Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida Alligator

Vol. 59 No. 54

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(Photo By Nick Arroyo)
PRESIDENT REITZ SIGNS PROCLAMATION
]
. .Dollars for Scholars week begins.
Teacher Evaluation
Response Favorable

Opinion of the Teacher Eval Evaluation
uation Evaluation Program to be conduct conducted
ed conducted the last week of this tri trimester
mester trimester seems to be favorable with
instructors across campus.
Dr. Ernest Bartley, professor of
political science, is willing to
give the program a chance and
is willing to be evaluated him himself.
self. himself. He stated, however, that
he is opposed to anyone but
other instructors as evaluators. He
also expressed a concern that the>
program might get tied Up with
salaries and provide excuses for
not getting raises.
" There is also a problem of
evaluating perhaps an outstanding
(or, on the other hand, mediocre)
section, and thus not receiving a'
fair evaluation. This is especially
possible since little is known about
the individual students."
One more disadvantage, he said,
would be the amount of class time
required to fill out the neces necessary
sary necessary forms and data. Often this
paper work will consume a whole
period, which most instructors
"just don't have."
"Though the original intentions

are good, the plan may sour/
Bartley said.
Dr. Clarence Derrick, pro professor
fessor professor and chairman of the hu humanities
manities humanities department, stated his
will to co-operate and has
already volunteered for the pro program.
gram. program. The program, he said,
should be given a chance. Well
see where it goes from here.
There were some professors,
however, who were not in favor
of the program. Dr. Coleman Goin,
professor of the biological sc sciences,
iences, sciences, stated his disbelief in
evaluation programs in general.
Such programs, he said, are
merely a release for student
gripes. In addition most students
do not know what is best for
them. Even with evaluation sheets,
students tend to neglect the
human element; that is r an in instructor
structor instructor deemed good on an eval evaluation
uation evaluation sheet may not be good for
the individual student. His meth method
od method of teaching and personality
may be in contrast to one in individual
dividual individual but not another..
In general. he said, '*l feel
the program will not do much
good, but I am willing to give it
a try.

University of Florida

'Dollars forScholarsWeek
Begins; Goal Is $18,039

By GAYE ANDERSON
Alligator Staff Writer
The Dollars for Scholars"
drive on the UF campus is in
progress. Tim Johnson, pictured
above and head of the drive, has
announced that the goal is $18,039,
the equivalent of one dollar for
every student enrolled at UF.
Fraternities, sororities, inde independents,
pendents, independents, and other campus
organizations have already begun
projects to raise money for the
1966 campaign by selling Campus
Pacs, and Gator Discount Cards.
Other projects also initiated were
a dance at the AOPi house,
spaghetti dinners at the Zeta,
Kappa Alpha Theta and DG houses,
and a pie toss at the ADPi house.
Fraternities began requesting
money from alumni at the Tulane
ame, Nov. 12.
There are also plans for raids
and slave days, when pledges offer
their services to shine shoes and
wash cars for contributions to the
drive.
Five trophies are awarded to
those organizations that raise the
most money during the drive. In
Leg Council
Meets Tonight
By JEAN MAMLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Approval of committee appoint-,
ments and revision in the elect election
ion election laws are the two main items
on the agenda for the Legislative
council meeting tonight.
Membership of the election
board has been changed to include
only the president of the stud student
ent student body, chancellor of the honor
court, and both the majority and
minority leaders of leg. council.
Formerly included were presi presidents
dents presidents of Blue Key and Mortar
Board.
The other election revision
states that students must show both
picture and regular I.D. cards when
voting.
First readings will be made con concerning
cerning concerning an amendment to the
finance law and a special request
moratorium. A second reading will
be made on the vacancy replace replacement
ment replacement bill.
Three Council replacements will
be voted upon: Joe Scafuti for
Jim Parsons, sophomore class;
Brad Culverhouse for Bill Carr,
arts and sciences; and Greg John Johnson
son Johnson for Gary Goodrich, Graham
area.
<. The seniority bill will not be
introduced until next meeting.
The Council will be called to or order
der order at 8:30 in the Florida Union
Auditorium.
Inside Today's
Alligator
Tyler Tucker Page 2
University Coed Page 3
Art Hoppe Page 6
Moot Courters Page 9
Sports Page 10

1965, the TEPs won in the fra fraternity
ternity fraternity division and the ADPis,
the sorority trophy.
The Dollars for Scholars
drive will end Saturday, November
19, when all money collected must
be turned in to the Student Govern Government
ment Government offices by 6:00 p.m.
All money raised by the UF will
be matched at a 9:1 ratio by the
NDEA, National Defense Education
Act Loan Funds. This would mean

Loan Applications
Now Available
Bv NED WOODFOLK
Alligator Correspondent
Students may now apply for loans for the school year be beginning
ginning beginning in September, 1967, according to Mac C. Grigsby, loan
services officer. Applications are available until Feb. 28.
Grigsby added that The bulk of student loans are based on
those applications received frotn students who realize that they
will need financial help and are planning for it now.
In applying for a loan, a student should contact the Student
Need Office when he becomes aware of the fact that he will
have to have financial assistance for school.** Grigsby went on
to say that While many students are directed to the University
Loan Department, in some cases a job or scholarship is another
possible solution to the students problem.**
Any full-time student at the school is eligible to apply for
a student loan. Rules regulating these loans make it necessary
for the student to show a real need, and the loan must be direct directly
ly directly related to school expenses. These conditions must be met
before a loan can be given.
According to Grigsby there are two major types of loans
available for the Florida student. These are the short-term and
the long-term loans.
A short-term loan is used to alleviate a temporary emer emergency.
gency. emergency. It is not available for investment-type borrowing. Grig Grigsby
sby Grigsby stated, These loans help when a student or his family
have a minor financial setback, when a veterans check doesnt
arrive on time, or when a similar temporary situation is in involved.
volved. involved.
Such loans are granted for a 90-day period of the full trimester.
These notes are due and payable in full at the end of the 90-day
period or the end of the trimester, whichever comes first.
A long-term loan is any kind that is payable after gradua graduation
tion graduation or termination of school for other reasons. It is an in investment
vestment investment in your education, Grigsby continued.
The University Long-Term Loan, the National Defense Loan
(which includes Dollars for Scholars), the Florida Scholarship
Commission, and the United Student Aid Fund are the four
types of long-term loans available to students.
For further Information concerning loans, the student should
contact the loan office in room 224, Building E.
TODAY & I
THURSDAY

Forum Debate
On U.S. Negro
The American Negro: Evol Evolution
ution Evolution or Revolution? will be
explored at 8:15 tonight during
the UFs third Forum Committee
debate.
The program will be held in the
University Auditorium.
Speakers will be Dr. Ernest R.
Bartley, professor of .political
science, who will defend the
evolutionary idea, and Dr. Mar Marshall
shall Marshall B. Jones, assistant profes professor
sor professor of psychology and psychiat psychiatry,
ry, psychiatry, taking the revolution theme.

Tuesday, November 15, 1966

the UF could possibly make a total
of SIBO,OOO in loan appropriations
for students.
Anyone having a 2.0 average and
making normal progress toward a
degree is eligible for a loan, wit!
special consideration given t<
those students majoring in edu education,
cation, education, modern languages, math
or science. Low interest payment
on the loans begin one year aftei
graduation.

Basketball
Dollars Game
Dollars For Scholars Benefl
Basketball Game will be held thi
Thursday night at 8:30 in the Flor
Ida Gym. The game Will pit thi
years varsity squad in an intra
squad game.
The game is free, but donation
will be taken up. All funds raise
will go into the Dollars For Scl
olars Scholarship Program.



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 15, 1966

n JR 1 \ 3'
\ne People, yes I
SHHHHHHHHB fljj
Silently she sat under the brown-tinged palms that lined the
library. On the dying summer grass and the sallow leaves, she
blended In with the colors of winters painted face.
Kay Ingalls was drawing. With her pad and pencil she carefully
outlined a small tree swaying in the chilly November wind.
Kay arrived at the university last year with a small dream
held tightly under her arm. She was satisfied with her home town,
but the dream of the Wyoming plains is a secret hidden in her
brown eyes.
From the hamlet of Hallandale, a Florida town with a traffic
light, a phone directory, a water works, and when the P.T.A.
takes the trouble of setting up the projection screen a theater,
she was comfortable in the rustic atmosphere.
Hollywood and West Palm always provided city life, she
says, but I still would rather live in the country.
One of the last of a special college breed the student who
enjoys reading, thinking, or drawing on the open Plaza of the
Americas lawn, Kay does her projects under the arms of the
palms and oaks.
I like the wind, and cold, and especially the rain, she says,
I really like walking in the rain. I was happy when it rained at
the football game last Saturday.
To the short brunette, college football is more than an after afternoon
noon afternoon of hysterical screaming.
It's different from high school football, she says. Here
there is more noise, ice throwing contests between the ATOs and
Phi Delts, and the 25 cent game Coke.
Kay has been in school since the fall of 1965. She went to school
last summer and plans a full load this summer. She doesnt mind
the work now that she doesnt have to read Max Lerner in
Institutions.
She is anxious about her new courses in interior design her
specialty.
I started drawing when I was about 14, she explains, Ive
been drawing ever since. I enjoy it. I want to continue with de design
sign design when I graduate.
She continued her slow methodic pencil strokes reproducing
the library sign and the nearby trees.
I dont like that palm tree, she said. I think Ill create
a prettier tree. And she did.
Even in her green knit dress, Kay admits to a past history
of tomboy antics.
Im still a tomboy, she says, But you should have seen
me play football in high school. What position? I dont know,
it was only the powder puff game.
The students at Florida have influenced her opinion of the
university. She likes most everyone she has met. She even likes
Broward hall, the girls dormitory with its paternal restrictions.
Its OK, she says, But its not home.
Kay Ingalls has one confidential dream she would like to have
happen. She wants it to snow.
The chances arent very good, I reminded her.
Maybe Steve Spurrier will make it snow, she said.
Maybe he will.
I ROBBIES I
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11718 W. University Ave. I
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Photo by Nick Arroyo
KAY INGALLS
. .creates prettier tree
. .and wishes for snow

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PRESS PUBLISHERS
ATTEND MEETING

BOCA RATON (UPI) Pub Publishers
lishers Publishers from 14 southern states--
along with visitors from as far
away as Finland registered
here Sunday for the 63rd annual
Southern Newspaper Publishers
Association convention.
The more than 800 members,
wives and guests will spend three
days at the Boca Raton Hotel mix mixing
ing mixing speeches and committee meet meetings
ings meetings with afternoon golf and tennis
tournaments.
First thing on the agenda Mon Monday
day Monday is the welcoming address from
Miami Herald Publisher James L.

