WE COULD

B
A
T
M
A
N

Quarter
(FROM PAGE 1)
$l5O each quarter for out-of-state
students.
N_^
"The changes in fees represent
slight reduction in cost," Lassi Lassiter
ter Lassiter explained, "but they must be
approved by the state legislature to
be official."
Lassiter said he personally
feels the students will prefer
the quarter system.
Japan's Brigitte
HOLLYWOOD (UPI)
Mie Hama, billed as Japans
Brigitte Bardot, will star as
James Bonds girl friend with
Sean Connery in You Only
Live Twice, filming in Tokyo.

ELECTION
(FROM PAGE 1)
The votomatic should save Stu Student
dent Student Government about SI,OOO or
20 per cent of the usual cost
each year, according to Charles
Shepherd, administrative assistant
to the student body president,
votes for all the candidates and
issues at a rate of about 500
votes per minute. For major stu student
dent student elections the results should
be available in less than 30 min minutes
utes minutes after the cards are fed to
thecomputer.
In past years the cost of con conducting
ducting conducting student fall and spring
elections on campus have amoun amounted
ted amounted to almost $5,000.
About 50 of the new machines
are to be bought at a cost of
about SII,OOO if it is decided
that they will fill the voting needs

He estimates that the machines
of the student body, Shepherd said,
will pay for themselves in about
five years. The cards to use with
the machines are included in the
initial cost of the machines.
New "safeguards" will be in
effect at the mock election which
will be held between 9 a.m. and
5 p.m. Thursday. Each student will
be required to present both his
brown fee card and his picture
I.D. ;

' .
I. Uni... uh ... now that we know 2. I have an exciting pipe
each other a little, I was won- collection,
dering if, uh, you think Im the
tvpe of guv you could go for? I want to be where
1 b ' b the action is.
I could go for a
real swinger.
£>.
3.1 know some daring chess 4. I read all about it in Tin Tinopenings.
openings. Tinopenings. New York Times.
I want a man whos I want to do in things
making it happen. with in people
in in places.
5.1 spend a lot of time in 6. Then I guess von wouldnt be
the library. interested in someone like me
.. r who has landed a good-paving
My motto is fun today j()b that wi H J et his family'
and fun tomorrow. l ive we U an d w ho, in addition,
has taken out a substantial
Living Insurance policy from
Equitable that will provide
handsomely for his family if,
heaven forbid, anything should
happen to him.
1 lows about showing
me that pipe;
collection, swinger?
For information alxnit Living Insurance, see The Man from Equitable.
For career opportunities at Equitable, see your Placement Officer, or
write: Patrick Scollard, Manpower Development Division.
The EQUITABLE Life Assurance Society of the United States
llortie Office: 1285 Ave. of the Americas. New York, N.Y. 10019 '''Equitable lOOfi
.An Equal Opportunity Employer Af/F

Released
The new UF magazine Re Release
lease Release goes on sale today.
Sponsored by student publi- f
cations, Release will be sold
all day in front of the Hub,
the library, Peabody Hall,
and the main cafeteria.
Release cost 35 cents a copy
and is composed >of campus
opinion, humor, and original f
fiction.



feATORS SURPRISE ALL
Mark
Pursues Another Record

Record-breaking quarterback Steve Spurrier lias
[brought about the biggest reversal of form in
any one season of football in Florida history.
The Gators of Ray Graves were picked to
finish 5-5, possibly 6-4 if lucky, and they not
only exceeded the predictions but are now on the
verge of the greatest season in Florida history.
Florida entered the 1966 season minus 21
key players and four All-Americans off the Sugar
Bowl team of 1965. Few veterans remained and
the list of 22 starters on September 1 included
12 new faces.
Graves and his staff predicted sophomores would woulddominate
dominate woulddominate the lineup and as late as the Tulane
game last week there were eight in the starting
lineup.
Floridas outlook was, in the words of one national
magazine, "The Gators will go as far as Steve
Spurrier can carry them.
Thus far Spurrier and friends have come far,
further than any team in Florida history. They
have already won as many regular season games
(eight) and have a record equal to any (8-1)
in Gator history.
Spurrier has shattered records in guiding the

