Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Top Republicans Coming To UF

u
gHA BtrJM
GERALD FORD
. . GOP House leader*
Ford Speaks
On Campus
Thursday
U. S. Representative Gerald R.
Ford Jr., House minority leader
from Michigan, will be the guest
speaker of UF Forums Committee
Thursday.
He will speak on The Future
of the Republican Party at
8:15 p.m. in University Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium. A limited number of tickets
(25 cents for students) remains.
Price for the public is 50 cents
and tickets can be picked up at
the Florida Union box office.
An added attraction will be the
guest appearance of Mayor H. W.
Goldner of St. Petersburg, who will
describe his city and tell students
of the advantages to remaining in
Florida after graduation.
Mayor Goldners appearance is
part of the Florida Crossroads
program designed to introduce dif different
ferent different mayors to the University
simultaneous with nationally
prominent speakers.
Congressman Ford, a 53-
year-old Republican, was elected
minority leader of the U. S. House
of Representatives in 1965. A
member of Congress since 1949,
he has served in House subcomm subcommittees
ittees subcommittees for defense and foreign re relations.
lations. relations.
His book, Portrait of the As Assassin,
sassin, Assassin, is a result of his work
as presidential investigator of the
Kennedy assassination.
For his work in Congress, Ford
was awarded the Distinguished
Congressional Service Award.
A scholar since high school days
at Grand Rapids, Mich., and an
athlete both in high school and coll college,
ege, college, Ford played on the Univer University
sity University of Michigans national champ championship
ionship championship football teams in 1932 and
1933.
In 1934, as center-linebacker, he
was voted Michigans most valu valuable
able valuable player and named to both the
East-West Shrine and College All-
Star football teams.
Upon graduation, Ford turned
down professional football offers
from the Detroit Lions and Green
Bay Packers for a Yale Univer University
sity University law school career. While
there, he served as assistant
varsity football coach and fresh freshman
man freshman boxing coach.
10 Firemen Killed
LOS ANGELES (UPI) -- At least
seven and possibly 10 firemen
were killed and 15 injured Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday while battling a series of
brush fires that swept through
tinder-dry Southern California,
sheriffs deputies reported.

Vol. 59, No. 45

DISABILITY INSURANCE

New Faculty Benefits

By GENE NAIL
Editorial Assistant
A tiny notice placed in The
Alligators Orange and Blue
Bulletin spells a step forward in
UFs efforts to attract and hold
sought-after teaching and adminis administrative
trative administrative personnel.
It reads: DISABILITY INSUR INSURANCE:
ANCE: INSURANCE: The Insurance Company of
North America is currently offer offering
ing offering long-term disability insur insurance
ance insurance to University employees on
a group basis. All faculty and staff
who earn $650 or more monthly
are eligible for this coverage.
What this means is that the Uni University
versity University is one step closer to clos closing
ing closing the competition gap that
makes UF less desirable to
much sought-after personnel.
While much deserving attention
is given to demands for higher
salaries for faculty, additional
benefits and teaching conditions
are ofter overlooked.
But all three of these are im important
portant important in attracting faculty
to the UF.
The fringe benefits which us usually
ually usually make a university com competitive
petitive competitive are hospitalization, ma major
jor major medical, life and disability
income insurance, and tax shelter sheltered
ed sheltered annuities.
The benefit of the different types
of insurance being taken out
through a group program is ob obvious
vious obvious cheaper rates.
The disability insurance, which
guarantees against the loss of
income due to disability, is sch scheduled
eduled scheduled to start this month.
The tax sheltered annuities are
not available at UF. But a faculty
committee on insurance is
Little Hall
Dedication
Coming Up
The General Classroom Building
will be renamed next Monday
when the UF dedicates it to Dr.
Winston W. Little.
Little Hall will be so named in
honor of the founder of the Univer University
sity University College and its director for
30 years. Dr. Little retired in 1962
and follows an exclusive and
honored line of Florida men and
women whose dedication to the uni university
versity university and to education is enscrib enscribed
ed enscribed in metal and stone on many of
the campus buildings.
None of these landmarks is more
familiar than Tigert Hall, the ad administrative
ministrative administrative hub of the Uni University.
versity. University. Dedicated Oct. 15, 1960,
the building was named for former
UF President Johi. J. Tigert.
J. Hillis Miller succeeded Tigert
and served as president for six
years. He died in office in 1953.
The health center named for him,
was built a few years later and
recently celebrated its tenth birth birthday.
day. birthday.

The Florida
Alligator

University of Florida

presently considering bids to
start a program at the UF. The
Alligator will report more on
Tax Sheltered Annuities in the
future.
Theres only one catch to these
group programs. They are vol voluntary,
untary, voluntary, and the companies general generally
ly generally seek a large percentage--about
Yearbook
Choices
Narrowed
By JEAN MAMLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Hulputta, The Orange
and Blue, and The Saurian
are the three top choices for
the name of UFs yearbook.
Last week 100 students from ap approximately
proximately approximately 200 invited, met for
a discussion and vote on the ques question
tion question of changing the yearbooks
name.
Editor-in-chief Nel Laughon
feels that the 100 in attendance
represented a good cross-sect cross-section
ion cross-section of the campus, and after four fourfifths
fifths fourfifths of the students voted for
a change in name, each re representative
presentative representative was given a list
of 190 names suggested for vote.
The favorite names in order
were The Hulputta (Seminole name
for alligator), The Orange and
Blue and The Saurian. The
Tower and The Floridian were
the next two favorites.
Names ranged from the clever
to the humorous including The
Sandcrab, The Gator-Crawl, Pines
and Palms, Albert, Shifting Sands,
1853, Millhopper, Orangade, Ga Gatordate,
tordate, Gatordate, and an entry from
FSU, Gainesburger.
I feel that the Committee of
100 took time in picking the names
and that the meeting was a very
good indication of the way the
students feel, Miss Laughon
said.
Next week, Miss Laughon will
talk to UF President J. Wayne Reitz
about picking a committee to
choose one of the three names. The
committee will consist of seven
to nine representatives from Stu Student
dent Student Government, alumni, Sem Seminole
inole Seminole staff, administration, Board
of Student Publications, Greeks,
off-campus housing and dorms.
The final decision will be known
three weeks after the committ committees
ees committees decision reaches the BSP.
If the BSP gives approval, the name
then be presented jo Legislative
Council for a final vote.
This years annual will be out
near the end of March. The
deadline for all senior and Greek
pictures has been extended to the
end of this week, Miss Laughon
ad4ed.
' *> i:

Wednesday, November 2, 1966

75 per cent --participation to keep
costs low.
The disability insurance, which
guarantees against the loss of
income due to disability, is sch scheduled
eduled scheduled to start this month.
The tax sheltered annuities are
not available at UF. But a faculty
committe on insurance is
presently considering bids to start
a program at the UF. (The Al Alligator
ligator Alligator will report more on Tax
Sheltered Annuities in the future.
Theres only one catch to these
group programs. They are volun voluntary,
tary, voluntary, and the companies generally
seek a large percentageabout
75 per cent--participation to keep
costs low.
The disability insurance which
was investigated and approved by
the Faculty and Staff Insurance
Committee this year, will be
provided by the Insurance Company
of North America INA.
INA also provides UF faculty
and staff group life insurance cov coverage
erage coverage under a program set up only
last year by the Insurance Comm Committee.
ittee. Committee.
Formed early last year, the
committee established the group
life coverage, then moved this year
to the disability insurance. They
are now studying proposals for the
tax shelter annuities.
Problems arise in the commit committees
tees committees efforts to achieve a 75
per cent participation before
the disability insurance goes into
effect.
One of these concerns the fact
many Agriculture Extension per personnel
sonnel personnel are officially employed by
the Federal government, and are
covered through that agency, but
still considered part of the
elegible UF members.
Also, some personnel, be because
cause because of their particular len length
gth length of service would not receive
full benefits from the program.
The disability insurance pro provides
vides provides payment of 60 per cent of
(.SEE FACULTY PAGE 2)
BUtLSEYE!
Inside j
Today f s
Alligator
19 Today the bullseye centers
on comment by University of officials
ficials officials on Buddy Jacobs new
election code plan, Page 9.
Viet Nam needs agricultural
developmnt, Page 2.
University of Georgia Bull Bulldog
dog Bulldog greasy, Page 6.
SDS working hard, Page 12.
UPI sports writer David
Moffit sees a Florida-Alabama
match in the Sugar Bowl, Page 20.

RICHARD NIXON
... on ACCENT docket
Nixon Heads
..
Long List
For ACCENT
By JOE TORCHIA
Alligator Staff Writer
Former Vice President Richard
M. Nixon will head the list of
speakers for UFs ACCENT sym symposium
posium symposium Jan. 19 to 21.
ACCENT Chairman Charles
Shepherd announced that Nixon will
be one of several national figures
scheduled for the symposium which
is themed The Responsibility of
Dissent.
Nixon will speak in Florida Gym
Jan. 20.
We have not asked him to
speak on a definite topic, said
Publicity Chairman Steve Smith.
We have asked him to speak on
the theme of the symposium, and
that can be as broad as he wants
it to be.
The program will host eight or
nine speakers from several walks
of life.
We wish to get the conser conservative
vative conservative as well as liberal point
of view, Smith said.
The symposium is a new idea
for education in Florida, although
similar symposiums on vital is issues
sues issues have been successfully
staged at other in including
cluding including Vanderbilt, Emory, Duke
and North Carolina.
Ours will be one of the big biggest
gest biggest ever held, said Smith. No
other school has put on as many
related activities as we have plan planned.
ned. planned.
In addition to speakers, the sym symposium
posium symposium will feature panel discus discussions,
sions, discussions, art exhibitions, concerts,
a stage photo exhibit
and a movie dealing with the theme.
The UF Alumni Association is
also backing the program by print printing
ing printing a magazine to be distributed
free at the symposium.
The magazine will consist of art articles
icles articles by international figures on
the ACCENT theme.
Those who have indicated they
will write an article on Thees Theesponsibility
ponsibility Theesponsibility of Dissent include
Norman Thomas, Robert McNam McNamara,
ara, McNamara, Hans Morgenthau, William
Fulbright, Wayne Morse, and Nor Norman
man Norman Cousins.
UF students and faculty will be
admitted to the three-day sympos symposium
ium symposium free of charge. All others
must pay a $2.50 fee. The fee
covers all activities of the pro proi
i proi
gram.
Forty Florida high schools have
been invited to send observers to
the symposium, giving them a
chance for intellectual ex ex(SEE
(SEE ex(SEE NIXON PAGE 2)
>



Page 2

' The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 2, 1966

BW £ THE ONLV PIRATBCRAFT IM i CERTAIN LV MJT, >OUN6 SIR.' BUT TH CRAFT CffOOKU ffl

Viets Must
Feed Selves,
Reitz Says
MIAMI BEACH UF President
J. Wayne Reitz said last week
a military victory in Viet Nam
will be meaningless" unless that
nation can feed itself and develop
its economy.
Speaking at a general session
of the Florida State Horticultural
Society here at the Carillon Ho Hotel,
tel, Hotel, Reitz said that because of
Floridas position as a horticul horticultural
tural horticultural leader in commercial pro production,
duction, production, research and education,
much of the developing world looks
to the state for leadership.
Two Vietnamese have just re recently
cently recently received their advanced de degrees
grees degrees ' in the Universitys fruit
crops department and have return returned
ed returned to their native land informed
on our culture and helping to win
a more lasting peace than can be
won militarily," he said.
Its noteworthy, Reitz said, that
horticulture department heads at
the Universities of the Philippines
and Puerto Rico both obtained their
Ph. D. degrees at the Univer Universitys
sitys Universitys fruit crops department with within
in within the last five years.
He added that the head of the
experiment station in Costa Rica
also recently obtained an advan advanced
ced advanced degree in the UFs vegeta vegetable
ble vegetable crops department.
The UF system he reminded
the group, is lending a number
of its scientists to foreign coun countries
tries countries for short periods as guest
lecturers and advisors in educa education
tion education and research.
Reitz pointed out that the In Institute
stitute Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences (IFAS) under Dr. E. T.
York, Jr., provost, has formed
a Center for Tropical Agriculture.

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Faculty Insurance Better

(FROM PAGE 1)
the participants salary if dis disabled.
abled. disabled. It is limited by a mini minimum
mum minimum salary of $650 a month and
a maximun on which the payment
will be computed of SI,OOO.
Tied in with this is the fact
the state retirement program pro provides
vides provides a payment of two per cent
per year of employment after
10 years employment.
Therefore, anyone with over 30
years employment would be able
to retire and receive the same
60 per cent of his salary with without
out without paying the cost of the dis disability
ability disability insurance.
This is because the disability
insurance policy with IN A provides
that payments received from
teacher's retirement, Workmens
Compensation, and other plans,
will be deducted from the bene benefits
fits benefits receivable from the insur insurance
ance insurance policy.
One of tlie major benefits of this
specific policy with IN A is that
the payments do not increase with
age. The costs are computed at 50
cents per SIOO of the employees
annual salary.
This type policy generally has
premiums which increase with the
age of the policyholder.
Dean Alan Robertson, chairman
of the insurance Committee, and
dean of the University Relations
and Development Department
said the new fringe benefit
would be particulary important in
attracting professors.
But the lack of employer part participation
icipation participation in several of the pro-,
grams makes the university less
competitive with most universities
in our class.
The Florida Legislature has yet
to provide funds to make the fa-

culty and staff fringe benefits"
participating.
While the benefits are avail available,

Nixon On Program

(FROM PAGE 1)
posure. Also, invitations have
been extended to several colleges
and universities throughout the
southeastern U.S.
This joint effort of UFs stu students
dents students and administration, says
Shepherd, is one which should
force students to ask themselves
a lot of questions.
Some of the questions are: How
can a student become involved in
national issues beyond the class classroom?
room? classroom? Is todays prevalent stu stustudent
student stustudent dissent a contribu contribution
tion contribution or merely a disturbance?
Should the responsible dissenter
limit his attention to certain issues
and methods?
The ACCENT program will be
the first of its kind at UF, but
we hope to make it an annual
event, said Shepherd.
Shepherd pointed out there are
more practical benefits to such
a program. It will put UF in the
national news spotlight and it will
enhanct UFs educational and in intellectual
tellectual intellectual prestige.
The need to supplement nor normal
mal normal classroom experience with the
ideas and contact of men who are

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recognized speakers or spokes spokesmen
men spokesmen and active leaders
brought about the formation of
ACCENT, said Shepherd.
ACCENT will give the Florida
student a chance to meet men who
are prominent thinkers on these
issues, or men who deal with
them day to day. We hope this
will lead the students to a deep*
er understanding of the responsi responsibility
bility responsibility he will one day assume.
Students wishing to learn more
of ACCENT can tune in Radio
WGGG Sunday at 9 p.m. for the
student government open panel dis discussion
cussion discussion featuring ACCENT repre representatives.
sentatives. representatives.

m CANT MISS

A
/jo S
BY
-GEORGE!-
DEAR GEORGE:
My boy friend has exquisite man manners
ners manners except for one thing. When we
go out to restaurants he pours
his coffee in the saucer and blows
on it to cool it Should I mention
this example of bad manners to
him?
UNA
DEAR TINA:
First, try to set him an ex example,
ample, example, as it is very bad man manners
ners manners to saucer coffee and then
blow on it. The saucer of cof coffee
fee coffee should be held beneath the ta table
ble table and fanned rapidly with the
menu when nobody is looking.
* *
DEAR GEORGE:
Do you think a crew cut might
give me a more youthful appear appearance
ance appearance --lam going on 50.
G.C.
DEAR G.C.:
I cant tell from your appear appearance.
ance. appearance. One reader got a crew cut
to look more youthful, but she
said it made her look even older.



