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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Claude Kirk Wins Stunning Upset

Vol. 59, No. 50

FBK Maintains Control
Over Elections, Politics

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the
third in a five-part series by Al Alligator
ligator Alligator Editor Eddie Sears and
Editorial Editor Andy Moor on
Florida Blue Key).
By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Editorial Editor
Tradition, the success of
its alumni, particularly as po political
litical political leaders, and the nature
of the homecoming banquet have
all combined to make Florida
Blue Key a symbol of status
and prestige on campus. Mem Membership
bership Membership is generally prized and
participation in extracurricular
activities is reportedly some sometimes
times sometimes guided by the qualifi qualifications
cations qualifications for membership in
Florida Blue Key. Undoubtedly
this organization exerts a major
influence on campus life.

Bottom Is Dropping Out
From Million Dollar Edifice
By HARVEY ALPER
Alligator Staff Writer
The bottom is literally dropping out from beneath the UF's
new million dollar chemical engineering building.
The building is currently under construction across the street
from Graham Area.
On Oct. 24 a work crew digging an hydraulic elevator found
two cavities at a depth of 37 feet under the buildings foundations.
A soil expert was called in from Atlanta to evaluate the pro problem.
blem. problem. In addition, other attempts were made to assess the extent
of the problem.
After attempts at using a Polaroid camera to evaluate the
caverns extent proved relatively unsuccessful, a borrowed
Genesys television camera was lowered into the hole. The re results
sults results of the pictures were good.
Because of the caverns extent, and the possibility that other
caverns existed beneath the test borings were ordered.
Originally, prior to the construction of the structure, about
six test borings were made. They revealed no faults in the land
beneath the building.
However, the new borings are being made in an attempt to
fathom tiie extent of the newly discovered cavern.

The Florida
Alligator

University of Florida

| £
former UF Vice President
Harry Philpott.
The most obvious and pro probably
bably probably most important influence
Florida Blue Key does exert on
campus life is control the out outcome
come outcome of student body elections
and Student Government.

Election Niaht Drama
By GERALD JONES
Alligator Staff Writer
It looked like a birthday party at the Ramada Inn Tuesday
night as Claude Kirk supporters gathered to share the victory.
The party faithful and the new converts were sniffing the first
sweet smell of success in 98 years: and sure enough they shout shouted
ed shouted about it.
Hell, yeah, were having a party, come on over, cried a
campaigner into the phone. People continued to crowd into the
tiny, white room to enjoy the geniality of the victors and the joy
of an upset. Nobody knew just how old Kirk was, or when his
birthday might fall, but Kirk couldn't have asked for a better
present.
Nobody was singing at the High headquarters but if they had
there was but one tune that could fit: Its My Party and Ill
Cry if I But there were no tears either in the dim,
drab room. Walking amidst the clutter of coffee cups, one
supporter was muttering to himself, It was the one thing I
was afraid of, the stupidity backlash.


Tuesday, November 9, 1966

For years, the chapter has been
split into two groups in the spring
one supporting one candidate
for student body president and the
other side, another.
Because of a high proportion
of fraternity men in the chapter,
the Keys from the various houses
decide which way their house is
going to go. Usually things come
out close to even.
Each side has so many bloc
votes. Recently that number has
been as high as 1,700 for a par particular
ticular particular party. In other words, 1,-
700 Greeks are committed to
a particular candidate.
According to a recent study by
a graduate student, commitments
are made to tap certain mem members
bers members of given houses at the next
FBK tapping session.
In addition, good seats are pro promised
mised promised for home football games.
These two factors bring most of
the fraternities into the fold
despite the large amount of money
they must put 19.
Each fraternity which backs a
candidate is expected to contri contribute
bute contribute to his campaign fund. These
funds are the primary source de depended
pended depended upon to run the election.
And expenses arent cheap. De Decision
cision Decision Party spend almost $2 per
vote in running Steve Cheese man's
losing campaign last spring.
Each side spends its money and
comes up with a couple issues
and promises most of which are
forgotten immediately after elec election.
tion. election.
There are no issues in student
elections, admits one Blue Key
alumni. There is only limited
discussion allowed so as to con confuse
fuse confuse the student and maximize the
bloc votes.
The candidates for the office of
student body president are almost
invariably Blue Keys or at
least will soon be tapped into the
organization. The managers of the
( SEE FBK PAGE 2 )

First Republican
Since Reconstruction
MIAMI (UPI) Conservative Claude Kirk Jr., riding an ap apparent
parent apparent anti-Johnson wave, was elected the Souths first Re Republican
publican Republican governor Tuesday night. Kirk, a handsome divorcee
who had never held public office, defeated liberal Miami May Mayor
or Mayor Robert King High, winning the rural vote and running well
in the urban areas considered Highs stronghold.
Race was not a specific issue in the campaign. Political
experts saw the Republican surge as a strong tide of sentiment
against President Johnson, who carried Florida by a bare 43,000
votes in 1964.
High was a strong backer of John F. Kennedy.
Much of Kirks support apparently came from backers of
conservative Gov. Haydon Burns, defeated in the Democratic
primary Kirk pinned a Johnson- Humphrey-High tag on the
dapper Miami mayor. Thus in January Kirk will become the
states first Republican governor in 98 years.
In contested Congressional races, voters returned to Wash Washington
ington Washington Democratic- incumbents Don Fuqua and James Haley
and Republican William C. Cramer. Republican J. Herbert Burke
won a seat from the 10th District.

Kirks Education Stand
Concerns UF Professor
By STEVE HULL
Alligator Executive Editor
Claude Kirks election as the next Governor of Florida came
as a surprise to some UF professors.
Dr. Walter Rosenbaum of the political science deptartment,
said before Kirk is totally accepted he roust first take a de de'
' de' finite stand on education.
Kirk talked in more general terms concerning his stand
on education at the university level, while High was more arti articulate
culate articulate and definite on the issue of education, Rosenbaum said.
Many UF educators have no idea what Kirk stands for anl'
this is where the problem arises, Rosenbaum added.
For the university to become well recognized and first
rate we must have the needed funds to recruit well qualified
personnel. Kirk has emphasized the point that he would rather
save money than invest it, said Rosenbaum.
If UF truly wants a first rate school we must pay the price.
Rosenbaum said.
Rosenbaum emphasized that whatever stand Kirk takes on
education there will likewise be a direct relation to recruiting
policy.
The possibility of a mass exodus of university personnel
is very possible if Kirk does not communicate with university
professors, and guarantee he will support the university with
needed funds. Consequently many professors might change schools
for a state with a more imaginative leadership, Rosenbaum
said.
Kirks surprise victory was no surprise to Dr. Ernest Bart Bartley
ley Bartley of the political science department.
Kirks election represents the dissatisfaction of the people
of Florida over the policy of the adroinstratlon in Washington,
Bartley said.
Bartley feels Kirk stands for more moderation in government
expenditures and taxation.
There has been too much civil rights legislation too fast,
and with Kirk in the governor's seat, there should be more
moderation in state and government spending, a reduction of
taxes and finally a more conservative outlook to civil rights.