/& KEI: A
Sports hero loses girl to mild-mannered math major.
DEAR REB:
& I'm a big football star, and Ive found a girl who suits me to a T. But
v> JbKHRIPA Ive k een blocked out of the play by a math major. He knows math
i from A=Pi R 2 to E = MC 2 Now she says hes found the formula
f / for success with her. All he has to do is mutter "Coronet R/T, and
lUlito J?Pr f %m I get thrown for a loss. Believe me, this is no equilateral triangle
that I'm in. Outside of telling me to bench myself, have you any
advice?
FALLEN STAR
DEAR FALLEN
Now's the time to plunge. Coronet R/T isn't his ex exelusive
elusive exelusive formula. Your nearby Dodge Dealer has it,
too. And it comes almost as easily as the cube root of
27. Then how can the girl your dreams resist two
superstars . you and your Coronet R/T? From
' there on out, your math major will be the victim of
* *WT diminishing returns. Huddle with your Dodge Dealer
your
And why not? Look what youll have going for you in your Dodge Coronet R/T, convertible
or two-door hardtop. All standard, too. 440-cubic-inch Magnum V 8 engine. Dual exhausts.
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M MOTORS CORPORATION
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young Gators through a tedious schedule with so
many heart-stopping fourth quarter rallies it looked
like Floridas version of the old Perils of Pauline
serial. Virtually every week found the Florida
football team, in the minds of the fans, tied to
the railroad track with the train bearing down upon
them in the games final moments.
Each time, with the exception of the Georgia
game, Spurrier appeared and performed some sort
of football miracle. Most of the time he did it
passing, winning the FSU and N.C. State games
with last moment TD passes, and against Auburn
he turned to his foot for a 40-yard field goal with
two minutes left for a 30-27 victory.
Spurrier now holds every school passing and total
offense record for game, season and career. He
holds virtually every SEC record, getting the career
total offense mark last Saturday. He now has 5082
yards in his career and has reached the point
where he is breaking SEC records he set only last
year.
Spurrier, at this stage, holds nine SEC records
and has a chance to break another in the season
finale with Miami, Nov. 26.

Wednesday, November 16, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

p§
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; j ,,
klk -fP\
4. a \
*' ts aIHNPw
i v i
STEVE SPURRIER
. familiar scene

%S§r f f fl /~ M *^|
Hi:
^"Kv'.^^BpXv-v/Iy!?r '^yyy. wa^>gaTOWW!Bais^!SSraww:-K--<
EUGENE TROSCH
. Miami mammoth
Miami Tackle
Main Reason
For Success
T stands for an offensive for formation
mation formation in football but the Univer University
sity University of Miami depends heavily upon
the T in defense in fact, part
of the great success of the Hur Hurricanes
ricanes Hurricanes on defense this fall comes
from two Ts, Bob Tatarek and
Gene Trosch, a pair of man sized
tackles who did a giant sized job.
Tatarek, 229 pounds, is 6 feet
4 inches tall, is a junior from
Jeannette, Pa. Trosch, 251, is
a 6-foot-6 senior and hails from
Weirton, W. Va.
They've made a hash of the run running
ning running game of Miami's foes. Col Colorado
orado Colorado rushed for 46 net yards in
31 tries; Florida State got 71
in 36 lunges; Georgia was nipped
with 42 in 36 despite having one
of the finest line smashers in the
Southeastern conference in Ron Ronnie
nie Ronnie Jenkins; Indiana got 75 yards
in 46 running attempts and South Southern
ern Southern California, which entered the
Miami game as one of the lead leading
ing leading rushing teams in the land,
picked up just 81 yards in 41
plays.
Trosch established his reputa reputation
tion reputation as a man to avoid right at
the start of the campaign when he
was in on nine tackles in the
Colorado opener, followed with 11
against FSU and he hasn't let up.
Coach Charlie Tate says the giant
West Virginian has moved into
real greatness in college football
and rates Trosch, along with Ta Tatarek,
tarek, Tatarek, as two of the more sensa sensational
tional sensational tackles he has been asso associated
ciated associated with since he became a
college coach. He tabs corner cornerback
back cornerback Tom Beier one of his all alltime
time alltime great backfield defenders.
Tatarek grew to greatness dur during
ing during the LSU game and has been
going great ever since. In the
Southern California game, he was
in on 14 tackles and put on an
exhibition of tackle play which is
likely to be shown on the films
to be viewed by every future de defensive
fensive defensive tackle at Miami. Tatarek
by the way, scored a touchdown
on a fumble recovery in the Col Colorado
orado Colorado end zone. He also had a
fumble recovery in the Indiana
game.
Following the Southern Califor California
nia California game Tatarek wasnamedNa wasnamedNational
tional wasnamedNational Lineman of the Week," an
honor that has gone to only one
other University of Miami player
Ed Weisacosky since the
founding of the school.
i Both Trosch and Tatarek are
adept at the blitz and each has
knocked down several forward
passes in the opposition backfield.