See Whats N w h
The Browse Shop
COOKIES & CANDIES Better Homes
CHILDREN'S LETTERS TO GOD Eric Marshal
CHILDREN'S LITERATURE Edward Ernest
STARTING FROM SAN FRANCISCO
Lawrence Ferlinghetti
WHY I AM NOT A CHRISTIAN Bertrand Russel
APPLIED MECHANICS FOR ENGINEERS
Sir Charles Inglis
BOOKS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD
Robert Downs
SUMMERHILL Eric Fromm
THE SOT-WEED FACTOR John Barth
ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST
Ken Kesey
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00
Campes Shop & Beokstore

Knight, followed by a speech on
advertising in the free enterprise
system by Charles T. Lipscomb
chief executive officer of the
American Newspaper Publishers
Association Bureau of Advertising.
Monday afternoon Cranston Wil Williams,
liams, Williams, retired ANPA general man manager
ager manager and former secretary-man secretary-manager
ager secretary-manager of (the SNPA, will lead a
panel discussion on newsprint.
The lineup of speakers for Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday includes Lindsey A. Van Vlls Vllssingen,
singen, Vllssingen, the Chicago Tribunes per personnel
sonnel personnel manager; Joseph G. Terry

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Min. Tin
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Illustrated is our creamy textured double crepe, seamed high
under the bosom, ever so merely darted for fashion's newest
understatement. You will see glamorous tinsel' and shimmery
sparkle' in our new collection of cocktail clothes.
RUSH DOWN TO
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225 W. University Ave.
Plenty of FREE Parking on the huge
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ADS

WUFT-TV: 'SECOND 100

'The University Coed

By MAURY OLICKER
and
TRISH CUTOFF
Staff Writers
The University Co-ed," a 15-
minute presentation of The
Second 100 television series, will
be shown tonight at 10 p.m.
on Channel 5, WUFT-TV.
The program will examine the
changing role of the Florida coed
on campus, adjustment to living
away from home, independent
study, and morals. Harold Dil Dillinger,
linger, Dillinger, UF Alumni Association
field secretary, will moderate a
guest panel consisting of Dean of
Women Betty Cosby, Miss UF
Donna Berger, and former Lyceum
Council President Emily Benson.

"D I G N I F R I E D"
CHICKEN
DINNER
SAVE 10c, TUESDAY ONLY
$59
RED BARN
2029 NW 13th St. Across from Gainesville H.gh School

Several copies of the 1966
Seminole are still available.
If you could not buy a copy
before the deadline last year,
you may purchase one in Room
9, Florida Union. No receipt
is necessary Yearbooks
are $4 each. 1967 yearbooks
are on sale at tables all over
campus.
j,, 3yi

Tuesday, November 15, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Dean Cosby will give her views
on the coeds role in student poli politics,
tics, politics, the possibility of class per performance
formance performance being hindered by social
aspirations, and the problem of
marriage versus an education. The
problem of inadequate campus
recognition for achievements will
also be discussed.
The Second 100" is sponsored
jointly by Florida Blue Key and the
UF Alumni Association. It has been
designed to acquaint the people of
Florida with current information
about educational research, exten extension
sion extension activities, and life at the UF.
The name refers to the second
century of UF's existence.
The program appears each week
on five stations around the state.
Alumni and others interested in

the University may watch the ser series
ies series on WFTV-Orlando, WPTV-
Palm Beach, WEAR-Pensacola,
WJXT-Jacksonville and WUFT-
Gainesville. In Gainesville, it is
shown every Tuesday at 10 p.m.
While the program is designed
primarily for alumni and parents,
the staff is quick to point out that
it is also of great interest to
students.
According to student producer
Bill Edgar, the show is valuable
public relations for the UF.
The program, financed largely
with student funds, is produced in
the studio of WUFT by a student
staff. Dillinger and Bill McCollum,
of Florida Blue Key, alternate as
host.
Each program originates with
an idea from Student Director Jay
Boynton or one of his four man
staff. Boynton then discusses the
idea with Edgar they work
out a rough sketch of the program
topic. The topic then goes back tc
Boynton's research staff for z
thorough investigation.
The research staff will returr
with complete background ma material,
terial, material, a list of questions fox
panel guests, and recommen recommendations
dations recommendations for appropriate guests.
Edgar and Boynton then invitt
guests, discuss the program for format
mat format with Television Director Kyle
Sterling, and decide which of the
two hosts will moderate the pro program.
gram. program.
Programs are videotaped, two at
a time, approximately one month
before the first broadcast of each
in Orlando. The tapes are rotated
around the state, showing finally
back at Gainesville, and then are
erased and used again.
Future Second 100" broadcasts
will present Obscenity and Liter Literature,"
ature," Literature," The Light Horse Indus Industry,"
try," Industry," Basketball," and Is God
Dead?" Programs will also dis discuss
cuss discuss Child Law," Junior
Colleges," Teaching vs. Re Research,"
search," Research," On-Campus Housing,"
Off-Campua Housing," and
Florida Blue Key."

Page 3



t The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 15, 1966

Page 4

*,,
l(
C / FROM THE
\ vggy WIRES OF
UPI /
* *
%*. ....
...Sy"
V-.
'
International
RELIEF DRIVE. .ROME. .Pope Paul VI Sunday launched a massive
drive for relief funds to aid victims of Italys floods even as fresh
destruction hit the northern third of the country.
In Pisa, the Solferino Bridge collapsed into the swollen River
Arno, but there were no injuries. The span, badly weakened by rising
waters, had been closed to all traffic.
At Urbania on the Adriatic Coast, the bell tower of the 18th cen century
tury century church of Mastro Paolo toppled and crashed through the roof
of the empty cathedral before dawn.
Latest official reports from the Interior Ministry said the confirmed
death toll in 10 days of flooding was 105, with nine persons still
missing in disaster zones. Unofficial estimates put the toll far higher.
VISIT ENGLAND. .LONDON. .Prime Minister Harold Wilson an announced
nounced announced today that Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin will visit Britain
Feb. 6.
The maximum amount of time during Kosygins visit to Britain
will be spent on talks Wilson told the House of Commons. He said
Viet Nam and methods of halting the spread of nuclear weapons will
be the main topics.
CROWN PRINCE. .LONDON. .Prince Charles celebrated his 18th
birthday Monday and became eligible to assume the British throne.
The future king of England spent his birthday at Gordonstoun School
in Scotland and like the other students had a lunch of Sunday left leftovers.
overs. leftovers.
Having reached 18, Charles begins drawing an income considerably
larger than his classmates or teachers, $1,615.60 a week. He can also
drink legally in a pub or apply for a flrivers license.
National
KIDDIE KAPERS . WINDSOR, N.C. . Roger Bernard Lee cried
a little bit and then admitted he killed his parents and sister five
months ago because his mother slapped him for smoking cigarettes.
The 14-year-old youth earlier convinced authorities that his father
committed double murder and then took his own life in the carnage
last May 28.
Roger said his father did it during a family fight and also had tried
to kill him but he fled. A 10-year-old cousin echoed the story to
authorities.
BOLTS CUBA. .NEW YORK. .A top-ranking Cuban diplomat who
bolted the Castro regime in London, Nov. 9 said Monday he has been
* in hiding since then to protect himself and his family against reprisal.
The secrecy surrounding my defection and the subsequent pre precautions
cautions precautions taken were necessary because more than one-half of all
personnel attached to any Cuban embassy or diplomatic establishment
abroad, and even here at the United Nations, are subversion officers
who could have made things difficult and even dangerous for me and
my family, Raul Volta Landa, 36, said.
SACRIFICE. .CHICAGO. .Mr. and Mrs. Donald Kaczmarek are
willing to give their 3-month old son away if they can find a doctor who
will take him.
The Kaczmareks love their son and dont want to see him go but
he is the victim of a rare and fatal disease which has killed two others
of their children and they want to help other victims.
If some doctor would bewillingtoseeka cure, we are willing to let
him study our baby in an effort to help other children, Mrs.
Kaczmarek said.
(UN)CLOTHING PROBLEMS. .NEW YORK. .The topless waitress
craze was launched on the West Coast, but if it is to take New York
by storm, cabaret owners apparently will have to pull off some cross crosscountry
country crosscountry raiding.
Tony Lech, who operates the Village West in Greenwich Village,
is in the vanguard of the bare-bosom movement here. But his problem
is getting local girls to appear scantily clad before paying customers.
Its impossible to get New York girls at double salary, Tony
said Sunday, shaking his head sadly. They chicken out when they see
the eager bar crowd.
Florida
MORE REGENT CONTROL. .TALLAHASSEE. .A group of legis legislators
lators legislators recommended Monday the board of regents be given near
autonomy in portioning funds and setting salaries of academic and
professional personnel at the state universities.
Also urged was a tightening of requirements for the 1965 regents
scholarship program to try to keep Floridas top scholars at home.
The committee, without committing itself to voting the money in
the final analysis, also recommended that the regents scholarships
be fully funded at an estimated cost of $3 million for the next biennium.
SESSION STARTS. .TALLAHASSEE. .Rules committees were slated
today to work on clearing the way for organization of the 1967 legis legislature
lature legislature at a one-day special session to formally elect leaders and get
the biennial business started.
Gov.-elect Claude Kirk and other Republican big-wigs flew to the
state Capitol today for their first face-to-face meeting with the 1967
lawmakers. Kirk will attend the special session. Senate rule makers,
led by Sen. Tom Whitaker of Tampa, have been at work several weeks
unde* direction of President Verle Pope of St. Augustine.