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Wednesday, November 2, 1966, TTie Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 2, 1566

# .
f FROM THE
\ WIRES OF /
' *
**,*,*,, t t # * # V*** *"
International
SAID HELPING REDS . ACCRA, Ghana . Hie military govern
ment tuesday accused ousted dictator Kwame Nkrumah of using
Soviet patrol boats with Russian crews to supply arms to rebels in
neighboring African countries.
The charges said Nkrumah, overthrown last February by the army
while visiting Communist China, planned to aid dissidents in coups
against at least six governments and replace them with regimes
subservient to his own.
Ghana's latest accusations against Nkrumah were contained in a
91-page booklet issued by the information department of the ruling
council headed by Maj. Gen. Joseph Ankrah.
The charges add to the turmoil with neighboring Guinea which
has erupted into an international dispute.
TO VISIT US . VALETTA, Malta . Prime Minister Dr. George
Bor Olivier departed Tuesday for a round of visits which will take
him to Australia, Canada, the United States and France.
Olivier said he would meet in Washington Nov. 16 with Secretary
of State Dean Rusk and possibly President Johnson and also visit
the United Nations.
EXCHANGE CHARGES . MOSCOW . The Soviet Union and
Communist China exchanged bitter accusations today, putting the
United States in the middle of their ideological squabble.
Kremlin leader Leonid Brezhnev said Red Chinas refusal to
cooperate with other Communist nations could be a decisive fac factor
tor factor in the future of Red aid to North Viet Nam.
Communist China sent Moscow an angry note accusing the Soviet
Union of mud-slinging, perfidy and collusion with the United States.
Brezhnev said Peking has rejected new Communist bloc pleas
for cooperation against Americas criminal aggression in Viet Nam.
The latest Peking charges came in a Chinese foreign ministry
note categorically rejecting Russias absurd protest last week
that Chinese officials had organized a mass anti-Soviet demonstra demonstration
tion demonstration near the Soviet Embassy in Peking.
National
VISIT MURDER SCENE . CLEVELAND ... Dr. Samuel H. Shep Sheppard
pard Sheppard returned to the past Tuesday with a 19-minute tour of the two twostory
story twostory clapl>oard home on the shore of Lake Erie where the state
claims he killed his first wife.
Ills murder trial jury of seven men and five women went with him.
Sheppard, hat less and coatless despite a persistent drizzle, did
not express emotion. He was the last one to enter the murder home
and the last to leave.
Francis J. Talty, the trial judge, granted the motion of both sides
that the jury 1h? permitted to tour the home where Marilyn Sheppard,
31, was found bludgeoned to death on her bed the morning of July
4, 1954. She was four months pregnant.
COPTER CRASH . PORTSMOUTH, Va. .. A helicopter pre preparing
paring preparing to take off from the deck of the aircraft carrier Guadal
canal tumbled ofl the ship onto a pier Tuesday killing 3 persons and
injuring 8 others.
The accident occurred at the naval shipyard pier.
Two of the dead were crewmen on the helicopter and the third
was a civilian worker at the shipyard.
DONNGGG . CHICAGO . The largest single-tuned bell in the
world fell 70 feet to the ground as it was being lifted into place on
the tower of the suburban Deerfield Presbyterian Church Tuesday.
A worker was buried in the debris.
It took police and volunteers a half hour to free Robert Zak,
Chicago, an employe of Reliable Welding Co. He was buried up to
his neck.
The pastor, the Rev. Bernard Didier, said the boom on the crane
buckled just as the 9 1/2 ton bell was being placed in position. He
said that as the bell fell, it knocked bricks loose. The bell itself
did not hit Zak.
BLASTS CALLAWAY . ATLANTA . Lester Maddox predicted
Tuesday that he would get about 60 per cent of the vote in the Nov. 8
gubernatorial election even with as many as 60,000 persons voting
for write-in candidates.
Maddox denounced Callaway as the candidate of the multi multimillionaires
millionaires multimillionaires and not the cool man with a platform that the image
people have made him out to be.
Callaway, he said, is the greatest dropout of all time. He dropped
out of the Board of Regents, he dropped out of Congress, he dropped
into the governors race, he dropped out of the governor's race,
and hes back in. Now he is hoping to drop into the Senate.
DIRECT FLIGHT . WASHINGTON ... A Soviet-American agree agreement
ment agreement on a New York to Moscow air route, a repeated victim of the
cold war, will be signed Friday, it was learned Tuesday.
No date has been set for the start of the new non-stop service by
Pan American World Airways on the part of the United States and
Aeroflot, the Russian national airline, but officials predicted recent recently
ly recently it might begin next spring.
Hie Soviet minister for civil aviation, Yevgeni F. Loginov, is sched scheduled
uled scheduled to arrive in the United States Thursday to sign the agreement.

War. War. War...

ELECTION ISSUES DISCUSSED

By GEORGE J. MARDER
WASHINGTON (UPp War
in the steaming jungles of Viet
Nam, war on the city's streets
between Negroes and whites, and
war on the rising costs of food
dominate the concerns of Amer America
ica America voters as they approach elec election
tion election day.
Unquestionably, the voters will
take these concerns into the vot vot_ing
_ing vot_ing booth. But as political issues
they are not clear-cut and their
impact on the elections is hard
to estimate.
Each issue carries a big im imponderable
ponderable imponderable what will be the
impact of the Manila
Where will the white backlash ma materialize?
terialize? materialize? How political is the
strike against high food prices?
With varying emphasis, the Re Republicans
publicans Republicans are pushing all three
issues.
ibe Democrats, on the de defensive,
fensive, defensive, are trying to make the
record of the 89th Congress the
main issue but without success.
The Republican party has been
schizophrenic on the Viet Nam is issue
sue issue -- sometimes hitting it hard,
then soft-pedaling it.
The GOP positions amount to
this: firm support of the bombing;
blaming President Johnson for in involving
volving involving the United States in an
Asian land war; denouncing the
Democratic split as encour encouragement
agement encouragement for the enemy; pushing
for an all-Asian peace conference
to dispel any idea that the Re Republicans
publicans Republicans are a war party.
The Democratic answer is that
the United States must stop ag aggression
gression aggression in Viet Nam or fight a
bigger war later on.
Although Viet Nam is a major
concern of the voter there is no
way to tell what impact the war
will have on the election.
In primary races,hawks sup supporting
porting supporting the administration have re repulsed
pulsed repulsed doves consistently. Yet
others, like Senators Clifford P.
Case, (R-N.J.), and John Sher Sher
Sher
CHINESE
BLOCKING
RUSSIAN AID
MOSCOW (UPI) -- Kremlin
leader Leonid I. Brezhnev indi indicated
cated indicated Tuesday the Communist bloc
would probably have to ship aid
to North V iet Nam by other means
than through Red China because of
the Peking supply bottleneck.
The Soviet Communist Party Partychief
chief Partychief said Red China had become
the decisive factor in the map mapping
ping mapping of aid to Hanoi. Sources in
Moscow said later the Soviet Un Union
ion Union is considering increased sea
shipments to North Viet N'am in instead
stead instead of by land through neigh neighboring
boring neighboring China.
Brezhnevs latest charges
against Peking came in a speech
in the Soviet Georgia capital of
Tbilisi, where he officiated at
state award ceremonies.
He noted that international Com Communist
munist Communist meetings, including the re recent
cent recent nine-nation summit of East
Europe leaders here, urged Com Communist
munist Communist solidarity in the face of
U.S. criminal aggression.
Brezhnev\decisively condemn condemned
ed condemned Chinas refusal to join a uni united
ted united Red front and noted that China
is the only socialist nation having
a common border with Viet Nam.

man Cooper (R-Ky.), appear in
no danger despite their more dove dovelike
like dovelike postures.
The backlash issue exists, al although
though although few like to talk about it.
It already has manifested itself
in the Maryland and Georgia gu gubernatorial
bernatorial gubernatorial primaries.
In the South, the backlash is
working against Republican can candidates
didates candidates for governor in Georgia
and Arkansas. There is solid rea reason
son reason to suspect it will help Re Republicans
publicans Republicans in California, Illinois,
Michigan, and New York.
In Massachusetts, Republican

FLORIDA NEWS
TALLAHASSEE Leading Jacksonville citizens are being asked wlmt
they think of the $4 million school crisis in Duval County.
Questionnaires were distributed Monday by the Florida Education
Association (FEA) at the request of the Duval Teachers Association
following the large cut in the county school budget.
Duval teachers have authorized the statewide association to take
whatever action necessary following a study of the crisis by As Associate
sociate Associate Executive Director Dr. Phil Constans and Director of Re Research,
search, Research, Dr. William B. Nunn.
The FEA was asked last week to conduct the study and evaluate
educational problems in the Northeast Florida county. Interviews
are also planned with school personnel.
TALLAHASSEE -- A killers third victim died Halloween night in
a city where terror made armed bastions of many homes, and po police
lice police warned that admitting a trick or treater could mean death.
Attractive Mrs. Helen Sims, 37, died without regaining conscious consciousness
ness consciousness or giving police any clue to the identity of the sex pervert or
psychopath who shot her, her husband and her youngest daughter
11 days ago.
Mrs. Sims, shot twice in the head and once in the leg with a
.38 caliber pistol, had been kept alive with a mechanical respirator.
Doctors said she had no chance of survival.
Police have been unable to uncover any motive for the crime,
which was discovered by the Sims oldest daughter, Norma Jeanette,
17, when she returned home from baby sitting on the night of Oct. 22.
Officers said neither Mrs. Sims nor Joy Lynn, 12, was raped, but
that the disarray of the girls clothing indicated the killer may have
been a sex pervert.
Joy had been shot and stabbed six times and her father, Robert,
42, a nationally-recognized computer expert for the Florida Ed Education
ucation Education Department, had been shot.
HALLANDALE -- The privy dumpers struck again Monday night,
leaving their annual Halloween treat on the Post Office lawn.
Residents of this sleepy town woke this morning to find a brand
new privy-hammered together two-by-fours and wood shingle roof roofon
on roofon the lawn.
It s been a tradition here longer than anyone can remember. The
privy used to be a stolen one from some farm hereabouts but theyre
getting so outdated that the dumping crew now builds its own.
CLEARWATER -- Halloween pranksters who got out of control in
a egro section here Monday night touched off an incident that snow snowa
a snowa e( into a massive wave of rowdyism resulting in three arrests,
Police Chief Willis Booth said today.
This had nothing to do with any civil rights action and there
was nothing racial about it, he said.
It was just rowdyism, vandalism and plain hell-raising, Booth
53.1C1
leediiaMv state Chamber of Commerce says it wants
pvptv t Ve sessions t 0 be held on the same basis they are now nowrpvicin
rpvicin^ nowrpvicin 0 ears ~ not every year as proposed by a constitutional
revision commission.
rnncMf chamber also said Tuesday it will recommend that the new
u 101 cont i n ue to restrict governors to a single term of of ofjudge
judges ofjudge 0 ere be no n the present system of elected
The chamber also recommended that:
the dollar obsessed 1 proper ty limlted to * wW8 n
tax?s e bek e ept n the P sam tlon a6a nSt eState lnheritance and lnCo, e
exemption and section prohibiting bond issues
iemain in the new constitution.
s^te^ove^nment? 111 administerin e the executive depart-
T P n e U tte governor to suspend state attorneys
lawmake^-s^to V Das >DS i Pr hibit Population acts which enable the
wmakers ,to pass local bills under the guise of general legislation.

Edward W. Brooke, seeking to
come the first Negro senator^
reconstruction, has been hn ?2
the cairfor black power." by
The growing tide of DroUc
against the rising cost off
has increased markedly T
election approaches and there i!
evidence that some of the demon,
strations have Republican backing.
The Democrats have countered
by telling voters that prices went
up more during the recession y ea J
under President Dwight D. Eisen
hower than during the Kennedy!
Johnson prosperity period.



1959 AFFAIR CITED AS WORST OF ALL BY ADAMS

Ur Riots Just Arent Like The Old Ones

By HARVEY ALPER
Alligator Staff Writer
Dean of Men Frank T. Adams doesnt
think UF football riots are what they
used to be.
In fact, Adams likes to call the riots
disturbances.
There has been a change in the at attitude
titude attitude of tiie students, Adams said. He
noted that todays students seem a lit little
tle little more sophisticated.
Nevertheless, students have been ar arrested
rested arrested by police during recent disturb disturbances.
ances. disturbances. Five persons were arrested dur during
ing during the LSU game festivities.
Three of these persons have been fined
SSO each in local courts. One man was

HERES WHAT TO DO
IF COPS GET YOU

By HELEN ELLIS
Alligator Correspondent
Approximately 100 traffic tic tickets
kets tickets are contested each month dur during
ing during the fall trimester, according
to William B. Conner, chief jus justice
tice justice of the Student Traffic Court.
The Student Traffic Court will
hear the case of any student who
wishes to contest a ticket issued
Computer
Conference
Calculated
A new million-dollar computer
to be obtained by UF Computing
Center will be duscussed at a
conference to be held Nov. 19
in the Engineering Auditorium.
The IBM 360 model 50 computer
is scheduled for delivery around
Jan. 1 and should be running by
February.
This new computer will give
us greater ease in processing,
as it is aaminimum of six times
faster than the old 709 model we
are presently using, said Jack
Stephens who is chairman of the
conference.
We have two objectives in pre presenting
senting presenting the conference, Stephens
continued, number one is to fam familiarise
iliarise familiarise people more with data pro processing
cessing processing and number two is to in introduce
troduce introduce the 360 show movies of
what it will be able to do.
Stephens explained that the new
computer will allow persons in
thevarious departments around the
university to run programs in their
own department. Previously, when
a program was desired the per person
son person would have to come out to
the Computing Center and wait for
it to be processed.
At this conference we want to
try and explain to the people what
the computer will mean to them,
Stephens said. I would say that
about 70 per cent of the student
will be directly involved with a
computer when they go out to work,
so this will come in haady.
Rates for running programs on
the old model 709 were S7O an
hour, but now rates for the speed speedier,
ier, speedier, more efficient 360 will be
S2OO an hour.
That old 709 was just falling
apart, Stephens said, plus this
is something we have to do to keep
up with all the advances that are
taking place in the field.

fined $25. Hie fifth student failed to
appear in court, Tuesday.
Adams noted that four of the men ar arrested
rested arrested will have to go before the Fa Faculty
culty Faculty Disciplinary Committee. The fifth,
Fredrick Koenig, has been placed on con conduct
duct conduct probation.
Adams repeatedly emphasized that re recent
cent recent arrests took place under compar comparitively
itively comparitively calm circumstances.
He said that in 1959, and earlier years,
riots were far worse. Police used tear
gas then. Admas said, this was ridu riduculous.
culous. riduculous. Students, the dean noted, ran
from the vicinity of the gas and started
rioting in othr areas.
Adams pointed to a large concrete slab
in his office along with two copies of

for a minor traffic offense, a re registration
gistration registration or decal violation, or a
parking violation. They have no
jurisdiction over major traffic vio violations,
lations, violations, including driving while in intoxicated,
toxicated, intoxicated, involvement in an ac accident,
cident, accident, reckless driving, drivers
license violation and speeding.
Such offenses fall within the juris jurisdiction
diction jurisdiction of the City Court of Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville.
Upon receipt of a ticket for
a minor offense, the student should
go to Room 18, Florida Union,
where he may post bond in the
amount of his fine. At this time
he must decide whether or not to
contest the citation. If he con contests,
tests, contests, he fills out a sheet ex explaining
plaining explaining the circumstances behind
the alleged violation, and his arg argument
ument argument as to why he should not be
found guilty or should have a les lesser
ser lesser penalty.
The student then is notified to ap appear
pear appear before the Student Traffic
Court. If he fails to appear at
the specified time and does not
offer sufficient reason for his fail failure,
ure, failure, his bond is forfeited, and the
points specified for his particular
violation are put on his record.
The Court is composed of a
chief justice, a clerk, and six jus justices
tices justices appointed by the president
of the university and the president
of the student body. The chief
justice of the court is required
by the student body constitution to
be a law student.
Decisions in each case are made
by vote following the presentation
of both sides of the case. It is
therefore possible for the violator
to know the decision of the Cour*
before he leaves the^cpurtroom.
If the student is notsfFffi!>fled
with the decision of the Student
Traffic Court, he may appeal to
the Traffic and Safety Committee.
To do this he must fill out a
written Appeal on a formobtamec
in the court office in the base basement
ment basement of the Florida Union. The
written appeal is sufficient in this
case; personal presence is not
necessary. The Traffic and Safe Safety
ty Safety Committee is composed of eight
faculty members and two students.
Charles Keenen, assistant dean
of men, is the secretary, and Con Conner
ner Conner is one of the student mem members.
bers. members. Decisions of this commit committee
tee committee are final, Conner said.
There is no more local adminis administrative
trative administrative recourse.
All funds collected by the Stu Student
dent Student Traffic Court are turned over
to the Treasurer of Student
Government. The money is used
for expenses of the Court.

%********
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Mflr j2IB22UP* fssz
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# In 1941 a young profes professor,
sor, professor, Lester Hale, set up a
speech clinic here. Above. Hale
now dean of student affairs
tests a student. The clinic has
expanded from one room in Pea Peabody
body Peabody Hall to three locations on
campus. Below, Dr. Tom Ab Abbott,
bott, Abbott, director of the hearing
clinic, tests the sound of Lyn Lynda

(Photo by Gerald Jones)
F*
.
- mm
M -a i -MB I M
\ HHyf m
m Tmj Jpl &

a 1959 Alligator. He pointed to a photo
in the newspaper and indicated just how
severe riots used to be. In 1959 Dale
Ernsberger was hit with the piece of
concrete Adams held. Ernsberger suf suffered
fered suffered considerable head and facual in injuries.
juries. injuries.
The photo of Ernsberger was a bloody
one.
Adams also noted that after World
War I the veterans at Florida really
knew how to celebrate after a win.
When they let loose after a football
game they really let loose, Adams de declared.
clared. declared.
Today things are different and the dean
is proud of this. Ibe student body needs
to get some credit for this (change),

Wednesday, November 2, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Adams said. We just dont have sc
much general tomfoolery, he continued.
In the past, Adams indicated, he used
to have weekly trouble, regardless of
whether there was a football game or
not. Adams said that in past years there
was hardly a weekend he did not have
to go to city jail and get some stu student,
dent, student, or students, out from behind bars.
Ibis homecoming weekend, Adams sta stated,
ted, stated, he didnt have a single call from
the police. To the best of his knowledge,
no UF students were jailed.
Adams feels that the students either drinking less or holding their
liquor better.
This place used to be called Brown
Bag U Adams said. He noted that the
reputation has worn off.

da Lynda Simmons voice
Thursday night at 7:45 in
Florida Unions Johnson Lounge
Hale will speak to Sigma Al Alpha
pha Alpha Eta, speech therapy frater fraternity,
nity, fraternity, on Past, Present and
Future of Speech Therapy.
The program will be open to
all students interested in the
subject.

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 2, 1966

The Florida Alligator
.A Myyty L Ow
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR DICK DENNIS
Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecessaniy reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is the editorial In the left
column.