Page 13



Page 14

l, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 16, 1966

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SCHOOL SPIRIT Tommy Bart Bartlett,
lett, Bartlett, new head coach of the bas basketball
ketball basketball team, has an Orange and
Blue Volkswagen. He had it pain painted
ted painted UFs colors in order to
help build up spirit and enthus enthusiasm

SHES FOR REAL
Woman Sportscaster?

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
ATLANTA (UPI) Jane Steppe,
alias Coach Friday, would like
to shed her status as a sex sym symbol
bol symbol and become an honest-to-good honest-to-goodness
ness honest-to-goodness sportscaster.
It all started as a gimmick
with Coach, a pretty little mo model
del model and part-time actress who
dressed in a tight sweater and
short-shorts while predicting foot football
ball football scores on a television show.
I didnt have the vaguest idea
what it was all about when we
started, Jane confessed. At
first, I let the stations sports
editor do the picking; my job was
to attract viewers.
But that was four seasons ago.
Now, Jane makes her own fore forecasts
casts forecasts hitting on 82 percent so
far this fail, runs a Saturday
afternoon scoreboard show and in interviews
terviews interviews athletes for a couple of
weekend sportcasts.
Coach Friday became an in instant
stant instant success. She attracted na national
tional national attention with some wild,
but accurate, predictions; was
named honorary coach of the Slip Slippery
pery Slippery Rock Pa. football team and
the Oglethorpe Ga. basketball
team; and invited to be a guest
prognosticator for several news newspapers.
papers. newspapers.
I studied everything about
sports I could get my hands on,
Jane said. The more I studied,
the more engrossed I became. Now,
I suppose I can become a bore
on the subject.
a
The first couple of years, the
husky-voiced Miss Steppe always
wore her Coach Friday costume
when appearing inpublic. But shes
become considerably more con conservative
servative conservative during her drive to rise
above the gimmick that got her
started and become accepted as
a legitimate member of the pro profession.
fession. profession.
There is a place for a wom woman
an woman sportscaster, Jane insisted.
Female fans are growing in num numbers
bers numbers and they need someone who
can cover sports events for them
from their point of view.
Os course, she added, I
dont want people to stop think thinking
ing thinking of me as a woman too.
Whether Coach Friday will
be accepted as a sportscaster
remains to be seen but to
continue to be accepted as a woman
she needs only to be seen.
Shes an official member of the
National Association of Sports cas casters
ters casters and recognized as a full fullfledged
fledged fullfledged sportscaster by the Atlan Atlanta
ta Atlanta Braves and the Atlanta Fal Falcons.
cons. Falcons.