Ambassador Comments
On US-Russian Relations

Editors note: Foy D. Kohler
is returning to Washington after
four years as American ambas ambassador
sador ambassador in Moscow. In this dispatch,
he reminisces about his life here
during some of the best-and-worst
times in Soviet-American re relations.
lations. relations.
By RICHARD C. LONGWORTH
MOSCOW (UPI) Theres only
one way for an American to deal
with the Soviets be firm,
be patient, be persistent, be po polite.
lite. polite.
That advice comes from the
man who had to follow it Foy
D. Kohler, the U. S. ambassador
in Moscow for the past four years
and two months.
With his departure Monday, Koh Kohler

GOLDWATER COMMENTS

RomneyDeniesPresidential Plans

WASHINGTON (UPI) Barry
M. Goldwater called on Michigan
Gov. George Romney Sunday to
prove his White House credentials
to the public and his own party
if he wants the 1968 Republican
presidential nomination.Theman
has to develop, he said.
Romney himself said the GOP
now had a very large number of
people who could beat President
Johnson at the polls. But he in insisted
sisted insisted he had not decided whether
to be a candidate for the job.
Both men appeared on separate
television programs signaling the
start of political maneuvering for
the GOPs top prize two years
hence. It was Romneys first major
public appearance since the Repub Republican
lican Republican sweep in last weeks mid midterm
term midterm elections made him a leading
contender for the nomination.
Resents Romneys Refusal
Goldwater told interviewers Is Issues
sues Issues and Answers ABC he
always would resent Romneys
refusal to endorse him as the
Republican candidate against John Johnson
son Johnson in 1964. But the Arizona con conservative
servative conservative said, Im not against
him and denied a report that he
and former Vice President Richard
M. Nixon were collaborating in a
stop Romney movement.
Although Goldwater obviously
had not forgotten Romney's rebuff,
Romney sought to dismiss their
1964 disagreement over civil
rights and extremism as a thing
of the past.
I am not interested in going
back and taking a look at the past,
the moderate governor told ques questioners.
tioners. questioners. When the present sits
in judgment of the past, the future
is lost, and the Republican party
has a great future and a great
opportunity here, and one based on
the fact that it is the party of
promise, now.
Romney, nevertheless declined to
back down from the fact that I
accepted him, I didnt endorse
him. And he said it was up to
Goldwater to decide whether to
support him in 1968 if Romney
becomes the nominee.
Whether the mode rate-conser rate-conservative
vative rate-conservative GOP struggle is revised
at the 1968 convention, both men
agreed that the list of possible
presidential candidates is long.
Neither tagged a specific favorite,
although Goldwater called Nixon
the partys most knowledgeable
man.
And while Romney predicted
Johnson could be defeated in 1968,
Goldwater said Johnson as an in incumbent
cumbent incumbent will be the toughest to
beat of any Democrat, including
Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, D-N.Y.

ler Kohler ends his tour as envoy here
and returns to the home office as
under secretary of state for poli political
tical political affairs the number four
spot in the State Department.
In a summing up he recalled
the trials and triumphs of his
dramatic four years here four
years that included the Khrush Khrushchev
chev Khrushchev and Brezhnev eras, the Cuba
crisis, the Khrushchev-Kennedy
era of good feeling, and the Viet
Nam war.
Weve had our ups and downs
to say the least, said Kohler, a
58-year-old native of Toledo, Ohio,
who holds the rank of career
ambassador.
Only a few weeks after I ar arrived
rived arrived in September of 1962, we
had the Cuba crisis, he said.
Once that was over, we made

Yet, Goldwater said, he had
heard talk from three or four
sources in the past six months
that Johnson might withdraw after
his current term. The former
senator said he put no credence
in these reports now, but added:
If he (Johnson) felt he might not
win as big as he did against me,
he just might go back to ranching.

Situation Unclear
In Georgia Dispute

By DON PHILLIPS
ATLANTA (UPI) A federal
tribunal was urged Monday to call
a runoff election Dec. 6 and bar
write-in votes at the polls in an
attempt to solve Georgia's guber gubernatorial
natorial gubernatorial crisis.
The states gubernatorial situ situation
ation situation became muddled when former
Gov. Ellis Arnall received enough
write-in votes Nov. 8 to keep Rep Republican
ublican Republican Howard Bo Callaway and
Democrat Lester Maddox from re receiving
ceiving receiving a majority.
The federal judges last week
tentatively voided the section of the
Georgia Constitution covering such
a situation and ruled the state
legislature cannot name the next
governor because the malappor malapportioned
tioned malapportioned body violated the U.S. Su Supreme
preme Supreme Courts one man, one onevote
vote onevote ruling.-
Georgl' tty. Gen. Arthur Bolton
told the w*rt Monday that if it is
going to overrule the constitution
then its up to the three-judges to
establish election guidelines.
Bolton said the court cannot sim simply
ply simply rule against legislative action
and then hand the problem back to
the state.
Bolton defended the consti constitutional
tutional constitutional remedy in a brief to the
court. He also raised the question
of who should pay for a runoff if
the court calls for one.
Attorney Francis Shackelford,
representing 12 citizens, both
Democrats and Republicans, urged
the court to set Dec. for the
runoff.
Shackelfords group filed suit
right after last Tuesdays election

quite a lot of progress over the
next 18 months.
He cited the partial nuclear test
ban treaty, expansion in cultural
relations and progress in nego negotiations
tiations negotiations on a Soviet-American con consular
sular consular treaty and cooperation in
space.
In the past 18 months/' Koh Kohler
ler Kohler said, we've had a holding
operation. We've had our casual casualties
ties casualties in the exchange program"
among other things, the Soviet
scratches performances here of
'Hello, Dolly' but on the whole
we have been able to maintain this
program close to the established
basis."
With Khruschev's departure, the
party whirl slowed down and
informal contacts became less fre frequent.
quent. frequent.

Os his own ambitions for the
presidency, Romney said he would
take a good, long, deep look" at
whether he had solutions for the
nation's problems and whether he
felt the public and the rank-and rank-andfile
file rank-andfile of the GOP wanted him before
he decided.
Meanwhile, he said, I am not
a candidate."

asking that the decision be taken
away from the legislature.
Bolton said that it could be
easily argued that if a runoff elec election
tion election is held, citizens would have
the right to a write-in vote.
In that way, a bloc of votes
could require runoff after runoff
and block the election process,
unless election by plurality was
established, Bolton said in his
brief.
The election was so close that
it was not until Saturday that
tabulations showed Callaway the
final leader with 1,850 votes more
than Maddox.
Bolton has said he will appeal
the tribunals decision to the
Supreme Court if it makes per permanent
manent permanent its order prohibiting legis legislative
lative legislative election of the next governor.
A long legal battle could push
the final outcome past the Jan. 10
deadline set by the state consti constitution
tution constitution for the legislature to elect
the governor.
Gov. Carl Sanders has agreed
to start planning the states bud budget
get budget for the legislative session that
begins Jan. 9. He met Monday with
Callaway and Maddox at budget
hearings at the capitol. The
incoming governor usually plans
the new budget.
1 guess youd call this on onthe-job
the-job onthe-job training, said .Maddox
as the three met for the. hearings.
Maddox skipped from room to
room through the capitol shaking
hands with everyone in sight as
the three walked to the budget
office.