In Agreement
The latest decision of the Florida cabinet
is an example of the changing objectives
of education due to the unjustifiable pres pressure
sure pressure of special interest. The section en entitled
titled entitled Student Freedom and Responsibi Responsibility
lity Responsibility is actually designed to further limit
the present short list of freedoms enjoyed
by university students.
The following is an excerpt (with our
comments) from this new code:
1. To give the university final authority
in admitting student groups to the
campus. (This would provide the
colleges with a method of segre segregation
gation segregation according to political belief
of both students entering the college
and those who are presently at attending
tending attending the college.)
2. To allow the administration to re require
quire require diversity of content and bal balance
ance balance of opinion in student forums.
(This would prevent free speech
unless both sides agreed to debate
the point in question.)
3. To perm it the administration to pass
on the distribution and content of
pamphlets and petitions. (By elim eliminating
inating eliminating the flow of student protests,
this would permit the adminis administration
tration administration to prevent any disagree disagreement
ment disagreement with their policies. It would
also eliminate the free flow of
political materials.)
4. To allow the administration to
require authorized student publi publications
cations publications (to) maintain high standards
of journalistic responsibility con consistant
sistant consistant with the aims and character
of the institution. (This would
permit the college to make student
newspapers conform with the aims
and character of the college, thus
eliminating all freedom of the press
that colleges may now enjoy.)
Until the rights of students are recog recognized
nized recognized by the political cronies of suppres suppression,
sion, suppression, arbitrary control of student and
academic freedoms will dominate the
state of Florida. They have succeeded
in the field of academics. The question
now is Can they obliterate the rights
of students?
-- St. Petersburg Junior College
Wooden Horse
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
accepts all letters to the editor Due, to
space limitations however we ask that
letters not exceed 350 word Typewrit Typewritten
ten Typewritten and double-spaced letter are prefer preferred,
red, preferred, and all must be signed Names will
be withheld upon request. Editors reserve
the right to select or reject letters for
publication.

2 A.M. rOFFF.F. STAIN

Georgia Bulldog Greasy

By JAMIE JOBB
Alligator Columnist
The guy with the camera was
the leader, apparently, because
he walked ahead of the young girl
who was carrying this little boy
they called Tadd. It looked like

WfjMtE&SjL M ; £' is?>w- > ***^sSae&
,w* If l^^'Vr^ltib-IilitTri

Our Man Hoppe
'"' By ART HOPPE

For the good of the party, Mr.
Bobby Kennedy has been campaign campaigning
ing campaigning night and day around the coun country
try country for the slate closest to his
heart. And you cant help but ad admire
mire admire his unquenchable energy, his
unflagging zeal and his quiet con confidence
fidence confidence in victory on Election Day.
Alter all, there are still 2206
days to go.
True, many ace Washington
npwsmen figure Mr. Kennedy wont
wait until 1972 to run for President.
Hell run for Vice President in
1968.
The way they see it, Mr. John Johnson
son Johnson will be so low in the polls
by then, that hell beg Mr. Ken Kennedy
nedy Kennedy to run for Vice President and
unite the party. Thats the way
they see it.
Howdy, there, Bobby. Im right
glad you could drop by today in
between your handshaking tours of
Inner Mongolia, Upper Volta and
Outer Space.
Being Senator from New York
is no easy task, sir. But I was
glad my staff of 472 former White
House aides was able to squeeze
you in.*
And I (gulp) appreciate it,
Bobby. Now theres no use deny denying
ing denying theres been just a mite of
coolness between us in the past.
But I been watching the fine job
youve been doing as Senator from
New York around the world and
Im willing to let bygones be by bygones.
gones. bygones. ft
In turn, sir, let me say that
I approve of the way youve been
handling your job I and 7.2
per cent of my fellow Americans,
according to the latest polls.
Thank you, Bobby. Os course,
nobody around here believes in
polls. Any more. But it must be
nice to have 98.2 per cent of the

two people from the yearbook had
gone to a nursery and rented a
little kid of whom to take pictures
while he was sitting on the Bull Bulldog.
dog. Bulldog.
The Bulldog is this life-sized
statue of a bulldog which stands
in front of the Student Union at

voters think youre doing a great
job as Senator.
We are not satisfied. We must
do better.
Yes. Well, speaking of you run running
ning running for President in 19 and 72,
I dont see why you should wait
so long for national office. So,
being a real generous fellow, I
decided we might have a little chat
about the Vice Presidency right
now in 19 and 68.
The Vice Presidency? I hadnt
given that office much thought.
Now, I know some folks dont
think so much of it. But its a
fine job. Not much work and some sometimes
times sometimes you even get your picture in
the paper. On a slow news day.
And let me say you can always
count on my complete loyalty.
Hows Hubert?
Hubert who? Me and you, Bob Bobby,
by, Bobby, thats the ticket. With my
brains, good looks and political
astutenes and with your votes,
(SEE HOPPE PAGE 7)

Florida Alligator Staff
NICK ARROYO CAROL HEFNER GENE NAIL
Photo Editor Society Editor Editorial Assistant
*--
JO ANN LANGWORTHY<6~ NEWT SIMMONS
General Assignment Editor Wire Editor
STAFF WRITERS Bob Beck, Sue Froemke, Barbara Gefen,
Maury Olicker, Kathie Keim, Jean Mamlin, Frank Shepherd, Aggie
Fowles, Justine Hartman.
ASSISTANT EDITORS Judy Redfern, Sherrie Braswell, Toni
Giliberti, Joe Torchia, Nick Tatro, Tyler Tucker, John Briggs,
Ken Garst, Margie Green.
_____ *!
In order to better cover campus events the Alligator uses
reporters from the School of Journalism and Communications.
Their bylines are followed by Alligator Correspondent.

the University of Georgia. People
paint gross things on this statue
because they are in college and
well, college students can paint
gross on statues of bulldogs 1
gross on statues of bulldogs if
they must satisfy their needs of
expression.
Anyway, this bulldog looks like
a truck stop bathroom wall. Thats
why the University of Georgia
maintenance department put
grease on it, to prevent students
from painting it and making all
the alumni sick during Home Homecoming.
coming. Homecoming.
Tadd wasnt much younger than
ten months because he was just
learning how to walk and the noises
that came from his mouth couldnt
be classified as words yet.
The guy with the camera was
the director of the whole thing,
because he had the camera. He
told the girl to put Tadd on the
bulldogs back and then run away
quickly so he could take a picture
and trick everyone into thinking
that Tadd had climbed onto that
m
bulldog all by himself.
Os course Tadd didnt like this
picture-taking stuff one bit be because
cause because its not very comfortable to
sit on a greasy statue. So the
kid did the only thing he could --
he cried.
That's when the guy with the
camera discovered that the statue
of the Bulldog at the University
of Georgia is greasy.
The guy took some pictures
anyway of Tadd sitting there,
crying then he asked the girl
to take the kid into the union and
clean him up.
After she left, an observer
walked over to the guy with the
camera and dpmanded to know just
what the heck he thought he was
doing, getting this poor little kid
from the nursery all greasy just
for a couple lousy pictures for the
yearbook.
The guy said he wasnt from
any yearbook. He was, in fact,
Tadds Father and that the girl
was Tadds Mother and they were
just taking pictures for the heck
of it. The observer decided that
was OK, then.
Tadds Father, who was rather
verbose, went on to say he was
a graduate student in Georgias
pharmacy school and that he had
only four weeks of college left
in his life.
Ive had enough of college,
he was saying, It cant do much
more for me. Ive been here six
years and Ive gotten about all I
can out of it.
But Mister, the observer
asked, you mean to say youve
reached a point where you no
longer think you can learn any anything?
thing? anything?
Well, Tadds Father said, I
cant learn any more from col college.
lege. college.
Oh, said the observer, who
was then a sophomore and no nowhere
where nowhere near graduate level work,
You mean people actually get
tired of college?



Gator
Changed
Column
EDITOR:
I wish to make it dear that
my Speaking Out column of
Monday, October 31, has nothing
to do with mathematics and does
not necessarily represent the opin opinion
ion opinion of the Math Department or any
of its other members. The Math
Department notation above the
article is due to the carelessness
or irresponsibility of an unknown
member of the Alligator staff.
Last Thursday 1 asked a friendly
staffer to run my column as sub submitted
mitted submitted or not at all. My request
was not honored. Two portions
were omitted entirely, thereby al altering
tering altering the intent of the piece
(in clear violation of the Alli Alligators
gators Alligators letters policy).
Alligator staffers are constantly
carping and griping about criticism
directed toward their journalistic
efforts. Their frequent and only
reply to this criticism involves
inviting the amateur critics to
cough up contributory copy or shut
up.
Until the publisher (whoever he
may be) and the staff will allow
solicited copy to enter the pages
of the Alligator before it is emas emasculated,
culated, emasculated, the reticence of would-be
contributors is likely to continue.
It is not the intent of this note
to portray the opinions of the math
department, the Defense Depart Department,
ment, Department, nor those of any adminis administrative
trative administrative official or Friend of the
University.
D. ANSON
A Solution
EDITOR:
Hindsight is fine and all that,
but griping isnt going to do any
good. I know I griped most of the
18 hours I spent in lines trying to
get date tickets for Homecoming.
I have a proposal which is very
unfair to the student but at least
it will put him in a better situ situation
ation situation than at present. If date tick tickets
ets tickets are to be limited in the future
at least let the students know
before the alumni tickets are sold
out, then students can buy these
tickets at sl2 a pair rather than
getting scalped sls a ticket as the
end zone tickets are now bringing.
This way the Athletic Dept, can
have its cake and eat it too. And
in keeping with Floridas greatest
tradition, the student still gets the
shaft.
BILL BAGLEY, 4BA
Hoppe
(FROM F\GE 8)
well sweep the country in a land landslide.
slide. landslide. Im asking you to do it,
Bobby, for the good of the country,
for party unity and for me. Not
necessarily in that order.
Youre right, sir, I cant turn
down a moving appeal like that.
In all humility, I accept your
offer.
Thank you, Bobby. You made
a wise choice. Well make a great
team. Oh, its mighty good to know
youve got confidence in me.
You bet I have, Lyndon. I cant
think of anybody Pd rather have
for my Vice President than you.
XEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, 10? ea.
20 it Over, 9?
Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.ro. toll r*- m
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE

Parades: Theyre For Kids Only

By KENT LANTAFF
Alligator Columnist
Parades are for kids.
The annual Homecoming parade Friday had all the neces necessary
sary necessary ingredients: marching bands, pretty girls, colorful floats
and thousands of enraptured children.
And with the children came as many adults who lost them themselves
selves themselves in the same fantasy world that a parade creates. But
there were many who found frequent reminders of the real
world they were trying to forget.
If you were among those to whom the parade meant something
else, you probably first realized it when a car carrying four
veterans passed by. The children beside you applauded wildly
without knowing why. But as you applauded, you couldnt help
wondering what those four--whose age was not much different
from your ownhad seen and felt.
No sooner had you found escape in the sounds of a marching
band than you were snapped back to reality by the sounds of a

Hits Fraternities On Homecoming

EDITOR:
I had always believed that Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming was for the entire student
body. I have finally learned the
truth its for the athletic asso association
ciation association and the fraternities.
Consider these facts: the student
body numbers over 18,000. Os
this, about 5,000 (about 25 per cent
of the men and 35 per cent of the
women, or 28 per cent of the
students) are in fraternities and
sororities. About 72 per cent of
our students are independents.
This 72 per cent is allotted 1,250
date tickets (250 per day). This
means that 9.6 per cent of the
independents may take non-stu non-student
dent non-student dates. Even general admis admission
sion admission tickets have long been sold out.

Belmonts Is The Name

EDITOR:
This letter is to serve notice upon a most serious error you
published Oct. 25.
In a DJ interview story you referred to a group as Dion and
the Bellmonts. What a shock!
Anyone with even slightest intelligence and musical knowledge
knows it is Dion and the Belmonts.
The name Belmonts comes from a famous street in Brooklyn,
N.Y.
The great, old New York sound surely will outlive the electronic
prostitution of the art now practiced by such noisemakers
as the Rolling Stones and the Beatles.
Humanities (CHN 251-252) would do well to Include them in the
curriculum.
If you do not believe these contentions just ask your friends
who are old enough to remember the golden age of music.
MARTY BERLANSTEIN, 4JM

Purple Piemen Challenged
EDITOR:
We the undersigned, feeling great apprehension for the well wellbeing
being wellbeing of the Intergalactic Cup do hereby state and make known
our intention of retrieving that noble treasure from the possession
of those who are utterly lacking in its proper appreciation. In
effecting that intention we challenge the Purple Piemen to a
match of croquet at a time and place of mutual choosing, the
Intergalactic Cup reposing with the winner.
CHARLES SHEPHERD
FRED BREEZE
MARC GLICK
808 IMHOLTE
(EDITORS NOTE: Youre really gluttons for punishment.)

TO ALL STUDENTS U
llPffi AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL J
\)L Lunch j| m pMpaiii m Dinner
I 11:30 2:00 CAEEFERIA 4:30 8:00
ll2l2N^MAlNSL(^nin^ron^ampus)Gainesvill^boppin*^enter

Therefore, getting a date ticket
depends on being in line early
(about four hours before the win windows
dows windows open). I waited for three threeand-a-half
and-a-half threeand-a-half hours, and date tickets
were gone about 50 people ahead
of me. Fortunately, my date is
a student, so I got my tickets (on
the six-yard-line).
Not everyone can afford to cut
classes or waste four hours in
line, though.
The fraternities were given the
number of seats and date tickets
they had used in the first two home
games. These were not enough.
But did they distribute what they
had and let the rest take their
chances along with the peons?
NO! They threatened to take their

Wednesday, November 2, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

marching ROTC unit. Its sounds were those of a cadence-calling
leader and of spit-polished boots on pavement. And instead of
flutes and trumpets, this unit carried bayonet-fixed M-ls.
As floats passed by, you were delighted by the coeds who
decorated them. But you also saw coeds marching in uniforms
in a unit known as Angel Flight. And your mind recollected
photographs of Chinese women marching in uniforms not quit
as pretty, but who suggested that world militancy is transcending
the line between the sexes.
And the floats also had one common theme expressing a
team s ability to defeat a week-end enemy on a football field.
But the Naay had a float of its own expressing its destroyers
ability to defeat a year-round enemy on the oceans.
The parade ended and you came to realize that even a parade
is spotted with the all too frequent reminders that we are a
nation at war.
And as you left, your car radio told you of a leader who sits
in Manila and talks of peace.
Parades are for kids. They have to be. Adults think too much.

marbles and go home. How mature!
Lets get something done about
this mess. Surely 28 per cent

otium
SEA AND
IN THE AIR
YOUR TRAVELS WILL BE
MORE FUN
AND CHEAPER.
WE DON'T CHAROE A FEE.
HOUsSi TRAVEL
| PHONE 378-1601 |
SENIORS and GREEKS:
THIS WEEK ONLY!
SEMINOLE PHOTOGRAPHY
HAS BEEH EXTENDED
THROUGH THIS WEEK ONLY)
12 noon to S p.m.
i p.m. to f p.m.
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY
THIS WEEK IS YOUR
' l
LAST CHANCE
FOR YOUR PICTURE TO BE TAKEN

shouldnt have the rest at their
mercy.
JACK SHAW, 3AS

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
1964 RED VESPA Motorscooter,
4 speed transmission excellent
condition. Have bought car will
talk terms. Ask for Tom Talcott,
372-9363 or 372-9437.(A-41-st-c).
1962 VW KARMAHN GHIA, good
condition, reasonably priced. 13
foot fiber glass boat and trailer,
35 horse power Evinrude motor,
excellent condition $450; Portable
G.E. TV, $25. Call 372-3734 after
5 p.m. (A-41-st-c).
POLAROID MODEL 160 10 second
black and white. 60 second color,
built-in range finder, likenewsss.
376-6921. (A-41-st-c).
FOR SALE: 1966 SUZUKI T-10
250 cc. Perfect condition. Only
6,000 miles. SSOO FIRM. Call 378-
6578. (A-42-10t-c).
1965 YAMAHA, 250 cc, $450 or will
trade for smaller cycle. Call 378-
2986. (A-43-lOt-c).
HARMONY ELECTRIC GUITAR
with case received as present,
never used. S4O Call 372-2958
after 6 p.m.
(A-44-2t-c)
BURNT ORANGE Naguahyde Sofa
bed $25.00 378-6792 after 5 p.m.
(A-45-3t-c)
SACRIFICE 1956 Nashua 8x37 foot
trailer. Excellent condition with
air conditioner and 12x15 foot en enclosed
closed enclosed cabana. Best offer, inquire
Lot 16, Hickory Hill Trailer Park.
(A-45-lt-p)
COMPLETE SET OF 1966 Jack
Nicklaus woods and irons, Bag,
cart and covers included $125. Call
372-0869 after 5:30 p.m.
(A-45-3t- c)
MOBILE HOME, 1966 Manatee, like
new, 56x12, two bedroom. Priced
reduced to S9OO an take up pay payment
ment payment of $51.97 per month. Equity
in large lot Arredonda Estates for
SIOO if desired. 372-1079
(A-45-3t-c)
BANJO, VEGA, Model FW-5, slls
372-1079 (A-45-3t-c)
STERO CHANNEL MASTER turn
table. Model 6653, excellent con condition
dition condition will consider trade for com comparable
parable comparable changer. Call 372-3709
after 6 p.m. (A-45-3t-c)
FOR SALE 2 column PA speakers
with stands, 4-6" speakers in each.
Barely used. Call 372-3950
(A-45-2t-c)
ESJITSHUMVaV La |
KmlflVlal!fal Show
iffiinlftifflVilTlll Every
mssmm*

for rent
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT to
sublet. Move in Dec 15th pay rent
from Jan. 1 carpeted, air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, pool, convenient location.
$l6O/month. 376-9547. (B-44-2t-c)
WANTED TWO FEMALE room roommates
mates roommates to share modern air con conditioned
ditioned conditioned apartment. $45 monthly
plus 1/3 utilities. Car needed. Call
378-3925. (B-44-3t-c)
WILLIS TON MOTEL: Rooms by
week or month. Single or double.
Students rates. Television and
daily maid service. Rooms avail available
able available for all University events. Sor Sorry
ry Sorry no phone calls. (B-36-10-c).
wanted
WANTED Fla. Geo. Tickets. 1,2
or 3. 372-5511 (C-45-3t-c)
FEMALE, ONE ROOM private bath
and carport. $45.00 Call 376-5673
after 4 p.m. (C-45-3t-c)
ONE WORKING GIRL or student
to share private home. $40.00 per
month. 372-3770 after 5 p.m.
(C-45-3t-c)
WANTED: 4 to 6 tickets together
for University of Florida Miami
game. West stand only. Dr. George
Dell, 372-0428. (C-43-st-c).
SUBJECT WANTED Will pay
$5 for a two hour listening ses session.
sion. session. Please call Mrs. Roakes
for appointment at extension 2307
regarding SPA experiment. Nor Normal
mal Normal hearing required. (C-42-4t-c).
WANTED to sublease one bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment in December or
January. Electric heat and air.
Three blocks from campus. Call
376-0359 after 5 p.m.(C- 36- lOt-c).
WANTED girl student to live in
with local lady. Free rent. Call
376-0404. (C-42-st-c).
lost-found
LOST GOLD WEDDING band
with inscription To JL from IH"
REWARD Call 378-6120.
(L-45- 3t-p)
rAfnT
I imtlrnm*mm, ***.
Box Office Opens 6:30
I
il .ft. VjK TAYLOR HARVEY
'KnT&oaf
BUTTERHEII)
TAYLOR NEWMAN
Mh D vCNHMXtn
IVES -m*mm O
Cat at 7:07 & 11:05
Butterfield 9:13
NEXT WEEK
DEAR JOHN &
MOLL FLANDERS