That recognition didnt come
without a battle, the slender bru brunette
nette brunette said. At first they didnt
want me on the field. But I in insisted
sisted insisted that I be permitted to talk
to the players there or else be
allowed in the dressing rooms like
my competitors. That settled that
question in a hurry.
She wears a size four shoe,
and therein lies the tale of how
she got into modeling.
Sportscasters come in all shapes
and sizes, but Coach Friday
is one of a kind. The shapely,
23- year- old native of suburban
Smyrna is barely 5-foot-3 and
weights about 100 pounds.
I couldnt find any shoes to
fit. But since Ive been modeling
shoes, the manufacturers have giv given
en given me about 300 pairs.
Jane heard about auditions for
Coach Friday by accident. I

OFFERS PHILOSOPHY
Soph Santille Turns In Great Game

Strange what success does to a
guy.
Before last Saturday, 19-year 19-yearold
old 19-yearold Mike Santille never talked to
a newspaper reporter. Florida
football coaches thought of the
Pensacola sophomore as a
quiet, humble boy who does just
as hes told.
At approximately 4:15 p.m. Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, Santille shed his anonymity.
He talked with his first sports
writer. He had just played his fin finest
est finest hour of college football in Flor Floridas
idas Floridas eighth victory of the season,
31-10 over Tulane.
Suddenly shy, humble Mike San Santille
tille Santille had turned philosopher.
Football, said Santille, a
handsome Idd with short-cropped
black hair and a chin cleff, is
90 per cent mental, 8 per cent
physical and 2 per cent coaching.
Some five hours later, Ray
Graves leaned back on a piano
stool in the den of his plush
Gainesville home and chuckled
at the Aristotle of Floridas
football team.
What frightens me, said
Graves, is that he might be
right.
It may be that Graves was

iasm enthusiasm in Gainesville for the Ga Gator
tor Gator cagers. Bartlett says the
students are the nucleus of fan
support, and they come back year
after year to cheer on the team.

called the station, asked for a
chance and got the job.
UPI Top 20
1. Notre Dame 26 8-0 338
2. Mich. State 5 9-0 316
3. Alabama 2 8-0 275
4. Nebraska 2 9-0 223
5. Georgia Tech 9-0 206
6. Arkansas 8-1 135
7. Southern Cal. 7-1 116
8. UCLA 8-1 99
9. Georgia 8-1 46
10. Florida 8-1 46
Second 10 Purdue 42; 12, Hous Houston
ton Houston 19; 13, Mississippi 10; 14,
Colorado 4; 15 tie, Wyoming and
Miami, Fla. 3; 17 tie, Syracuse
and Tennessee 2; 19 tie, Colorado
State and Southern Methodist 1.

just ir an agreeable mood. Here
he was, sitting in a good posi position
tion position to mastermind the Gators
best season record (9-1) if Flor Florida
ida Florida beats Miami Nov. 15. The bowl
people were knocking at his door.
And to make the evening com complete,
plete, complete, he was puffing on his
favorite brand of cigar.
Santille was partly responsible
for No. 8 and maybe thats why
he was so lenient. It was Mike
who intercepted a Tulane pass
that set up Floridas go-ahead
touchdown in the third quarter and
put the Gators in front, 17-10,
for good.
That was enough to ask from a
second stringer who wasnt even
good enough to get off the bench
against Georgia. But wait, theres
more.
Not only did Santille come in to
contain Greenie quarterback Bobby
Duhon on his favorite play, the
sweep.
He also recovered a fumble that
led to the typng field goal, 10-
10.
For an encore, he jarred the ball
loose and allowed tackle Don Gior Giordano
dano Giordano to recover it, setting up the
Gators final score.
All this would make Santille an
obvious choice for lineman of the
week honors in Florida. But it