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Tuesday, November 15, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

ia^ J - -i 1 m
UF Growth Does Not
Meet States Demand

By MAURY OLICKER
Alligator Staff Writer
Big, bigger, and bigger still.
The University of Florida is
constantly growing and so is
Gainesville. Todays seemingly
fantastic growth projections will
be tomorrows realities.
Within the next six to eight
years, UF is predicted to reach
its enrollment ceiling of 25,000,
set by the Board of Regents. Al-

Historian
To Speak On

Reconstruction
Professor Harold Hyman, prize prizewinning
winning prizewinning historian from the Uni University
versity University of Illinois, will speak or
Reconstruction history Thursday.
Professor Hyman will speak ai
8:15 p.m. in Room 105 of the
Architecture and Fine Arts
building. He is being sponsored by
the UFs Department of History.

though this means an average in increase
crease increase of about 1,000 students per
year, UF will still find itself not
large enough to fill the demands
of students for college education.
At least 5,000 prospective students
in addition to qualified freshmen
that dont make it, will have to
be turned away due to space lim limitations.
itations. limitations.
According to UF President Dr.
J. Wayne Reitz, There will be
a demand for us to provide edu education
cation education for 30,000 students in 1975,
as can be seen by looking at pro projected
jected projected enrollment figures compiled
by our admissions office.
Meanwhile, all the other aspects
of UF are also expected to
increase. There will be 4,000 new
full time jobs on the University
faculty and staff and a S2O- million
increase in the UF payroll. Stu Students,
dents, Students, also, will add sl2-million
to the economy of Alachua County
with personal spending.
Alachua County will feel the
growth in other ways. For one
thing, there will be a $13.24-
million increase in total retail
sales in the county, bringing the
aggregate to almost $l5O-million,
based on 1965 prices.
The county population will in increase
crease increase by about 14,000 persons
with a 2,560 increase in support
jobs. Alachua County schools
will feel the need for 130 addi additional
tional additional teachers and classrooms tc
satisfy the demands of 4,000 new
elementary and secondary school
students. Parking, already a ser serious
ious serious problem, will become a majoi
crisis if the demand for 4,000 tc
5,000 new parking spaces is not
filled.
There will also be an increase
in the demand for off-campus
housing. Projected plans call for
50 per cent of future UF stu students
dents students living on campus, with the
remaining students, 12,000 of them
living in various off-campus hous housing
ing housing units. About 1,000 will be
living at home.
By 1975, Gainesville and the Uni University
versity University of Florida will have growi
up considerably from the cam campus
pus campus we know now. Registration thi:
trimester is 18,039, compared witl
16,874 last year.
The Board of Regents has set
a maximum of 25,000 students for
the University in 1975, said Dr
Reitz, and this ceiling will pre prevent
vent prevent our meeting the higher de
mand. It will require that We im
pose additional limitation
through admission standards at a
levels over those now in effec
I consider 25,000 to be a desir
able limitation.
XEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, 10? ea.
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Service Available From
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Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator. Tuesday. November 15, 1966

The Florida Alligator
*_A M.ttfVuty Ii OuVk&o*V%Mlki < Tiu)tk'
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR DICK DENNIS
Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecessaniy reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is the editorial in the left
column.
Why, Regents?
On September 28, the UF Faculty Sen Senate
ate Senate made a decision that would change
the life of every future Florida student.
It was then that the Senate voted 109-74
to compulsory ROTC.
The story was given big play through throughout
out throughout the state on that day and the ques question
tion question seemed settled. UF President J.
Wayne Reitz made a statement which sup supported
ported supported the Senates move.
But last Thursday the Board of Re Regents
gents Regents chose to undo it all. It was then
that that body -- with Reitz on hand to
hear -- voted unanimously to overturn
the facultys decision and keep ROTC com compulsory
pulsory compulsory for at least one more year.
Regents Chairman Chester Ferguson
argued against the voluntary program say saying
ing saying that it was not the appropriate time
to change. 4
Ferguson cited the values of young men
learning discipline and further alluded to
Viet Nam war shortage and the impact
this would bring.
After a discussion of only 10 minutes,
the Regents made their decision.
Manning J. Dauer, president of the Fac Faculty
ulty Faculty Senate, said he could remember
cases where that body and the Board of
Regents had tossed issues back and forth.
But never, Dauer said, could he remember
an issue dealing with curriculum.
I cant think of a time when the Re Regents
gents Regents reversed a curriculum change made
by the Senate, Dauer said. This whole
incident appears unfortunate.
Dauer also expressed doubts as to the
why of the reversal.
Im sure the timing had a lot to do
with it, Dauer said. But present con conditions
ditions conditions were taken into consideration when
the Senate made its decision.
For this reason, we find it hard to
believe that the Regents had so little
confidence in the UF Faculty Senate that
it would deliberate for only 10 minutes
before making so important a decision.
Before the Senate took its vote, The Al Alligator
ligator Alligator stood behind compulsory ROTC.
It was our opinion that it was necessary.
But when the Senate elected the opposite
decision, we felt the matter closed.
If Floridas university system were
operated on the same basis as some North Northern
ern Northern universities -- such as Cornell --
there would be no such case.
There, decisions of import to the aca academic
demic academic community are discussed by a com committee
mittee committee of elected student representatives
and faculty members.
When this committee reaches a consen consensus,
sus, consensus, it relays its views to thestudent
body through the student newspaper. Stu Students
dents Students are encouraged to show their re reaction
action reaction to the proposal. If necessary, a
student referendum is held.
If Florida would adopt such a policy,
it would in no way take financial matters
out of the hands of the Regents. But it
would prevent that body from passing on
issues which pertain basically to the aca academic
demic academic community and dont involve state
funds.
We think the idea is worth considering.

You Need Discipline Little Boy!

By DAVID MORRIS
Alligator Columnist
Yes sir, father Ferguson of the
Board of Regents has decided that
the sniveling, whimpering adol adolescents
escents adolescents of the University of Flor Florida
ida Florida need a little character build building,
ing, building, a little discipline. And what's
the best way to build character and
straighten a wandering lad's back?
Is it to give the young man a lit little
tle little responsibility, a little

You Heard Me, George Go Home
And Start Supper
Our Man Hoppe
By ART HOPPE

It was the morning after the
election and a goodly crowd of
new members was on hand for
the traditional Morning-After
Meeting of that huge but little littleknown
known littleknown service organization
Losers Anonymous.
Standing on the rostrum be beneath
neath beneath the clubs banner The
People Have Spoken, the Bums
was the organizations ex experienced
perienced experienced director, Mr. Stassen
E. Milhaus.
Rapping his gavel to quiet the
hubbub of groans and moans,
Mr. Milhaus cleared his throat
and launched into his annual in inspirational
spirational inspirational talk entitled, The
Evils of Politics.
* *
Good morning, fellow losers.
Welcome to the club. You have
all, Im sure, waged vigorous,
hard-hitting campaigns. And you
* course, have lost. Re Remember,
member, Remember, as you sit there with
your heads in your hands, that
we are here to help you.
Yes, friends, with our help,
with your own strength of char character
acter character and with Divine Guidance,
you will be able to here,
Mr. Milhaus paused for dra dramatic
matic dramatic effect swear off pol politics
itics politics forever!
As usual at this point, there
were cries of Swear off!,
No more speeches? and
other expressions of horror.
There is no alternative, Mr.
Milhaus said firmly. Let us
take a cold, hard look at the
statistics: for every man who
struggles through the primaries
and the November elections to
at last win political office there
are, on a national average,
12.3 losers. Think of it, 12.3 to

a little voice in what goes on?
Is it to invite the young man into
the decision-making process? Is
that the way to mature the youth
of America? Oh heavens no says
Chuckie Ferguson and company.
Compulsory ROTC, with all its
benefits, thats the key, thats the
answer.
It is ironic that only a few weeks
ago SDS was picketing Hubert Hum Humphrey
phrey Humphrey and handing out a leaflet
entitled Self-Determination.

1! Does it make sense to buck
odds like jthat? Year after year?
True, there are a fortunate
few who can take politics or
leave them alone. But the first
thing we must admit to oursel ourselves
ves ourselves is that we cant. For us,
the only answer is total ab abstinence.
stinence. abstinence.
Oh, it wont be easy. Temp Temptation
tation Temptation will beckon at every cock cocktail
tail cocktail party when issues are rais raised.
ed. raised. Well, you'll think, a little
social politicking wont hurt.
Dont yield! For the next thing
you know youll be making
speeches from the floor at
(SEE HOPPE, PAGE 7)

Florida Alligator Staff
TYLER TUCKER NEWT SIMMONS GENE NAIL
Assistant Managing Editor Editorial Assistant Editorial Assistant
NICK ARROYO CAROL HEFNEL NICK TATRO
Photo Editor Society Editor Wire Editor
STAFF WRITERS -- Bob Beck, Sue Froemke, Barbara Gefen,
Maury dicker, Kathie Keim. Jean Mamlin, Frank Shepherd Aggie
Fowles, Justine Hartman. Walter Woodward, Harvey Alper
EDITORS Jud y Redfern, Sherrie Braswell, Toni
Giliberti, Joe Torchia, Ken Garst, Margie Green John Briggs,
Jo Ann Langworthy &
LAB ASSISTANTS -- JoAnn Gerard, Diann Devine, Jerry War Warren
ren Warren Laura Brown, Peggy Sneider, Dave Reddick, Brady Farris
Joe Varon, Marie Varon, David Weiss, Greg Borden, Richard
Irwin, Carol Summers.
In order to better cover campus events the Alligator uses
reporters from the School of Journalism and Communications.
Their bylines are followed by Alligator Correspondent

Item #1 on the list was the fol following
lowing following statement, A few weeks
ago the Academic Senate of the
University of Florida, in an act
of astonishing forgetfulness, voted
to abolish compulsory ROTC at
this university. The next day
members of the Board of Re Regents
gents Regents reminded the Senate that
the Regents were the Univer University
sity University of Florida and that they
would decide what to do about
ROTC. Students and faculty at this
University have NO authority to
make any decision whatsoever as
to their internal arrangements.
This university is a top-down
managed, not a self-governing,
community/*
Well, here we are, and it's
all true. Not only can the Board
of Regents spit in the eye of the
student, but it can blithely ignore
a lopsided Faculty vote. Well, what
can we do now?
Open forums on the issue of com compulsory
pulsory compulsory ROTC should be held
on campus, with members of the
Board of Regents presenting their
point of view and being questioned
by the students whose future they
are deciding. Then a referendum
should take place, with the students
themselves presenting their judg judgments.
ments. judgments. Then the Faculty, keeping
this advice of the students in mind,
should draft another resolution.
If the result is that compulsory
ROTC is once again abolished
thats it. Thats the end of the
line. It the Board of Regents de decides
cides decides to overrule the Faculty once
again the University of Florida,
as a unit, students, faculty, and
administration, should tell old
Fergie where to go.
Some faculty and students are
scared to publicly speak out
against this mockery of en loco
parentis. But speaking out against
what you believe to be wrong is
part of what a university is all
about.
Others will say, But were for
compulsory ROTC** and sit smugly
back. Well, damn it, thats not
the issue. The students are against
ROTC, so is the faculty. Cant
it be understood that theres some something
thing something rotten about a university that
has to have its nose wiped by some
man or men who are qualified
only because they are rich or polit politically
ically politically powerful. Cant people real realize
ize realize that students who are 18, 19,
20, 21 years old are old enough
to understand, old enough to de debate,
bate, debate, old enough to decide, old
enough to be responsible. Isnt that
the issue?
There is a need for unity on
this occasion. The Alligator has
lent its voice and influence. Now
it is up to the faculty and student
body to join in a movement to
tell the Board of Regents that we
think its decision stinks and that
our characters are not so bad that
we need two years of ROTC to
build them up.