Hi §
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Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 9, 1966

National Roundup
i
GOPs Percy
Illinois Winner
.
CHICAGO CL'PI; Republican industrialist Charles H. Perry
jumped to a quick and imposing early lead Tuesday night in
his Illinois senatorial race with veteran Democrat Sen Paul
H. Douglas.
With one per cent reported, the National Broadcasting Co.
and the American Broadcasting Co. both declared Percy the
winner. The Columbia Broadcasting System said its projections
showed Percy would get 53 per cent of the total vote.
With 349 precincts counted of the states total of 10,707 the
golden boy millionaire had 88,500 votes to Douglas 40,593.
Percy was getting about 00 per cent of the vote, even though
most of the early ballots were from Cook County, where Douglas
was supposed to draw his greatest Democratic strength.
With 220 of the states 10,707 precincts reporting, the gold goldmillionaire
millionaire goldmillionaire had 59,033 votes to Douglas 27,248. Most of the
early-counted votes came from Chicago, where Douglas was
supposed to draw his greatest Democratic strength.
A day long rain held down the vote in Chicago to an estimat estimated
ed estimated 72 per cent of those eligibleclose to a record low for an
off-year election. But the estimated vote in the surrounding
suburbs, where Republicans are strong and white backlash
a factor, was estimated at better than 85 per cent of those eli eligible.
gible. eligible.
Percy kept up his fast and furious pace throughout election
day, hurrying from one polling place to another and once storm storming
ing storming into the headquarters of Rep. William Dawson, the power powerful
ful powerful Democratic boss of Chicagos South Side Negro wards.
Percy was protesting the arrest of three poll watchers for
Dawsons GOP opponent, David Reed. The poll watchers, appre apprehended
hended apprehended at the order of a poll judge, were held until the polls
closed, then released.
Byrd Jr. Inherits
Late Fathers Seat

RICHMOND, Va. (UPI) Dem Democrats,
ocrats, Democrats, both liberal and conser conservative,
vative, conservative, turned back their Republi Republican
can Republican senatorial opposition in Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia Tuesday and the Byrd dy dynasty
nasty dynasty remained in power despite
the death of its patriarch.
Republicans fared well in con congressional
gressional congressional races, however.
Harry F. Byrd Jr. was elect elected
ed elected over a Republican and a con-
Jules Feiffer
Speaking Here
Thursday
FEIFFER, EARNEST
. . speaking here
Jules Feiffer, noted cartoonist,
satirist and humorist will speak
Thursday in University Auditorium
at 8:15 p.m. Feiffer, who is pro probably
bably probably best known for his strongly
favored Freudian comic strip, has
written four books of cartoons,
seven other books and one novel.
An animated version of his car cartoon
toon cartoon Monroe" was awarded an
-
Oscar as the best short subject
cartoon of the year.
Speaking with Feiffer will be
West Palm Beach Mayor, C. Har Harold
old Harold Earnest. Earnest is a UF law
school graduate.

servative party opponent to fin
the term of his famous father, who
died last month.
The younger Byrd had been ap appointed
pointed appointed to replace his father when
he retired from the senate last
year.
Contrasting with the election of
Byrd, a staunch conservative like
his father, was that of liberal Dem Democrat
ocrat Democrat William R. Spong to the
state's other senate seat. Spong
easily trounced a Republican to re replace
place replace Senate Banking Committee
Chairman A. Willis Robertson, a
conservative he defeated in the
Democratic primary.
In the race to replace vener venerble
ble venerble House Rule Committee
Chairman Howard W. Smith, un unseated
seated unseated in the primary, Republi Republican
can Republican William L. Scott was lead leading
ing leading Democrat George C. Rawlings.
Republican Richard Poss defeated
Democrat Murray A. Stoller in
the states 6th District race.
The three men being replaced
Tuesday the elder Byrd, Rob Robertson
ertson Robertson and Smith had a com combined
bined combined seniority of 86 years in Was Washington.
hington. Washington.

TO ALL STUDENTS |
AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL j|
If \[ |
I \Pw Lunch am Dinner I
I 5*11:30 2:00 CAFETERIA 4:30 8:00|

Lurleen Alabama Victor;
Wallace 'Dynasty Intact

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. I PI) Lurleen Wallace,
overwhelming strong Republican opposition, was
elected the first lady governor of Alabama
Tuesday night so that her arch-segregationist
husband George could remain in power.
Wallace could not legally succeed himself,
so Mrs. Wallace ran for him. She piled up
a 69,000-vote lead over Republican Congress Congressman
man Congressman Jim Martin with 1G per cent of the vote
counted.
In the states other major race, VJS. Sen.
John Sparkman held a 2-1 margin over Repub Republican
lican Republican John Grenier in his bid for re-election.
The demure little mothers name was on
tite ballot, but Wallace, who did most of the

GOP Making Significant Gains
But Demos Still Hold Majority

WASHINGTON (UPI) Repub Republican
lican Republican Howard H. Baker Jr.,
in Tennessee headed toward vict victory
ory victory in a crucial Senate race in
Tuesdays elections and GOP can candidates
didates candidates were making inroads in De Democratic
mocratic Democratic strength in the House.
Republicans had an indicated
net gain of 22 House seats on the
basis of returns from half the 435
contests reported and showed
every sign of picking up more.
Their gains came from widely
scattered areas, ranging from
the Northeast to Florida and
from Ohio to Oklahoma.
Actually the Republicans had won
or were leading for 28 Democra-
Georgia Race
Undecided
ATLANTA (UPI) Democrat
Lester Maddox and Republican
Howard Bo Callaway fought
a neck-and-neck battle of the
conservatives Tuesday right
for the Georgia governorship in
the GOPs first major bid for
the states top office in the 20th
Century.
Maddox called his campaign
an effort to return Georgia to states
rights conservatism. Callaway
labeled his drive a bid to keep
law and order and prevent his
opponent from running the state
with an axe handle.
Standing in the way of a clear
victory for either side was a
write-in vote for former Gov.
Ellis Arnall.
With returns in from 536 of
the states 1886 precincts Mad Maddox
dox Maddox had 131,972 votes for
51.9 per cent* of the votes count counted
ed counted to 106,899 and 45.5 per cent
for Callaway. Arnall, the strongest
write-in contender had 6,029 and
2.5 per cent.
Callaway, a millionaire mem member
ber member of a textile family and a form former
er former one-term GOP congressman,
was running a strong lead over
Maddox in urban areas.

tic seats. But Democrats were
leading for six GOP House seats,
reducing the indicate net Re Republican
publican Republican pickup accordingly. Only
two of the indicated Democratic
gains were outside the South.
Charles Percys lead over De Democratic
mocratic Democratic Sen. Paul H. Douglas in
Illinois came in a race where
white backlash was not an
issue between the candidates but
was deemed important.
Baker, son-in-law of Senate
GOP Leader Everett M. Dirksen,
111., was running ahead of form former
er former Tennessee Gov. Frank Cle Clement.
ment. Clement.
Republican National Chairman
Ray C. Bliss claimed a trend

? ?
Florida vs. Tulane
Ha-ve you heard about
JERRYS PICK THE FINAL SCORE CONTEST?
SIOO.OO in CASH PRIZES
\
No purchase required get your entry blanks at
JERRYS RESTAURANT ?310 S.W 13th Street
1505 N. W. 13th Street
' "" " 1 ~
fl I 'I A J Y
RAND EDELSTEIN
GOODBODY MAN IN GAINESVILLE
Rand is on top of the market everyday.
His phone is busy keeping Goodbody
clients up to date with the help of
Stockmaster's electronic brain at his
fingertips. A steady stream of inform informmation
mation informmation comes into the Gainesville
office on the Eleteroscan stock tape
and teletype from Goodbody's research
department in New York.
0 GOODBODY St CO.
ESTABLISHED Ittl
Member* of leading Stock and Commodity Exchanges
118 West University Avenue
- OUR 75TH YEAR of service to investors

campaigning, assured the voters that he would
be the governor in effect. He badly needed the
victory to launch his scheme to run for the
presidency on a third party ticket in 1968.
The frail Mrs. Wallace became the first
lady governor in the nation since Ma Ferguson
left the office in Texas in 1927. And she did
it over the strongest GOP bid for power in
Alabama, sinee-the 1800 s.
It appeared the vote would eclipse the gen general
eral general election record of 689,817 in 1964.
The other candidate in the gubernatorial race,
independent doctor lawyer Carl Ray Robinson,
ran a distant third.