Two New Stars
Shine For South
*
ATLANTA (UPI) Two new stars shone on the Southeas Southeastern
tern Southeastern Conference horizon Tuesday.
Sophomore Brad Johnson, second string fullback at the Uni University
versity University of Georgia, was named Southeastern Conference back of
the week by United Press International.
Defensive end Jerry Richardson of Ole Miss was named
SEC lineman of the week.
Johnson, a 195-pounder from Avondale, Ga., who plays behind
Ron Jenkins, No. 2 runner in the SEC, was cited for his out outstanding
standing outstanding performance in the 21-13 victory over Auburn that
gave Georgia at least a share of the conference championship.
Richardson, a 215-pound junior from Vidalia, La., won his
honor for his role in Mississippis 14-7 upset of Tennessee.
Johnson ran for 99 yards and one touchdown in 13 carries
while leading the Bulldogs, down 13-0 at halftime, to their
come-from-behind victory.
Georgia alternated Johnson and Jenkins, who gained 69 yards,
in a second-half show of pure power.
Johnson was delighted at being chosen back of the week but
said the credit had to go to Georgias offensive line. They
really opened up some holes, he said,
Richardson, who has amazing speed for a big man, scored
what turned out to be the Rebels* winning points when he grabbed
a Tennessee funble and raced 51 yards for a touchdown late in
the fourth period.
He was one of the key men in the Mississippi defense that
limited the Vols to 62 yards running and clamped down time
and again when passes carried Tennessee into scoring position.
Quarterbacks Steve Spurrier of Florida and Dewey Warren of
Tennessee, front-runners almost every week, were runner-upk
to Johnson for the back of the week award.
Georgia's two great tackles, senior George Patton and soph sophomore
omore sophomore Bill Stanfill, were runnerups to Richardson in the lineman
derby.
Spurrier became the greatest yardage gainer in SEC history
Saturday when his 288-yard bag in a 31-10 victory over Tulane
gave him a career total of 5,082 yards with one game, Miami,
left to go.

So far this season, Spurrier has completed a record-setting
153 passes for 1,785 yards, 108 yards short of the SEC record
he set last year and his total offense mark of 1,861 is 262
yardt> shy of his 1965 pace.
Warren passed for 249 yards in a losing effort Saturday to
raise his total offense mark, with two games left to play, to
1,359 yards.
Thats 126 yards more than the previous Tennessee re record
cord record set by Hank Lauricella in 1951.

HV
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'4tf -
BOBBY DUHON
. . tried sweep
may not even earn him a starting
berth ahead of Jacksonvilles Rex
Rittgers.
Santille played a good ball
game, said Gene Ellenson,
who was justifiably proud of his
entire defense.
He made some big plays. But
he made some mistakes, too. He
was stopping Duhon because he
went in the game armed with in-

1
BL
m M-/1 m K?
m 1
irauH
MIKE SANTILLE
. stopped him
formation on how to stop him.
Which is rather incongruous
with Santilles football quotient.
That kid, winked linebacker linebackerend
end linebackerend coach Don Brown . boy
am I going to run his tail off
next week. Two per cent coaching
now that takes nerve.
But you know what, said
Brown in a half grin, Im afraid
he might be right.



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RAY ROLLYSON
. . finds new role

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Former UF Star
Now Coaching
Freshmen Teams

By ANN MAHAN
Alligator Correspondent
What happens to an athlete after
he has graduated from the Uni University
versity University of Florida? Ray Roily Roilyson,
son, Roilyson, who was a three year let letterman
terman letterman on the baseball team, has
found one answer.
Rollyson, now a graduate student
in physical education, is the as assistant
sistant assistant baseball coach for the
freshmen clinic held each year
from September through October.
Rollyson works with P. A. Lee,
head coach of the freshmen team.
The clinic is open to any
freshmen interested in trying out
for the freshman baseball team.
Junior college transfer students
also attend this clinic.
Rollyson explained the purpose
of this clinic was to orientate
them as to how we like them to
do things.
About 40 men come out for these
clinics, 20 of which get picked
by Coach Lee and Rollyson to
play on the University of Florida
freshmen team. The transfer stu students
dents students compete for positions on the
varsity team.
During the clinic the men are
taught signals, hitting, double

idelity Union /s\LiSe Insurance
Tssa
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steals and base running. The in infielders,
fielders, infielders, outfielders, catchers and
pitchers are each taught techni techniques
ques techniques about their own particular
positions.
Rollyson also is the graduate
assistant for BUI Potter, head
tennis coach. He alternates his
time between the two sports when
practices conflict.
Rollyson, who played all sports
at Plant City High School, turned
down baseball scholarships at oth other
er other schools since he wanted to
come here for an education.
As a freshman, Rollyson atten attended
ded attended the clinic and was picked
for the freshman team. He also
received a full scholarship.
Except for his junior year when
he was red shirted, Rollyson was
the starting pitcher for the team.
Rollyson was a pre-season All-
American pick before his senior
year. He lead the conference in
wins with four wins and 1 loss.
He also pitched the most innings
that year with a total of 97 1/3
innings.
Asked about future plans, Rol Rollyson
lyson Rollyson said, I hope to coach base baseball
ball baseball somewhere in a university or
junior college.

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Understanding
the New York
Stock Exchange
Intelligent investments start with an understanding of
the stock exchanges. But to the individual investor their
operation often seems too complex to be comprehended.
To help you understand how your money works in the stock
market to combat inflation, Goodbody & Co. offers this
48-page booklet, UNDERSTANDING THE NEW YORKS
EXCHANGE, it contains information about:
* i y
History
Exchange Organization ;g|| d
Stocks and Bonds
How an Order is Handled
You and Your Broker i
Why Prices Change j

For Your Free Copy, Just Msil The Coupon Below.
Name
Address / Tel
GOODBODY & CO.
KSTABLISHKO IMI
Mombort of boding Stock and Commodity Exchon gas
118 W. University Ave.
Our 75th Year of Service to Investors

Wednesday, November 16, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

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BRAD MUNROE AND MARC CREMIN
. . prep for Saturdays meet
Army Wrestling Coach
Holds Clinic Saturday
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Leroy A. Alitz, wrestling coach
at the United States Military Aca Academy,
demy, Academy, will conduct a wrestling
clinic at the North end of the
Florida gymnasium between 10
a.m. and 4 p.m. on Saturday, Nov.
19.
Alitzs clinic will be held at
the same time as the U. of F.
Invitational Judo Championsttps
which will be on the north side of
the gym.
Everyone interested is invited
to attend and may bring sweat
suits to participate if they so de-

Sire, said wrestling coacii rnc rnchard
hard rnchard Reisinger.
Coach Alitz has produced many
championship teams at West Point.
He is an old pro at conducting
clinics, so everyone present should
enjoy them selves and learn at the
same time, stated Reisinger.
Alitz conducted a similar clin clinic
ic clinic here last year which Coach
Reisinger called very success successful.
ful. successful.

Soccer Club
Ties Mighty
South Florida
The University of South Flor Florida
ida Florida had its high-flying bubble pop popped
ped popped by a down-to-earth UF Soc Soccer
cer Soccer Club this past Saturday on
Fleming Field.
The blemish on the USF record
came in the form of a tie, at 2-2.
The Brahmans were sporting a
7-0 season including wins over
University of Miami and Florida
State. They also defeated the Ga Gator
tor Gator booters in Tampa early in
the trimester.
USF controled the first half.
But they were only able to score
once in that half. Their fine team
work and passing ability was quite
evident.
In the second half, Coach Moore
and the team captains decided on
a change of team formation.
The passing was the best the
Gator Booters had all year, and
the offensive plays were beginning
t take form.
Early in the second half a USF
ball bounced lose from one of the
Florida Defenders and went into
the goal to give USF a 2-0 lead.
Soon after that the Gator Boot Booters
ers Booters caught fire and Rashid Char Charafeddine,
afeddine, Charafeddine, from Lebanon slid a
shot past the USF goalie.
The back line continued apply applying
ing applying pressure and with 15 minutes
to go in the game Max Ventura
punched the score for a tie on
a corner kick play.
The Booters now have a 5-1-3
record. Thfcs week the team is
off to Daytona to play against Em Embry
bry Embry Riddle Aeronautical Institute.

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 16, 1966

UUIJIHIj at all murphy
STORES . EVERYWHERE!
wnuHL
j H wwUmm f f I I II
ON ALL PURCHASES*
>
ONE DAY ONLY
WEDNESDAY, NOY. 16th
r-r ; ~ _~. '".- :
It's just in time for your Christmas shopping . you get an
outright 10% discount on all purchases you make at Murphy's
during this one day only! Ana remember this is actually
10% OVER AND ABOVE the low, low prices you ALWAYS
find at Murphy's! Take advantage of this terrific one day
offer! Bring your Christmas shopping list and SAVE MORE
THAN EVER BEFORE!
p

*Tobacco / Restaurant & Snack Bar Items Excluded N.W* 6th & UlllV* Av