Telling
The Truth
Got Cason
EDITOR:
What I will say is going to be
short, but I believe it will mean
a lot to the ones who are still
patriotic to this country.
The United States was founded
(I thought it was) on freedom. How However,
ever, However, it seems that freedom has
degenerated not only on this cam campus,
pus, campus, but across the greater part
of the United States. If pro and con
cannot be discussed in the public
eye on a university campus, some somebody
body somebody must have quite a few strings
to pull on. I was also under the
impression that human beings were
capable of making mistakes, so I
suppose Mr. Cason was at fault
by printing the truth.
I am a lowly freshman, and I
realize my knowledge is anything
but complete. I do not understand
fully the political sheme on this
campus, and I do not understand
how one organization can have
a monopoly over a college cam campus
pus campus of 18,000 students. But I do
know that this country was based
on freedom; one was freedom of
speech and another freedom of
the press. To me, when these two
freedoms are suppressed, we
might as well face communism, and
let a minority of subversives tell
us when, where, and how what
we are going to do with our lives.
ROGER ROBERTS, lUC

Compulsory ROTC Morally Wrong

EDITOR:
Compulsory ROTC is morally wrong. The
University of Florida is an academic university,
and as such it should not sustain a compulsory
military program. The faculty senate and the
president of the university favor a voluntary pro program,
gram, program, yet the Board of Regents had the power
to nullify the decision of this apparently signi significant
ficant significant group. Is the faculty senate nothing more
thpn a puppet of the Board of Regents?
The two major arguments for compulsory ROTC
seem to be physical fitness and discipline. As
for physical fitness, a student must take four hours
of physical education per week with no credit.
And if a student has not learned discipline by the
time he enters college, he never will. A full
time academic schedule requires a great deal of
discipline.
Nearly everyone realizes the inevitability of

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Hpt' gef read x f r
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from Jerrys South
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Call 372-4606
K|L99LujL,
EHfUf. Baaa^^^l

By JUSTINE HARTMAN
Alligator Columnist
I was lying there in the hay resting after long climb, looking
around, taking it all in, absorbing the atmosphere. A damp,
musty smell permeated the placenot at all unpleasant. The
black, dirt-covered floor an earthy dirt--mingled its smell
with the fresh hay under me. Long and short shadows flickered
on the roof as candles, which were tucked into crags above me,
sputtered occasionally in the dwindling air. Off to the right,
another passage disappeared winding its way through the gloom.
A long trek through a cornfield in the crisp, night air had led
me to this place. Peering through the entrance into the void,
I had been afraid. However, once inside, warm and sheltered
from the wind, I wanted to investigate every nook and cranny.
Giant jack-o-lanterns leered from behind rocks. Smaller pump pumpkins
kins pumpkins laughed, their candles glowing to light the labyrinth as I
groped my way further. Suddenly, the sound of the Rolling Stones
ricocheted off the rock walls as the rest of the members of the
Florida Speleological Society arrived underground.

EDITOR:
The Alligator printed a letter
some time ago from an inmate
prison instructor who suggested
that prisoners might be sent to
fight in Viet Nam rather than
students now in school. His rea reasoning
soning reasoning was that the prisoners had
shown adventuresome spirit in
breaking the laws and there therefore
fore therefore would make good soldiers.
He cited a company of former
convicts which distinguished it itself
self itself in World War 11.
Having seen no response from
student or faculty, I'd like to
strike a blow in defense of stu students
dents students and law-abiding people. I

New World Awaits In Underworld

Leave Service To The Law-Abiding

the service. Most are aware of how they will
fulfill their obligation by the time they enter col college.
lege. college. For those who want to pursue a military
program in college, a voluntary program should
be available.
Another reason given for compulsory ROTC is
the shortage of men in Viet Nam. There is also
a shortage of doctors. Why not compulsory ?re-
Med?
In a university as large as Florida, a volun voluntary
tary voluntary program would have a more than adequate
response, and the persons enrolled would have a
genuine interest in the program.
If the University of Florida is to remain a top
notch college, it must adopt a voluntary ROTC
program.
GORDON GALBRAITH, lUC

question the thinking encountered
frequently that those who show no
regard for the rights of others or
their own integrity by committing
crimes are somehow superior;
that breaking laws is an act of
courage and prisons are filled with
brave men who were unlucky
enough to be caught.
Many of them are unlucky. But
the true adventurer often turns out
to be a person of extraordinarily
GOOD luck. True adventurers
accept .training from without, are
strongly disciplined from within
and have the ability to perceive
rules inherent in a real situation.
Many students are true adventur-

Tuesday, November 15, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

The assorted individuals in the club, be they building construc construction
tion construction or philosophy majors, have one thing in common: instead of
visiting the pyschedelicatessen, they go caving for kicks. Slith Slithering
ering Slithering around stalagmites on their stomachs, or swimming throug
underground rivers with scuba equipment, the cavers chart new
passages to caverns and sometimes dig their own.
As everyone descended the ladder into the depths, a long
procession of small lights from their helmets, filtered into the
cave. The bats did not wake up despite the Rolling Stones Stonesmuch
much Stonesmuch to my dismay. (1 had hoped to see a genuine bat cave.)
However, the arrival of the Great Pumpkin, disguised as a caver,
made the evening.
The spelunkers like caves and they like to partythey like
both well enough to lug seven monstrous pumpkins, a record
player, and other goodies 40 feet down into a black hole. They
really have a unique way of getting away from it all.
Moral of this story: Awhole new world awaits you in the under underworld.
world. underworld. s

ers, not to mention the explorers
of the past and the astronaut teams
of the present.
Perhaps there are men of cour courage
age courage and integrity in prisons. But
perhaps there are more of the
reckless, luckless ones living from
boyhood in an unreal world where

your local P.T.A. meeting.
And, oh, the headiness of the
applause!
Carried away, youll find your yourself
self yourself sneaking down to party
headquarters to pore over old
precinct lists. Youll be spend spending
ing spending your nights with the boys
in smoke-filled rooms. And youll*
be grabbing the hands of total
strangers on the streets.
Then, inevitably, youll suc succumb.
cumb. succumb. Once again, youll go off
on a months-long campaign binge
forsaking your family, squand squandering
ering squandering your savings on bumper
strips and whooping it up at
rallies night after night. And
once again, 12.3 to 1. youll lose!
Mr. Milhaus paused to let
this sink in. Remember,
friends, he said slowly, pol politics
itics politics is not a character weak weakness.
ness. weakness. Its a disease. You can

I
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Our Man Hoppe
(FROM PAGE 6)

laws and rules are for others.
Granted the men in prisons are
unfortunate. I submit that they are
not so adventurous as they are
foolhardy, leaving their families
to take the consequences for their
own moral cowardice.
DOROTHY R. BAUTM

be cured. When you feel that
urge to shake a hand, to make
a speech, call us night or
day.
With total abstinence, you can
be rehabilitated. You can be
restored to your family and
friends. Yes, fellow losers, by
giving up politics you can once
again become a useful member
of society.*
For information leading to
the recovery of Marie,**
or SSO for information of
his fate. He is a large,
black-and-tan male German
Shepherd. Left eye is com completely
pletely completely gray, and he is
unmistakably blind in that
eye. Last seen near Flor Florida
ida Florida Field July 4th. 376-&712

Page 7



I6ATOR CLASSIFIEDS!