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 2, 1966

Page 8

help wanted
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA needs
12 clerks to work from November
14 to December 2. Must have
passed or be able to pass cleri clerical
cal clerical aptituded test. $1.25 per hour
Apply Central Employment office
Building E ext. 2645 (E-44-st-c)
HELP WANTEDpersonality girl
--learn to make hair pieces. Sa Salary
lary Salary plus commission. 30 hour
week, Contact Mrs. Grieves, Belk
Lindsey. (E-45-st-c)
NEED ONE BELLHOP immediate immediately
ly immediately 7-1 p.m. Apply in person at
personnel office, Ramada Inn 1250
W. Univ. Ave. (E-45-4t-c)
NUMEROUS Part-time jobs (tech (technical
nical (technical and non-technical) for UF
students. For further information
report to* room 183, Bldg. E on
campus. (E-37-7t-nc).
LOAN SUPERVISOR, Clerk 3, call
to arrange for interview. Campus
Federal Credit Union, Ext. 2973.
(E-41-st-c).
OFFSET PASTE-UP ARTIST
needed by Student Publications.
Student only, experience prefer preferred
red preferred but not essential. Night work,
hourly wages. Apply in person
to Ed Barber, Room 9, Florida
Union Bldg., anytime between 8:30
a.m. and 5: P.M. or 9: P.M.
and 1: A.M.
(E-40-tf-nc)
autos
1953 PLYMOUTH -- excellent
mechanical condition. $l5O or
best offer, must sell. Call 376-
9161 any time will return call.
Tom Greek (G-45-2t-p)
XKE 1963 33,000 miles, excellent
condition. 372-4979 (G-45-st-c)
1964 DODGE DART GT, buckets,
4 speed, $1,149. Call Hokus 372-
9427 or 376-9208. (G-41-st-c).
1963 VW, very clean, new tires,
extras, call 378-3886. $975. (G (G---43-st-c)*
--43-st-c)* (G---43-st-c)*
FLORIDA STATE THEATRES
fSNi'kJJ-j i:oo 3; oo
5:00-7:00
JjWWjjjjjALg 9:00
f_ William
Holden
...Richard
Wldmark
Alvarez
I kelly l
nnwMown

j autos I
1966 VOLVO PIBOOS, excellent
condition, good price. For infor information
mation information call Bob Wilson at 376-
3211, ext. 5414 until 5 p.m. or
376-3173 after 5 p.m.(G-43-st-c).
services
mmmmrn
LOST BRIGHT CARPET colors
. . restore them with Blue Lus Lustre.
tre. Lustre. Rent electric shampooer sl.
(Lowry Furniture Co.)
(M-45-lt-c)
EXPERIENCE TUTOR in any area
of Psychology, reasonable rates.
378-4525 evenings and weekends.
(M-3t-45-c)
FLAMENCO GUITARIST, Richard
Priest, every Thursday night 9:30
- 12:30 p.m. at Windjammer,
520 SW 2nd Ave. (M-45-2t-c)
TUTORING: Newly established
Fla. Tutoring Agency. Provides
tutors in all subjects. Competent
tutors, reasonable rates; 378-5518
or 372-6649. (M-42-6t-c).
VERY SPECIAL black and white
puppy, needs a loving home, 6
weeks old, German Shephard
Collie type. Call 376-1585 (M (M---44-st-c)
--44-st-c) (M---44-st-c)
STUDENT TYPING done in my
home. Call 378-3051 after 6 p.m.
(M-43-3t-c).
SEWING, KNITING: dresses,
suits, skirts, sweaters, etc. Call
376-0748. (M-40-lOt-c).
"' 1 ,r
FOR YOUR PRIVATE parties,
complete bar service. Experienced
bartender and cocktail waitress,
call 376-6106. (M-42-st-p).

K SWTE
' ; lk W iNGwo mod
Hr BGRGMBNsQUINN
Ik P I "me Visit 1-3-5-7-9
1 rFEATURE SHOWN ATn
I 1:10-3:20-5:25-7:35-9:45 |
Telephone 378-2434 I
LIQUIDATOR GOES
/SOf WOW OJVf HOT BED OF
%Q\IHTRIGUETO AHOTHER!
ROD TAYLOR TREVOR HOWARD JILL St JOHN \V m
" the liquidator

personal
REJOICE! The Deltas cometh
to the Jennings Social See you
Friday night.
(J-44- 4t-p)
real estate
TWO BEDROOM Duplex near cam campus,
pus, campus, live in one side and receive
rent from other. Call for an
appointment. Ten acre tract, lo
miles west of campus, $350 per
acre with terms. Ideal for Trailer
owner. Call Wayne Mason Realtor,
c/o Ernest Tew Realty, Inc. 376-
6461. (I-41-st-c).
Its Not
Sfflaf
GATOR
ADS
SELL MORE...
Just Plain
Good Sense
i 1



SENORS
AND
GREEKS
THIS IS THE
LAST WEEK
TO HAVE
YOUR
PICTURE
TAKEN
FOR THE
YEARBOOK
'' : {
PICTURES TAKEN IN
ROOM 200 FLA. UNION
MEN DARK COAT & TIE
WOMEN ROUND COLLARED DARK BLOUSE

Jacobs Taking Action
To Rewrite Honor Code

By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Correspondent
Stemming from an election vio violation
lation violation in the recent Legislative
Council elections, action is be being
ing being taken by Student Body Pre President
sident President Buddy Jacobs to expand
the scope of the Honor Code.
We are rewriting the election
laws so that defrauding of elec elections
tions elections will be a violation of the
Honor Code, Jacobs said.
He said that the UF Consti Constitution
tution Constitution is being rewritten to adapt
to the quarter system, which be begins
gins begins next fall. The new Honor
Code violation will be included
in the revised Constitution.
TTie Constitution will become law
if ratified by the student body

MEDICS TO HEAR LECTURE
Motivation in Medicine will be the topic of the first lec lecture
ture lecture in the 1966-67 History and Philosophy of Medicine series
presented by UFs College of Medicine.
Presenting the lecture Friday will be Dr. Thomas M. Durant,
chairman of the Division of Medicine at Albert Einstein Medi Medical
cal Medical Center, Philadelphia.
Durant, former president of the American College of Phy Physicians
sicians Physicians and associate editor of The American Journal of Med Medical
ical Medical Science, will speak at 12:10 p.m. in the auditorium of the
J. Hlllis Miller Health Center. His talk is open to the public.
In line with the lecture series, now in its fifth year, distin distinguished
guished distinguished men in the field present addresses at the University
throughout the year on different aspects of the history and philos philosophy
ophy philosophy of medicine.
Durant, the first speaker, received his medical degree from
the University of Michigan and served as professor and chiarman
of the Department of Medicine at Temple University, Philadel Philadelphia.
phia. Philadelphia.
Other series speakers will be Dr. Douglas R. Shanklin, as associate
sociate associate professor of pathology and pediatrics, UF College of
Medicine; Nobel Prize-winner Dr. Charles Huggins of the Ben
May Laboratory for Cancer Research, Chicago and Dr. Seymour
Block, Harvard Medical School, Boston.

The big guys are here. Take one of em (or both) and 0 wL
youre a cinch to be boss. Twist the swivel buckle on the VA y
saddle-stitched reversible belt and youll see brushed denim 'WfIT
on one side, oiled leather on the other. 54.00. Or pick w/m BbL
the IV\ sueded saddle-stitched job at S 3-50. Be on the lookout ;
for another big deal-a 26 x 39 poster for Bogey! Just send in M| U
the Fife & Drum Paris tag to Paris Belts; P.O. Box 5269; IB
Chicago, Illinois 60680 with half a buck. MmM
Fife 6r Drum Belts by Paris I I
WOODROW f 1
STORE FOR MEN I H
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER J

Wednesday, November 2, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

#
BULLSEYE!
in the Winter, 1967, elections.
Violations so the present Honor
Code are stealing, cheating, and
willful cashing of bad checks.
Administration leaders have
reacted favorably to the proposed
change.
Dean of Women Betty Cosby
said she favored expansion because
the Honor Code should include all
situations in which a student's
honor is involved.
I think expansion of the Honor

Code into appropriate areas would
be beneficial if present standards
are effective, which they are. In
my short time here, I have been
impressed by the effectiveness of
the Honor Code. The students can
be justly proud of it,* she said.
Dean of Men Frank Adams also
approved of the proposal.
Honor is away of living; it
is pervasive. It cannot be restrict restricted
ed restricted to three very specific areas,
but should include all phases of
student life, Adams said.
Dean of Student Affairs Les Lester
ter Lester Hale indicated that he would
favor a careful reconsideration of
the Honor Code and the jurisdic jurisdiction.
tion. jurisdiction.
I dont know at this time if
I would definitely favor change of
the Honor System or if changes
are needed. But I would favor an
in-depth evaluation of the system,*
he said.
Hale added a persons honor
cannot be narrowly restricted to
a few specific instances but should
instead involve a students whole
life.
Honor Court Chancellor Herb
Schwartz endorsed the proposal,
adding that he would favor other
Improvements of the present Hon Honor
or Honor Code, such as misrepresenta misrepresentation
tion misrepresentation of the truth to faculty mem members.
bers. members.
The present system is a very
effective, and is respected in the
professional community of the
state. When businessmen hire
Florida students, they know the
students word can be taken with
assurance, Schwartz said.
Jacobs said that he is study studying
ing studying other additions to the Honor
Code, such as misrepresentation
of the truth, for inclusion in the
revised Constitution.

Page 9



Page 10

>, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 2, 1966

I JL V
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tropical pontiac
GLISTENING BEAUTY and prize-winning
styling combined in one shinning package.
Glamorous Linda Rowland is standing in
the winner's circle with the performance
car that started all the trends, the Pontiac
GTO. Stop by Tropical Pontiac and take
a ride in the finest.

donigans
IF YOU'RE STEPPING out like
Kay Simpson, the place to go
to find that extra-special,fan extra-special,fancy
cy extra-special,fancy but chic outfit is always
Donigan's.

,_ H \
yj /
** I§ £ (
- ** w iiiiii i ts WiIMITOrfTT :^^^^f g Ur
x., : 1 8i K

johnstons
photography
GIVE THE MOST personal of all
gifts this Christmas, portraits from
Johnston's Photography. Always
in good taste, a portrait of your yourself
self yourself will be highly prized by all
your loved ones and friends. All
photographs on this page
taken by Johnston's Photography.

mm h
WHATEVER \
Gainesville)
Are Able And Willii

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9iH| r ;L
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RECORI
DIANA ALLEN SHOW
sel SONY po f
from the Record Bar.
products in entertairir
be sight or sound, sto
Bar and browse arounc
the finest records and
plus a complete line c



FANGY

OUR TASTE,
Merchants
tig To Serve You

IQI
F ywfflKM Ini
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r |1
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wp||HHHHnffflffi9F W if [n]
# jf El
fOMS- *. JrEl
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10000000000000000000130
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S good taste in
rtable television
For the finest
lent, whether it
>jp by the Record
cj Thousands of
tapes await you
4f SONY equipment.

rj r JP / ?
v "i jdk Bb
HL,. *# _*/'
pppvm b&
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silverman 9 s
SOMETHING FANCY for bedtime
wear? Susan Silverman models a
nightshirt from Silverman's that
will turn sleep into an activity to
look forward to. Available in his
and hers sets

jerry s )S<
CHERYE CARPENTER HAS found
that Jerry's means fancy food at
plain prices. If it's a quick
snack ora full meal you want,try
Jerry's at two easy-to-get-to lo locations.
cations. locations. Located on both north
and south 13th Street.

Wednesday, November 2, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

evQ#y

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university
city bank
IT'S NOT ONLY good taste to pay your bills
by check from the University City Bank, but
it's also plain good sense. Marsha Goheen
has found the friendly people at University
City Bank are always eager to help her with
any banking problem.

Page 11



Page 12

5, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 2, 1966

Gainesville SDS
Working Hard*
Miss Greenspan
By HELEN ELLIS
Alligator Correspondent
Students for a Democratic Society is an active organization
in Gainesville. It has no dues, no official membership roll,
no local constitution, and it is not recognized by the University,
yet it is composed mainly of university students, according to
SDS leader Alan Levin.
The organization is based on the premise that individuals
should play a part in the decisions that affect their lives,
according to Levin.
However,'* he cautioned, "having a role in making a decision
is different from such one making a decision himself. Further,
he added, we believe in a great degree of decentralization of
political and economic institutions, and democratic control over
the decentralized institutions.
The local chapter was formed in the fall of 1965, said Miss
Bonni Greenspan, executive secretary of SDS. "We applied for
University recognition in November 1965, but were denied by
Dean of Student Affairs Lester Hale.
At that time, she added, the national organization of Students
for a Democratic Society was under investigation by the At Attorney
torney Attorney General as possibly being communist infiltrated.
"On the University of Florida campus, Miss Greenspan con continued,
tinued, continued, "prior to the fall of 1965, there were many single singleissue
issue singleissue radical groups. Eventually all these groups consolidated
to form Students for a Democratic Society, which is a multi multipurpose
purpose multipurpose organization.
t.
We work locally on issues that we feel are important,** she
added. Sometimes we have a national project, but it is only
suggested by the national organization. We are not required
to participate.
Miss Greenspan attended the national convention of SDS in
August 1966, in Clear Lake, lowa. Delegates numbered 350.
The local SDS plans to sell a series of "white papers on
the University campus with the permit issued by the University
to Levin and certain of his helpers under the policy of free ex expression
pression expression of a personal view on a sirigle subject. Scheduled for
the near future are papers on "Black Power and on migrants.
These will probably be sold also at other colleges and univer universities
sities universities throughout the state.
According to Levin, there are no plans whatsoever to seek
University recognition of SDS.

URA NOT CHURCH-AFFILIATED

Student Opinions Wrong

By JACK LUZZO
Alligator Correspondent
The University Religious Association, a cam campus
pus campus organization designed to encourage and
stimulate religious discussions among UF stu students,
dents, students, is attempting to dispell major misbe misbeliefs
liefs misbeliefs held by the student body.
Ron Lanier, URA president, said that many
people believe this organization is church churchaffiliated.
affiliated. churchaffiliated.
This is completely wrong. The URA is
completely composed of university students and
is not connected with any one church organ organization.
ization. organization. We may work with different churches,
but we are in no way affiliated with them,
Lanier emphasized.
Another feeling which UF students have is
that religion should not be discussed in their
daily lives,' said Lanier.
For some reason, religion is taboo here
as well as many other Southern campuses.
This is not so in most of the Northern col college
lege college communities. As of now, there doesnt
seem to be any explanation for this fact.
The main objective of the URA is to des destroy
troy destroy this barrier which prevents religious dis discussion.
cussion. discussion. This discussion among students is
very important not only as religion is concerned
but also as the students personal identity
is concerned, cited Lanier.
Lanier said that this problem of personal
identity is the major problem the UF stu student
dent student faces today.
This problem is not necessarily religious.
The student comes to the UF campus with

Jacobs Cabinet On Move;
Teacher Evaluation Tops List

about one-fourth of his personality intact. The
other three-fourths he has left behind him i n
his home, parents, high school and friends, etc.
Here the job of the university itself and
such organizations as the URA comes in. The
universitys part in shaping a students personal
identity is debatable. But this is one of the
main purposes of the URA. We are trying to
help the student discover himself and his peers
through discussion of different subjects, not all
of them religious, stressed Lanier.
Laniers statement is supported by the URAs
next project, the Campus Life Conference, to be
held December 21 and 22 at the Baptist Stu Student
dent Student Center. In Loco Parentis will be the
subject and the main question discussed will
be, Should the university act as an educator
or as a parent?
Another project which Lanier is proud of
this year is the Religion-In-Life-Week Convo Convocation
cation Convocation to be held January 25. Main speaker will
be Bishop Pike, former Episcopal bishop of
California, who has recently resigned his post.
Bishop Pike is the most controversial figure
the URA or possibly any other campus organ organization
ization organization has had appear on campus. He is ac accused
cused accused of hersey the first such charge in 200
years, by fellow clergymen for a statement he
made to the UPI which wound up in headlines.
His statement was, The church had to be
dragged kicking and screaming into the 20th
century.
This statement will be Bishop Pikes title
for his convocation speech. Im sure this will
be the most interesting and unusual speech ever
heard at a UF Religion In Life Week Convo Convocation,
cation, Convocation, Lanier mused.