In our direction throughout the
country on the basis of party
advances in Illinois and Florida.
Control of the Senate, never
in doubt, stayed with the De Democrats
mocrats Democrats when Sen. James O.
Eastland won reelection in Miss Mississippi.
issippi. Mississippi. That seat, with those
of three other unopposed South Southern
ern Southern Democrats, gave President
Johnson's party 51 of the Se Senate
nate Senate 100 seats for the 90th Con Congress.
gress. Congress.
Republican candidates also
were leading in early returns
for two other Senate seats, those
of Democrats Thomas J. Mcln Mclntyre
tyre Mclntyre in New Hampshire and Fred
R. Harris in Oklahoma.



Orange a d

Campus Calendar

Advance Notice: Hillel: Brunch followed by dis discussion
cussion discussion for future action,..." Wbat-Role Should
Hillel Take in Our University? Sunday, Novem November
ber November 13, 11:00 a.m. v
Wednesday, November 9
Latin American Colloquium: Dr. Martin C. Needier,
Race, Social Structure, Politics, 219 FLU,
8 p.m.
Medico Wives: Guest speaker, Mr. Hollis Holbrook,
6205 N.W. 20th Place, 8 p.m.
Ballet Movie: Romeo and Juliet, Plaza Theater,
8:15 p.m.
Veterans Club: guest speaker, Walter Bain, FLU
Aud., 8 p.m.
College of Architecture Lecture: Burnham Kelly,
Architectural Education, 105-B AFA, 8 p.m.
Arts and Science Dames: Meeting, Home of Mrs.
George Butler, 1722 N. W. 11th Road, 8 p.m.
AIESEC: Open meeting, 121 FLU; 4 p.m. Discussion
of soliciting jobs for international exchange
Hillel: Rabbi Max Lipschitz will be at the Hillel
Foundation for conferences with students, 7:30p.m.
Speleological Society: Group meeting, 212 FLU,
7 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: Auditions, 1826 W. Univ.
Ave., 8:30 p.m. Every kind of talent wanted
Univ. Womens Club Arts and Crafts Group: FLU
Craft Shop, 9:30 a.m.
Thursday, November 10
FLU Forums: Jules Feiffer, The Social Critic in
American Society, Univ. Aud., 8:15 p.m.
ALA Film Series: Leonardo Da Vinci, Giant of the
Renaissance, 103-B AFA, 8 p.m.

Administrative Notices

FLORIDA BLUE KEY MEMBERSHIP: Applications
for membership to Florida Blue Key, men's honor
leadership fraternity, are now available at the Florida
Union Desk or at the office of the dean of your college.
The deadline for returning applications is 5 p.m.
Nov. 11, 1966. Qualifications for selection are: (1)
full time undergraudate student of the University of
Florida; (2) completed five trimesters of college
work, of which at least three have been at the Uni University
versity University of Florida; (3) participated in extra-curricular
activities at the University of Florida and distinguished
himself through leadership and service in at least
one area, and (4) have at least a 2.0 scholarship
average and have passed at least 70 hours of college
work accepted by the registrar of the University of
Florida.
STUDENT FINANCIAL AID: Applications for student
financial aid including scholarships and all long term
loans repayable after graduation for all or any part
of the 1967-68 academic year beginning in Sept. 1967
may be obtained at Room 182, Building E. Deadline
for returning completed applications is Feb. 28, 1967.
WIFT PROGRAM: A discussion of the tax taxsheltered
sheltered taxsheltered annuities program at the University of
Florida will be presented over \VUFT Channel 5, 10
p.m. on Nov. 10 and 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 14. All faculty
and staff members are urged to view one of the pro programs.
grams. programs.
GRADUATE FACULTY MEETING: A meeting of
the Graduate Faculty will be held Wednesday, Nov. 9,
at 4 p.m. In MeCartv Auditorium.
General Notices
FLORIDA PLAYERS LAB: Son of Silent Film
Festival, featuring Valentino, Hart, Bickford, Chap Chaplin,
lin, Chaplin, the Keystone Cops, 1905 Miss America pageant
and others. Also The Case of the Mukkanese Battle
Horn," starring Peter Sellers. Medical Sciences
Building Auditorium, Sunday. Nov. 13, at 3:3C and
7:30 p.m. Admission is 25',.

I MONTHLY DEPOSITS ARE NO LONGER LIMITED IN YOUR CREDI^JNIOf^^^I
I Building J Radio Road I
I Dividend Rate No Increase
I 514% Serving Uof F Employees Since 1935 I
I Paid Semiannually Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union Loans!!! I

BLUE BULLETIN

Football Film: Fla. vs. Georgia, MSB Aud., 8 p.m.
Craft Shop: Creative Stitchery Class, 215 FLU,
9:30 a~.m.
Painting for Fun: 215 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Hillel Foundation: Rabbi Max Lipschitz will be at
the Hillel Foundation for conferences with stu students,
dents, students, 10:30 a.m.
Wrestling Club: south end of the Gym floor, 4 p.m.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship: Prayer meeting,
4th floor of the Library, 5 p.m.
Adult Ceramic Class: FLU Craft Shop, 7:30 p.m.
Phi Chi Theta: group meeting, 208 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Circle K: Group meeting, 212 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Christian Science Organization: group meeting, FLU
Aud., 5:15 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club: 121 F'LU, 7:30 p.m. Everyone
welcome, no experience necessary
Young Republican Club: group meeting, 218 FLU,
7:30 p.m.
Friday, November 11
Graham Area: Playboy Party and Banquet, Graham
Area, 7 p.m.
Veterans Club: Operation Americanism, Infor Information
mation Information Booth, 10 a.m.
ROTC Dept.: Veterans Day Ceremony, Century
Tower, 11:00 a.m.
Dept, of Humanities and Fine Arts: Commedia
dell Arte, McC Aud., 8 p.m.
Newman Club: Campus wide Record Hop, Catholic
Student Center, 8 p.m.
Movie: Mondo Cane, 7, 8:50 & 10:40 p.m., MSB
Aud.
Chess Club: Chess Games, 215 FLU, 7 p.m.
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE: Tickets now on
sale for Jules Feiffer, Serendipity Singers, and
Our Town

SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS: Scholarship funds for Fall
Trimester, 1966-67, are now available for State
Teacher and State Nursing Scholarship Loan Holders.
Contact Scholarship Section. Student Service Center.
ID CARD PHOTOS: Students will be photographed
for lost or stolen ID cards on Friday, Nov. H,
8 a.m. 12 noon at Photographic Services, Build Building
ing Building L. Cards will be available later that afternoon.
FLORIDA vs. GEORGIA FOOTBALL FILM: Color
film of Floridas game with Georgia at Jacksonville
will be shown Thursday, Nov. 10, 8 p.m., Medical
Sciences Building Auditorium.
COMPUTING MEETING: The November meeting
of the Northeast Florida Chapter of the Association
for Computing Machinery will be held Wednesday,
Nov. 9, 7:30 p.m., in Matherly Hall, Room 18. The
public is cordially invited.
FLORIDA UNION SPACE: Any recognized student
organization may apply for space in the new Florida
Union. Applications are available in Room 315 of
the Florida Union and should be picked up by 5 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 14.

Students must be registered with the Placement
Service to interview. Sign-up sheets are posted two
weeks in advance of the interview date at Building
H. All companies will be recruiting for December,
April and August grads unless otherwise indicated.
* Indicates hiring juniors for summer employment.
NOV. 10: AMERICAN HOSPITAL SUPPLY CORP.
--majors interested in sales. BETHLEHEM STEEL
CORP.Eng, Lib. Arts, Gen. Bus. LTV AEROSPACE
CORP.--AE, ME, IE, EE, CE, Physics, Math. FAIR
CHILD CAMERA & INSTRUMENT CORP.EE, ME,
Physics, Math. HONEYWELL, INC.EE, ME, IE.

Placement Notices

Wednesday, November 9, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Progress Tests
PROGRESS TEST: (Students in the following courses
are expected to take the following tests. Each student
must bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will be required to
use bis SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER.)
CY 215 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Nov. 10, 7
p.m. Students whose last names begin with (A- L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6, 7,8,9,10,11,
12, 13, 14 or 1G; (M /.) report to Matherly 102,
105, 108, 112. 113, 114, 115, 11G, 117, 118 or 119.
CPS 121 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Nov. 10,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Lloyd 10G or 109; (B) report to Peabody
1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) report to I.eigh 207;
(D) report to (jCB 121, 125 or 127; (E) report to
GCB 113; (F) report to Matherly 213, 21G or 219;
(G) report to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; (10
report to Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208, or 209; (I
J) report to Flint 110 or 112; (K) rejw>rt to Walker
301, 303, 307 or 308; (L) report to GCB 201, 203,
205 or 207; (M) report to GCB 213, 215, 217, 219,
221, 223, 225 or 227; (N) report to GCB 233 or 235;
(O) report to GCB 237 or 239; (P Q) report to
Flint 101 or 102; (R) report to Floyd 108; (S) report
to Walker Auditorium; (T V) report to GCB 101 or
109; (W /) report to Walker Auditorium.
CPS 122 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Nov. 10,
7 p.m. Students report to Walker Auditorium.
CSS 111 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Nov. 15,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Peabody
1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) report to Leigh 207;
(D) report to GCB 121, 125 or 127; (E) report to GCB
113; (F) report to Matherly 213, 216 or 219; (G)
report to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; (H) report
to Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209; (I J) re report
port report to Flint 110 or 112; (K) report to Walker 301,
303, 307 or 308; (L) report to GCB 201, 203, 205
or 207; (M) report to GCB 213, 215, 217, 219, 221
223, 225 or 227; (N) report to GCB 233 or 235;
(O) report to GCB 237 or 239; (P Q) report to
Flint 101 or 102; (R) report to Floyd 108; (S) report
to Walker Auditorium; (T V) report to GCB
101 or 109; (W Z) report to Walker Auditorium.
CSS 112 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Nov. 15,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with (A- L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, G, 7,8, 9, 10, 11, 12,
13, 14, or 16; (M -z) report to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 11G, 117, 118, or 119.
*- + ****#***

NOV. 10, 11: COPOLYMER RUBBER & CHEM
ICAL CORP.ChE, Chem. EASTMAN KODAK CO.
Chem, Physics, ChE, EE, ME, IE. AMERICAN
RED CROSS--Psychology, Ed, Soc. Sci. ARGONNE
NATIONAL LABORATORY--Math, Physics, Chem,
ChE, EE, ME, NE, MetE.
NOV. 11: TENNECO OIL CO.Acctg, majors in interested
terested interested in sales, ChE, Chem, ME. GILMAN PAPER
CO.ME, CE, IE, ChE, Chem. CONTINENTAL CAN
CO.EE, ME, IE, ChE, Bus. AD, Lib, Arts. NAVAL
SHIP SYSTEMS COMMANDPhysicist, EE, ME, CE,
ChE. WORTHINGTON CORP.ME, CE, EE. CHEV CHEVRON
RON CHEVRON CHEMICAL CO. Any major interest in sales.
KERR-MCGEE CORP .--Engineers.

Page 3



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EUNICE TALL never loses out on dining pleasure at Jerry's. Whether it's a big
date or a quick snack, Jerry's north or south serves you best.

university
city bank
WHEN JO ANN LANGWORTHY elects
to take a trip, she protects her money
by using American Express Travelers
Cheques, just one of the many services
offered by University City Bank. It's
YOUR Full Service Bank.

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YOU'RE AIWAYS

johnston
photography
COME ONE, COME ALL and se select
lect select your homecoming picture
for your scrapbook or nation national
al national publications in black and
white or color. All pictures on
these pages taken by Sam John Johnston.
ston. Johnston.

WITH GAINESVILLE 4
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IN THE LIMELIGHT is Susan Silverman,
dress, lime green, trimmed in white. Thli
only one of many outfits offered you by Sllvei



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Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 9, 1966

The Florida Alligator
'A I* OHtRMwP6 < 71^* c^^^^fll,
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR DICK DENNIS
Edttortel Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not necessarily reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of toe Alligator staff is the editorial In the left
col tuna.
Voters Blew It
Florida voters took a step forward in
May when they chose Robert King High
as the Democratic candidate for Governor
over incumbent Haydon Burns.
The selection of High brought to an
end special interest control of the state
Democratic party. For the first time in
years, the state had a chance to move
forward.
But Tuesdays election ended all that.
Instead of voting for progressive re reforms
forms reforms in the Capitol, instead of select selecting
ing selecting the man who could work with the
newly-appointed legislature, they chose to
move back where they started from.
In electing Claude Kirk the next gover governor
nor governor of Florida, they reestablished the
power of the Burns organization. And the
special interests will once again have
their say.
Claude Kirk went through the entire
campaign without ever coming out with a
constructive program. The only thing he
managed to do was call his* opponent an
ultra-liberal whenever he got the
chance.
The voters could have chosen in Bob
High a man who would be a friend to
elementary, secondary and higher edu education,
cation, education, a man whose record shows he
stands up for his constituency.
Instead they chose Claude Kirk, a man
who has never held any public office.
The voters of Florida had their chance
to elect the best man -- Robert King
High.
They blew it.
INFORMATION NEEDED
The announcement that the quarter
system was going into effect in Sept September,
ember, September, 1967,came 10 months ago;
It was| a baffling thing to almost all
UF students at that point since it would
change the term length and number of
hours necessary to graduate. But most
didnt get alarmed. After all, the actual
change was more than a year-and-a-half
away.
Now the switch is a mere 10 months
off and the student is just as much in
the dark as the day the announcement was
made.
With the changeover, many courses are
going to be changed and some will be
cut back or eliminated. The student must
therefore plan accordingly.
But he doesnt have a single thing to
go by.
And registration for the Winter Tri Trimester
mester Trimester is ready to begin.
Now if someone is going to graduate
next winter or spring, how is he going
to plan a program?
We dont know if the plans are set for
4 ieasc in t near future. But they should
be.
The academic careers of many students
rest on it.

STOKELY WAS INEVITABLE
What Black Powers About?

By DAVID MORRIS
Alligator Columnist
Stokely Carmichael, leader of
SNCC, coined the slogan black
power** a little over five months
ago. Since then the debate has
waxed hot and heavy as- lo what
the hell he meant by it and whe whether
ther whether black power is a worthwhile
goal.
Since the Brown vs. Board of
Education decision in 1954, which
supposedly declared segregation
unconstitutional, we find the
disconcerting statistic that a
higher percentage of Negroes are
going to segregated schools in
1966 than were in 1954. The spread
In amount of education between
white and black has increased,
and this with automation making
a higher educational level a pre prerequisite
requisite prerequisite for an adequate job.

prices (Ayr
mint-.
Non-Veterans Spend Big

By NEWT SIMMONS
Alligator Columnist
Organizations of all types pop
up on campus with annual regular regularity.
ity. regularity.
Few, however, achieve campus campuswide
wide campuswide recognition as quickly as
has a new group which recently
applied to the Legislative Council
for $23,500 in student body funds.
The group, the UF Non-Veter Non-Veterans
ans Non-Veterans Club, said that it needs
the money for printing, postage,
secretarial expenses, the 6th
Floor of the Siegle Building, paper
clips, 5-cent cigars, miscel miscellaneous
laneous miscellaneous expenses and a part partridge
ridge partridge in a pear tree.
At first this amount might have
seemed a bad large, but after the
groups president explained the
reason for the appropriation,
the request seemed more un understandable:
derstandable: understandable:
You have to realize," he said,
that we non-veterans have to
deal with a great many compli complicated
cated complicated state, local and national
agencies and that our organ organization
ization organization needs a lot of money
to cover the expenses generated
in helping non-veterans solve
these problems.
It seemed to me that since
most students were 1 non-veterans,

With the Viet Nam war taking
so many people into the armed
and with the economy
booming as a result of the war,
unemployment has gone down. But
unemployment rates for the Ne Negroes
groes Negroes have either remained
steady, or, in some_ instances,
have actually increased.
This, then, is the background
of today's militant Negro move movement.
ment. movement. It is ironic, and unfortunate
that at the same time as the
Negro is beginning to give up
the idea of non violence and the
begging attitude of the NAACP the
white community has come to be believe
lieve believe that it has done enough al already
ready already by passing such notable leg legislation
islation legislation as the Civil Rights Act
of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act
of 1965. Thus such liberals as Sen Senator
ator Senator Mike Mansfield has stated that
the Negroes are going too fast
in their quest for equality (when,

that practically all of them would
be eligible for membership in
the group and asked if this was
the case.
He replied in the negative.
We dont let just anyone join,
certainly not. Its first apparent
(SEE NON-VETERANS PAGE .9)

Florida Alligator Staff
TYLER TUCKER NEWT SIMMONS GENE NAIL
Assistant Managing Editor Editorial Assistant Editorial Assistant
NICK ARROYO CAROL HEFNER NICK TATRO
Photo Editor Society" Editor Wire Editor
STAFF WRITERS Bob Beck, Sue Froemke, Barbara Gefen,
Maury dicker, Kathie Keim, Jean Mamlin, Frank Shepherd, Aggie
Fowles, Justine Hartman. Walter Woodward, Harvey Alper
ASSISTANT EDITORS Judy Redfern, Sherrie Braswell, Toni
Giliberti, Joe Torchia, Ken Garst, Margie Green John Briggs,
Jo Ann Langworthy
LAB ASSISTANTS JoAnn Gerard, Diann Devine, Jerry War Warren,
ren, Warren, Laura Borwn, Peggy Sneider, Dave Reddick, Brady Farris,
Joe Varon, Marie Varon, David Weiss, Greg Borden, Richard
Irwin, Carol Summers.
In order to better cover campus events the Alligator uses
reporters from the School of Journalism and Communications.
Their bylines are followed by Alligator Correspondent.
*"

as stated above, the black man is
really going backward).
And into this delicate, confus confusing
ing confusing picture Mr. Carmichael has
thrown the fearful term black
power/* Black power, as such, Is
inevitable. It Is as irreversible
as old age and no one argues the
merits of old age, just how to
cope with it).
Why do I call it inevitable? It
is a well-known fact that as
Negroes move into a neighbor neighborhood
hood neighborhood the whites move out. Thus
we find a place like Brooklyn,
which used to be predominantly
white, now primarily black. In
New York City between 1960 and
1964, 250,000 colored people moved
into the City, and 250,000 whites
moved out. There is a majority
of blacks in Washington, D.C.,
and a significant percentage in Chi Chicago,
cago, Chicago, New York City and Los
Angeles. It is only a matter of
time before these cities become
all black or all colored (adding
Puerto Ricans to the existing
masses of Negroes) with whites
commuting into the ghetto to work.
It is this future that Stokely
Carmichael foresees. Integration
has not worked. Maybe it could
not work. But what Stokely fears
is a future Harlem, like the
present one, which is run by
whites or blacks who live out outside
side outside the ghetto. The principals
of the schools are white. The
teachers, whether black or white,
commute into the ghetto to work.
Grocery chains, run by whites,
charge higher prices in the low
income district than in the high
income sections. The politicians
in Harlem, like Adam Clayton
Powell, have no sense of race,
except as a weapon with which
to bludgeon white opposition.
Stokely wants organization. He
wants cooperatives run by Har Harlemites.
lemites. Harlemites. He wants politicians who
will work for their community. He
wants schools which can engender
civic pride by being run by the
ghetto itself. Basically, he wants
to give the Negro a pride in nun nunsell,
sell, nunsell, a pride that is impossible
under the present system. SNCC
does not reject white help, noi
white money, and certainly need:
white votes, but wants to run pro programs
grams programs associated with blacks b;
blacks.
It is not difficult to understam
this attitude, and violence is no
a part of it. When a majorit;
of voters in certain Mississipp
counties are Negro, and ye'
vote for a white segregationist.
When nine of 13 jurors are black
and yet vote to acquit an allegec
killer of Mrs. Viola Liuzzo, de despite
spite despite an eyewitness account of an
FBI agent, then something is
wrong. This is what SNCC
wants to change. This is what
Black Power is all about.



mudent
Wmoyed
l oncert
H R:
IBjoyed very much the concert
|Kruesday featuring Lee Luvisi,
JHcomplished young pianist who
well beyond theaudien-
Wk expectations according to the
jKuse he received.
|Hwever, this concert-goer was
annoyed when many in this
|Bingly enlightened audience
IHuded after the first move move
move of Beethovens Waldstein.
|B>e the reason for this mis-
Kd handclapping was due to
|Haudiences inability to see
|Brinted program in the dark.
|HI rule, applause is withheld
the end of a work. (A
[B>le exception would be the
movement of Tchaikovskys
Leonard Bern Bern|B
|B Bern|B and the New York Phil Philjonic
jonic Philjonic received a resounding
|Bon at this point in a per perance
ance perance I heard over radio
o
His was not all. Maybe the
|Bnce expected only one encore.
Luvisi hardly finished his
selection when a rush to
exits began with the lights
out. Luvisi fortunately rush rush>ack
>ack rush>ack to the bench and began
second encore. Those who
IBiearly reached the exits stop stop
stop dead in their tracks and
ned to the final selection.
Biis student certainly hopes
B concert audience manners
Improve when William Stein Stein
Stein and the Pittsburgh Symphony
Hrn here again this winter.
I KENT JONES, 4BA
TOR:
hose attending the peformance
the Florida Woodwind Quintet
Sunday, Nov. 6 were privi-
Bd to hear a well chosen, so sosticated
sticated sosticated program performed
1 great musical sensitivity and
Bnical skill.
lessrs. Bowles, Koonce, Small,
Its, and Poole merited the warm,
Intaneous reception which they
leived. We appreciated the op oplt
lt oplt unity to hear a form of mus-
Bhich, unfortunately, is toosel-
B performed.
Be wish to thank these Uni-
Isity of Florida faculty mem mems,
s, mems, as well as all the perfor perforrs
rs perforrs in the Faculty Chamber Mu Mu
Mu Series, for having devoted so
By hours of rehearsal time in
ler to provide varied musical
leriences for the community.
hope that the interest obser-
V today will be sustained and
ftt the Florida Woodwind Quin-
I will perform on many occa-
Bns.
I Sincerely,
I RAY JONES
I ILONA RICHEY
I TOM RICHEY
WEDNESDAY
SPECIAL
lamburgers
BURGER CHEF
15 NW 13thST.

(FROM PAGE 8)
that since this is a non-veterans
club, one must first be eligible
to become a veteran. This ex excludes
cludes excludes women, conscientious ob objectors,
jectors, objectors, physically unfit men and
those who have already put in
their military service. As a
matter of fact, one of our big biggest
gest biggest sources of problems are draft
boards. Thats why weve re requested
quested requested SG,OOO to pay for the cost
of a WATS long distance tele telephone
phone telephone line so that we can call
them directly whenever anyone has
a complaint.

They Always Talk
About Same Things
By JIM CALLAHAN
Alligator Columnist
Well, here I sit. Trying to conjure up some topic of vit vitality
ality vitality and interest, to write about in this column. You know, as
the weeks go by, I find it increasingly hard to find such live lively
ly lively topics as would be informative to our student body ofl,ooo.
Its especially hard when I review old copies of the Alligator,
only to find,-lo and behold, were all writing about the same
over-used things.
From editor to columnist to the Letters to the Editor sec section,
tion, section, its almost always the same thing. Either Blue Key is
critisized, or Food Service is defamed, the Infirmary is denoun denounced,
ced, denounced, Vietnam defended or LBJ is condemned. Only its not just
The Alligator which is caught in this web of standardization,
its institutions and media all over the country. We all read the
same stories, watch the same TV programs, and eat the same
foods. The majority of us get up at the correct times every
morning and put on the correct clothes (here its traditional
Ivy League), then we all ride off to school or work in our Fords
or Chevrolets, or whatever other stream-lined mass of chrom chromium
ium chromium advertising has persuaded us to believe is best. We go through
the routine of the day, not necessarily enjoying what were do doing
ing doing for a living or learning at school, but anticipating the ma material
terial material gain which will allow us to keep up with the standards
set by the ever-present Joneses.
All this standardizing wouldnt be so irritating if it wasnt
for the fact that most of us are so content to sit back and sink
into it. Personally, Im glad we have minority and radical
segments of our population. It gives life and interest to the
issues of our time.
So, since I just would never want to go against the stand standards
ards standards set by so many others before me. Now lets see, what can
I write about? Well, theres always the campus police who
never catch theives, but do a great job of giving out parking
tickets. Or theres always the Terror of Tigert, whom every everyone
one everyone wants dump. Then again, the ridiculousness of freshman
courses would be really newsy, I could say volumes about
the ineffectiveness of Effective Thinking, or the planned fun*
of required physical education. Maybe a good subject would be
that my roommate bugs me, I know thats original.
You know, I could get really way out. I might even write
about some of the good things in life. Only problem, is then
nobody would read the column.
-
\ '" j
Glasgo has sweaters
for the times youre in
a fantastic mood
FOR STORE NEAR YOU. WRITE TO GLASGO LTD 1407 B'WAY. NEW YORK. N Y.

NON-VETERANS SPEND BIG

I see . .
Yes and then theres the Bur Bureau
eau Bureau of Internal Revenue we have
to contact quite a bit, espec especially
ially especially along about April: the lo local
cal local and state police when someone
gets a ticket, and of course, the
drivers license bureau; then we
have to communicate with em employers
ployers employers and other schools and
school authorities here and the
Anti-Poverty office whenever one
of our poorer members applies
for a grant; and of course the
Office of Indian Affairs for our
Navaho and Seminole members
and the city department of Health

Wednesday, November 9, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

whenever someone's apartment is
condemned and the ADA and John
Birch Society and Explorer Scouts
and all the other clubs non-vet non-veterans
erans non-veterans belong to and ...
I think I get the picture. Its
a very complicated life being a
non-veteran ...
'That's right and we have
to have our own little office to
aid and guide and help out on these
things.

? ?
Florida vs. Tulane
Ha-ve you heard about
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But still havent you asked for
a great deal of money?
Well, we have to hire at least
six full-time employees .
What for?*
A lot of non-veterans haven't
been getting their money from
home on time and we want to
hire people to write letters to
their parents for them .

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale 1
FOR SALE: 1966 SUZUKI T-10
250 cc. Perfect condition. Only
6,000 miles. SSOO FIRM. Call 378-
6578. (A-42-10t-c).
1965 YAMAHA, 250 cc, $450 or will
trade for smaller cycle. Call 378-
2986. (A-43-10t-c).
1966 YAMAHA 100 cc. Twin
cylinders, dual exhaust, perfect
condition. .must see to appre appreciate.
ciate. appreciate. 372-5451 after 5 p.m. CA CA-47-st-c).
-47-st-c). CA-47-st-c).
1964 CHAMPION 10x50 foot trailer,
2 AC, furnished, carpeting, awning,
tool house. Lot 18, Hickory Hill,
all offers considered, 372-2896.
(A-49-3t-p)
MUST SELL Vox Knight Am Amplifier,
plifier, Amplifier, twin ten model with Vibrato
and normal channels. Call Bill
Baldwin 378-2125. (A-50-2t-p)
1960 ALLSTATE 250 cc. motor motorcycle,
cycle, motorcycle, SIOO. Joe Farcus 378-5663.
(A-50- 3t- c)
FOR SALE, one and one half bed bedroom
room bedroom mobile home with cabana and
storage. Permanently located in
Archer Road Vilg. Furnished $895.
Phone 372-3573 (A-50-st-c)
autos
1962 RAMBLER, good condition,
radio and heater, seat belts $550.
376-5790 (G-49-4t-c)
1960 FORD, 6 cylinder, stick, must
sell immediately, perfect inside
and out, best offer takes it. Call
376-9205, Room 814. (G-48-st-p).
services
KEEP CA PET cleaning problems
small--us- Blue Lustre wall to
wall. Rent electric shampooer sl.
(Lowry Furniture Co.) (M-50-It-c)
GET ACQUAINTED SPECIAL
Miss Linda Phillips, former own owner
er owner of Lindas Hairstylist will
give $lB frostings for $12.50 Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Call 372-
5549 Rames Hairstylist. 319 West
Univ. Ave. (M-50-3t-c)
EXPERIENCED TUTOR in any
area of Psychology, reasonable
rates. 378-4525 evenings and
weenends. (M-45-3t-c).

2:25-7:00 15WTCI 4:40-9:15 I

wanted
WANTED: Rides to Plant City
or Lakeland, 11/11/66. Royce Beau Beauchamp,
champ, Beauchamp, 2:30. Jay Ura, 12:00 or
2:30 Returning Sunday, call 376-
9120 (c-50-lt-p)
MALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share modern 1 bedroom Summitt
House Apt. 1700 SW 16th Court.
372-3573. (C-50-st-c)
EASY GOING GUY with $39
per month to share large new house
in North East section. Relax,
enjoy living Call 378-5153
(C-46-st-c)
ONE OR TWO MALE roommates
wanted for Fredericks Apt. S4O
a month, available immediately.
378-3148. (C-46-3t-c).
MALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share large apartment. $37.50 per
month and one half utilities. See
after 5 p.m. at 405 NE sth Ave.
Apartment 5 (C-49-3t-c)
NEEDED DESPERATELY. .
Non student ticket (not in the
end zone) in groups of 2,3, or up
to 6, for Miami-Florida Game.
Call 378-6010. (C-48-3t-c).
help wanted
HELP WANTED Students who
type and students eligible for
work study program. For further
information report to room 183,
Bldg. E on campus. (E-46-6t-nc)
MALE HELP wanted, must be
21 years or older. If interested
contact Jack Shelton, Pizza Hut.
(E-50-3t-c)
WANTED: CARRIER TO DELIVER
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
.VEEKDAYS MORNINGS, MUST
HAVE IST THRU 3RD PERIODS
FREE MONDAY THRU FRIDAY.
CONTACT GERALD JONES ROOM
9, FLORIDA UNION BASEMENT
BETWEEN 7 and 10 A.M. (E-47-
ts- nc).
PARTTIME TECHNICIAN or tech technologist
nologist technologist immediately or opening
at Alachua General Hospital. Good
salary, good working conditions,
inquire Personnel Director, 372-
4321 est. 365 (E-49-4t-c)
EXPERIENCED LEGAL secretary secretarywanted
wanted secretarywanted beginning Dec. 5. Must be
proficient in shorthand and typing.
376-5242 (E-49-ts-c)

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 9, 1966

Page 10

help wanted
PART-TIME INCOME, Free Man Manual,
ual, Manual, Box 5477, Athens, Georgia.
(E-48-3t-p).
GO-GO GIRLS, no previous ex experience
perience experience necessary. Dance 1 to 4
nights per week. 378-1636. The
Lamplighter Lounge. (E-48-3t-c).
STUDENT WANTED, male or
female, lunches or nights at
Woodys Sandwich Shop, 3458 West
University Avenue. No phone calls,
apply in person. (E-48-3t-c).
for rent
COOPERATIVE LIVING Organi Organization
zation Organization announces openings for next
trimester. Room and Board S6O
per month, one block off campus.
Inquire 117 NW 15th St. or call
376-6203 (B-50-st-c)
SUBLEASE MODERN, fully furn furnished,
ished, furnished, two bedroom apartment with
swimming pool privileges. S4O. a
month plus utilities. Available
Dec. 8 Call 378-6128 (B-50-3t-c)
iN.W. 33t1>
IFOR ADULTs'oNLYI^^^^^M
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FLUNKING SPANISH? Contact
Mrs. Josephine Kropatsch, tutor in
conversational Spanish. 376-8204.
Reasonable fee. (J-49-3t-c)
WILL SELL THREE general
admission tickets to Tulane game.
Norm Swast 372-9341. (j-50-3t-p)
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MEMBERS
of the
VETERANS CLUB
Be Sure to Attend
MOST IMPORTANT
MEETING
OF THE YEAR
TONIGHT BPM
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o Nomination of
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FLORIDA STATE THEATERS
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._ ^^
mm^m mpWM
m~l JIMMEY BAILEY
By JIMMEY BAILEy
Alligator Sports Assistant
Florida should play in one of the major postseason bowl
games December 31 or January 1. Many good teams have lost
at least one game and still made a big splash on New Years
Day.
The Gators can follow that pattern if they get by Tulane.
The Florida dream season was smashed against Georgia on
Saturday. Down the drain went hopes for a perfect season and
at least a share of the SEC title. But the Florida team is one
that all Gator fans can be proud of.
It is a team that was given very slim chances of even having
a winning record at the beginning of the 1966 college football
season.
Overloaded with sophomores, but skillfully and tactily directed
by the magnificient Steven Orr Spurrier--SOS for shortthe
Gators have become the Cinderella team of the season. Spur Spurrier
rier Spurrier and the sophomores have jelled into one of the most
efficiently working football units most fans have ever seen seenespecially
especially seenespecially Florida fans.
The defeat by Georgia was surely tragic, but not all is lost.
The probabilities of ending the season with a 9-1 slate are strong
and the Gators are still the number one team for at least two
major post-season bowl games.
This week, Florida is opposed by the Tulane Greenies, who
are having their most successful season in many years. It is
also their first year out of the SEC even though the game will
count as a conference game for Florida.
The Green Wave has a record of 5-2-1 and has played some
tremendous games. Their latest effort was against the Miami
Hurricanes, conquerors of nationally ranked Southern California.
The Hurricanes had to scrabble against Tulane before emerg emerging
ing emerging with a 10-10 standoff that was as even on paper as it was on
the scoreboard.
Tulane has an offense similar to the one possessed by the
Georgia Bulldogs. They rank among the nations top rushing
outfits. Bobby Duhon, Greenie signal caller, has topped the
thousand-yard mark in total offense for the second consecutive
year.
Duhon is doing even better this year as he has already gain gained
ed gained 1,039 yards, 20 yards better than last year, and two games
remaining on the Tulane schedule.
Green Wave losses have come at the hands of always tough
Stanford and Georgia Tech, the latter of whom is ranked fifth
in the nation and a possible bowl opponent.
Overall, the Tulane-Florida series has been close, but lately
the Fightin Gators have been having their way. Since the first
two met in 1915, Florida has won seven, lost six, and there have
been two ties. But the Gators have taken five straight victories
and Tulane must go back to 1946 in search of its last win.
Pete Johns, Tulane tailback, has blossomed into one of the
most exciting runners in the South. He spent last season as a
defensive cornerman. When Tulane hired Jim Pittman as head
coach, one of the first things he did was to move Johns to the
offensive backfield. Johns had a terrific spring and has had an

even better season.
VISIT
Oft )t Jkb Uton
Where Everyone

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get it yourself!
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Cologne, 6 oz., $4.50 W J|§ P
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GATOR
ADS
SELL MORE I

Trapp Nears SEC Record
As Best Pass Receiver

Without a lot of fanfnre Flor Florida
ida Florida flanker-split end Richard
Trapp has slowly closed in on the
Southeastern Conference pass re receiving
ceiving receiving record.
TTie all-time single season high
is currently 58, set last year by
Florida All-American Charlie Ca Casey.
sey. Casey.
Trapp, after eight games, has
caught 46 passes and since the
second contest has averaged a
shade over eight catches per game.
Trapp, a junior from Braden Bradenton,
ton, Bradenton, Florida, has come on rapid rapidly
ly rapidly this season and his ability now
compares most favorable with that
of Casey.
Richard didnt play much foot football
ball football before his first varsity sea season,
son, season, says Florida head coach
Ray Graves. He was signed be because
cause because Don Brown, one of our as assistant
sistant assistant coaches, thought the boy
had great natural ability and would
fit in as a pass receiver, if noth nothing
ing nothing else.
Browns judgement was correct.
Trapp, improving with experience,
has all the tools and now is one
of the most respected receivers
in the country. He has tremen tremendous
dous tremendous speed, 9.8 in the 100, ex exceptional
ceptional exceptional moves and good hands.
At the rate Trapp is improv improving
ing improving he could become a great re receiver,
ceiver, receiver, says Graves. He is
close to that already and as he
plays he will continue to improve.
Trapp played flanker early in
the season, then alternated between
that position and split end and in
the last two games, Auburn and
Georgia, started a split end with
senior Paul Ewaldsen moving to
flanker.
The 6-1, 176-pounder also plays
wingback and has run the wing wingback
back wingback reverse with astounding suc success
cess success thus far. He is averaging
12.5 yards per carry with 52
yards in four attempts.
Trapps biggest asset, coaches
believe, is what he can do with
the ball once he gets it. He has
which are those a great
athlete has and has scored three
times this year on plays where
he was evidently duck-soup for a
tackier only to fake the defensive
man and go.
Barbell Club
Weight lifting equipment is
available in the basement of the
Florida Gym six days a week for
any interested Florida students.
However, a membership card in
the Barbell club is required. To
obtain a card just go to room
227 in the Florida Gym and pick
one up.
Subscribe Now To
Reader's $1 50
iV Digest mo.
Pick up an order card in
your mailbox or classroom
halls this *eek.

?
Florida vs. Tulane
Have you heard about
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SPORTS

Wednesday. November 9, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

k!lrH9&? l JMp
: "iHI *
RICHARD TRAPP GOES FOR SEC RECORD
. . great ability
Rifles Beat Georgia;
Depth Is Problem

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator
The Florida Rifles beat the
Georgia Bulldogs, while their foot football
ball football counterparts were being
knocked from the unbeaten ranks
by Georgia last Saturday.
The men are now starting to
reach their potential, said Ma Major
jor Major Harvey Dick, advisor to the
Gator sharpshooters. I think from
here on well be tough to beat.
This latest victory raises the
Rifles season record to 5-3. Vic Victories
tories Victories have been recorded over
Mississippi State,Stetson, Auburn,
Wake Forest, and Georgia. Losses
were suffered at the hands of FSU,
N.C. State, and nationally second secondranked
ranked secondranked Citadel.

Page 11

Next on the Florida marksmen
schedule is a match against Tu Tulane
lane Tulane this Saturday. The following
Saturday, the Rifles will host rif rifle
le rifle squads from Miami and Florida
A&M.
We know Miami is loaded with
talent this year, said Dick.*FSU
just barely edged them out in a
match earlier this year.
Depth on the firing line con continues
tinues continues to be the major problem of
the Rifles.
If we could get a couple of
good freshmen shooters to back
up our front line, we would be
in great shape, said Sgt. Joe
Nave, coach of the Rifles.
Leading shooters for the Gator
marksmen this year have been
Toby Muir, Lee Young, Jim Waugh,
and Bill Starke.
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Page 12

>, Hie Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 3, 1966

NEW ROOM IN A NEW DORM
. . the best, for the best
Gators Injured;
Lose Linebacker
Defensive Back

By SKIP PEREZ
Alligator Sports Writer
Steve Heidt, first team lineback linebacker
er linebacker for the Gators, will probably
miss the Tulane game according
to head coach Ray Graves.
Heidt, who was instrumental in
the early part of the season due
to his fine play, has been plagued
for the last three games with var various
ious various injuries and this time its
a torn cartilage in his ribs.
The Gators were hit with a
rash of injuries yesterday, Graves
reports, and it now seems that
stalwart defensive tackle J.D. Pas Pasteris
teris Pasteris will probably miss the
game.
Defensive halfback George
Grandy had a sprained knee and
he reinjured it Monday. His sta status
tus status is doubtful. Linebacker Char Charlie
lie Charlie Pippin may miss the game,
as he is suffering from a bad
knee. Tom Hungerbuhler will miss
practice all this week with a
sprained arch. Middle guard Jer Jerry
ry Jerry Anderson has a pulled leg
muscle and linebacker Jack Card
has two bad Charlie horses.

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salad, veg., pot.,
coffee or tea, C 1 7C
rolls & butter, y I / J
apple pie
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1250 W. University Avenue

The only bright spot in yester yesterday's
day's yesterday's practice was tight end Jack
Coons, who is looking fine and
will probably start, according
to Graves.
Theyll give us a lot more
trouble with their strong running
game, Graves said. Theirs is
more of a series-type offense,
like North Carolina State.
V.
Graves thinks, as many others,
that this Tulane squad is one of
the most improved teams in the
South, Just look at their record
and the way they've played.
Tulane has lost two games, one
to Stanford out on the West Coast,
and another to sth- ranked Georgia
Tech.
Graves was asked what he
thought his Gators chances were
of going to a major bowl should
they be victorious over the Green Greenies.
ies. Greenies.
Sure I think we'll go to a
bowl, he quickly replied. Any
team that has a. potential 8-1
record deserves it.

New Dorm For Athletes
To Help In Recruiting

A new dormitory which will
house athletes at the University
of Florida, a major new aide in
recruiting, could become one of
the finest furnished in the coun country.
try. country.
I think this new dormitory
will be the biggest single help
we will have in recruiting, says
Director of Athletics Ray Graves.
And the efforts to properly fur furnish
nish furnish it are tremendous.
A special fund effort to fur furnish
nish furnish Yon Hall the athletic dor dormitory
mitory dormitory under construction under
the new east stands of Florida
Field has been enjoying suc success
cess success nearly comparable to the re record
cord record of the Gator football team.
The $50,000 drive began on Sept September
ember September 24 and has already reach reached
ed reached the $37,000 mark. Being hand handled
led handled by the University of Florida
Foundation, Inc., the fund was es established

Soccer Club Edges By Eglin;
Play Unbeaten South Florida

A hard-hitting UF soccer team
won a narrow 3-2 victory over
the semi-pro Eglin Air Force team
on a brilliant second half penalty
kick by co-captain Max Ventura,
last Saturday.
Florida took an early 1-0 lead
when Rashid Chadereffil blasted
home a 10-yard kick through
the Eglin goalie.
Good passing kept the Eglin
defenders off balance for most of
the first 30 minutes, but late in
the first half Eglin forward Bob
UF Archers,
Turkey Shoot
Hey Gators! Looking for some
action thats a little bit out of the
ordinary? Tired of paying high food
prices? Come to the third annual
UF Archers Turkey Shoot, Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, November 19.
Equipment and instructions will
be provided for those who have
never shot before. Also handi handicappes
cappes handicappes will be given to those who
can't shoot.
Everything will be free.
The Turkey shoot will be locat located
ed located behind Broward and will run
from 10:30 a.m. till Noon.

tablished established when it became apparent
that Athletic Association funds
would be short the amount neces necessary
sary necessary to furnish the dormitory for
use in 1967.
The 220 bed dormitory for Ga Gator
tor Gator athletes and student non-ath non-athletes
letes non-athletes will be named for Colonel
Everett Yon, longtime director of
Gator Boosters who died last
year.
No state funds are involved in
construction of the stadium-dor stadium-dormitory
mitory stadium-dormitory project, with the entire
$2.4 million for construction com coming
ing coming from the sale of bonds by the
Athletic Association and from their
reserve fund.
Friends and admirers of Col Colonel
onel Colonel Yon have responded enthus enthusiastically,
iastically, enthusiastically, said Alan J. Robert Robertson,
son, Robertson, Dean of the University Re Relations
lations Relations and Development. Their
quick and generous support of
this fund are another indication

Johnson rammed home a driving
shot to tie the score at 1-1.
Center Forward Bob Versluis
came right back with a long shot
into the right upper corner to put
the Gators out in front 2-1 as the
half ended.
Ventura then got off his penalty
shot to put the Gators ahead 3-1.
The second half was rough and
muddy as Eglin drove deep into
Florida territory several times
only to be stopped by tough de defensive
fensive defensive play.

LAUGH,
CRY,
WONDER
RELEASE
November 16
r

of the admiration and respect
many had for Everett Yon.
Major emphasis in the fund t
fort, Robertson explained, has be
aimed at asking friends and a
mirers of Colonel Yon, and oth
Gator followers to provide gil
to furnish rooms and lounges
tlie Hall.
A big kickoff to the drive w:
provided when T.G. Buckner, Ji
of Miami donated $25,000 in men
ory of his late father, T.G. Bucl
ner of Jacksonville. Buckner Sr
along with several friends, aide
scholarships for Florida athlete
during the 1930's when other fund
were not available.
Gifts of S6OO or more from in
dividuals or groups will allo\
the donor to name a dormitor;
room or other area in memorj
of an individual organization, oi
group.

The Gator squad had to fight for
its life the rest of the way as
Eglin scored late in the game and
threatened several other times.
This Saturday, the rugged Gator
squad takes on undefeated and un untied
tied untied University of South Florida.
South Florida had previously hand handed
ed handed the Gators their only defeat
earlier in the season.
The game will be played on
Fleming Field before the Tulane
game at 10:30 a.m. Fleming Field
is located just north of Florida
Field.