for sale
SAILFISH (SUPER); fully equip equipped
ped equipped $200.00; boat trailer, 350
lb. capacity, fully equipped, $65.
Call 372-1014. (A-53-3t-e)
FOR SALE 1964 Honda 305. Call
378-6195. Between 5 and 7 p.m.
(A- 52-lOt- c)
VM TAPE RECORDER, 4 track
mono, with tapes SBS; one set
headphones (monostero) $lO Call
376-9229 Ask for Mike Farris.
ONE PORTABLE drawing table
$10; assorted sets drawing in instruments
struments instruments $5 and down,. Call JM JM-12.
-12. JM-12. 1 after 6 p.m. (A-53-2t-c)
FOR SALE: High quality stereo
camera, F 3.5 lens, flash light
meter, filters, makes wonderful
slides-first reasonable offer. Call
378-6024. (A-52-st-p)
MOBILE HOME 1965 Amer American
ican American Homemaker, modern, like
new, 10x50 foot, two bedrooms,
central heating. Price reduced to
SSOO and take up payments $47
per month. Paradise Trailer Park,
4546 NW 13th Street. Call 376-
6191 after 5:30 pm. (A-52-3t-c)
FOR SALE, one and one half bed bedroom
room bedroom mobile home with cabana and
storage. Permanently located in
Archer Road Vilg. Furnished $895.
Phone 372-3573 (A-50-st-c)
GLASSPAR G-3 SKIBOAT, 13x6
LONG, ALMOST BRAND NEW
MERCURY 850, SKI PYLON,
GOOD SKI RIG OR RUNABOUT,
ANY REASONABLE OFFER.
CALL 378-4027 after 6:00 p.m.
(A-52-3t-c)'
1965 DUCOTTI DIANA MK HI,
must sacrifice, best offer over
$385. takes it. Call 372-3755
before 10 a.m. (A-53-3t-c)
TWO BEDROOM mobile home for
rent for sale. Call 372-7584. (A (A---54-3t-c)
--54-3t-c) (A---54-3t-c)
SCUBA complete outfit only one
year old. Best offer- call Rick
Fey 376-9208 or 372-9427.
(A-54-4t-c)

t
B |N l, "
| Jf:>/:ITODAY 'SPINOUr-COLOR
830 5:30 # 7:40, 9:40
3TS TOMORROW

for rent
WHY LIVE IN A traffic jam?
Walk to classes and be relieved
of your parking problem. Fully
furnished, spacious, one bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment, air condition conditioned,
ed, conditioned, gas heat, fully equiped, kit kitchen,
chen, kitchen, including washing mach machine.
ine. machine. Call 372-3357
(B-46-10t-c)
COOPERATIVE LIVING Organi Organization
zation Organization announces openings for next
trimester. Room and Board S6O
pe' month, one block off campus.
Inquire 117 NW 15th St. or call
376-6203 (B-50-st-c)
ONE BEDROOM furnished apart apartment
ment apartment for sublease in Dec or Jan.
Ele> ic heat and air conditioned.
Three blocks from campus. Call
376-0359 after 4 p.m. (B-51-st-c)
TO SUBLET new, modern, two bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment near canpus.
Completely furnished, air condi conditioned,
tioned, conditioned, swimming pool on pre premise
mise premise From Dec. 15, 1966 Phone
378-6024. (B-52-st-p)
TWO BEDROOM French Quarter
Apartment for rent. Available
December or January. Must know
by November 28th. Call 378-5228.
(E-53-10t-c)
WILL SUBLET OR LEASE one
bedroom apt. Village Park, on
swimming pool, $122 a month.
Available Dec. 20th. 378-6028
(E-53-2t-p)
SUBLEASE UNFURNISHED two
bedroom apartment. University
Gardens. Occupancy Dec. 17 one.
CaU 372-3035 (E-53-st-c)
AVAILABLE NOW spacious one
bedroom furnished apartment,
large living room and kitchen,
lease required. S9O monthly. Cou Couple
ple Couple or two graduate students
preferred. 923 NE 3rd Ave. 378-
2436. (B-54-lot-c)
situations
wanted
MY 36th month old daughter
needs a playmate, all day, five days
week. Your home or mine. Inter Interested?
ested? Interested? Call 376-1215. (F-54-2t-c)

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 15, 1966

Page 8

wanted
POETRY WANTED for antho anthology.
logy. anthology. Include stamped envelope.
Idlewild Publishing Company,
543 Frederick Street, San Fran Francisco.
cisco. Francisco. California 94U7
(C-53-st-p)
MALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share modern 1 bedroom Sum mitt
House Apt. 1700 SW 16th Court.
372-3573. (C-50-st-c)
WANTED MALE ROOMMATE
to share apt. at French Quarter.
SSO monthly rent and utilities.
Call either Dave or Joe 376-
8317. (C 51 4t-c)
help wanted
EXPERIENCED LEGAL secretary
wanted beginning Dec. 5. Must be
proficient in shorthand and typing.
376-5242 (E-49-ts-c)
OPPORTUNITY UNLIMITED
Make as much money as you
wish. A few openings left, for
information call Doris Moore
372-8354. Between 9-12 a.m. and
5-6 p.m. (E-54-st-c)
autos
1952 T-BIRD, university pro professor,
fessor, professor, 32,000 miles, like new,
air and all power, see 2036
NW 18th Lane after 6 p.m. 378-
3742. (G-53- st-c)
1963 VW, $950, very clean,
very good condition, new tires
service booklet, AM-FM radio.
Heater, headrest, seat belts. Ori Original
ginal Original owner: 378-3886
(G-52-lOt-c)
FLORIDA STATE THEATRES
q .; nrSi i:00-3:ii
5: i 2 ~la 33
jiijMi 9*44
IHEfIGONTjn
asms la
starring
CHABUOH HESTON
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Rt.MUTI today
PM
THE MOST HONORED
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i WINNER OF 6
ACADEMY
AWARDS!
MtTOGOUWVN MAYER
acarS*pontiproduction
DAVID LEAN'S
OF BORIS PASTERNAKS
DOCTOR
ZHIVAGO
MATINEES WED-SAT
LSUN 2 PM EVE 8 PM-I

autos
1962 Karmann Ghia good con condition
dition condition $650.00. 372-3734. (G-51-
st-c)
1960 METROPOLITAN, $175; fair
condition, radio and heater, good
economical transportation. Call
372-8832 after 6 p.m. (G-54-3t-c)
SIMON TEMPLAR'S VOLVO 1963
P-1800 GT model. At least a
look alike! Good condition, AM AMFM
FM AMFM radio, air conditioned. Below
book price. $1,895. See at 2818
NE 12th Street or arrange 202
Building D. (G-54-4t-c)
1932 FORD, 5 window coupe, 331
cu. in. Chrysler Hemi power, eng engine
ine engine is completely rebuilt, Wieand
Drag Stai Manifold, super full
cam, body is channeled over
custom tubular frame. Call 378-
1274 Price S3OO firm.(G-54-10t-c)
1953 PLYMOUTH, excellent
mechanical condition, must seU
$l4O. Call 376-9252 after 6 p.m.
ask for Tom. (G-st-53-c)
personal
- r
RIDE TO NEW YORK CITY;
two people desire to leave Dec December
ember December 22; will share expenses.
Call 372-6466 5-7 p.m.
(J-53- 3t-c)
HELP Need two tickets for
Miami game for my parents (Not
in the end zone) Please Call
378-6010. (J-54-3t-c)
WEIGHT PROBLEMS? Getting
a little broad in the beam? We
can groom you down with our new
vibrating machine. Its helpful,
invigorating and absolutely free
Come in, talk to Toby and have
coffee with us at the Gator Groom Groomer
er Groomer where friends meet and romance
blooms. (J-54-st-c)
H MOONtrAo~*arf*ftf. N *Fft *4*l
sh C.st N r H.fjid ribune l
>IC S.qmj Hi piesenis
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\ PORNOGRAPHY OR
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1 There is no doubt that this
I film contains more overt
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sen on screen. The fascin fascinating
ating fascinating question is, however,
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tainly Certainly the prudish and even
the modest may be repelled
by the several scenes of
sexual gratification in whkh
the two sisters indulge, but
even they would be hard
put to argue that these ex exemplify
emplify exemplify gratuitous eroti eroticism
cism eroticism on Bergmans part or
are irrelevant to the prob probing
ing probing character studies he has
set for himself.
Judith Crist
Nsw York Herald Tribone.
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CAMPUS BRIEFS

The European club will show
Cyrano de Bergerac" on Nov.
16 and 17 at 7:30 p.m. in the Med Medical
ical Medical Science Building Auditorium.
Admission is 25 cents. A color
cartoon version of Edgar Allan
Poes The Tell-Tale Heart," will
also be shown. Those attending the
film will be asked for suggestions
for future programs.
* *
A special private showing
of Woody Allens latest movie,
Whats Up, Tiger Lily? will
take place at the Wometco Plaza
Theatre Wednesday at 10 a.m.
for selected members of UF

organizations. Tickets will be pas passed
sed passed out.-
* *
Jennings Hall will sponsor a
fashion show to raise money for
Dollars for* Scholars tonight at
8:30.,
The girls will model clothes
coming from Blanches. There will
be a door prize and refreshments
will be served. The admission is
25?.
This past Sunday night Jennings
held an auction of the Jennings
R.A.*s. Head auctioneer was Bill
Mcride. All proceeds went for
Dollars for Scholars.
CORRECTION
William Witt was one of the
three students put on disciplinary
probation after being arrested
in the riot following the LSU game,
not William Witte as the Al Alligator
ligator Alligator reported yeaterday. The
Alligator apologizes for any con confusion
fusion confusion caused by this misspelling
of names.

Tuesday, November 15, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Moot Courters Rosenbaums
In Regional Statements
Championship s our Grapes

Four winning moot court team teammates
mates teammates from the College of Law
travel to Atlanta, Ga., Thursday
and Friday to compete in the
Southeastern Regional Champion Championship.
ship. Championship. i
Charles Pillans of Ocala, and
Stephen Powell of Sanford, will
team with Greg Presnell of St.
Petersburg, and John DeVault of
College Park, Ga., for the region regional
al regional event.
The same four-man team won the
state moot court contest last
July at the annual Florida Bar
Association convention in Holly Hollywood,
wood, Hollywood, giving the UF its sixth
consecutive state championship.
Winners of the regional con contest
test contest will be eligible for the nat national
ional national championship at New York
in December.
The University won the re regional
gional regional meet both in 1964 and 1965,
but was eliminated in the early
rounds of the national comDetition.