I?
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HALLOWEEN PARTY The
ATO Little Sisters held their
Fifth Annual Benefit Halloween

Teacher evaluation heads the
list of projects being worked on
by Buddy Jacobs cabinet. Prob Problems
lems Problems in parking and election pro-

Release Target Date
Just Two Weeks Away

By RICHARD SHELTON
Alligator Correspondent
Release, the new UF student magazine will go on sale Nov.
16 at various points on the campus according to managing editor
Andy Sheldon
The magazine has a general interest format,*' Sheldon said, and
is not restricted to humor alone. We plan to use humor of course,
but also thought pieces, soapbox or student forum articles and edi-

to rial cartoons.
We also hope to familiarize
students with the lesser known de departments,
partments, departments, people and places on
the campus through photo essays
and interviews, Sheldon said.

cedures have been of major con concern
cern concern also.
Bob Imholte, Secretary of Aca Academic
demic Academic Affairs, coordinates educa-

Our editorial policy is aimed at
quality, depth and interest,' he
added, and our political stance,
as indicated in our first issue,
is best expressed as restrained
anarchy.*
Earl Kicliter, Release editor,
and Sheldon began planning the
magazine last summer. They de decided
cided decided upon the general interest
format after a campus poll indi indicated
cated indicated it to be the most popular
with UF students.
The 32-page magazine will sell
for 35 cents, according to Sheldon,
and will be published once each
trimester and eventually once each
quarter. An initial run of 3,000
copies is planned with hopefully
substantial increases over the
year. Although the first issue is
black and white, except for the
cover, Sheldon said more color
printing was planned for future is issues.
sues. issues.
We plan to eventually become
self sustaining,*' Sheldon said.
We began publication on a $2,000
appropriation from student funds,
he added, but hope to build future
advertising sales considerably. We
had three pages of advertisements
in the first issue, which will in increase
crease increase as the magazine becomes
established.*
Release has a small student
staff at present, and besides Kic Kicliter
liter Kicliter and Sheldon, it consists of
Jay Zimmerman, contributing ed ed.
. ed. itor and Martin Myers and Mike
Davis, photo editors.
We are open to student con contributions
tributions contributions and material, Sheldon
said, and welcome any interest interested
ed interested students who would like to help
with the magazine.
It is hard work at times,* he
added, but is an interesting chal challenge
lenge challenge and a rewarding personal
experience.

Party for underprivileged child children
ren children Monday, Here one of the
boys plays with a ball.

tional forums for evaluation in the
dorms, offers weekly review ses sessions
sions sessions in University College cour courses
ses courses and will publish the results
of his three-point teacher evalua evaluation
tion evaluation project at its completion. In Included
cluded Included in this endeavor are in instructors'
structors' instructors' rating their teaching
methods, evaluation of courses and
student self-evaluation. The pur purpose
pose purpose of the program is to improve
classroom techniques and give UC
students a better idea of what
the courses are like.
Charles Shepherd Jacobs' ad administrative
ministrative administrative assistant, coordi coordinates
nates coordinates all cabinet activity. Shep Shepherd,
herd, Shepherd, while spending most of his
time on the ACCENT program,
also is working on tightening up
the election procedures with his
investigation into the purchase of
IBM voting machines.
These machines are fool foolproof,
proof, foolproof, he says.
Secretary of Traffic and Safe Safety
ty Safety Bill Sullivan is working on
plans for a multi-level parking
building to alleviate the campus
parking shortage. Shepherd says it
will take three years to actually
solve the parking problems.
Beau Smythe, Public Relations,
is planning the January Miss UF
contest. Publisher of the SG news newsletter,
letter, newsletter, Smythe is also overall wel welcome
come welcome week chairman for all re residence
sidence residence halls.
Secretary of Womens Affairs,
Cathy Hayes is working with WSA
on curfew revisions and trying to
organize Women's Interhall like
Mens Interhall so it will have an
effective voice in SG.
Nel Laughon, Traditions Secre Secretary,
tary, Secretary, is responsible for getting
permission to move Albert to the
pond by the new Florida Union.
She is trying to acquire a copy copyright
right copyright of the UF class ring so that
the school can obtain bids from
different companies and award the
ring contract to the lowest bidder.
In this way students would be able
to purchase their rings for less.
Investigating the possibility of a
nursery for married students'
children is Dan Meserve, secre secretary
tary secretary for married students. He has
helped establish the bus service
to county schools for married
students' children and is now look looking
ing looking into the addition of playgrounds
for each village.



I"

DRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
H)TICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
BfICE, FLORIDA UNION

tampus Calendar

jjHvance Notice: Graham Area Banquet and Playboy
Friday, November 11: Tickets on sale
|Hevenings 7:30-10:00 p.m. in Graham Area Office
November 2
|Hock & Bridle: Mr. John Hursh, Careers and Op-
Hportunities in the Feed Industry, 254 McC,
7:30 p.m.
Film and Lecture on Mayan Architecture, 105-
B AFA, 8 p.m.
Ha Film Series: Mark Tobey, Artist, and a Jack-
Si son Pollock film, 103-B AFA, 8 p.m.
Hutheran Student Association: Please have brown
H IDs to Don for block seating.
Hudent Medical Association: The Doctor Draft,
H guest panelists, Dr. R. L. Williams, Dr. N. C.
Leone, Lt. Col. P. .P. Pierce, H-611 MSB, 7:30p.m.
H All Med. and Pre-Med. students are invited.
Speleological Society: Group meeting, 212 FLU, 7 p.m.
Hent Card Coffee House: Auditions, 1826 W. Univ.
Ave., 8:30 p.m. Every kind of talent wanted.
Hhursday, November 3
Hood Science Club: Applications of Computer Tech-
Hnology in Food Processing, 130 McC, 7:30 p.m.
Hrab Club: meeting, 218 FLU, 7 p.m.
raft Shop: Creative Stitchery Class, 215 FLU,
I 9:30 p.m.
Hainting for Fun: 215 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
igma Xi: Lecture, Dr. Paul Elliot, Bio-Lumines-
I cence & Comparative Protein Structure, and Dr.
I Weltner, Stellar Molecules at four Degrees K,
I Bless Aud., 7:30 p.m.
I Placement
Notices
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: (Students must be
igistered with the University Placement Service
interview. Sign-up sheets are posted two weeks in
ivance of the interview date at Building H. All
Dmpanies will be recruiting for December, April and
ugust grads unless otherwise indicated. *lndicates
iring juniors for summer employment).
NOV. 3: BELL SYSTEM Bus. Ad, Lib. Arts,
Ed, Pub. Rela. NAVY DEPT. CE, EE, IE, ME,
SanE, AE, Arch, Acctg, Gen. Bus, Ind. Rela, Ind.
Mgmt, Econ, Mktg, Fin, Stat. DOW CHEMICAL
CO. ChE, ME, Chem, Mktg, Biochem, Phar Pharmacy,
macy, Pharmacy, Micro-Bio, MetE, Pharmacology, Agronomy.*
GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. EE, ME, ChE, MetE,
Ceramic, NE. INTERNATIONAL PAPER CO.
ChE, ME, EE, CE, IE, Org. Chem, Forestry, Acctg.
NOV. 3,4: CENTRAL SOYA CO. Bus, Eng,
Agri. FORD MOTOR CO. -- Bus, Acctg, Econ,
Stat, Fin, Mktg, ChE, EE, IE, ME, MetE.
NOV. 4: U. S. GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE
Acctg. NATIONAL BISCUIT CO. ME, IE, Acctg,
Chem, Bio-Chem, Food Tech. UNITED AIRCRAFT
AE, EE, ME, MetE, Physics, Chem, Math, ChE.
SYSTEMS ENGINEERING LABORATORIES, INC.
EE, Math, Physics. THE CECO CORP. EE,
Math, Physics. THE CECO CORP. CE, Bldg.
Const, ME, Bus. Ad. GULF OIL CORP. ChE,
ME. GRAND UNION CO. mgmt. trainees. CROWN
ZELLERBACH CORP. IE, ChE, ME, EE.

I
Building J Radio Road / ncrease I
O'.dendato £ en; Uof F Employees Since 1935 LTolr I
Loons!!!
Paid Semiannually Gainesville Florida Campus

BLUE BULLETIN

Game Films: Fla. vs. Auburn, MSB Aud., 8 p.m.
FLU Forums: Gerald Ford, Republican Minority
Leader of the U. S. House of Representatives,,
Univ. Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club: 121 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Christian Science Organization: Group meeting, 121
FLU, 5:15 p.m.
Circle K: Group meeting, 212 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Phi Chi Theta: Group meeting, 208 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Craft Shop: Adult Ceramic Class, 7:30 p.m.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship: Prayer meeting,
4th floor of the Library, 5 p.m.
Wrestling Club: south end of the Gym floor, 4 p.m.
Latin American Club: Deadline for Tulane game
block seating, Nov. 3, bring brown IDs to In International
ternational International Center.
Friday, November 4
History and Philosophy of Medicine Lecture: Dr.
Thomas M. Durant, Motivation in Medicine,
MSB Aud., 12:00 p.m.

PROGRESS TEST: (Students in the following courses
axe expected to take the following tests. Each stu student
dent student must bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will be
required to use his SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER.)
PROGRESS TESTS:
CBS 261 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Nov. 8,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with:
(A) report to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Pea Peabody
body Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) report to Leigh
207; (D) report to GCB 121, 125 or 127; (E) re report
port report to GCB 113; (F) report to Matherly 213, 216
or 219; (G) report to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114;
(H) report to Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209;
(I J) report to Flint 110 or 112; (K) report to
Walker 301, 303, 307 or 308; (L) report to GCB
201, 203, 205 or 207; (M) report to GCB 213, 215,
217, 219, 221, 223, 225 or 227; (N) report to GCB
233 or 235; (O) report to GCB 237 or 239; (P Q)
report to Flint 101 or 102; (R) report to Floyd
108; (S) report to Walker Auditorium; (T V)
report to GCB 101 or 109; (W Z) report to Walker
Auditorium.
CBS 262a (Evolution) PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday,
Nov. 8,7 p.m. Students report to Matherly 2,3,
4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14 and 16.
CBS 262 b (Man and Nature) PROGRESS TEST:
Tuesday, Nov.B, 7 p.m. Students report to Mather Matherly
ly Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 and 119.
GRADUATE FACULTY MEETING: A meeting of
the Graduate Faculty willbeheld Wednesday,Nov. 9,
at 4 p.m. in McCarty Auditorium.
MARKETING MAJORS: All marketing majors (bus (business
iness (business administration) must report immediately to
Matherly 209 to receive counseling appointments.
Counseling will take place through Nov. 8.
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION STUDENTS: Appoint Appointments
ments Appointments are now being made in Norman Hall, Room
202, to plan courses for next trimester and to
file copies of planned programs. This includes
2UC students applying this term for admission to
the College of Education.
PRE-VETERINARY STUDENTS: Applications for
the School of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn Univer University,
sity, University, are available in Dean Brookers office, 124
McCarty Hall.

and

Administrative Notices

/
ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

Wednesday, November 2, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Mensa: Lecture, Dr. John V. McQuitty, Testing and
College Credit, 103-B AFA, 7:30 p.m.
Hillel: Eugene Eifin, Jewish Community Service,
Hillel Foundation, 7:30 p.m.
Phi Kappa Psi Social Fraternity: Smoker-by invita invitation,
tion, invitation, 212 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Chess Club: Chess Games, 215 FLU, 7 p.m.
Movie: Night Walker, 7:35 & 10:45 & Tbe Son
of Captain Blood, 6 & 9:10 p.m. MSB Aud.
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE: Tickets now on sale
for Gerald Ford, Jules Feiffer, The Royal Ballet
and The Serendipity Singers
General Notices
RUMMAGE SALE: The Medico Wives Rummage
Sale will be held Friday, Nov. 4,7 a.m.-5 p.m.
at the entrance of the University Health Center in
the room next to the gift shop. Sale proceeds are
used in service projects both at the Medical Cen Center
ter Center and in the community.

STUDENT JOBS: Part-time employment is avail available
able available for typists, secretaries, and computer oper operators
ators operators and programmers. For information, contact
Student Employment, Room 183, Building E.
STRAY GREEKS: All students who are init initiated
iated initiated members of a national fraternity or sorority
that does not have a chapter on the University
of Florida campus should contact the IFC secre secretary
tary secretary in the Dean of Mens Office, Tigert Hall,
or Marie Dence, 376-4013. Deadline is Wednesday,
Nov. 2.
FLORIDA BLUE KEY MEMBERSHIP: Applications
for membership to Florida Blue Key, men's honor
leadership fraternity, are now available at the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union Desk or at the office of the dean of
your college. Hie deadline for returning applications
is Z p.m. Nov. U, 1966. Qualifications for select selection
ion selection are: (1) full time undergraduate student of the
University of Florida; (2) completed five trimesters
of college work, of which at least three have been
at the University of Florida; (3) participated in
extra-curricular activities at the University of Flor Florida
ida Florida and distinguished himself through leadership
and service in at least one area, and (4) have at
least a 2.0 scholarship average and have passed
at least 70 hours of college work accepted by the
registrar of the University of Florida.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS, DEPART DEPARTMENTAL
MENTAL DEPARTMENTAL SECRETARIES AND CLERKS: A train training
ing training program designed to assist new personnel in
handling of business transactions will be held
through Thursday, Nov. 3, in the Blue Room, Stu Student
dent Student Service Center, 9 11 a.m. Procedures re regarding
garding regarding Finance and Accounting, Purchasing and Per Personnel
sonnel Personnel matters will be discussed.
ORANGE & BLUE DEADLINES: All notices for
Orange & Blue Bulletin must be received by 9 a.m.
of the day prior to publication. Deadlines are Fri Friday
day Friday for Monday publication, Tuesday for Wednesday
publication and Htursday for Friday publication.
Notices should be typed and signed and sent to the
Division of Informational Services, Building H, cam campus.
pus. campus. Items for the Campus Calendar should be
sent to the Public Functions Office, Florida Union.

Page 13



Page 14

[, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 2, 1966

EMBARRASSED W
saces in your Bookshelf?

BOOK SALE
Â¥llh Through Friday
(Buy h FEW FEET)

Campus Shop & Bookstore In Front of Service Center

PICTORIAL ANATOMY OF THE
HUMAN FIGURE. By Frederick
Taubee. The world renowned art
teecher demonstrates ell aspects
es the buma.i body that bare pic pictorial
torial pictorial value |pr the contemporary
artist Hundreds of large, clear
drawings. Orig. Pub. at $3.75.
New, complete ed. Only 1.96
OHO6TB ALONG THE MISSISSIPPI:
The Magic es the Old Houses of
Louisiana. By Clarence John
Laugtdia. With 100 superb photo photographs.
graphs. photographs. A vivid history in words
and pictures of a gracious way of
Ufa: the architecture, landscaping,
decoration and nostalgic atmos atmosphere.
phere. atmosphere. Bias: 10 3/4 a 12 1/2.
Orig. Pub. at $12.50. New, com complete
plete complete ed. Only $5.95
COMPLETE WORKS OF SHAKES SHAKESPEARE.
PEARE. SHAKESPEARE. All the plays, complete
and unabridged; all the sonnets
and poems. Over 1,000 pages,
clear, dark type, cloth bound with
gold stamping. Pub. at $6.25. Only
2.49
THE BIBLE DICTIONARY. Every
Important Old and New Testament
name, place and thing Is listed,
pronounced and explained In this
compact volume. Special 1.00
BOOK OF FAMILIAR QUO QUOTATIONS.
TATIONS. QUOTATIONS. Over 2,500 well known,
useful, widely recognized
quotations listed under 500 topic
headings from Ability to Zeal,
indexed. Only 1.00
COINS THROUGH THE AGES. By
Laurence BrownJllus. with photos.
The fascinating story of coinage
from ancient Lydua about 700 B.C.
to modern times how they got
their names, the designs, legends,
content, abbreviations, etc. Pub. at
$3.95. Only 1.00
THE LIFE OF CHRIST IN MAS MASTERPIECES
TERPIECES MASTERPIECES OF ART, And The
Words of The New Testament.
11l us. with 44 Plates In-Full Color.
A deluxe (10 1/2 x 12 3/4) vol volume
ume volume portraying the life of Christ
by the- greatest masters of art In
palritlngs by Breugel, Memllng, El
Greco, Botticelli, Leonardo, Titian
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enamel, sculpture, manuscript
Illumination, stained glass, etc.
Pub. at SIO.OO. Only 5.95
THE ANNOTATED SNARK. Introd.
A Notes by Martin Gardner. The
full text of LEWIS CARROLLS
great nonsense epic and the
original Illustrations by Henry
Holiday. A delightful volume In
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at $3.95. Only 1.69
OVER THERE: The JKory of Amer Americas
icas Americas First Great Overseas
Crusade. By Frank Fraidel. Over
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MEh -'MPACT ATLAS OF
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jomu Johnerthojomu .. pact pocket atlas
12$ pages of maps In light colors,
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A. LINCOLN: Prairie Lawyer. By
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prints. His career as lawyer end
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Papers; extremely capable trial
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Orig* Pub. at $7.50. New, com complete
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CHINESE ART. By Judith A Arthur
H. Burling. With 248 Ulus., 9 In
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Including: pottery end porcelain,
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New, complete ed. Only 4.95
GUNS THROUGH THE AGES. By
Geoffrey Boothroyd. Illus. with
photos A drawings. A detailed,
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powder gunpowder up to the present, Ameri American,
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I y
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F.D.R. Text by Roger Butterfield.
More than 400 photos selected by
Robt. D. Graff A Robt. E. Glnna.
A memorable photographic record
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THE GOOD HOUSEKEEPING IN INTERNATIONAL
TERNATIONAL INTERNATIONAL COOKBOOK. 312
authentic recipes ranging from
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TWO CAPTAINS WEST. An
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ANGRY KATE. By EUzabetb Jane Janeway.
way. Janeway. Illus. by Chas. B. Slack man.
Delightful little tale In verse about
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BIRDS OF THE WORLD. Text by
the noted ornithologist, Dr. Oliver
L. Austin, Jr. 300 specially com commissioned
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Spectacular (10 x 11 1/$) volume,
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FRENCH-ENGLISH COMMON
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Ulus tret ed by sentences. Special
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Pub. at $2.50. New, complete ed.
Only 1.00
FAMOUS GUNS FROM THE HAR HAROLDS
OLDS HAROLDS CLUB COLLECTION. By
Hank W. Bowman. 300 photos. A
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THE MERRY ADVENTURES
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GURUS' WESTERN INDIANS. Life
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FASCINATING FOODS FROM THE
DKIP SOUTH. By AlUne P. Van
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In hundreds of recipes tor meet
sad poultry, eggs, seafoods,
soups, vegetables, pies and tarts,
breads and cakes, cookies and
beverages. Pub. at $2.95. Only 1.00
THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO IN INDOOR
DOOR INDOOR PLANTS. By E. Kiser. With
372 Ulus. In full natural color.
The care and treatment of In Indoor
door Indoor plants from all over the
world soli, potting, fertilizer,
transplanting, arrangements, etc.,
more than 350 varieties described.
Pub. at $5.00. Only 2.69

EROTIC POETRY: AN UNIN UNINHIBITED
HIBITED UNINHIBITED TREASURY. Edited, with
a running commentary by Louis
Untermeyer. The worlds greatest
erotica In verse ranging from the
Bible to the present day -a fresh
collection of the most renowned
poets from Ovid to Swinburne,
Chaucer to e. e. curomlngs, Queen
Elisabeth to Emily Dickinson the
outspoken sensuality of lust and
the earthy celebration of carnal
pleasure, In more than 600 poems.
Pub. at $7.90. Only 3.95
WINES A SPIRITS. By Wm.
E. Masses. A complete buying
guide Including prices,vintages,
food and wine combinations, pro pronunclatlons,
nunclatlons, pronunclatlons, ordering In res restaurants;
taurants; restaurants; with charts, maps, vine vineyards,
yards, vineyards, and full Information on all
the greet, good, and ordinary wines
of the entire world. Orig. Pub. at
$8.95. New, complete ed. Only 2.98
GRANDMOTHERS HOUSEHOLD
HINTS: As Good Today As Yester Yesterday.
day. Yesterday. By Helen Lyon Adamson, with
81 drawings by Fred Harsh. Out
of the nostalgic past and an Old
New England collection, come
these practical and delightful
hints for every Imaginable thing
around the house; cooking, clean cleaning,
ing, cleaning, sewing, first aid, painting,
gardening, canning, repairing
homes and furniture, etc. Pub. at
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HOW TO PLAY CHESS. By Eman Emanuel
uel Emanuel Leaker. New revised edition
of one of the best books for be beginners.
ginners. beginners. Only 1.00
HOW TO BUILD 20 BOATS. By
Boris Leonardl. Illus. with photos
and plans. Detailed drawings and
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THE NEW EDITION OF THE EN ENCYCLOPEDIA
CYCLOPEDIA ENCYCLOPEDIA OF JAZZ. By
Leonard Feather. Completely
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to date. .Over 2000 biographies,
over 200 photographs with biblio bibliography,
graphy, bibliography, critics, social aspects,
Jazz overseas, booking agendas,
organizations, techniques of play,
records, etc. Orig. Pub. at $15.00.
New, complete ed. Only 4.95
ITALIAN COOKING FOR PLEAS PLEASURE.
URE. PLEASURE. 100 Ulus. A 24 Pagas In
Color. Hundreds of recipes with
fascinating ways of cooking meat,
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OEOGRAPHY AND MAN. Ed. by
W. O. V. Balchln. 3 Vol. Set.
Over SOOO Photos, Maps A Dia Diagrams,
grams, Diagrams, 40 Plates In Color. Au Authoritative,
thoritative, Authoritative, practical survey of
Ufa and work of man In relation
to his natural environment. 75
authorities present unbiased,
accurate review of conditions in
every corner of the globe. The
excellent illustrations give a vivid
Impression of the races which in inhabit
habit inhabit the world. Pub. at $30.00.
The $ VoL Sot, Only 14.55

A BOOK OF HORS DOEUVRES.
By Lucy G. Alien. Revised, en enlarged
larged enlarged edition of the leading book
In its field. These recipes,
canapes, unusual savories,
spreads, garnishes and dressings
will delight you and your guests.
HI us. orig. Pub. at $3.00. New,
complete ed. Only 1.49
ESQUIRE'S WORLD OF HUMOR.
Commentary by David Newman.
Foreword by Malcom Muggertdge.
Hilarious cartoons, photos, criti criticism.,
cism., criticism., assays and fiction by tbs
worlds great funnymen Jona Jonathan
than Jonathan winters. Zero Mostel, Menc Mencken,
ken, Mencken, Terry Southern, Scott
Fitzgerald, Dorothy Parker, Lenny
Bruce, Dick Gregory, Ring Lard Lardner,
ner, Lardner, Thurber, Ben Hecht; car cartoonists
toonists cartoonists Dean, Hoff, Price and
many others. 8 3/4 x 11. Pub. at
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KING ARTHUR AND THE
KNIGHTS OF THE ROUND
TABLE. With 45 pages of
beautiful full color Illustra Illustrations
tions Illustrations by Gustaf Tenggren. A
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ED FISHERS DOOMSDAY BOOK.
A wonderful cartoon album with
philosophical overtones by the
regular contributor to The New
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tator, Spectator, etc. Size 8 x 11. Pub. at
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MICHELANGELOS THEORY OF
ART. By Robt. J. Clements. Illus.
with 21 pistes. A unified view of
Michelangelos thoughts, opinions
and seeming contradictions on all
the arts he practiced so vigorously
and brilliantly. His artistic biases,
personality and temperament are
brought lido sharp focus In this
handsomely Illustrated volume,
471 pages, annotated with biblio bibliography.
graphy. bibliography. Orig. Pub. at SIO.OO. New,
complete ed. Only 4.95
WSm
TRICKS A STUNTS WITH PLAY PLAYING
ING PLAYING CARDS Plus 20 Games of
Solitaire. By Joseph Learning. Il Illus.
lus. Illus. with explanatory diagrams A
drawings. Card tricks, stunts and
puzzles tor all ages as well as
Solitaire games, such as: Can Canfield,
field, Canfield, Klondike, Gaps, Streets and
Alleys, and Idlote Delight. New,
complete ed. Only 1.00
Ogden Nash: MARRIAGE LINES.
Ulus, with 20 Drawings. Here again
are those Incredibly clever Nash
verses, this time all centered on
the theme of martage -a mar marvelous
velous marvelous book-length valentine. Pub.
at $3.96. Only 149

CARE AND REPAIR OF
ANTIQUES. By Thomas H.Orms H.Ormsbee.
bee. H.Ormsbee. Ulus, with 40 photos. How to
keep old furniture in good con condition,
dition, condition, restore broken and
neglected piev.<:s; repair and
enhance the luster In sliver, Old
Sheffield, pewter, brass, copper,
Chios, glass, pottery, old paint paintings
ings paintings and other articles. How to
detect lakes and reconstructed
pieces. Orig. Pub. at $340. New,
complete edition. Only 1.00
THE STORY OF AMERICAN
YACHTING. By Wro. H. Taylor A
Stanley Rosenfeld. Told In Pic Pictures.
tures. Pictures. Over 200 magnificent photos
by Moris Rosenfeld, as well as
rare Old prints and drawings. The
complete story of this thrilling
sport with pictures from the col collection
lection collection of America's foremost
yachting photographer. Everything
from the earliest to the most mod modern
ern modern craft including Ice-boating,
motorboating, surfboarding, ocean
racing and cruising and regatta
racing. 9 1/4 x Is. Orig. Pub. at
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4.95
A HISTORY OF ART, From Pre Prehistoric
historic Prehistoric Times to the Present
By Germain Bhzln. With 568 Hlua.
Monochrome and color. Man's
achievements In painting and
architecture from the cave paint paintings
ings paintings of me Paleolithic age to the
present In concise authoritative
detail with a wealth of pictures
from public and private col collections.
lections. collections. Orig. Pub. at $9.00. New,
complete ed. Only 3.95
THE GOLDEN ENGLISH-FRENCH
DICTIONARY. Mora than 1000
words, 1500 pictures In full color,
3000 easy to learn sentences, pro pronunciation.
nunciation. pronunciation. A lively picture-dic picture-dictionary
tionary picture-dictionary tor children. Size 10 z 13.
Pub. at $3.99. Only 1.98
TIFFANY TABLE SETTINGS. With
148 beautiful Illustrations, 132 In
monochrome A 16 in Full Color.
A great variety of attractive table
settings created by Americas
foremost silversmiths. Tasteful,
Imaginative arrangements tor
every occasion, formal, Informal,
buffets, picnics, parties, dinners,
sig>pera, etc. 9 z 12. Orig- Pub.
at $15.00. New, complete ed. Only
5.95
4 yogi bear and ms friends.
Every page Ulus. In color. A big,
beautiful volume contalnli* the
adventures of Yogi Bear. Huckle Huckleberry
berry Huckleberry Hound, Cindy Beer, Mr.
Jinks, 800 800 Bear, Pixie A
Dixie. Picture-story ages. 10x12.
Pub. at $2.95. Only 1.00

MORE FUN WITH MATHEMATICS.
By Jerome S. Meyer. Ulus,
throughout with drawings, charts
A tables. Hoars of mental silme silmelatlon
latlon silmelatlon and entertainment: games A
pussies, mathematical tricks
curiosities, new charts unique
systems tor Instant answers.
Special 1.00
Paintings A LETTERS OF THE
GREAT ARTISTS. I Volume set,
Bond. With SOt reproductions,
110 In color. Ed. by Richard
Frledenthal. A truly handsome
nirvey of the worts of the great
artists with tbelr comments and
self-revelations on taste, style,
attitudes towards the public, etc.
which influenced their work. Beau Beautiful
tiful Beautiful reproductions from the Early
Renaissance to the 30th century:
Durer, Michelangelo, Rembrandt,
Velasquez, Goya, Hogarth, Blake,
Delacroix, Corot, Manet, Renoir,
Rodin, Picasso, Chagall,
Kokoschka, and many others. With
notes to the plates, sources, re references
ferences references A Index. 7 1/4x9 1/4.
Pub. at fIS.OO. The 2 voL set,
In slip case. Only S.9S
A MILLION MENUS For Dining
A Entertaining At Home. By Lenore
Joyce-Cowen. Illustrated through throughout.
out. throughout. An Ingenious new Idea In cook
books each page of the recipe
section contains a complete menu
tor a meal 3 main courses.
The pages are cut horizontally so
that by turning over any one sec section,
tion, section, a different combination of
dishes may be made. For exam example,
ple, example, Menu I consists of Lobster
Pernod; Ham en croute; Grand
Marnier Pudding. Other features:
glossary of food A cooking hints,
large section on sauces, pictures.
Index. Spiral bound (or convenient
use In the kitchen. 7 3/4 x S 1/4.
Pub. at $4.95. Only 2.98
THE GREAT PLANTATION. ByC.
Dowdey. 13 Photos. Through the
story of one at Virginias oldest
and greatest plantations and
plantar families, Berkeley Hun Hundred
dred Hundred and the Harrison family
here Is solid history at Tidewater
Virginia, from frontier days to the
Civil War, vivid personal por portraits,
traits, portraits, accounts at massacres, the
founding of Williamsburg, etc.
Orig. Pub. at SB.OO. Only 2JB
A DIRECTORY OF ANTIQUE
FURNITURE. By F. Lewis
Hinckley, tflth 1100 Ulus. The
classification at European and
American designs precisely as
to period arranged by the leading
furniture technologist In the UJS.
Orig. Pub. at SIO.OO. New, com complete
plete complete ed. Only 4.98
THE AFRICAN HUNT. By Col.
Chas. Asklns. 11l us. with photos.
Indispensable Information tor any anyone
one anyone Interested in an African saf safari:
ari: safari: planning, eqMpment, locales,
etc. Pub. at $8.90. Only 1.98
Korean War: THIS KIND OP WAR.
By T. R. Fehrenbach. With 89
photos A 26 maps. An Immense,
dramatic, authoritative and hard hardhlttli
hlttli hardhlttli ~ account of the Korean War
based largely on the narratives of
the men who served there with
source material from operations
journals, the successes and blun blunders
ders blunders of our strategy, political
background, etc. 700 pages. Pub.
at SIO.OO. Only 3.99



K E COMPLETE SAYINGS OF
vBsUS As Recorded In The King
ines Version. Introd. by Norman
Hncent Peels. A precttcsl means
Wm getting si the rery heart of
H l riit i teachings in compact
Hrm. Orig. Pub. at SI.OO. New,
Hmplete edition. Only 1.00
Hou CAN GROW CAMELLIAS. By
K Noble B. Oraham. Over 65
IHoto*. diagrams, charts *6 color
Sates. A complete guide to the
Kitlvatton and usee of camellias,
Kdoors and out, with special em-
Hasls on the new oold-hardy and
Heat tolerant hybrids. PVb. ats7.so.
Hnly 2.08
HuEEN NEW ORLEANS. By
Harnett T. Kane. With 22 pages
MT photographs drawings by
Hllden Landry. The colorful, tur-
Hulent story of one of Os most
Hxcltlng cities In the world
Huelllng days, steamboats, masked
Halls, French opera, creole
Huislne, Mardl Gras, le Jans hot,
Htc. with a special chapter on
Suggested tours tor today, Orig.
Hub. at $5.00. New, complete ad.
Hnly 1.08
Italian English common
HsAGE DICTIONARY. Over 18,000
Basic terms defined A all meanings
Hllustrated by sentences. Special
Better-writing section. Prepared
B Living Language Institute. Orig.
Hub. at $1.05. New, complete ed.
Only 1.00
wiNSLOW HOMER American Art Artlist:
list: Artlist: HU World and Work. By Al-
Ibert Ten Eyck Gardner. Introd.
by James J. Rorlmer, Met. Mus Music
ic Music urn of Art, New York. With $8
full-color plates and over 106
black A whits reproductions. A
I comprehensive collection of the
I work of the greatest artist Amartea
has ever produced with a full full
full seals biography of hla life, the
I story of hU friends, his times and
I tbs Influences that molded Mm.
Size 0 1/4 z 12 1/2. Orig. Pub,
I at $25.00. New, complete ed. Only
17.05
I Nick Manero's COOK-OUT BAR-
I BECUE BOOK. Over 150 lllua. A
picture cook book featuring the
famous Manero recipes for Beef
Brochette, Veal Roulade, Lobster
Tails Inferno, Shrimp Flam be,
Chicken in Foil, Staak, and many
more with information on how to
buy meats and equipment for your
barbecue. Pub. at $2.50. Only 1.00
The Life ofCM*
i I
HANDGUNNERS GUIDE. By CMc
Gaylord. Over 800 photos. A
manual on modern handguns and
their use written by a quick-draw
record holder and expert on com combat
bat combat shooting. Sections on choosing
a gun, the art of the quick-draw
and combat shooting, holsters and
ammunition **
tor on gun- fighters of the Old West.
Orig. Pub. at $7.50. New, complete
ed. Only 2.96
AMERICAN REGIONAL COOK COOKERY.
ERY. COOKERY. By Sheila ltor, Recipes
from nearly every Mate soups,
entrees, desserts, beverages:
Stuffed Crabs (Baltimore), Chicken
Pilau Otouth Carolina), Apple Roll
(Minnesota), Short Ribs with
Sauerkraut (Pennsylvania), Pump Pumpkln
kln Pumpkln Pie (Iowa), Schnecken (Cin (Cincinnati),
cinnati), (Cincinnati), etc. Orig. Pub. at $3.50.
New, complete ed. Only 1.69
The Heart Saver Cook Book: EAT
WELL AND LIVE LONGER. By
Emil G. Conason, MJD. A Ella
M, Person. Eaey-to-follow menus
and recipes tor tasty dishes of
*U types, making use of the latest
medical findings concerning
cholesteroL calories and essential
tote in the prevention of coronary
artery disease. Orig. Pi*. at $2.05.
N ", complete edition. Only 1.40
NEEDLE a THREAD BOOK: A
Golden Learning Book. Complete
Instructions on how to sew with
embroidery thread, sewing needle,
sampler and easy to follow dia diagrams
grams diagrams and full-color Ulus, of deco decorative
rative decorative stitches. For the Junior
Miss. Pub. at $1.50. Only 1.00
MOTHER'S ENCYCLOPEDIA: The
Complete Book of Mother craft.
Complete library at care in
one volume by 25 leading spedal spedalist*
ist* spedalist* Including Spock, Gesell,
Menninger, etc. Advice from be before
fore before the infant Is born, right
through adolescence. Many spe special
cial special features. 898 peges. Over 100
Ulus. Pub. at $6.80. Only 2.98
the epic OF MAN. By Hie Edi Editor*
tor* Editor* of Llf*. mue. with hundreds
of Full-color photos, pointings,
* Mans progress from the
stone Age to th* first dvlUxatfcxw
of the Egyptians, Mlnoaiw, Etrus Etruscans,
cans, Etruscans, Celts, Chinese and Incas:
the down of religion, development
or tribes, families and towns;
craftsmanship, languages, art and
Wlr ; primitive aodeltas that etui
xtot today. For all ages. Pub. at
*5 00. Only 8.98

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CAROLINE IN EUROPE. Story and
pictures by Pierre Probst. Joyous
tala of a young girl* visit to
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Giant Full Color drawings through throughout.
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$1.99. Only 1.00
WALTER CHANDOHA'S BOOK OF
KITTENB AND CATS. Here, In over
240 sqparb photographs to the
cat as Interpreted by Americas
bast-known animal photographer.
Large format S 1/2 x 11. Orig.
Pnb. at $8.50. New, complete ed.
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CIVIL WAR NEWSPAPERS. Auth Authentically
entically Authentically reproduced In their en entirety
tirety entirety from original editions, same
size and on newspaper stock. Set
of 6 lncL 3 Northern and 3 South Southern
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COCKTAIL-SUPPER COOKBOOK.
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INTERNATIONAL CUISINE BY
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Ed. by G. W. Cur an AL. D.
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FLOWER ARRANGING. By Joyce
Rogers. Lavishly Illus. with 300
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LAWRENCE OF ARABIA: The Man
A The Motive. By Anthony Nutting.
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VETERAN AND VINTAGE CARS.
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with 32 pages In Full Color. A
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models, etc. Special 2.96
THE BOOK OF THE AMERICAN
WEST. Ed. by Jay Monaghan. Th#
most magnificent array of his historical
torical historical fact, legend and lorn about
the West ever assembled in one
volume. Actually 10 books In 1
volume: Opening of the West. By
Date Morgan; Transportation by
Oscar O. Wlnther; Treasurers. By
Oscar Lewis; Indians and Soldiers.
By Don Russell; Th# Law. By
Wayne Gard; Cowboys and Horses.
By Ramon F. Adams; Guns. By
Robert Eaton; Wild Lite. By Natt
N. Dodge; Folklore A Songs. By
B. A. Botkin; Gallery of Art. By
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ings, paintings, engravings, historical maps,
documentary art, old prints, wood woodcuts,
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each artists as Remington, Rus Russell,
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Blerstedt, and many others. Over
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DOGS, DOGS, DOGS, DOGS. Over
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HORSES, HORSES, HORSES,
HORSES. Over 300 illus., 32 pages
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word and picture In sport, art
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formation Information and wonderful photos.
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SHE LOVES ME. .SHE LOVES
ME NOT. .By Robert Keeshan.
Ulus, by Maurice Sendak. En Enchantlng
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MAGIC WITH LEFTOVERS. By-
L. R. Brunner. Illus. 300 recipes
for making Interesting dishes and
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how to save work by doing the
basic cooking for several meals
at one time from appetizers to
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REDWOOD CLASSIC. By Ralph
W. Andrews. In more than 200
photos and perceptive text, the
story of California's magnificent
redwoods is told their beauty,
the building of a lumber empire,
the cabins of the pioneers, the
old coastal streamers, etc. 81/2 x
11. Orig. pub. at SIO.OO. New,
complete ed. Only 3.95
AMERICAN CELEBRITY REGIS REGISTER.
TER. REGISTER. Cleveland Aroory, Editor-
In-Chief. Reference book with a
point of view. Biographical
sketches of more than 2800 news newsmakers
makers newsmakers from the Kennedy# to
Captain Kangaroo. Each with a
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Over 600 pages, written with wit,
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ROSES. By H. Edlund. With 24
full-page full-color plates. Lovely
gift book on the most pnpuier
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A TREASURY OF FOLK MELODY VOL. 2 EUROPEAN
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FLUTE, BRASS, VIBES AND PERCUSSION THE HERBIE
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SWINGING BRASS WITH OSCAR PETERSON
THE TRAVELERS 3
1960 NEWPORT FOLK FESTIVAL
THE EXCITING ARTISTRY OF WILL HOLT
JEAN CARIGNAN THE FOLK FIDDLER WHO
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THE ASTRONAUTS: By John
Glenn, Alan Shepard, etc. Fas Fasclnatlng
clnatlng Fasclnatlng story of Project Mercury
told by the astronauts themselves
for young people. More than 100
Illus. many In full color. Soft Softbound.
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Only .40
WHY COOK? By Jesse C. Beesley.
Illus. 218 recipes for anyone with
limited time for cooking but wbo
likes good end sophisticated food.
Orig* Pub. at $2.95. New, complete
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THE ifbLY LAND. 130 striking
photos, many In brilliant color.
A splendid memorial volume spe specially
cially specially prepared to commemorate
the historic pilgrimage of Pope
Paul VI and the first step in
ending the Great Schism. Tills Is
a history of Christianitys roost
sacred shrines as well as a pic pictorial
torial pictorial tour of the Holy Land. Size
9 z 12. Pub. at $7.50. Only 2.98
ATLANTIS: The Antediluvian
World. By Ignatius Donnelly. A
Modern Revised Edition edited by
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on the Lost Continent of Atlantis
brought ig> to date with new fact#
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Only 1.98

SLANG: Today and Yesterday.
By Eric Partridge. A history of
slang from Its origins to the pre present:
sent: present: American, Cockney, law,
medical, military, rhyming and
spoonerisms, elaborate and ori original
ginal original vocabularies; a reference
work Jthat Is highly useful and en entertaining.
tertaining. entertaining. Orig* Pub. at SB.OO.
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THE MUSTANGS. By J. Frank
Doble. Ulue. by Charles Banks
Wilson. ITUs magnificent book
traces the descent of the mus mustang
tang mustang from the horses brought to
the New World by the Spaniards.
It la a monument to all the wild
and free" horses that once were
the glory of our Western ranges
over a million In Texas alone and
to the white men and the Indians
who captured, rode and annihilated
them. Orig* Pub. at $6.75. New,
complete ed. Only 2.98

THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR. By
Earl Schenck Mlers. 342 repro reproductions
ductions reproductions of drawings, paintings
engravings A maps many in full
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tory history of the years 1861-1865 as
seen by the artist-correspondents
who were there every battle
from Sumter to Appomattox and the
death of Lincoln. 10 1/4 x 13 3/4.
Pub. at $15.00. Only 7.95
A Pictorial History of the Ameri American
can American Hotel: FARE THEE WELL.
By Leslie Dorsey A Janice Devine.
With 600 rare and unusual pictures.
A nostalgic look at 2 centuries of
historic American hotels, fashion fashionable
able fashionable spas A seaside resorts from
the little ordinaries of Colonial
days to the famous establishments
of the 10th century: Tremont House
In Boston, New Yorks As tor
House, Hoffman House, the St.
Nicholas; resorts like White Sul Sulphur,
phur, Sulphur, Saratoga, Long Branch,
Coney Island; San Francisco's Pal Palace
ace Palace Hotel, Chicago's Palmer
House, Royal Polnciana at Palm
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explains how to distinguish the
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Page 15



Page 16

5, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 2, 1966

LIKE A FRATERNITY

Frame r D* Dwellers Defend Their House

By ALAN SIMS
Alligator Correspondent
Defending their house against all criticisms,
the residents of Frame Dorm D have developed
into one of the most devoted fraternities on cam campus.
pus. campus.
I wouldnt live anywhere else, exclaimed Rich Richard
ard Richard L. Miller, SEG. No other area has the ad advantages
vantages advantages that this place has. Miller, who lived
in Hume Hall before moving into the frames, said
his only real complaint was that the windows leaked.
At this point he dug out a caulking gun and ex explained
plained explained that he had stopped most of the leaks.
He also said with a grin that the caulking gun had
come in handy in repairing small holes in the walls.
Millers brother Robert, 3BA, who is also his
roommate, claimed his only gripe was that the water
fountain in the hall is not putting out water cold
enough this year to make milk. His eyes twinkled
as he maintained he was serious about his complaint.
Paul G. Habel, 4EG, expounded for half an hour
on the advantages of the frames. He pointed out

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PLANNING ACTIVITIES--Plan ACTIVITIES--Planning
ning ACTIVITIES--Planning future activities forUF Col College
lege College of Medicine alumni are three
new officers of the Colleges
Alumni Association which was
organized last year. Dr. Frank
Fischer (left), resident in oph ophthalmology
thalmology ophthalmology in the universitys
Shands Teaching Hospital, re replaces
places replaces Dr. Mark Barrow as pre president;
sident; president; Dr. Charles McCurdy

LOCAL MERCHANTS SAY

Very Few Rubber Checks

By GRACE SPILLER
Alligator Correspondent
No trouble.
This was the general response from Food
Service and other establishments near campus
concerning the problem of student rubber
checks.
Food Service cashes approximately 1,200
worth of student checks per day, explained
Assistant Diredtor of Food Service Douglas W.
Craig.
Less than one per cent at the most of
these are bad checks, he said.
Craig said most rubber checks cashed by
students are due to a misunderstanding between
the student and his parents.
Often times the student's parents forget to
deposit the students allowance before a check
clears, and, thus, the student has unknowingly
written a bad check, he said.
The policy of Food Service in dealing with
such a case is to first resend the check to
the bank. If it does not clear this second time,
then we notify the student, he said.
Craig cited the $5 limit on weekend checks

they are centrally located in one of the prettiest
parts of campus.
According to Habel, moving his belongings into
the frames was simply a matter of backing his car
up to the window of his room and handing his things
in through the window to a friend who helped him.
I like to tell people that we have twice the con convenience
venience convenience at half the price, said Habel, explaining
that the rent for a room in the frames is only
$65 a trimester.
Besides, its kind of like a small fraternity,
continued Habel. The guys get to know each other
better here than in other dorms. They feel closer.
According to Habel, all of the men in the dorm
are at least 20 years old and most have lived there
at least three terms. The students are able to
get along in a more mature manner than is possible
in a dorm which houses younger students.
Thomas J. McManus, 4AS, pointed out parking
areas are quite convenient to the frames. He, said
this was an important consideration since many of
the residents drive cars.

(center), resident in obstetrics
.. and gynecology at the Teaching
Hospital, is the new president presidentelect,
elect, presidentelect, and Dr. James Rawls,
practicing physician from Perry,
replaces Dr. Charles Ozaki of
Lake City as secretary-trea secretary-treasurer.
surer. secretary-treasurer. The new officers were
elected Saturday during Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming weekend.

as being due to the fact that the banks are
closed.
We just arent able to keep enough ready
cash on hand, he said.
This was the same reason for the $5 limit
over the amount of purchase at Quik>Save drug
store.
We cant keep enough ready money to cash
checks and carry on regular business, said
Mrs. Bobbie Brown, cashier.
Quik-Save does not cash double endorsement
checks. This cuts down on the possible number
of bad checks, she said.
9 k
The head waitress at Wolfies said bad checks
were neglibible. Wolfies places a $5 limit
on all checks cashed.
Mr. D. Bauldree of the Florida Book Store
said there was no problem concerning rubber
checks from students.
She explained often students do not under*
stand the necessity of showing identification when
cashing checks.
Frequently, this is one of the first times
they have ever had to cash a check away
from home, he said. They do not understand
that we are not doubting their honesty.

Asked repeatedly whether there were dis disadvantages
advantages disadvantages to living in the frames, the students
finally agreed there are a few drawbacks. The
roof leaks and moths fly in at night. However,
they were quick to point out that there are no
problems with roaches or other crawling pests.
Hie students also admitted that the rooms are
a bit small and that closet space is cramped.
However, they pointed out that this lack of space
can be conquered by stowing carefully. One stu student
dent student hung a surfboard from the water pipes that
rn across the ceiling and used it as an extra
shelf.
The students have adapted to life in the frames,
and they try to impress upon visitors that they
enjoy living there. Habel explained it this way:
People walk by and say and to think guys
actually live in those places. Id like those people
to know that the frames arent really bad at all.

Jennings Annex
'Experiment In
Dorm Living
By BETTY DIAMOND /*^>
Alligator Correspondent
To take care of the ever-abundance of upper division women
students who were housed in dormitory study lounges, Jennings
Hall has secured a small building behind the dormitory and
appropriately named it the Jennings Annex.
The housing office has borrowed, until April, the old diet dieticians
icians dieticians cottage which has been vacant since September.
There are 20 girls living in the five apartments that make
up the cottage.
Miss Susan OHara, resident counselor for Jennings Hall,
explained that this was purely an experimental group.
The girls will give us an eye as to how things will be run
next year in the new Twin Towers, Miss OHara said.
The girls living in the Annex must be juniors or seniors
according to university standing. The rent is no more than
regular university housing.
Each apartment is equipped with a kitchen and two bedrooms.
Each of the apartments has its own private telephone.
The girls are under basically the same rules as the dormitory.
No boys are allowed in the apartments, unless there has been
an open house planned by the girls and overseen by the coun counselors
selors counselors of the dormitory. There is a small porch where the boys
and girls can gather. The boys can go up to the door of the apart apartment
ment apartment to get their dates.
The girls must sign out overnight, but regular sign outs are
optional.
We are working on a kind of buddy system, Miss OHara
explained. The girls must know where their room mates or friends
are going.
The doors in the Annex lock at 11:30 because all of the girls
living there are juniors or seniors.
Kathy Kraft, 3AS, is a transfer from Barry College in Miami.
She has been living in the Annex two weeks.
I really like living out in the Annex, Miss Kraft said.
Wanted: Parking
Near Norman Hall
By MARCIA GIORDANO
Alligator Correspondent
LOST: about 130 parking places near Norman Hall.
Recently, State Road Dept, crews have removed the parking
spaces on the east side of U.S. 441, from Archer Road north
to S.W. 7th Ave.
G. S. Burleson, Assistant Maintenance Engineer with the
State Road Deptartment, said the city of Gainesville requested
the action.
I guess the city felt like the traffic was too heavy for park parking,
ing, parking, said Burleson.
The State Road Traffic Planning Department made a survey
in August to see what should be put there, stated Burleson.
On Sept. 15', the final approval to revise that area was given
by the State Road Board. Three left turn lanes have been added
to the 2,956 ft. of road.
Capt. Courtenay Roberts, Commander of the Gainesville Traf Traffic
fic Traffic Division, said there was a necessity for the change be because
cause because of the volume of traffic. On S.W. 13th St. and Bth Ave.
there have been a number of serious accidents, he stated.
The first use of streets is traffic, he reminded. Parking
corned second. /



(Bettue UfendtsMs. \
Hm "YOU CAN REALLY GET IN |
BMI,on the action
H ERES WHAT YOU GET! j

1. FREE BIC PEN
(exp. Dec. 1, *66 ) Quick Save Carolyn Plaza
2. FREE DANISH BASKET and COFFEE
Wolfles Across from Campus
3. FREE $2 Polish Cloth
University Chevrolet 1515 N. Main
4. FREE GIANT 15 SUBMARINE SAND.
with purchase of 1, Worth 85?
The Snack Bar6l3 Nw 16th Ave.
5. FREE $1 RECORD CLEANING CLOTH
Top Tunes Record Shop 1230 W. Unlv
6. 25? Toward ANY PURCHASE
Jerrys North or South 13th St.
7. 50? Toward ANY DRY CLEANING
OY SHIRTS S& S Cleaners 503 SW 3rd St.
8. 1 FREE HAMBURGER
Burger Chef 715 NW 13th St.
9. 50? TO WARD ANY DR Y CLEANING
Tropical Shirt Laundry 402 NW 13th St.
10. 1/2 PRICE ON ANY SAND WICH
Roaring 20s lOll W. Unlv.
11. FREE DONUT & COFFEE
Bakers Dozen Across from Wolfles
12. 1/2 OFF ON BURGER BASKET
(exp 12/1/66) College Inn Across from campus

Over 20 Others Over 20 Others
WORTH $75 ONLY * i
25/o of proceeds donated to University of Florida Dollars for Scholars
ON CAMPUS P" I
N w
AND AT /'TEAR THIS CARD |
LOCAL NEWS OUT AND jgS SSisrl I
stands ca??II-Al keepw,thyou Jam 7" i

13. FREE ONE SURPRISE
You wont be disappointed
Dubs STEER ROOM 4560 NW 13th St.
14. FREE PIE AND COFFEE
University Inn Motel l9Ol S.W. 13th St.
15. 55% OFF LIST ON NEW TIRES
Tire City 405 NW 13th St.
16. FREE CHOICE OF $2.50 HAIR
CONDITIONING TREATMENT
DOES NOT APPLY TO
SHAMPOO & SET.
GOOD Mon. Wed. Phone 372-2394
Jacs Hair Stylist 917 N. Main
17. FREE 24 x 36 TRAVEL POSTER
House of Travel 3415 W. Univ.
18. FREE STP DECAL
v ates Auto Parts Across from Police Dept.
19. 1/2 PRICE MON. & TUE.
State Theatre W. Univ.
20. 40% OFF ON ANY RECAPPING
Gator Tire Service lO3O E. Univ.
21. sl.lO Chicken Special 75$
Captain Louis's Galley
309 NW 13th St. 231 NW 10th Ave.
22. FREE XEROX COPY
Quick Save Carolyn Plaza

Wednesday, November 2, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

23. 300 SHEETS NOTEBOOK PAPER 25 f
McCollums Drugs Esst or West Uni*.
24. FREE CHIU DOG with PURCHASE of 1
Dougs Dairy Twirl 2117 NW 6th St.
25. FREE 1/2 HOUR of PRACTICE
WITH CARD EVERY DAY
THROUGH DEC. 1
Happy Hour Billiards 207 N. Main St.
26. FREE TYPECLEANING, OILING
& ERASURE SHIELD
Royal Typewrtter Co. lO7 S.W. 7th St.
27 FREE PEPSI WITH SANDWICH
Schooner Room 1222 W. Unlv.
28. FREE NYLON TIP MARKING PEN
Cassels _ln The _Alr unv MNCPL AIRPORT
29. 25? Toward ANY sl.lO DINNER
Col. Sanders Kentucky Fneu uuicxen
214 NW 13th St. 207 NE 16th Ave. 114 SW 34th St.
30. 20% OFF ANY ORDER
Shelley's Behind Fla. Bookstore
31. FREE 10? DRINK WITH ORDER
Royal Castle w. Unlv.
32.
Gator Groomer -- Next to Unlv. Sta. Post Off.

Page 17



CBdB JIMMEY BAILEY
spor ts asst.
Saturday the Florida Gators face their stiffest test en route
to a possible SEC championship and perfect season.
Providing the stern opposition is Georgia, loser only to
upset-minded Miami. The Bulldogs are in a three-way tie
for the SEC lead with the Gators and Alabama.
Florida kept its perfect season and title hopes alive with
a 40 yard field goal by the ever fabulous Steve Spurrier against
Auburn last Saturday. The Gators surely faced their biggest
scare this season as the Auburn Tigers got the breaks and took
advantage of them.
The Georgia Bulldogs, however, had a much easier time
with North Carolina. The Bulldogs romped past the Tarheels
in 28-3 fashion getting an outstanding performance from soph sophomore
omore sophomore Kent Lawrence.
Alabama, the third team in the conference with title hopes,
slipped past Mississippi State, 27-14. Coach Paul (Bear) Bryant
expressed disatisfaction with the Crimson Tides play.
Georgia has one of the strongest ground games in the con conference
ference conference with Ronnie Jenkins carrying the brunt of the load.
They also have a formidable passing attack with either Kirby
Moore or Lynn Hughes as signal caller. Hughes, who usually
starts at defensive safety, has filled in for an injured Moore
and has turned in great offensive performances in the last
two games.
Jenkins, a 210-pound junior fullback, who made the All-SEC
sophomore selection last year, is currently the number two
leading rusher in the conference. He provides Georgia with a
ground game that is virtually unstoppable.
Jenkins runs a lot like Larry Smith of Florida except when
he is in a tight situation. He then runs over defending linemen,
linebackers, defensive backs, and anything else that gets in his
way.
Moore, a triple-threat junior quarterback from Dothan, Ala.,
blends well with Jenkins running. Moore is Georgias own
version of Spurrier. He is averaging almost 40 yards per kick
as a punter and has been tabbed as one of the fastest men in
the SEC.
The Bulldogs also boast the best field goal kicker in the SEC
in Bob Etter. Etter, who kicked 10 FGs in 13 attempts last year
is sailing along at a record-setting clip. He has good range
and is one of the most accurate kickers in the country.
Georgia presents one of the best kickoff and punt return
men in the SEC in the person of Kent Lawrence. Lawrence,
a 9.5 speedster, has broken lose for several long gains this year
and is second in rushing for Georgia.
One of Georgias best fortified positions is tackle where
All-America George Patton returns. Patton is in his third
season as the number one left mammoth. Patton is aided by 10
returning regulars and a host of tough juniors and sophomores.
Tackle Patton and safetyman Lynn Hughes were both selected
to Playboy Magazines pre-season All-America defensive unit.
So far this season, each has shown himself worthy of this honor.
The Bulldogs have a lot of notable talent with outstanding
credentials and stand as the best team the Gators will have to
face this season. They will provide the Gators with a tough test.
Florida will have to take Georgia seriously and play its best
game of the year to emerge from the battle as victor.
Riding atop a seven game winning streak are Ray Graves
charges, ripe for an upset. But the Gators have a great team and
are able to adjust to any situation.
They should adjust to the tune of a 27-13 victory.

HELPS PLAN STRATEGY

Coach Works By Phone

By BRUCE FLOWER
Alligator Correspondent
Fred Pancoast, offensive backfield coach for the
Fighting Gators, is nowhere near the team during
football games. He spends the entire game in the
press box telephoning information and recommend recommendations
ations recommendations for strategy to Ed Kensler, head offensive
coach, who is on the sidelines.
I only telephone information and make recom recommendations
mendations recommendations to Ed (Kensler)/* said Pancoast. Ed
and the coaches on the sidelines then make the
game strategy, but the final playing decisions are
up to Coach Graves.
Most offensive playing changes are made during
the spring and summer. Only slight variations are
made each week for the upcoming game. The game
films of both Florida and the upcoming opponent
are studied Sunday and Monday, and game strategy
is planned from them.
We used a new formation against Auburn and
planned to run more than usual, but as it turned
out, we threw more, Pancoast declared. Auburn
used their same defensive tactics, so we changed
our offensive by using a different body motion
In giving th ball to Smith.
According to Pancoast, the hardest offensive
decision this year was going for two points after
a touchdown during the FSU game.
Coach Graves also made the decision to use

the offensive second team to demoralize FSU. Sev Several
eral Several of the coaches did not agree with this deci decision,
sion, decision, but it turned out for the best, said Pan Pancoast.
coast. Pancoast.
Yes, Fenner was out all the way. What most
people dont consider is that he did not have com complete
plete complete control of the ball until he was out-of out-ofbounds,
bounds, out-ofbounds, contested Pancoast.
The only time coaches have really been concerned
about victory was during the Auburn game.
When Spurrier threw the intentional ground, we
were quite concerned about what to do, but he
actually had no choice. His decision on the field
to ground the ball and hope the judge would not
call a penalty was the correct one, said Pan Pancoast.
coast. Pancoast.
P
Pancoast feels Spurrier is probably the best
back ever to play in the S.E.C.
Is Spurrier in contention for the Heisman Trophy?
Definitely so, declares Pancoast. But he is
competing with three other great backs: Eddy,
from Notre Dame; Greise, from Purdue; and Lit Little,
tle, Little, from Penn State.
But lets forget about that for a while, said
Pancoast. Our main concern now is the S.E.C.
Georgia game this Saturday.

figs ~\TBfSSISSI§ t_v|- w '
JUDO CLUB TRAINS FOR STATE MEET
. . eliminations next week

Judo-Karate- Wrestling
Experts Battle For Titles

The fourth UF Invitational Judo-
Karate- Wrestling Championships
will be held on Saturday, Nov. 19,
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the
UF Gym.
Florida Gators have won the
championship twice. LSU has won
once.
Judo club members took part
in Homecoming festivities holding
individual matches last Saturday.
Team eliminations will be held
November 11. All club members
will battle for the honor of re representing
presenting representing UF against other state
teams on the 19.
University of Miami, FSU, Flor Florida
ida Florida Southern, Tampa, and South
Florida will enter the different
contests. The states top Junior

SPORTS

l, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 2, 1966

Page 18

College Teams will also enter
the matches.
The Judo-Karate-Wrestling club
is sponsored by the College of
Physical Education and Health
through department intramurals.
Any UF student that wants to
join the club should contact the
Physical Education department.
A clinic will also be conduct conducted
ed conducted on the 19 for students interest interested
ed interested in learning about wrestling.
Leoy A. Alitz, wrestling coach
at the United States Military Aca Academy
demy Academy will host the clinic in the
North end of the Florida Gym.

Baby Gators Tangle
Tough Hurricanes

GAINESVILLE The Orange
Bowl will be the scene of the
Ninth Annual Kiwanis Freshman
Football Classic Between the Uni University
versity University of Florida and the Uni University
versity University of Miami, Friday night at
8:15.
A crowd of 35,000 are expect expected
ed expected to be on hand as the two un unbeaten
beaten unbeaten teams tangle. Last year the
Baby Gators led by quarterback
Larry Rentz defeated Miami 34-
27. Miami leads in this series,
5-3.
This year, the Baby Gators are
led by former high school All-
America Jackie Eckdahl. The 6-2,
180 pound quarterback from
Gainesville has thrown three
touchdown passes and run for two
more as the Gators defeated Au Auburn
burn Auburn and Florida State. Eckdahl
has gained a total of 528 yards
in the two games.
Florida, also has some fine
receivers to go along with Eck Eckdahls
dahls Eckdahls arm. Leading the list is
split end Steve Tannen, from Mia Miami
mi Miami who has caught 11 passes for
148 yards and one touchdown. Flan Flankerback
kerback Flankerback Paul Maliska, from Win Winter
ter Winter Park and Guy McTheny from

Members of the Judo club in include
clude include Martien Carroll, Jack Haney,
Mike Powell, Kiyo Saji, David
Frisby, John Flynn, Clyde Kill Killer,
er, Killer, Carl Hayes, Steve Craig, Dav David
id David Bullock, Jerry Nghiem, and Ed
Rodriquez.
The list of outstanding wrestlers
at UF are Lars Balck, Bradley
Munroe, Billy Joe McCabe, and
Mike Magrino.
Outstanding Karate experts are
Peter Haddad, Pete Altman, Ted
Powers, Don Collyer,TedSatach Collyer,TedSatacher,
er, Collyer,TedSatacher, Rick Clark, Wayne Torbett,
Allen Gaither, and Sam Wiley.

vnfnam- |X* |
$ vv
, am*
- -**
JACKIE ECKDAHL
. . tough
Sarasota both have scored on pass
plays.
Miami defeated Florida State 16-
2 and Georgia Tech 25-17. The
Gators defeated Auburn 20-0 and
Florida State 34-20.



TEST YOUR DRIVING SKILL

Spend Funfilled Weekends Racing

By BILL McMATH
Alligator Correspondent
If you are tired of fraternity parties, woods and
beer parties, the local movie houses and cannot af afford
ford afford flying lessons, then, there is still away to spend
your week end rally racing in Gainesville.
A rally race is basically a test of driver ability
with the aid of a navigator over an exact driving
course within a specified time limit," said Charles
Mathis, former University of Florida student. Mathis
Is a member of the Gainesville Sports Car Club.
lliere are no regulations for types of automobiles
In a rally race, but, Mathis said participants usually
drive compact or sports cars.
Two rally clubs are in Gainesville. They are the
Gainesville Sports Car Club and the Sports Car Club
of America.

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The local club distributes Information to most
service stations and to all car dealers in Gainesville.
Membership is open and there are no dues.
The Gainesville Sports Car Club holds meetings
once a month in the Guarantee Federal Bank Build Building
ing Building on Main Street. Students interested in the meetings
and functions of the club can call Guarantee Federal
for exact dates, Mathis said.
Navigation is as important to the race as is driver
skllL Drivers leave the starting line in intervals
of three minutes. Then the job of the navigator is
to read the road signs and to give speed directions
from the Instruction sheet to the driver.
Rally races are timed to the .001 of a second in
most cases, Mathis said. The car approaching the

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Wednesday, November 2, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

most accurate time requirements in a race is named,
the winner.
A main point in the American rally race is that
die races are all held within legal speed limits.
A driver is automatically disqualified from the race
if he exceeds the legal speed limit.
A third type of race is the international rally
race.
High speed and the endurance car are character characteristics
istics characteristics of the International rally race," Mathis said.
The trans-Belgium and trans-Italian races are in international
ternational international races held In Europe annually. These races
are restricted to specified roads. Mathis said open
road races are on the wane and the Targo Floria
rally race in Sicily is the only recognized open road
race held annually.

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 2, 1966

By DAVID MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA Nobodys doing much talking about it be because
cause because the NCAA is getting pretty touchy these days but the
post-season college football bowls are starting to shape up.
Theres_a supposedly ironclad rule this year that NO bowl
invitations will be made before Nov. 21 -- the Monday after
many teams complete their regular seasons.
Thus Bear Bryant clams up when people ask him about
reports that fourth-ranked Alabama is headed for the Sugar
Bowl and Bobby Dodd brushes aside reports that fifth-ranked
Georgia Tech is Orange Bowl bound.
Theres one fact no one will deny: Theres going to be a
lot of Southern teams in the bowls again this winter.
Bowl Pact
That Rose Bowl pact between the Big Ten and the Pacific 8
keeps a lot of the Midwest and the West Coast out of the pic picture,
ture, picture, top-ranked Notre Dame has an anti-bowl policy and the
East has a scarify of candidates. p
This throws the spotlight on the Southland wherein seven of
the 18 top ranking teams in the nation currently reside.
The Orange, Cotton, Sugar, Gator, Bluebonnet and Liberty
bowls offer berth for a dozen teams.
Thus Alabama, Georgia Tech and seventh-ranked Florida,
all unbeaten at present, would appear to be shoo-ins and once oncebeaten
beaten oncebeaten Georgia and 10th-ranked Tennessee, Mississippi and Mia Miami
mi Miami Fla., all with just two losses, must be high on the bowl
want lists.
The Sugar i Bowl would have a natural if it pairs Alabama
against the winner of this Saturdays Florida-Georgia game.
Those two teams are expected to be co-champions of the South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference.
The winner of the Arkansas-Southern Methodist game Nov 12
can be expected to be the Cotton Bowl host against a Southern
team with the loser likely ending up in another bowl.
Perfect Season
This puts the Orange Bowl in position to pair Georgia Tech
against sixth-ranked Nebraska, the likely Big Eight kingwith
a very good possibility that both will post perfect seasons this
year.
The only team in the Atlantic Coast-Southern conferences re region
gion region that could be considered a bowl prospect at this stage is
independent Virginia Tech which now has a 5-1-1 record after
opening its season with a loss to Tulane. The two conference
leaders, Maryland in the ACC and William and Mary in the Sou Southern,
thern, Southern, have two losses each already and are likely to lose
some more.
The Miami Hurricanes have been gaining ground fast in the
bowl derby after upset wins over otherwise unbeaten Georgia
and Southern California. And Tennessees narrow losses to Geor Georgia
gia Georgia Tech 6-3 and Alabama 11-10 shouldn't be a bowl handicap
if the Vols win the,rest.
A major bowl bid obviously will be at stake when the Vnls
meet Ole Miss on Nov. 12. The winner of that game is virtually
assured an 8-2 record and likely will get a bid to the Cotton
x3OWI.
How s this for a bowl lineup: Rose -- UCLA-Purdue, Sugar-
Alabama-Florida, Orange-- Georgia Tech-Nebraska, Cotton--
Arkansas-Tennessee, Gator -- Mississippi-Miami, Bluebonnet
Southern Methodist-Georgia, and Liberty -- Houston-Syracuse.

Bowl Picture
UPI Hows this for a bowl
lineup: Rose -- UCLA Purdue,
Sugar Alabama Florida,
Orange Georgia Tech Ne Nebraska,
braska, Nebraska, Cotton Arkansas
Tennessee, Gator i Missis Mississippi
sippi Mississippi Miami, Bluebonnet
Southern Methodist Georgia,
and Liberty Memphis State
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WHILE FATHER WATCHES

Christian Plays Top Game

By EVAN LANGBEIN
Alligator Sports Writer
Among the VIPs who witnessed
the Florida-Auburn homecoming
game was State Superintendent of
Schools Floyd Christian.
He didnt come to town for
political reasons. He has a spec special
ial special interest in the Florida team
his son.
Tom Christian made his fath fathers
ers fathers trip to Gatorland well worth
the while. He played his finest
game of the season. In Head Coach
Graves terms, Tom Christian
became a man against Auburn.
Christians effort against the
Tigers actually was nothing
more than fulfillment of his poten potential.
tial. potential.
He runs the 40 yard dash in
4.7 seconds, which gives him quick
power into the line; he is one
of the strongest men on the Flor Florida
ida Florida team; and, he is a good pass
receiver.
In the Auburn game, Christian
displayed his best effort. He bull bulldozed
dozed bulldozed 22-yards on one offensive
dash and caught two more pas-

WEEKS BEST IN SEC

Yearout, Trimble Honored

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA -- Outstand Outstanding
ing Outstanding performances in losing efforts
often are overlooked. But that
was not the case this week for
Auburn linebacker Gusty Yearout.
The 202-pound junior from Bir Birmingham,
mingham, Birmingham, Ala., was named South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference lineman of the
week Tuesday by United Press
International for his valiant ef efforts
forts efforts in Auburns 30-27 loss to
seventh ranked Florida.
Switched prior to the game from
middle guard to linebacker, the
young law student ran one fum fumble
ble fumble recovery 91 yards for a touch touchdown,
down, touchdown, made another deep in Flor Florida
ida Florida territory that tied the score
at 27-all, and was recognized
throughout the afternoon as the
finest defensive performer in the
offensively-orientated game.
Another Alabama native, re reserve
serve reserve quarterback Wayne Trim Trimble
ble Trimble of Cullman and the Univer University
sity University of Alabama, earlier was named
Southeastern Conference back of
the week by UPI for his offensive
heroics in the fourth-ranked Crim Crimson
son Crimson Tides 27-14 victory over Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi State.
To win the weekly award, Tri Trimble
mble Trimble had to beat out three-time
winner Steve Spurrier of Florida.
Spurrier probably would have won
this week if he hadnt dominated
the honor so completely all sea season
son season long.
Spurrier, a 200-pound senior
from Johnson City, Tenn., com completed
pleted completed 27 of 40 passes for 259
yards and a touchdown, ran for

m
i|||||| v
§§L E flr *]
' Hr
ses for 22 yards. One of the re receptions
ceptions receptions was a big third down pass
on the Gators winning field goal
drive.
Christian adds more depth to
the Gator backfield which, prior
to the Auburn game, had been doip^

another touchdown, had a 47.5
yard punting average and kicked
a 40-yard field goal in the clos closing
ing closing minutes for the winning points
in Floridas victory over Auburn.
Whereas Triable gained more
yardage last Saturday than he had
in his previous five games, Spur Spurrier
rier Spurrier merely added to his already
glittering record. Spurrier has
now completed 117 of 177 passes,
66.1 per cent for 1,397 yards and
a nation-leading 14 touchdowns,
has 1,461 yards in total offense
for seven games, and has a 41.5-
yard punting average.
Other backs nominated this week
included sophomore tailback Rent
Lawrence of Georgia who ran for

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inated by the work-horse chores
of Larry Smith and Graham Mc-
Keel.
I got down on myself at the
beginning of the season, Chris Christian
tian Christian said. Playing behind Smith
and McKeel required a lot of
adjusting.
Tom has had to adjust to much
offensive rotation this year. He
started the season at fullback be behind
hind behind McKeel which demands a lot
of blocking, but Christian likes to
run the ball.
The coaches werent sure about
McKeels leg this year, so they
started me out at fullback, Tom
explains. But one of the coaches
told me that wed need two good
tailbacks. Id rather run the ball
so I was quick to take the op opportunity.
portunity. opportunity.
In the Gators offensive setup
the tailback bears the brunt of
the ball-carrying. In the Auburn
game Larry Smith could simply
not do it alone. He was slowed
by exhaustion. Christians strong
running eased the load on Smith.

106 yards and two touchdowns in
the Bulldogs 28-3 victory over
North Carolina and Tennessee
quarterback Dewey Warren who
completed 18 of 25 passes for
250 yards in the Vols 38-7 win
over Army.
Other linemen nominated this
week included sophomore tackle
Bill Stanfill of. Georgia, tackle
Jim Urbanek of Mississippi and
tackle Cecil Dowdy of Alabama.
visit
if )t &eb Uton
Where Everyone