By FRED VOLLRATH
Alligator Cormpondent
fe
Sour grapes from the ivory
tower* was State Representative
Richard Condon's answer to
Asst. Prof. Rosenbaum's state statement
ment statement on Kirk election.
Rosenbaum said there was
"a possibility of a mass exodus of
university personnel if Kirk ...
does not support the university with
needed funds.
maamm? condon, 23-
year old Repub Republican
lican Republican and a senior
law school stud student
ent student at the Uni University
versity University of Flor Florelected
elected Florelected
(he Florida
Repre-
Broward County
CONDON Group 6. Hisvotf
total exceeded that 01 RoDert
King High by 6,000.
At 23 Condon is the young youngest
est youngest member of the Florida Leg Legislature.
islature. Legislature.
Condon said I believe a nec necessary
essary necessary element for education is
dedicated personnel, people who
are interested in teaching and
developing students. They should
not have their sole interest in big
Udministration buildings, multi multilevel
level multilevel parking lots, and carpeted
faculty offices. A person who
would leave if he doesn't get
these luxuries is an intellectual
prostitute willing to sell .his
knowledge for creature comforts.
"No legislature will deny just
funds for the university, ** he
claimed.
Taking your
M.R.S.?
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Page 9



Tough Purple Piemen
Win Intergalactic Cup
Shear Shepard Sheep

After a shocking close call with
the notorious Bengal Ball Bonkers
of LSU, the Purple Piemen came
back to thump Shepherds lice licefilled
filled licefilled Sheep in an exciting croquet
match Saturday to preserve the
Intergalactic Cup for the 20th time.
The Piemen were saved only by
darkness and droves of people in
Baton Rouge as the match had to
be called off when wickets were
pulled from the ground and mallets
were stepped on and broken.
But it was a different story
Saturday.
Playing inspired ball, Marc
Glick placed his shots perfectly
in leading the Sheep to first place
in the opener. His partner, how however,
ever, however, Bob Imholte, had the mis misfortune
fortune misfortune of having his ball roqueted
into the nearby creek several times
by alert Pieman Rick Brown.
Browns prowess enabled captain
Bill Killeen to amble home ahead
of Imholte and give the Purple a
tie.
In the second game, Piemen
Newt Simmons and Andy Moor
broke to a commanding lead, while

Bulldogs Wait for December,
Spurrier, Greatest Yardage

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA (UPI) The Georgia
Bulldogs, performing the impro improbable
bable improbable ever since Vince Dooley
became their coach three years
ago, overcame a two-touchdown
deficit in the second half Saturday
to beat Auburn 21-13 and win at
least a share of the Southeastern
Conference championship.
Now, the ninth-ranked, once oncebeaten
beaten oncebeaten Bulldogs have to wait until
December to find out if they rule
the SEC alone or share the throne
with third-ranked, unbeaten Ala Alabama,
bama, Alabama, the defending conference
champion.
Georgia is now 6,-0 in SEC play
with only independent Georgia Tech
remaining. Alabama is 5-0 with
independent Southern Mississippi
next up and then Auburn on Dec. 3.
Alabama picked up its eighth

Basketball Coach Needs
More Support for Team

Head basketball coach Tommy
Bartlett has had his Volkswagen
convertible painted a brilliant
orange and blue to bug UF
students into giving their basket basketball
ball basketball team more support.
According to Richard Giannini,
assistant sports publicity director,
Bartletts eye-catching car is
symbolic of a campaign by the
publicity department to create a
new image for the basketball team.
We will have one of the best
teams in Floridas history this
year, emphasized Giannini. He
said his department hopes to make
the Gator squad as big a crowd crowdpleaser
pleaser crowdpleaser in basketball as the LSU
team is in football.
Basketball games will begin at
7:30 p.m. this year instead of 8:15,

Shepherds Shepherd and Breeze
trailed. Moor retained his lead to
the end, but Simmons had some
trouble with the next to last wicket.
After Moor had finished, Breeze
roqueted Simmons three times,
enabling poor-shooting Shepherd to
finish third and ensure a tie in
the second game.
It was a tense moment as Sim Simmons
mons Simmons and Killeen went against
Glick and Breeze in the deciding
game.
Simmons and Killeen built a
good-sized lead, only to have
Breeze pass them. Playing the
gamblers role, Breeze finished
ahead of the pack, but elected not
to hit the stake and play rover
in hope he could let a hopelessly hopelesslyfar-behind
far-behind hopelesslyfar-behind Glick catch up. But
Breeze, who gave a valiant effort
all day, missed a crucial shot and
Simmons and Killeen came in 1-2
to preserve the cherished Cup.
The Piemen have accepted the
challenge of a group of campus
malcontents headed by the Birthday
Boy himself Pete Boylboll. A match
date has yet to be set.

straight win Saturday in its march
to its third perfect season in six
years by sweeping past South
Carolina of the neighboring Atlan Atlantic
tic Atlantic Coast Conference 24-0.
Ole Miss 14 Tennessee 7-10 pt.
In other SEC action Saturday:
15th-ranked Mississippi beat 12th 12thranked
ranked 12thranked Tennessee 14- 7 on a fourth fourthperiod
period fourthperiod fumble recovery run by
defensive end Jerry Richardson;
Louisiana state exploded for two
quick touchdowns to beat Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi State 17-7.
Steve Spurrier had another
record-setting day as 10th- ranked
Florida trounced Tulane 31-10;
Houston swamped Kentucky 56-18
and Navy trounced Vanderbilt 30-
14.
Spurrier Saturday became the
greatest yardage gainer in the his history
tory history of the Southeastern Confer Conference.
ence. Conference. He gained 288 yards against
Tulane and that gave him a career

according to Giannini, so that more
students can attend the games and
still have time to study when the
games are over. He said the pub publicity
licity publicity department also hopes to
have a pep band play at all the
games.
Giannini added that coach Bart Bartlett
lett Bartlett may have a large alligator
built at one end of the gymnasium
through which the Gator team will
come onto the floor.
To make students more en enthusiastic
thusiastic enthusiastic about attending the
games, half-time shows may
feature performances by the
majorettes and the gymnastics
club, Giannini suggested. There is
also a possibility that fraternities
may be invited to present shows
during half-time.

TcnnossGG Eclqgs Florida
Wins Cross Country Meet

By 808 BECK
Assistant Sports Editor
Birmingham, Ala. UFs Cross
Country team led by Frank Lagotic
took second place in the SEC fal falling
ling falling to Tennessee, 39-67, Monday.
Auburn took third place with 78

Temperature Drops
Swimming Unliked

By LIBBY JARVINEN
Alligator Correspondent
With a drop in temperature,
recreational swimming at UF
quickly loses its popularity. The
reason is simple there is no
indoor swimming pool.
The present outdoor pool is kept
at 72 degrees. H. Spurgeon Cherry,
assistant dean of the College of

total of 5,082 yards with one game
left to play.
The previous record was the
4,824 yards rolled up by Georgias
Zeke Bratkowski in the early 50s.
Among the other independents:
fifth-ranked Georgia Tech kept its
perfect record intact with an easy
21-0 victory over Penn State; Sou Southern
thern Southern Mississippi edged North
Carolina State 7-6.
Wake Forest surprised Memphis
State 21-7; Syracuse outslugged
Florida State 37-21; and, in a
lone Friday night game, Miami
whipped Pittsburgh 38-14.
Auburn scored two touchdowns
in the first period and it looked
like Tiger alumnus Dooley might
again lose to his alma mater as
he did his first two seasons at
Georgia. But the Bulldogs came
back strong in the second half on
the running of fullbacks Brad John Johnson
son Johnson and Ronnie Jenkins and quar quarterback
terback quarterback Kirby Moore.
Moore only completed one pass
all afternoon but that was a 52-
yarder to sophomore Hardy King
that tied the score at 13-all late
in the third period.
Alabama toyed with South Carol Carolina,
ina, Carolina, scoring once in each period.
Main item of note was the return
of tailback Les Kelley who had been
bounced several weeks ago for
missing a curfew. Kelley was top
runner in the one-sided contest.
Warren Completes 21 10 Pt.
Tennessees Dewey Warren
completed 21 of 36 passes for 249
yards as he continued to rewrite
the Vols record book but to no
avail. Despite 24 first downs, the
Vols didnt score until the last
three seconds.
Ole Miss scored 24 seconds be before
fore before halftime on one of only four
pass completions and 1:40 before
the end of the game on Richard Richardsons
sons Richardsons 51-yard run with a loose
ball.
It was rumored that Tennessee
might get a Cotton Bowl bid with a
victory over Mississippi but now
it is speculated that Georgia may
be Arkansas opponent there on
Jan. 2.

sports

Tuesday, November 15, 1966 The Florida Alligator,

points followed by Mississippi
State with 102.
Mississippi States Don Hunt,
a four minute miler, won the race
in 19:33, pushed all the way by
Lagotic, who finished in 19:39,
Vick Kelly of Auburn took third

Physical Education, said,The pool
is not conducive to recreational
swimming during the winter
months. More students would use
the pool during the second
trimester if it were inside.
r
An indoor pool would be recrea recreational
tional recreational in nature. The varsity swim swimming
ming swimming team would use the outdoor
pool, with the indoor pool, for
general student use.
A proposal was made several
years ago by the College of
Physical Education for a new
womens gym to be built with
a regulation size indoor pool in included.
cluded. included. Presently, this has low
ranking on the UF priority list
for new buildings.
Independents
Independents
W L T PF PA
Ga. Tech 9 0 0 234 58
Va. Tech 71 1 168 78
Memphis St. 5 2 0 81 69
Miami 5 2 1 131 80
Southern Miss. 5 3 0 121 55
Tulane 5 3 1 146 161
Fla. State 4 4 0 181 166

Judo, Karate Meet
Experts Needed Now

By JACK LUZZO
Alligator Correspondent
Judo, wrestling, and karate en enthusiasts
thusiasts enthusiasts will have a field day at
the Florida Gym Saturday.
Approximately 60 participants
are expected to partake in the
fourth UF Invitational Judo
Championships to be held on the
South end of the gym floor be between
tween between 9:30 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Leoy A. Alitz, wrestling coach
at West Point, will hold a clinic
on the North end of the gym be between
tween between 10 a.m. ana -1 p.
The UFs wrestling ;.-jm will
open its season against the num number
ber number one state rated Miami Dade
Junior College team at 4 p.m. in
the gym.
Also, a karate match between
the UF and the University of South
Florida will be held at 2:30 p.m.
in the Womens Gymnasium.
We won the first and third
Judo Championships and L.S.U.
won the second. We dont intend
to be beaten this year, said a
confident Coach Reisinger. Reis Reisinger
inger Reisinger is both the judo and the
wrestling coach.
Florida has a few participants
from last year back for the judo
meet.
Martien Carrol won the 180

Page 10

place in the 4.06 mile course
with a 19:51.
Although Tennessee did not have
a runner in the top three they
managed to take three of the first
ten places to win in the overall
point competition.
Lagotic will go to the NCAA
national meet in Kansas next Mon Monday
day Monday as a result of his placing
second in SEC competition.
Gator Don Hale ran 11th, Steve
Adkinson placed 12th, Chris Hos Hosford
ford Hosford was 20th, Dieter Gebhard
nailed down 25th, Mike Teipel
placed 26th and Larry Powell
grabbed 28th. Over 50 runners
represented nine SEC teams. Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi did not participate.
Tennessee victory made it two
in a row for the Volunteers.
Billiards
Tourney
Tonight
& *£-
The Florida Union Recreation
Committee is holding a billiards
tournament beginning tonight at
8:00 p.m. The competitipn will
include side-pocket and cushion
play. Trophies will be awarded to
the winners.
All interested in participating
in the tournament should go to
room 315 of the Florida Union or
call extension 2741 in order to
register. Competition will be held
in the Billiards Room of the Union.
Richard Trapp will be on hand
to defend the title he won last
year in this tournament.

pound division last year and is
expected to do the same this year.
He is an excellent player, said
Reisinger.
Another returnee is Jack Haney
in the 150 pound division. He is the
overall judo champion at the UF
right now, said Reisinger.
Jack Eckdall, Director of Intra Intramural
mural Intramural Clubs, said that the purpose
of this judo tournament was to
promote judo on the college and
junior college levels in the
of Florida.
Coach Reisinger said that all
students who have had previous
experience in judo or wrestling
are invited to try out for these
tournaments. Afternoon practice
will be held in the gym all week.
Judo has been at the UF since
1952. The Judo Club is a member
of the Florida Judo Black Belt
Association and also the United
States Judo Federation.
The sport of Karate was started
at Florida in 1963 and wrestling
appeared a year later
These three activities are
growing at a fantastic rate in
this state, so we would like to
encourage and invite all interested
coaches and students to attend
the events at Florida Gym this
Saturday, said Eckdall.



Night Football?
Not For Gators

By FRANK McNEESE
Alligator Sports Writer
Norm Carlson, athletic publi publicity
city publicity director, said yeaterday that
night football has never been rea really
lly really considered at the University of
Florida.
As far as I know, this has nev never
er never been brought up for discussion
in any of the athletic meet meetings,"
ings," meetings," he said.
vis.l
IXet) Uton
Where Everyone
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Carlson said there are two fac factors
tors factors that would tend to rule out
night football.
He said that Gainesville is not
a metropolitan area. It is harder
to attract a large crowd from the
local area.
Another point is safety, Carl Carlson
son Carlson commented. There are a lot
of people on the road after a game.
Gainesville does not have enough
hotel space to accomodate all the
people that attend the games."
Carlson said the negative fac factors
tors factors outweigh the positive points
for night football.

I OOPS, I BLEW IT "]

1

TEP END MARK GREENBERG MISSES PASS FROM IRA POLLACK
. .but he snared his share during game
TEP Wins Grid Crown
In Orange League Thriller

The Gators themselves couldnt
have provided a more exciting,
down to the wire finish in Mon Mondays
days Mondays Orange League flag football
championship game.
Tau Epsilon Phi and Sigma Al Alpha
pha Alpha Epsilon battled to an 18-18
tie score, with the SAEs driving
from behind to tie in the last
minute of play. It wasnt enough
as TEP won the game on the
basis of most first downs accumu accumulated,
lated, accumulated, nine to seven.
TEP scored first, driving 40
yards down to the SAE 10 yard
line, where quarterback Ira
Pollack hit short back Evan Feist
for the games first marker. Pol*
lacks pass to end Mark Greenberg
for the extra point was no good.

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Tuesday, November 15, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

The Tepmen, who took Orange
League football honors for the
second straight year, scored again
after an SAE drive faltered.
TEP scored on only five plays
later as center Robert Segal
snared an over the middle pass
at the SAE 10 and ran it In for
the score.
SAE cam storming back on a
30 yard pass play from quarter quarterback
back quarterback Charlie Thompson to end Lou
Kapasack. On the next play, Steve
Arthur skirted right end for a
six yard run andSAEs first score.
The extra point try failed, making
the score 12-6 as the first half
ended.
TEP started the second half
off by moving to the SAE 10 on a

m PwM
4 m\ %' Jg^|
Photo by Nick Arroyo

pass from Feist to end Ricky
Perillo. SAEs Pete Parsons inter intercepted
cepted intercepted a Pollack pass in the end
zone and ran it out to the SAE 15.
SAE scored three plays later
when quarterback Thompson hit
Kapas&ck in the end zone to even
the game at 12-12. The point after
touchdown try was no good.
With three minutes left in the
game, TEP defensive end Frank
Silow intercepted an SAE aerial
and raced it back to the 40 (on
an 80 yard field). A penalty for
roughness was called on SAE f
giving TEP a first down on the
SAE 20.
Three plays later Pollack hit
Perillo with an arching alley alleyoop
oop alleyoop pass to make the score 18-
12. The extra point try failed.
Then the suspense set in.
With little light or time re remaining,
maining, remaining, Kapasack snared a 30
yard pass from Thompson in the
end zone to knot the score at
18-18. The extra point try was no
good.
The victory gives TEP better
than a 30 point lead in the Orange
League over the SAEs, who won
the Presidents Cup last year. The
next sport for fraternities is track,
which starts next week with the
IFC track meet.

Blue league
Title To KA
Kappa Alpha won the Blue League
football championship Tuesday
7-0, defeating Phi Gamma Delta.
KAs Jack Newkirk provided the
lone scoring action, intercepting a
pass and scampering 65 yards
jr the score.
The next sport for the Blue
League is track, with action start starting
ing starting Monday in the IFC track meet.
SEC Standings
W L T W L T
Georgia 6 0 0 8 1 0
Alabama 5 0 0 8 0 0
FLORIDA 5 10- 8 1 0
Miss. 3 2 0 6 2 0
Tenn. 2 2 0 5 3 0
LJS.U. 2 3 0 4 4 1
Kentucky 2 3 0 3 5 1
Auburn 1 4 0 4 5 0
Vandy 0 4 0 17 0
Miss. State 0 5 0 2 7 0

Page 11



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 15, 1966

. _|b: So smart
I So suitable for casual wear
I (Called the "Play-King" denote its wonderful UIM
Tile classic styling of the Button-
down shirt, has become more de denow
now denow that
oxford weaves. The choice of color
unusual. The proprietor suggests
a for country
1127 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE
Following the lead Os both head coaches in Saturdays Tu- .-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-..;.-.-.-.-. ; ; .:.:.;.;.;.;.;.;.:.;.;.;-;.:.;-;-:.;.;.;-:-:-:.:-;-:.:-:-:-r---T.:-....--
lane-Florida game the Alligator Player of the Week is Gator
defensive halfback George Grandy.
Grandy, a senior from Jacksonville Beach, got credit from I WrmSk VV ELI BERRP
Fop YoilP Tulanes Jim Pittman and Floridas Ray Graves for performing
the feat which broke the game open, namely an 83-yard TD punt ~ , mm
return early in the fourth quarter. Lightweight, J JL^
AdS Grandy*s run In the rain came with the score 17-10 and gave durable
the Gators a comfortably working margin. The return was against carrying cases
one of the nations leading teams on punt coverage. Tulane had
allowed eight previous foes a total of only 73 yards In punt re- ... . ._
To Reach turns. I NATIONAL BRANDS
That play alone would be enough for the Alligator honor but
a check of the game films makes Grandy a solid winner. He PORTABLE, MANUAL
came up with seven stops, including two key individual tackles
on fourth down situations deep In Gator territory. There were
four passes thrown In his zone, none completed. # .-*-
It took a super effort such as this to win out over sophomore
defensive end Mike Santille, who intercepted a pass to set up f a touchdown, recovered a fumble to set up a field goal and forced
another fumble, recovered by teammate Don Giordano, to set I
/ U P the final Florida score. \/ J|
* *' Other Gators drawing support from coaches were Giordano, | ||
wmT., .' defensive tackles Bobby Adams and Brian Jetter, safetyman | J
|pisS!V v Larry Rentz, center Bill Carr, guards Jim Benson and Red J lUifififiSMrMf^r^l 5 II
Anderson, tight end Jim Yarbrough, quarterback Steve Spurrier J
P and tailback Larry Smith.
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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR