Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Crowd, Pickets
Greet HHH
The arival and speaking appearance Friday of
Vice-President Hubert Humphrey highlighted UFs
74th homecoming.
Before a cheering cowd of 3,000, Humphrey and
his ertrouge of newsmen, and secret service agents
arived at Gainesville Muncipal Airport at 4:30 p.m.
An official greeting party headed by Gov. Haydon
Burns, Sen. George Smathers (D-Fla), Rep. Claude
Pepper, Billy Mathews, Gainesville mayor James
Richardson and Student Body president Buddy Jacobs
extended welcome greetings to Humphrey as he em embarked
barked embarked from the plane.
Humphrey was pesented a key to the city of
Gainesville, an honorary degree from a pharm pharmaceutical
aceutical pharmaceutical group and a stuffed baby alligator.
Almost an hour behind schedule, Humphrey and
visiting dignitaries finally climbed into a limousine
and sped from the airport.
After stopping at a friends house enroute to
here, Humphrey arived at Florida Gym where the
Blue Key Banquet was being held. Members of the
SDS picketed carying signs, Make Love, Not War,
Some of our Boys Cant come Home. Many of the
demonstrators were wearing black bands to signi signify
fy signify a state of mourning for our Gls in Viet Nam.

Vol. 49, No. 43 University of Florida Monday, October 31, 1966

Wizard Spurrier Great
In 'Closest Run-away

By DICK DENNIS
Alligator Sports Editor
Wizard of Odds Steve Spur Spurrier
rier Spurrier shocked Auburn back from
Fantasyland to reality before a
record crowd of 60.511 Homecom Homecoming

Jki ~
ImBME V
( Photo by Gerald Jones )
OOOH, I JUST CANT BEAR TO LOOK
. . says the Auburn War Eagle

The Florida
Alligator

ing Homecoming fans Saturday.
The smooth senior unlimbered
his strong right leg with 2:17
remaining and kicked the Tigers
rug out from under Head Coach
Shug Jordan with a 40- yard field
goal to give the Gators a 30-

A v /
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VICE PRESIDENT HUMPHREY
...Blue Key Speaker

27 win.
It was Spurriers first field
goal since the Northwestern game,
but the ball unwaveringly rose on
a straight line throught the goal
posts.
Splendid Steve earlier scored his
first TD of the season, a one oneyard
yard oneyard plunge which gave the Gators
a temporary 20-17 lead.
Richard Trapp, the SECs lead leading
ing leading scorer and pass receiver, ear earlier
lier earlier chalked up the games first
tally as he stood all alone in the
end zone waiting for a 10 yard
aerial from Spurrier.
It was Spuiriersfourteenth TD
pass of the season, equalling his
entire 1965 production.
Florida dominated this game
more than probably any other, but
good field position and some
flukes gave Auburn the breaks
they needed to stay close.
As defensive coach Gene Ellen Ellenson
son Ellenson said: This was the closest
run-away Ive ever seen.
The Gators scored on drives
of 13, 73, 69 and 71 yards. The
clinching field goal march spanned
49 yards.
Auburns offense had little hand
in the scoring, despite the 27
points. Lary Ellis matched Flor Floridas
idas Floridas first marker in just 12 sec sec(SEE
(SEE sec(SEE WIZARD PAGE 20)
* Ford, Goldner
Here Thursday
House Minority Leader Gerald
Ford and St. Petersburg Mayor
Herman Goldner will speak in
University Auditorium Thrusday
night at 8:15 in a Forums Com Committee
mittee Committee Florida Crossroads
presentation. /
Admission is 25 cents for stu students
dents students and $1.50 for general
public. Tickets are on sale at
the Florida Union ticket office.

Three Problems
Facing America
Today: Humphrey
By GENE NAIL
Editorial Assistant
Vice President Hubert Humphrey spoke of three wars Friday
night.
Speaking to an audience of 1,200 the Florida Blue Key Ban Banquet
quet Banquet in Florida Gym, the Vice President said three major in interrelated
terrelated interrelated problems are facing the United States today.
Today we face three great and interrelated tasks in the world,
he said, the pursuit of peace, the effort to narrow the gap
between the rich and poor nations and the necessity of sustain sustaining
ing sustaining an American economy able to bear its future responsibil responsibilities
ities responsibilities here and around the world.
Frequently departing from his prepared text, the Vice PRe PResident
sident PResident dwelled at length on the Viet Nam War and the our
committment to this tiny Asian Country.
The last three wars this nation has been engaged in had
their start in Asia.
Today, Humphrey said, peace is at stake in Asia. Peace
is at stake in a tortured South Viet Nam, in the struggle against
the classic power tactics of Communism.
We have committed once more, men, money and resources
to help the nations of Asia help themselves toward security
and independence, he said.
It wont be easy. It will be frustrating and at times heart heartbreaking.
breaking. heartbreaking.
But, if we are not to deny our leadershipif we are not
to deny the principles in which we believe, we must stay and
see it through, he emphasized.
Humphrey said the role of the United States in Asia and the
world was to provide leadership.
Either we are capable of exercising this leadership or some someone
one someone else will, he said.
There has never been a power vacuum in the world.
Because of the role of world leadership the United States
has assumed the Vice President said, we must ask ourselves
these questions.
Are we overreaching ourselves? Will we tire of our tasks?
Will our economy be able to support the burdens we cary at
home and abroad? Are we equal to the role of world leadership?
(SEE 3 PAGE 2)

Like Florida Whos Who
At Blue Key Banquet
Hail, Hail, the gangs all here was the by-word of the Flor Florida
ida Florida Blue Key Banquet Friday night.
Not only was Vice President Hubert Humphrey and most of
Floridas Congressional delegation there, but it looked like a
gathering of Floridas Whos Who,
Both Floridas U. S. Senators--Spessard Holland and George
Smathers sat at the head table with Humphrey and the other
distinguished guests.
Smathers introduced Humphrey, recalling the 1964 Democratic
Convention when he was asked to second Humphreys nomination
as the partys vice presidential candidate.
Another national figure at the banquet was Supreme Court
Justice Thomas C. Clark. Clark did not speak to the banquet
but he did speak at the ground-breaking ceremonies for the new
UF law school building earlier Friday afternoon.
Florida House speaker-elect Ralph Turlington was Emcee for
the banquet.
Before Humphrey was introduced by Smathers, Turlington in introduced
troduced introduced Head Coach Ray Graves to the audience.
After receiving a hardy round of applause, Coach Graves
introduced the offensive and defensive captains of the football
squad.
When Vice President Humphrey took the podium, he made
several quips about Graves reception.
I havent heard such applause for anyone I know in a long
time.
You might have thought I was down here to make a major
address, but Im here recruiting, he said referring to the
talk of football.
I just hope hes (Graves) is not as tired of defending as I
am, Humphrey said.
(SEE LIKE PAGE 5)
# Inside Todays Alligator
Todays Bullseye story focuses on Robert
King High and Claude Kirk visiting campus.
See page 9.
UPI News 4
Bill I CCVCI Editorial Pages 6,7
DULLScTc! Homecoming in Pictures 10, 11, 16
Sports 17, 19
Dennis Column 20
ii . i i y
P* t



I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 31, 1966

Page 2

3 Major Problems Cited

( FROM PAGE 1 )
I think so, Humphrey said, My answer is positively, yes.
For the answers affect the great majority of nations and the
great majority of the worlds people. Not only because of the
weight of our power, but because of the things we stand for.
In Tom Paine's words: The cause of America is in great mea measure
sure measure the cause of all mankind*, Humphery said.
While some people still consider foreign aid an extravagence,
he said, it is really a form of insurance.
If someone has a substitute for foreign aid, I'd like to hear
about it. The investment we make in foreign aid is certainly
less than that necessary to treat the symptons of massive econ economic
omic economic crisis and disorderand, yes, of war, he said.
But we cannot do all this alone, the Vice President said.
Nor should we.
But how can we expect others to follow if we do not lead?
We need to build an America so strong, so free, so able to
lead, that there may be no question about our purpose or our
endurance, Humphrey said about the third task facing the
United States.
Basis to this is the necessity of building an economy of growth
and opportunity, yet stable in times when it is tested, he said.
The reason for our economic success, Humphrey said, is
a creative partnership for prosperity among those in our society
who used to think of themselves as natural antagonists.
How long has it been since we've heard old and empty lables
such as labor boss' and economic royalist'?
The fact is that American government, business and labor
are increasingly united in the premise that a stronger and better
America will be to the common benefit of all, he said.
If we can build a society that operates on all cylinders,
others in the world may have some hope of doing the same.
If we cannot, who can, Humphrey said.
Americans are being called on today to see ... if self selfdenial
denial selfdenial can replace government.
Either we do it as responsible citizens, or we will have
to do it under government mandate, Humphrey said.
Dont sell your country short, he said, the American econ economic
omic economic miracle that has astounded the world before by doing the
impossible, is stronger than ever.
By making the American system work, he said, we can erase
any doubts the world may have about our ability to fulfill the
responsibility of leadership.
Leadership in today's world requires far more than a large
stock of gunboats and a hard fist at the conference table.
Leadership today requires more than the ability to go it
alonealthough we roust not be afraid to do so when necessary.
Leadership today requires understanding of the problems
we face, of the resources at hand, and of the objectives we seek,
Humphrey said.
It requires the ability, perhaps even more, to lead and in inspire
spire inspire in a sense of common enterprise.
This then, he added, is the test we must set ourselves ourselvesnot
not ourselvesnot to march alone, but to march in such away that others will
wish to join us.

SENIORS and GREEKS:
THIS WEEK ONLY!
SEMINOLE PHOTOGRAPHY
HAS BEEN EXTENDED
THROUGH THIS WEEK ONLY!
12 noon to 5 p.m.
6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY
THIS WEEK IS YOUR
LAST CHANCE
FOR YOUR PICTURE TO BE TAKEN
tm naatta Alligator nunii tho right to ragtaata tho typographical mm or mi advortuamoou and
a mtao ar tan tnr copy watch it ooaotitara obJoettoaaMa.
MO KamOM GUARANTEED, thoogh gaolrad postdoc win bo glna whoapTir pooalbla.
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BPPr
I ;
: 4 w* s
peace at stake
must see it through

UNIVERSITY FOOD SERVICE PRESENTS
ITS TREAT
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Choice Os Meat 2 Vegetables
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And Beverage w T

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Monday, October 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

1, Tbe Florida Alligator, Monday, October 31, 1966

MOB STORMS US/S LIBRARY

Leftist Riots Greet LBJ

By RAY F. HERNDON
United Press International
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (UPI)
- Leftist-led riots against Pre President
sident President Johnson erupted in seven
cities Sunday during the Chief
Executives visit to Malaysia.
One demonstrator was killed
and at least 16 others injured
in the worst violence of the Pre Presidents
sidents Presidents Asian tour.
In Kuala Lumpur, police gunfire
killed one person and wounded two
others when a screaming mob arm armed
ed armed with rocks, sticks and iron pipes
attacked the U. S. Information Ser Service
vice Service library about two miles from
parliament building where Pre President
sident President Johnson was meeting with
the Malaysian cabinet.
At least 171 persons were arest arested.
ed. arested.
Other riots broke out in Penang,
Malacca, Ipoh, Klang Seremban
and Muar as demonstrations
against Johnson and American pol policies
icies policies in Viet Nam swept the
country shortly after Johnson ar arrived
rived arrived from Bangkok, Thailand.
Malaysian Prime Minister Ab Abdul
dul Abdul Rahman said the demonstra demonstrations
tions demonstrations were an attempt by Com Communists
munists Communists and Communist sym sympathizers
pathizers sympathizers to embarass our coun country
try country and absolved police of blame
for the injuries.
But the president of Malays
Peking-oriented Labor party, Dr.
Tan Chee Khoon, sent a protest
telegram to Johnson and denounc-
Goes Berserk
Shoots Fellow
Employees
CHICAGO (UPI) A man scream screaming
ing screaming Im doing it for the kids
ran berserk through a Curtis
Candy Co. factory last week shoot shooting
ing shooting at fellow employes. At least
one man was killed and two more
were wounded.

Ifyoudo not
think about
your future...
you cannot
have one.

IN THE AIR
- MUNICIPAL AIRPORT WALDO ROAD

ed the use of gunfire as uncall uncalled
ed uncalled for and inhuman.
The shooting at the USIS li library
brary library in Kuala Lumpur broke
out when riot police charged
into a mob of about 500 dem demonstrators,
onstrators, demonstrators, mostly Chinese, who
stormed the building and ripped
down American and Malaysian
flags.
The First Lady and President

Burglar Swipes
Italian Masterpiece

By JAMES TOUHY
CHICAGO (UPI) An acrobatic
burglar invaded Chicagos Art
Institute early Sunday and stole
a 16th century Italian masterpiece
by Coreggio, valued at $500,000.
Authorities said the painting was
insured but for far less than its
value.
Institute authorities feared
the Madona and Child with the
Infant St. John, may have been
damaged during the thiefs es escape.
cape. escape.
The 25 by 19 inch painting on
a slab of wood was wrenched from
the wall to which it was screw screwed
ed screwed in a gallery on the second
floor at the northwest end of
the vast block square building.
Clutching the 15-pound painting,
the thief raced through 10 gall galleries,
eries, galleries, stripping the work of
pieces of its intricately carved
frame as he ran to a window,
nearly 200 yards away, at the
southeast end of the building.
Leaps To Roof
The burglar pulled back the
screen, smashed one of four 3
by 4 foot panes from a window
and leaped to a roof 20 feet below.

Johnson had only a 22-hour stay
in Kuala Lumpur before de departing
parting departing for Seoul, South Korea,
and the windup of their 25,000-
mile Asian and Pacific tour.
You are very susceptible to
beauty, and your city glows with
grace and beauty, Mrs. Johnson
told a news conference. I would
love to return some day.

Police and Federal Bureau of
Investigation agents found a dent 4
in a ventilator 6 feet above the
roof onto which the thief dropped.
They were unsure whether the
thief might have tossed the paint painting
ing painting to the roof before he leaped.
Charles C. Cunningham, admin administrative
istrative administrative director of the institute,
said, if it was dropped, it could
have been damaged.
Cunningham also feared that
the painting might suffer further
damage if the thief stores it
under adverse temperature and
humidity conditions.
It is a wood panel and very
definitely changes with changes in
humidity, much more so than can canvas,
vas, canvas, Cunningham said.
Cunningham said the painting
would not be readily marketable.
He (the burglar) would have a
great difficulty selling it because I
assume that anyone wanting to pay
the price would check on the paint paintings
ings paintings authenticity and discover it
was stolen, Cunningham said.
Asked whether the institute
would agree to ransom the paint painting
ing painting from the thief if an offer was
received Cunningham said, it
has not been discussed yet with
trustees and police.

WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD FOR
YOU as a trained Airline Pilot or a Pilot in |
Private Industry? Your future is limitless!
Learning to fly will be the soundest invest investment
ment investment you can make in your future. Pilots
are in great demand! Why? More new
jets are flying longer, carrying more pas passengers
sengers passengers and cargo than ever before...
and there is a growing number of aircraft
in commercial fleets. For years the avia aviation
tion aviation industry's pilots have been supplied
by the military... today this source cannot
provide the pilots so greatly demanded.
Fifty per cent of the pilots in one major
airline will retire in the next 15 years.
APPROXIMATE SALARIES OF AIRLINE
CAPTAINS ranges from $20,000 to $35,000
per year. After onlv two years one major
airline pays pno.s syro a month! Airline
Pilots also enjoy many fringe benefits too:
Paid life insurance, travel benefits, and
retirement programs... at 60, a ranking
pilot retires on more than $20,000 a year,
says one airline.
PLAN YOUR FUTURE NOW! GET SET TO TODAY
DAY TODAY FOR YOUR HIGH PAYING, PRESTIGE
CAREER IN AVIATION AT CASSELS IN THE
AIR . FULLY STAFFED AND EQUIP EQUIPPED
PED EQUIPPED SO YOU CAN BEGIN TRAINING AT
ANY TIME!

America's Choice For '66:
Prosperity Or Negativity
EDITORS NOTE: In the following two dispatches, the chair chairmen
men chairmen of the National Committees of the Democratic and Re Republican
publican Republican parties sum up the record and describe what each
party offers the voter on Nov. 8.
By JOHN M. BAILEY
Chariman Democratic
National Committee
When America goes to the polls Tuesday Nov. 8 our citizens
will have the opportunity to decide the major issue of the 1966
election-the progress of the worlds most powerful nation.
At this time we are in the longest continual period of econ economic
omic economic prosperity in our entire 190-year history. Unemployment
stands at less than 4 per cent, the lowest figure in more than
a dozen years. The Gross National Product has soared to more
than S7OO billion.
This basic economic strength has been gained from Democra Democratic
tic Democratic fiscal policy. It has moved our country forward swiftly and
surely and permitted us to propose the great social programs
which have been approved under these Democratic admin administrations.
istrations. administrations.
It has permitted our country to maintain superioity in space
and in national defense. It has contributed to our nations for foreign
eign foreign policy successes around the globe. It has enabled us to
cary a message of hope and accomplishn.ent to people of all
lands.
Almost without exception the major Democratic policies and
programs have been opposed by the majority of Republicans
in the Congress of the United States. The oppositionpparty
grumbled against programs of progress. They sought to ob obstruct
struct obstruct the most compassionate legislation. They have been ne negative.
gative. negative. They are backward looking. They are fearful.
The Republicans today must bear the responsibility for ob obstructing
structing obstructing this legislation which represents major advances for
our people and which contributes to the total strength of our
country.
Not only have they been negative in their outlook but they
have not been in concert in offering alternates to these programs.
Therefore, the 1966 election poses the clear question to every
American: will America move forward under Democratic lead leadership
ership leadership or will it stifle under the heavy veil of Republican ne negativism?
gativism? negativism?
The answer is up to you.

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GATOR ADVERTISERS
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Monday, October 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

_ / l
Like Floridas Whos Who

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( FROM PAGE 1 )
I teel perfectly safe tonight, he said, the president is in
Thailand.
Humphrey noted that both John F. Kennedy and President
Lyndon Johnson had spoken at past Blue Key Banquets prior
to being elected to the top office.
I dont want anyone to draw any conclusions why Im here,
he said.
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Robert King High entered
the Florida Gym, site of the banquet, shortly before Humphrey
was scheduled to speak.
Chip Block, Blue Key president, said protocol prevented
High from being introduced to Humphrey and the Banquet.
High had earlier been scheduled to take the airport-to-ban airport-to-banquet
quet airport-to-banquet ride with the Vice President, but missed the opportunity.
Also on hand for the festive banquet were three possible can candidates
didates candidates for the Senate seat to be vacated by Smathers. Only one
--former governor Leoy Collins--of the three was introduced.
But the other two candidates--U. S. Rep. Claude Pepper and
U. S. Rep Charles Bennet, made the rounds at the start of the
banquet greeting the guests.
Besides Collins, four other fromer Florida governors were
at the banquet: Doyle Carlton, Fuller Warren, Supreme Court
Justice Millard Caldwell, and U. S. Sen. Spessard Holland.
Also attending were most of the Florida Cabinet, Gov. Hay Haydon
don Haydon Burns, state senate and house members, state supreme
court justices and Chief Justice Campbell Thornal.
FLORIDA PIZZA
Gator Style
Specializing in Pizza To Go
Call Ahead, We Will Have It Ready For You
376-9407
GUARANTEED BEST
YOU HAVE EVER EATEN,
OR YOUR MONEY REFUNDED j
THERE IS NO FINER ( SY N,
PIZZA tT
ANYWHERE [w7]
FLORIDA PIZZA
613 N.W. Ave. L*J
(across street from Thrift-Way Grocery Store)
Formerly The Snack Bar

SIRPt
J/m mj
W Jf
Bk fr
LEROY COLLINS
. . did get in



Page 6

', The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 31, 1966

The Florida Alligator
'JK Ij Om
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR DICK DENNIS
Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecessaniy reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff Is the editorial in the left
column.
Traffic Jam
A lot of talk is devoted to the Uni Universitys
versitys Universitys traffic and parking problems.
Almost every month, another study
is announced or another plan proposed
-for the furture.
On the other hand, nobody seems to
pay much attention to whats causing many
of our problems right now.
Take one example -a traffic light.
Its at the corner of SW 13 Street and
SW sth Avenue, the street that most
of the traffic from the girls dormitory
area exits on. When it changes, the
cars on SW sth have exactly seven se seconds
conds seconds . thats right, seven seconds,
roughly enough for three cars to
move. During peak times of day, there
are cars backed up by the dozens, be because
cause because of this.
In addition the ridiculously short time
allowed for cars on SW sth Avenue to
move (it stays green facing SW 13th
Street a full 90 seconds), the light does doesnt
nt doesnt seem to be timed with another one
a hundred yards away. Thus, traffic on
SW 13th Street pulls away from one
light, only to be stopped by the next.
In the future, to use the preferred
phrase, these lights will have to be re replaced
placed replaced with a more sophisticated, auto autoactuated
actuated autoactuated system that can change its tim timing
ing timing to suit changing traffic patterns during
the day.
But now -- instead of weeping and
wailing and calling for surveys and stud-*
ies -- something helpful could still be
done.
Someone could ask the city to send
out a man with a screwdriver to ad adjust
just adjust the light more satisfactorily.
It would help*

SPEAKING OUT

The Code: Going National?

By D. ANSON
Math Department
A new nationwide university system operating
code was approved Tuesday by the Defense De Department
partment Department meeting in Washington.
The new code limits student activities to the
educational goals of the university program.
In a new section of the code, entitled Student
Freedom and Responsibility (meaning Student
Responsibility), regulations concerning academic
freedom and policies are established for students.
These rules are similar to those established for
Boot Camp Marine Recruits some years ago.
The new code gives individual generals final
authority in admitting new student recruits to the
campus. Generals are now permitted to demand
a diversity of content and balance oflopinion in
student forums.
(When contacted by this Intrepid Reporter last
night at the Pentagram, General McNamara ad admitted
mitted admitted that he was unable to define diversity.
He did define balance, however, as the re regulation
gulation regulation non-traditional military application of
pacification and firepower for its optimum effect
upon the power structure of the strategic ham hamlet.)
let.) hamlet.)
Generals may also rule on (against) the dis-

LOS ANGELES -- This is where
the candidates are campaigning for
Governor of California. This is
where the votes are. This is the
heartland of California politics.
And should you ask an expert
whos going to win next month,
hell likely shake his head, purse
his lips and say frowningly, It
all depends on how L.A. goes.
Thus, in order to bring you a
clear picture of whos going to
win next month, I set forth
to interview In depth the
typical, average man on the
street in order to probe the opin opinions
ions opinions of the typical, average Los
Angeles voter on the candidates and
issues.
The area selected for this ran random
dom random sampling was a few blocks
along Sunset boulevard in the very
heart of this heartland --an area
known as the Sunset Strip.
Hie first typical, average re resident
sident resident I bumped into was wearing
pigtails, flowered trousers, a
green woollen cape and a goatee.
Hi, there, sir or madame, as
the case may be, I said in the

tribution and content of printed materials and pe petitions
titions petitions distributed on campus.
The code also gives the Defense Department
the power to maintain standards of journalistic
responsibility in student publications. Tlie Se Secretary
cretary Secretary of Defense will henceforth be considered
the publisher of all such material. Therefore the
Defense Department will have final authority in all
student publications. (For in one may read
to censor, to abolish, to change the names
of, etc.)
Students will have freedom of assembly, under
the new code, as long as they do not violate
Federal Law or the Uniform Code of Military
Justice in their gatherings. Such gatherings will
also be required not to disrupt educational pro programs,
grams, programs, para-military operations, or the status
quo.
Senator Lister Hill (D-Ala.) commented on these
moves Wednesday.
These are not rules as much as Defense
Department policy, Hill said. This is merely
an updating of the policy manual. Hill also said
he could not comment on particulars because
there are none.
A reliable Washington source revealed this
morning that no copies of the new code would be
made available to anybody.

'JTst' 'MM
& Hi

Our Man Hoppe

By ART HOPPE
Alligator Columnist

best poll-taking traditions, who
do you feel is going to win?
Man, he said dreamily, ask
me about flowers. Right now, Im
thinking flowers.
Putting him down as uncom uncommitted,
mitted, uncommitted, I allowed him to drift
off and approached another typi typical,
cal, typical, average resident --a large
gentleman in black jeans, boots
and leather jacket sitting astride
a large motorcycle.
Cool it, he said, mothers
in the go-go getting chicks.
Before I could press him with
questions on the vital issues of
the day, his mother returned. The
mother was his spitting image in
dress, manner and motorcycle.
Except the mother was slightly
larger and had a bushy beard.
I decided not to pry.
Stepping into a typical average
establishment called The Whisky
a-Go-Go, I spent two hours ex exhaustively
haustively exhaustively interviewing such typi typical,
cal, typical, average voters as a little
old boy in short pants and tennis
shoes, a lady in spangled trou trousers
sers trousers and matching halter, and
something in a sailor suit, black
net stockings and deerskin boots
eating raisins.
On the way out, I did run into
one young man with a moderate
page-boy cut who said he felt
most local residents would favor
Mr. Ronald Reagan because they
identify. But he didnt seem typ typical.
ical. typical.
Extrapolating this data should
give you a much clearer picture
of public opinion in this heart heartland
land heartland of California politics.
True, the poll will probably be
pooh-poohed by some critics on
the grounds that the Sunset Strip
is not representative. This just
shows that some critics dont know
California politics.

JO ANN LANGWORTHY
General Assignment Editor

STAFF WRITERS Bob Beck, Sue Froemke, Barbara Gefen,
Maury Olicker, Kathie Keim, Jean Mamlin, Frank Shepherd, Aggie
Fowles, Justine Hartman.
ASSISTANT EDITORS -- Judy Redfern, Sherrie Braswell, Toni
Giliberti, Joe Torchia, Nick Tatro, Tyler Tucker, John Briggs,
KenGarst, Margie Green.

1
Florida Alligator Staff

NICK ARROYO
Photo Editor

4 >
Campus
Mirror
By 808 MENAKER
Alligator Managing Editor
Tliis is another chapter of my
forth-coming book, The Silly
Games People Play, subtitled
How to Dabble In VolitKj; on
the Third Floor.
Seems that in my last column
on campus politics I inadvertantly
left out one very important per person
son person in considering possible choices
for student body president in the
Winter elections.
John Darlson, a Phi Delta Theta
and student body treasurer, would
seem to be a strong candidate,
both in terms of qualifications and
his physical appearance. The se second
cond second factor may be more impor important
tant important than the first. Sometimes a
pretty face goes over big with
the girls, regardless of what qua qualifications
lifications qualifications stand behind it. Im
not saying this is the case with
John Darlson, but it has happen happened
ed happened too many times in the past
for me not to be leery.
Right now, a Draft Fred
Breeze movement might prove
very popular. Breeze has done
more than any other would-be
aspirant for the top post (if he
is an aspirant) in the way of
qualifications. Fred is popular just
about everywhere -- except on
the third floor. A certain person
active in fraternity affairs might
be the Greek needed to balance
the ticket and would be an ex excellent
cellent excellent choice to run with Breeze.
* *
Word has reached me that Flor Florida
ida Florida Blue Key has liberalized its
requirements for membership.
This old bit of having a major
and two minors no longer is
the criteria for membership. Be Being
ing Being generally active in one field
of endeavor is now enough. I won wonder
der wonder if that new group, Univer University
sity University Circle,has anything to do with
FBK loosening up its require requirements.
ments. requirements. Im glad it has done so.
Now many more hard-working stu students
dents students will be able to dangle the
big blue from their belts if
they want to.
* *
When Assistant Business Man Manager
ager Manager Charles Goodyear told me
Tuesday that Florida Field would
hold 57,100 maximum attendance,
he was right but only in one
respect. That was probably the
maximum paid attendance, but Sat Saturdays
urdays Saturdays figure counted everyone in
the stadium Coke vendors, press
box, presidents box, policemen
and possibly the football teams.
Make the maximum capactiy some somewhere
where somewhere around 60,000. To be exact
the figure Saturday was 60,511.
I enjoyed the card section while
working in the press box Satur Saturday.
day. Saturday. Its just too bad that around
99 per cent of the student body
never get to see it perform. Also
understand the card section is get getting
ting getting bloc seating at the Georgia
game. Looks like more of the
peons get left out in the cold
literally.

CAROL HEFNER
Society Editor

GENE NAIL
Editorial Assistant

NEWT SIMMONS
Wire Editor



Doesnt Like
Starkey View
EDITOR:
Thanks loads for again publish publishing
ing publishing the splendid, profound, eye eyeopening
opening eyeopening sheet by your foreign cor correspondent
respondent correspondent from never-never land,
Joel Starkey.
His latest "writings were of
particular interest to me. Not
from any literary or philosophi philosophical
cal philosophical point of view, you understand.
Heavens no! Sometimes even I
have profound thoughts Id like
to express. The only trouble is,
when I have more than three beers
I can never get roy portable type typewriter
writer typewriter out of its case.
Mr. Starkeys latest contribu contribution,
tion, contribution, however, was interesting in
a different respect. I must con confess
fess confess I discovered it purely by ac accident.
cident. accident. But we mustnt discount
the merit of my find simply be because
cause because it was an accident. After
all, Christine Keelers true worth
was discovered "purely by ac accident.
cident. accident. -T
But, back to Starkey. My dis discovery
covery discovery never would have been made
if I didnt have rats in my room.
I returned to my room Friday,
after third period, and found an
enormous rat dragging off my fav favorite
orite favorite canary yellow toilet paper.
"What a low blow, rat.
Seizing my Alligator, I turned
to the editorial page and began
cutting out columns in the hopes
that the rat would put down my
toilet paper and take the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator editorial page, instead.
Thats when I made my discovery!
Starkeys letter, when cut out,
made a perfect little sheet.
W. AKINS, 3JM
(EDITORS NOTE: You put Co Columbus
lumbus Columbus to shame.)

Go Home,
Claude Kirk
EDITOR:
The general election is before
us. The states highest office is
being contested. The issues con concern
cern concern Florida students.
Several of our State Legisla Legislators
tors Legislators have declared the Republican
candidates White Papers to be
either ignorance or fraud. No won wonder
der wonder the Republicans have such an
acrimonious following; they cant
figure out whats eating them themselves!
selves! themselves! What is their swan-song?
Strangers is Paradox?
These White Papers, concocted
by an expert, promise harvest harvesting
ing harvesting of the states Water Hycinth
resources to establish a new cat cattlefeed
tlefeed cattlefeed industry. Since hycinths are
98 per cent water and 2 per
cent useless bulk this proposal
would seem a typical serving of
Republican swamp-gas straight
from huckster heaven. Couldnt
they better use the hycinths as
ticking for their KKK constituency?
Really, should Alberts cousins be
splashed out of bed by hycinth hycinthhunting
hunting hycinthhunting Republican ^experts?
The Republican candidates pub public
lic public record is equally interesting.
Does he have one? Did he help
finnce Duvals school disaccred disaccreditation?
itation? disaccreditation? Was he bored with all
that public corruption in Jackson Jacksonville?
ville? Jacksonville? Could he be expert on
crime?
Accordingly, every responsible
newspaper in Florida has endor endorsed
sed endorsed the Democratic nominee. His
programs are well known, includ including
ing including the proposal to lower the vot voting
ing voting age. The campus precincts will
certify the political l maturity of
Florida students. I hope we pass.
KENNETH COLLINS

EDITOR:
I owe to Dr. Kent Bradley a 14-inch thoracic scar, a changed
conception of what's truly valuable in life, and a deep expression
of gratitude.
Last February, having had a "bad cold and chest pains for
nearly a month, I went to the infirmary one rainy morning with
the intention of getting some nosedrops and seeing a doctor.
Having gone through the standard get-your-folder, have-your have-yourtemperature-taken
temperature-taken have-yourtemperature-taken procedure, I was called into see Dr. Bradley
who until this time was unknown to me. Dr. Bradley discovered
that I had severe pneumonia and admitted me upstairs. However,
due to Dr. Bradleys conscientious attention to my case, he
discovered a cyst on the pericardium which required diagnosis.
Because of Dr. Bradleys efforts, arrangements were made
after the pneumonia had cleared for my transferral to the Med Medical
ical Medical Center where in March I underwent surgery for removal
of the cyst.
The professionalism and ethical manner in which my entire
case was handled left me with deep admiration for this man both
as a person and as a physician.
During my stay at the infirmary and the Medical Center, I
was regularly visited by both Dr. Bradley and Dr. Hall, director
of the infirmary. They both expressed sincere concern, did
everything possible to aid me and gave up a great deal of their
valuable time to answer the myriad questions posed by me and
my family.
The article in Tuesdays Alligator attacking Dr. Bradley and
blaming Dr. Hall made me see red. All the information in that
article was news to me, yet, surprised as I was to learn of
Dr. Bradleys past drug addiction, I was still more than slightly
upset at the way this article had manipulated the truth.
I feel that most probably the actual facts presented in that
article are ture -- but truth alone has never been a guarantee
of justice. And in this case, it has been used to administer to
both Drs. Hall and Bradley grave injustice.
I am in no way justifying Dr. Bradleys past drug addiction,
but does the general reader realize the difference in severity
of cause between having ones license suspended and having it
revoked? Bradleys license was re-issued, "three psychiatrists
and several other doctors pronounced him cured, he had "glow-

EDITOR:
As you probably know, the peo people
ple people of Diamond Village have a
severe problem of traffic safety
due to the absence of a traffic
light at the temporary access road
on Thirteenth Street. Our requests
for a light have been repeatedly
ignored. We are not sure of all
the administrative offices on cam campus
pus campus that are responsible for traf traffic
fic traffic safety and stop light erection
but we are absolutely certain that
some of the most skillful buck buckpassers
passers buckpassers in the world are employed
by the University of Florida.
Mr. William E. Neylands, As Assistant
sistant Assistant Director, Housing Division,
told me yesterday that no stop
light can be erected until the road
is completed and the State Road
Department can survey the traf traffic
fic traffic flow. I wonder if there was
a traffic survey to authorize the

Card Section Ruined Show

EDITOR:
I am sure that all my fellow students will
agree that the Homecoming Game against Auburn
He Agrees
EDITOR:
I feel compelled to vent my wrath toward the
leader of the Card Section at the Homecoming
game.
Im sure most of the fans around the area
would have appreciated it very much if he would
have given the instructions to the card holders
via a megaphone, and not a loudspeaker system
capable of drowning out any music coming from
the field.
I dont know if anyone else has ever complain complained
ed complained about tls noise, but since this was my first
time near the forty yard line, (my seat, by the
way, was located in the aisle) I had hoped that
it would have been a more memorable occas occasion.
ion. occasion.
Please have pity on those few who want to
hear the half time ceremonies.
9
£ 808 RAY, 2 UC

Blasts Article On Dr. Bradley

Diamond Editor Hits Authorities

stop light that was put in front
of Dr. J. Wayne Reitzs house
on University Avenue just a few
weeks ago. Could it be that the
traffic from Dr. Reitzs home is
equal to the traffic of the 208
families of Diamond Village? If
Dr. Reitz can cut the red tape
and get a stop light for himself
and his own small family, could
he have the kindness to help us
cut some red tape? Are the lives
of the men, women and children
of Diamond Village less impor important
tant important than the convenience of Dr.
Reitz? Will Dr. Reitz wait un until
til until someone is killed or seriously
injured before he sees our need?
The editorial from our October
14 issue of The Dusty Diamond
is enclosed. Please print this let letter
ter letter and the editorial if you pos possibly
sibly possibly can.
ROBERT EVANS,
Editor, Dusty Diamond

was spectacular. The halftime show would have
been enjoyable for those sitting in the East
stands had it not been for one major thing, name namely
ly namely the card section.
The only complaint I am voicing about the
card section is that whoever was giving them
instructions made it rather impossible for those
sitting in the stands to hear the halftime show.
How in the world can students hear the music
when someone is speaking through the intercom
and drowning out the music? Even when students
asked him to allow them to hear the halftime
music, he still kept talking, all the way through
the halftime show.
The Fightin Gator Band gives one of the best
halftime performances I have heard, and it is
thoroughly disgusting that they had to have been
drowned out by someone who apparantly shows
little respect towards them and their audience.
They put in a lot of hours of practice for half halftime,
time, halftime, and they may as not waste their time, need
there be someone else who makes it impossible
to hear the performance.
DAVID CRITCHFIELD, lUC

Monday, October 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

ing letters of reference, was very popular with the students,
a fellow physician said he was a cheerful person and good
physician. See how the very same facts can tell the reader
a very different story?
I agree that there is room for improvement in our infirmary
but shall we rationalize that the end justifies the means? Must
we blacken a mans hard-earned reputation by warping the truth
to achieve reform? As a journalism major, I find it dispicable
to see the priceless privilege of free press turned into such a
deceptive and destructive tool. Until we as citizens have made
an equally as admirable achievement as that evidenced by be becoming
coming becoming a physician, we do not begin to have the right to be so
righteous and critical.
You blamed Dr. Hall, implying incompentence, for hiring
Dr. Bradley. There was no reason why Dr. Bradley should not
have been hired in light of the factors above stated. It is a sad
commentary on humanity when a man such as Dr, Hall is con condefiinevi
defiinevi condefiinevi for estending faith and confidence to another man, who
by all reliable evidence, fully deserves it.
Mistakes have been made regarding the infirmary, granted.
I feel that one such serious mistake was in the case of Dr. Ariail.
Truly, this case was a tragedy. But anyone who has even the
basic ability to reason logically must see that equating the case
of the late Dr. Ariail with that of Dr. Bradley is not only gross
exaggeration but an absurdity.
I am only glad that Dr. Bradley (who is presently doing renal
research at Indiana University) is not here to receive directly
this unwarranted kick in the teeth. As a student here, I am deep deeply
ly deeply ashamed to see this happening through what portends to be a
representative organ of the student body. I feel compelled,
both as a journalist and for my above stated personal reasons,
to do what I can to repair what damage has already been done
and to eliminate any further unjustified defamation.
SHARON (SAM) MORLAN, 4 JM
(EDITORS NOTE: The article in question was in no way
intended to smear Dr. Bradley. Its sole intent was to indicate
that someone whose license was under suspension was hired
by the UF Infirmary a practice we frown on regardless of
the parties involved.)

(EDITORS NOTE: Here it is.)
* *
The people of Diamond Village
are a patient, long-suffering group
that has too long been ignored
and not considered by the great
white fathers in the red brick
building on Thirteenth Street.
Okay, I wont hedge; I mean you,
J. Wayne Reitz. Either Dr. Reitz
is not informed of the terrible
plight of the residents of Diamond
Village or he is informed and
does not feel the situation warrants
his attention. Only seldom have we
screamed when we were stepped
upon, and then only meekly, al always
ways always exercising extreme care not
to point the finger of accusation
at the man with the real respon responsibility.
sibility. responsibility. People who have suffered
for the entire thirteen months of
the villages existence are able to

recall many long-standing injus injustices
tices injustices and inconveniences that were
finally corrected only after vil villagers
lagers villagers became so irate that pro protest
test protest marches and other publicity publicitygetting
getting publicitygetting tactics were threatened.
We have always been pacified just
before the flame hit the power;
but we/ have always settled for
second/best. So much for the past.
Right now, today, the village
is. srijl surrounded by a narrow,
often- extremely bumpy
road that is tittle more than a
series of pot holes. To my know knowledge,
ledge, knowledge, this that is worse
than the roads in the ghettos of
downtown Gainesville, has never
been graded since the construction
began. Now, today, villagers must
enter either through a nearly im impassable
passable impassable road on the south side
(behind J. Hillis Miller Medical
Center) or through another nearly
impassable entrance from Thir Thirteenth
teenth Thirteenth Street. We are all fami familiar
liar familiar with the curb bumping that
is necessary to enter from Thir Thirteenth
teenth Thirteenth Street and the deep mud
holes near the entrance.
Why, J. Wayne Reitz, cant we
have a stop light on Thirteenth
Street to protect the lives of our
wives and children at this extreme extremely
ly extremely dangerous entrance to the vil village?
lage? village? Must you wait until someone
is killed before you see the need?
We need a stop light on Thirteenth
Street and we need it now, today!!!
We are told by housing that a
stop light is not possible because
the State Road Department will
not allow a stop light on a tem temporary
porary temporary access road to a U.S.
highway.
We believe Dr. Reitz is an
outspoken leader who does not hes hesitate
itate hesitate to disagree with the highest
officials in state government when
he seeks to gain the things he
and others know are necessary if
excellence is to be achieved at
our university; but if Dr. Reitz
is to continue to be viewed with
favor by the men, women, and
children of Diamond Village, he
must exert immediate leadership
in the area of road building and
stop light erection.

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
1965 HONDA I 50 f 3,500 miles,
brand new condition S4OO. Sony
Model CS-300 4-track stereo tape
recorder. Cost over S4OO, sell for
S2OO. EKO steel string guitar,
never used. Cost $125 with case,
sell for $75. Call 378-6187. De Definite
finite Definite answer between midnight
and 1 a.m. (A-4u-st-p).
1964 RED VESPA Motorscooter,
4 speed transmission excellent
condition. Have bought car will
talk terms. Ask for Tom Talcott,
372-9363 or 372-9437.(A-41-st-c).
POLAROID MODEL 160 10 second
black and white. 60 second color,
built-in range finder, llkenewsss.
376-6921. (A-41-st-c).
1962 VW KARMAHN GHIA, good
condition, reasonably priced. 13
foot fiber glass boat and trailer,
35 horse power Evinrude motor,
excellent condition $450; Portable
G.E. TV, $25. Call 372-3734 after
5 p.m. (A-41-st-c).
FOR SALE: 1966 SUZUKI T-10
250 cc. Perfect condition. Only
6,000 miles. SSOO FIRM. Call 378-
6578. (A-42-10t-c).
.22 single shot rifle, 3x to 6x
variable scope, water proof case
S3O. Call Philip at 372-8748 be before
fore before 10 p.m. (A-42-2t-c).
1965 YAMAHA, 250 cc, $450 or will
trade for smaller cycle. Call 378-
2986. (A-43-10t-c).
for rent
WILLIS TON MOTEL: Rooms by
week or month. Single or double.
Students rates. Television and
daily maid service. Rooms avail available
able available for all University events. Sor Sorry
ry Sorry no phone calls. (B-36-10-c).
§N,W. 13th
mMgmZm

I WHAT MAKES GATOR ADS SELL ? ""
I Some Combination Os
ABCDEFGHIJKLM NOPORSTUV WXYZ
I PLUS SKILL, IMAGINATION, AND THE MOST CONCENTRATED,
I WELL-INFORMED rad AFFLUENT MARKET IN NORTN*FLORIDA
-

wanted
WANTED to sublease one bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment in December or
January. Electric heat and air.
Three blocks from campus. Call
376-0359 after sp.m.(C-36-10t-c).
WANTED girl student to live in
with local lady. Free rent. Call
376-0404. (C-42-si-c).
SUBJECT WANTED Will pay
$5 for a two hour listening ses session.
sion. session. Please call Mrs. Roakes
for appointment at extension 2307
regarding SPA experiment. Nor Normal
mal Normal hearing required. (C-42-4t-c).
WANTED FEMALE ROOMMATE,
art or interior design major pre preferred,
ferred, preferred, to share studio apt. S4O
plus 1/2 utilities. Paula 376-3261
Ext. 2601 or 376-1131.(C-41-3t-c).
FEMALE roommate, $36 monthly,
1/4 electricity, La Fontanna Apt.
One block from campus. Call Lou
Anne, 378-5174. (C-43-2t-c).
WANTED: 4 to 6 tickets together
for University of Florida Miami
game. West stand only. Dr. George
Dell, 372-0428. (C-43-st-c).
WANTED: Ambitious college stu students
dents students to earn your tuition selling
first quality mens hosiery at dis discount
count discount prices. Excellent commis commissions.
sions. commissions. Write for free sample sales
kit: Elway Sales Co. P.0.80x 4005,
High Point, North Carolina, 27263.
(C-43-lt-p).
situations
wanted
WILL DO BABYSITTING at night,
call 376-7658 after 5:30 p.m. (F (F---40-st-c).
--40-st-c). (F---40-st-c).
'|j
SS [STOTT

L The Florida Alligator. Monday, Octobe^3l^DK^

Page 8

autos
1964 VW, Excellent condition,
extra clean. Call 376-0458. (G (G---39-st-c).
--39-st-c). (G---39-st-c).
1960 FORD A-l all around
$425, light blue, 6 cyl. Stick, 4-
door, perfect shape. 376-9205,
room 814, North Hall. (G-40-5t-
P).
1964 DODGE DART GT, buckets,
4 speed, $1,149. Call Hokus 372-
9427 or 376-9208. (G-41-st-c).
1966 VOLVO PIBOOS, excellent
condition, good price. For infor information
mation information call Bob Wilson at 376-
3211, ext. 5414 until 5 p.m. or
376-3173 after 5 p.m.(G-43-st-c).
DEPENDABLE TRANSPORTA TRANSPORTATION
TION TRANSPORTATION 1948 Chevy, SBS, good mech mechanical
anical mechanical condition, good tires, heat heater.
er. heater. Phone 372-9351, John Kizer.
(G-43-lt-p).
1963 VW, very clean, new tires,
extras, call 378-3886. $975. (G (G---43-st-c).
--43-st-c). (G---43-st-c).
1960 MGA 1600, engine rebuilt
this summer, new paint new tires,
$395. 376-4764. (G-42-3t-c).
1959 VOLVO, black, good tires,
rebuilt engine, good running con condition.
dition. condition. Call 378-3659. (G-42-2t-p).
FOR SALE 1959 Austin Healy
Sprite, radio, heater, etc. Clean,
good tires $475. Call 376-9700
after 5 p.m. (G-*39-st-p).
FLORIDA STATE THEATRES
W^C K l N 0 c H a lr
8HE313 s'oo-too
-jyl 9:oo
f William
Holden
Richard
WIDMARK
Alvarez
i -§|ELLY 1
fr,.-. nnwHTOWN
|3tI:lliTwNOW!
a
JTL 1 if JTI

help wanted
NEED EXTRA CASH? Local Co.
will hire 3 students part-time.
Working hours flexible. Income
dependent on your ability and
needs. See Bob Gaddy, 2224 N.W.
6th Street. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (E (E---35-10t-c).
--35-10t-c). (E---35-10t-c).
LOAN SUPERVISOR, CleTk 3, -call
to arrange for interview. Campus
Federal Credit Union, Ext. 2973.
(E-41-st-c).
OFFSET PASTE-UP ARTIST
needed by Student Publications.
Student only, experience prefer preferred
red preferred but not essential. Night work,
hourly wages. Apply in person
to Ed Barber, Room 9, Florida
Union Bldg., anytime between 8:30
a.m. and 5: P.M. or 9: P.M.
and 1: A.M.
(E-40-tf-nc)
NUMEROUS Part-time jobs (tech (technical
nical (technical and non-technical) for UF
students. For further information
report to room 183, Bldg. E on
campus. (E-37-7t-nc).
lost-found
LOST In Warens Cave Sat Saturday
urday Saturday night, Paul Dominique watch
with chrome expansion band. Re Reward.
ward. Reward. Call 378-3952. (L-43-2t-nc).
LOST Aluminum sliderule in
blue leather case, Wed. morning
in vicinity of Eng. Building. Re Reward
ward Reward for return. Van McClellan,
1536 NW 2nd Place. Phone 378-
6587. (L-43-2t-p).
hi mil
Box Office Opens 6:30
AS FUNNY A MOVIE AS ANY
AgNCE COULD ASK FOR!
|F Sellers in
[ 4 BRYAN FORBES
production of
If pnWROMGBO>'I
I EASTMAN

services
DIAL 372-3364 and hear a Pro
American Taped Message "Let
Treedom Ring. (M-42-3t-p).
FOR YOUR PRIVATE parties,
complete bar service. Experienced
bartender and cocktail waitress
call 376-6106. (M-42-st-p).
TUTORING: Newly establish
Fla. Tutoring Agency. Provides
tutors in all subjects. Competent
tutors, reasonable rates; 378-5518
or 372-6649. (M-42-6t-c).
SEWING, KNITING: dresses,
suits, skirts, sweaters, etc. Call
376-0748. (M-40-lOt- c).
STUDENT TYPING done in my
home. Call 378-3051 after 6 p.m.
(M-43-3t-c).
real estate
TWO BEDROOM Duplex near cam campus,
pus, campus, live in one side and receive
rent from other. Call for an
appointment. Ten acre tract, 10
miles west of campus, $350 per
acre with terms. Ideal for Trailer
owner. Call Wayne Mason Realtor,
c/o Ernest Tew Realty, Inc. 376-
6461. (I4lstc).
I MW. 13th St at 23rd Road I
Telephone 378-2434 {
| <: Jj4sOj2<£2joarSWC_
Walt Disney resent* I I
THE
Fighting
Prince \
ADDED FEATURETTK
WALT DISNEY'S
"WINNIE the POOH
AND
THE
HONEY TREE
technicolor
1:15 3:40 6:15 8:4&]
H Acres of Free Parking L-
Rocking Chair Lose 1



H*.
SEMORS
AND
GREEKS
"'V~r
THIS IS THE
LAST WEEK
TO HAVE
YOUR
PICTURE
TAKEN
FOR THE
YEARBOOK
PICTURES TAKEN IN
ROOM 200 FLA. UNION
MEN DARK COAT & TIE
WOMEN ROUND COLLARED DARK BLOUSE


Kirk, High Speak
As Charges Fly

HIGH
By BARBARA GEFEN
Alligator Staff Writer
Robert King High, democratic
gubernatorial nominee, addressed
the American Association of Uni University
versity University Professors here Saturday.
He promised that he would make
public school education*anoppor education*anopportunity
tunity education*anopportunity for adventure and discov discovery,
ery, discovery, not a treadmill.
The Miami mayor received an
enthusiastic reception as he out out-376-1208
-376-1208 out-376-1208

CLIP THIS VALUABLK COUPON!
SPECIAL! MONDAY & TUESDAY ONLY!
COL SANDirS
A REG. $1 IS BOX OINNER AAn WITH COUPON
COMPLETE DINNEB IN U IIU
CLUDEB: 3 plMca of Fried
Chickea. PeUtoe*. g J pi
Cklekca Gravy. Freak w w
Cole Slaw aad BoIL j'J (J
NO SUBSTITUTIONS. ONI I^-J
r 0 coupon T 'c&'Tj
*0 T*so ifgtt cusroW Yf
| ((eittidcy frid CtiAvi"
H "If* Flat %r Utkl* 9 G4
3 Locations: 214 NW 13th St. 376-6472
114 NW 34th St. 372-364$
207 NE 16th Ave. 378-2959
OFFER EXPIRES OCT. 31

printed, instantaneously across a
' ter Auditorium on this campus. Two
Wffip presentations at 10 a.m. and at
|p 1:30 p.m. will explain the uses
111 a< van ages new
in graphic
communications
. ./ Wf
__ r ___; "

Monday, October 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

lined some of Floridas educational
ills and how he plans to cure them.
High pledged to seek a consti constitutional
tutional constitutional guarantee for academic
and intellectual freedom.
He had to say of his Republi Republican
can Republican opponent Claude Kirk that he
has never appreciated the litera literature
ture literature of the wild, the strange, the
bizarre, the incredible, the impos impossible
sible impossible . .
He criticized Kirks proposal to
place all educational facilities und under
er under the state school superintendent
as astonishing, but added it is
not dangerous, because it will
never pass.
He scoffed at Kirks plan to spend
$872 million to fund his education
program.
That would be encouraging encouragingperhaps--to
perhaps--to encouragingperhaps--to educators, except that
the commitment is barely made
before the author goes on to say
no new taxes will be required to
fund it.

<§)
BULLSEYE!

Kirk forgets that educators are
educated. They cannot be made
to believe the make-believe. They
know that the monies made avail available
able available for education cannot be
increased so massively without
additional taxes.
KIRK
Robert King High was described
by Claude Kirk, republican can candidate
didate candidate for governor, as a man
who cant be counted on to keep
his promises. He addressed Al Alpha
pha Alpha Kappa Psi business frater fraternity
nity fraternity here Saturday.
With only nine days of campaign campaigning
ing campaigning remaining before the Novem November
ber November 8 election, Kirk blasted his
opponent Robert King High.
He violated contract to speak
at the Associated Industries of
Florida which met last Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, said Kirk.
My opponent doesnt know how
to keep an appointment. If you
cant keepappointments--you cant
keep promises either.
Kirk reasoned that if you cant
keep promises, you certainly cant
run a state as large as Florida.
Kirk attacked High as a poor
leader. You can fool around with
innuendoes of integrity, but you
cant run a business or state
with it alone.
The state of Florida can be
run in a business-like manner or
it can be run in a haphazard man manner.
ner. manner. It depends on you.
You can be what you want to
be under my American dream.
Government wont run you--you
will run government.
Kirk concluded by telling the
group that he has asked them for
a job--the job of running the state
of Florida. Ive given you my
qualifications. Its up to you now.

Page 9



Page 10

' T* l Florida Alligator, Monday, October 31, 1966

'
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Â¥
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iHA < jHX
alldlS&'B HH|W a : *i.?m~~
;
_-r:H ""OBBI
*"- ? "* ~ r ,J' V T J V^'
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EVERYBODY LOVES PARADES
. especially little girls
I rlf I Ift f fli I If
--4 L ... a, WB BPB Wv ;BMPBBB BMBr m wffIBIBBBBI
f wr r** v"
* aJHMto 1 -C- f l m B
V :
*7 __ &£.\ -. ..>v::A JPHBBf A j
t -^ wwmJ'"Lju*^Bfl^^^^fllll^H
* ~. \it /9r
PARADE POKES FUN AT EVERYTHING
Leg Council certainly not immune

| A Disneyland Lai-

~ ~,
' y BKft : ~fl^
: >:
M M mm mKm
j§
J Jag
SHE IfflHik is
JBIIyBMp JHaam; $
MiBBT^ N 1
'fSSHHEKiS!.' ' .r xwia
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- r\-
M^H^W^x v lflbiv f
v is" v| iV > >" FCtnlk 1 '\
DELTA TAU DELTAS PEI
V *:
. . complete will
- flr
m |b|
*Hf w
THESE STUDENTS LEFT OUT
no .
... by Blue Key



Through Pictures

B jHk. \yr \tJni j
Jr mKr< S Mil > :S £ Mtt^MM^-.,
B& B % JrUv* & :? f BS
RW' k w ml 11
lif m ** < w *'->
Kif T* 8 * 8 I,K
llttaiMlriN
Hfc i "os\ Kg^H
-WINNING FLOAT
vely UF coeds
#
.
IV/
/
ESTER SUTHERLAND
... at Interhall dance

. jjf
JB4 }WgP' V/SSfflwro. m
EVERYONE HAS CANDIDATE
. . they push Batman
o
o
vr^** > SI -CT§ ,*
< i^.i^M.'i>ap\-
fe. # Igi^
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.*
Bl'lp -w v%
l|fMLj fltt > .,
. ,**:::<< *' i^l^^BSfcJS' *-'
fjlligaH^^MSg^^-./.'-. ;.'* ?ssi^g
PARADE SHOWS ITS BEAUTIES
. . Carol Eastman and frat beast
7
\ ; V v 7
Photos By
f
Nick Arroyo And Chuck Broward

Monday, October 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



I. The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 31, IM6

Page 12

t.r ...
"YOU CAN REALLY GET IN
THE ACTION
Witha
COVER GIRL m^S
m BM BB
HERE'S WHAT YOU GET!

1. FREE BIC PEN
(exp. Dec. 1, '66 ) Quick Save Carolyn Plaza
2. FREE DANISH BASKET and COFFEE
Wolfies Across from Campus
3. FREE $2 Polish Cloth
University Chevrolet 1519 N. Mein
4. FREE GIANT 15 SUBMARINE SAND.
with purchase of 1, Worth 85?
The Snack Bar6l3 NW 16th Ave.
5. FREE $1 RECORD CLEANING CLOTH
Top Tunes Record Shop 1230 W. Univ
6. 25? Toward ANY PURCHASE
Jerry's North or South 18th St.
7.50 f Toward ANY DRY CLEANING
Or SHIRTS SAS Cleaners 503 SW 3rd St.
8. 1 FREE HAMBURGER
Burger Chef 715 NW 13th St.
9. 50 f TOWARDANY DR Y CLEANING
Tropical Shirt Laundty 402 NW 13th St
10. 1/2 PRICE ON ANY SANDWICH
Roaring 20s lOll W. Univ.
11. FREE DONUT & COFFEE
Bakers Dozen Across from Wolfies
. ; 12. 1/2 OFF ON BURGER BASKET
(exp 12/1/66) College Inn Across from campus

Over 20 Others Over 20 Others j
25/b of proceeds donated to University of Florida Dollars for Scholars
ON |
iomorrowK3B^^kacmoui 'l |
AND AT 9H >TFAP TH IS A I
L 0 T A A L M nc W S MM DISCOUNT CUi r OUT AN D SK ' R I
STANDS yftprffl. Vjj keep with you j

13. FREE ONE SURPRISE
You won't be disappointed
Dubs STEER ROOM 4560 NW 13th St.
14. FREE PIE AND COFFEE
University Inn Motel l9Ol S.W. 13th St.
15. 55% OFF LIST ON NEW TIRES
Tire City 405 NW 13th St.
16. FREE CHOICE OF $2.50 HAIR
CONDITIONING TREATMENT
DOES NOT APPLY TO ;
SHAMPOO & SET.
GOOD Mon. Wed. Phone 372-2394
Jacs Hair Stylist 917 N. Main
17. FREE 24" x 36" TRAVEL POSTER'
House of Travel 3415 W. Univ.
18. FREE STP DECAL
v ates Auto Parts Across from Police Dept.
19. 1/2 PRICE MON. & TUE.
State Theatre W. Univ.
20. 40% OFF ON ANY RECAPPING
Gator Tire Service lO3O E. Univ.
2L sl.lO Chicken Special 75?
Captain Louis's Galley
309 NW 13th St. 231 NW 10th Ave.
22. FREE XEROX COPY
Quick Save Carolyn Plaza

23. 300 SHEETS NOTEBOOK PAPER 25 ? |
McCollums Drugs East or West Unlv.
24. FREE CHILI DOG with PURCHASE of 1 I
Dougs Dairy Twirl 2117 NW 6th St. I
25. FREE 1/2 HOUR of PRACTICE I
WITH EVERYDAY
THROUGH DEC. 1
Happy Hour Billiards 207 N. Main St.
26. FREE TYPECLEANING, OILING
& ERASURE SHIELD |
Royal Typewriter Co. lO7 S.W. 7th St.
27. FREE PE PST WITH SANDWICH
Schooner Room 1222 W. Unlv. A
28. FREE NYLON TIP MARKING PEN \
Cassels _Jn The _Alr un v MNCPL AIRPORT 1
29. 25$ Toward ANY sl.lO DINNER I
Col. Sanders Kentucky Fneu I
214 NW 13th St. 207 NE 16th Ave. 114 SW 34th St. 1
30. 20% OFF ANY ORDER
Shelley's Behind Fla. Bookstore 1
31. FREE 10? DRINK WITH ORDER |
Royal Castle W. Unlv. |
32. FREE 25? WASH I
Gator Groomer Neat to Unlv. Sta. Post Off.



m t W IB mm f§
k < '\<
aMMdB proposed law center on its way is As-
I sociate Justice of the U.S, Supreme Court
pfff^^pi,Tom Clark.

//G*\
I if jHMM 3 > \\
1 i
j >'
|. /
I Our Traditional Vested Suits
I For The Man With Cl assic Tastes
We hod these good-looking suits tailored to our exacting
specifications. The fabrics are excellent examples of fine
I British and American cloth making. They are rich,
I hearty herringbone and all wool worsteds with a natural
I affinity for fine tailoring .See our selection of new solid
| tones,heather mixtures, andstripes.Our Nottingham vest-
I ed suits are SBS. The shirt sketched is from our selection of
H traditional shirts by Sera.. .from $7. Silk neckwear from
wmm v
I §sck
BGiCIS BQBB
mm 6 South Main Stroet

Monday, October 31, 1966, The' Florida Alligator,

Says Law Center
To Help Answer
Legal Problems

By GENE NAIL
Editorial Assistant
UFs planned law center will be
the answer to ever-increasing
problems facing the law profes profession
sion profession today, said U.S.~ Supreme
Court Justice Thomas C. CiaFk.
Justice Clark was the main
speaker at the groundbreaking
ceremonies for the new UF $3
million College of Law center
Friday afternoon.
"The law center which will soon
grace this spot will be the answer
to the urgency we face over the
increasing complexities of the
law," Justice Clark said.
Also participating in the ground groundbreaking
breaking groundbreaking ceremonies were UF Vice
President Frederick Conner,
Frank E. Maloney, dean of the
College of Law; Chester Ferguson,
Board of Regents chairman; Camp Campbell
bell Campbell Thornal, chief justice of the
Florida Supreme Court and Flor Florida
ida Florida Bar Association representa representative
tive representative Fletcher Rush.
The changes the law profession
is facing, Clark said are the new
areas of social, political and tech technological
nological technological change, the new role the
legal profession must give to the
protection of the disadvanaged and
HULLS
Brake Service
& Supply
* Complete Brake
Service on All
American And
Foreign Cars.
* 10,000-Mile or
1-Yr. Guaranty
On Complete
Brake Jobs.
* Wheel Balancing
* Rebuilt Genera
tors & Starters.
* Expertly Trained
Mechanics Here
To Serve You.
Member of
Independent Garage
Owners of America, Inc.
1314 5. Main St.
PH. 372-1497

§Wm
TO ALL STUDENTS
VM&M AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL J
\W
I 1 l:30 Ch 2:00 CAFETERIA JSofcOO
1212 N. MAIN St. (^Tiln^ron^ainpus)Galnesvlll^ho^i^^^^T

the priorities it must give to the
development of human dignity, the
importance of the individual and
the nature of mans freedoms in
relation to the means by which he
pursues his essential needs.
The groundbreaking marked the
first of a three pari construction
which will eventually house facil facilities
ities facilities for 700 students.
The academic law building now
being started will include a 750-
seat auditorium plus instructional,
administrative, auto-visual and
other modern facilities.
The other two parts of the new
law center will provide housing and
food service facilities for the law
students.
Clark said the new law facil facilities
ities facilities will allow the law studies
to be extended to "living law"
and take in the professions duty
to an expanding society.
Primarily, he refered to the
changing attitude toward the dis disadvantaged
advantaged disadvantaged portion of the society.
"Much has been done in this
regard *- but much remains,
Clark said.
The extension into these areas,
he said, "will generate a greater
respect for the judicial process.
The program must also include
home and office assistance,
he said.
"Nothing can better bring to fo focus
cus focus the problem of the disadvan disadvantaged
taged disadvantaged than participation in the as aspects
pects aspects of their everyday living.
"As we shovel this ground to today,
day, today, Clark said, "let us hope
that this center may dedicate it itself
self itself to the meaningful expansion
of our concept of human dignity
and equal justice.
Computer Meet
Schedule Test
The IBM 360-50 computer will
be the main topic of discussion
at a computer conference Nov. 19,
in the Engineering Auditorium.
The University Computing Center
will sponsor the meeting.
The all-day meeting will feature
a briefing on terminology and con concepts
cepts concepts and an extensive discussion
of the new computer.
The IBM 360-50 is being intro introduced
duced introduced this year by the Interna International
tional International Business Machines Corpor Corporation.
ation. Corporation.
The seminar begins at 8:30 a.m.
and lis open to all students and
faculty members.

Page 13



Page 14

! > The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 31, 1966

Orange

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

Campus Calendar

Advance Notice; Hillel: Guest speaker, Eugene Eifin,
Jewish Comapunity Service, Hillel Foundation,
Friday, November 4, 7:30 p.m.
Hillel: Guest speaker, Eugene Eifin, Bnai Brith and
Your Gomffrtatfty, Hillel Foundation, Saturday,
November 9 t 11 a. m.
Monday, October 31
*s *r ! JeSAi m.rwafcmb fLu, 8:30 p.m.
Mensa: HtMteft House Halloween Party, for time and
place dated Mike Sipe, 378-4950. All Mensa
Members sad Affiliates are invited.
Inter-Vasity Christian Fellowship: Prayer meetings,
4th floor of the Library, 5 p.m.
Seminole Pictures: For Graduating Seniors and
Greeks, 200 FLU, 12-5 & 6-9.
Mensa: Daily luncheons from 11-1 for faculty, stu students
dents students and staff members. Reserved table in west
wing of Main Cafeteria.
AHA: Meeting, 324 FLU, 7:30 p.m. All Engineering
students welcome.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

WOODROW WILSON NATIONAL FELLOWSHIPS:
Oct. 31 is the deadline for faculty members to nomi nominate
nate nominate students for Woodrow Wilson Fellowships for
1967-68. Send candidates name, current mailing add address,
ress, address, college and proposed field of graduate study
to Dr. Robert Bryan, graduate School, 235 Tigert Hall.
Placement
Notices
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: (Students mustbe reg registered
istered registered with the University Placement Service to
interview. Sign-up sheets are posted two weeks in
advance of the interview date at Building H. All
companies will be recruiting for December, April and
August grads unless otherwise indicated. *lndicates
hiring juniors for summer employment).
NOV. 1: MORRISON CAFETERIA CO. Bus,
Lib Arts, Ed, Food Tech. FACTORY MUTUAL ENGR.
DIVISION EE, CE, ChE, ME, IE. RINGEL, HEEB
& CO. Acctg. TENNESSEE CORP. Chem,
ChE.* ARMOUR AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL CO.
Ag, Bus .Ad, Lib. Arts, Mktg. NATIONAL CEN CENTER
TER CENTER FOR HEALTH STATISITICS Stat, Math,
Econ, Psy, Soc. KURT SALMON ASSOC., INC.
IE. BELL SYSTEM -- Group meeting, 5 p.m., Flor Florida
ida Florida Union.
NOV. 2: CHAS. PFIZER & CO. Org. Chem.
IRC, INC. Engr. R.J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO.
Bus. Ad, Lib. Arts, Ed. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CE, EE, ME, Math,
Physics. ANHEUSER BUSCH, INC. EE, ME, IE,
ChE. PURE OIL CO. -- Bus.Ad, Lib. Arts, Ed.
NOV. 2,3: BELL SYSTEM Bus.Ad, Lib. Arts,
Ed, Pub.Rela. NAVY DEPT. -- CE, EE, IE, ME,
SanE, AE, Arch, Acctg, Gen. Bus, Ind.Rela, Ind.Mgmt,
Econ, Mktg, Fin, Stat. DOW CHEMICAL CO. ChE,
ME, Chem, Mktg, Biochem, Pharmacy, Micro-Bio,
MetE, Pharmacology, Agronomy.* GENERAL ELEC ELECTRIC
TRIC ELECTRIC CO. EE, ME, ChE, MetE, Ceramic, NE.

I Dividend Rate Building j Radio Road ( I
I 5%7. Serving Vof F Employees Since 1935 LTHI I
Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union Loans!!! I

BLUE BULLETIN

Administrative Notices

and

Tuesday, November 1
Insurance Society: Group meeting, 208 FLU, 8 p.m.
Lyceum Council: Lee Luvisi, Pianist, Univ. Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
General Assembly for Faculty: Univ. Aud., 4 p.m.
Architecture and Fine Arts Dames: Meeting, FLU
Craft shoD. 8 n.m.
9 ** *;
Lambda Gamma Phi: Dr. Himes, Vet. Science Dept.,
133 McC, 7:30 p.m.
Wrestling Club: south end of the Gym floor, 4 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi: 118 FLU, 7 p.m.
Tuesday Evening Supper Club: Presbyterian Student
Center, 6:30 p.m. Non-denominational, everyone
single and over 21 invited.
Union Board: Bridge lessons, 215 FLU, 7 p.m.
Student Finance Association: Group meeting, 212
FLU, 7 p.m.

REMOVAL OF I GRADES: Oct. 31 is the dead deadline
line deadline for removal of I grades (excluding 699 and
799) for all graduate students who wish to receive
their degrees on Dec. 17.
U.C. STUDENTS PRE-ADVISEMENT: Academic
advisers are now available to help plan programs
for next trimester. This will save time during
registration. All University College students re report
port report to the U.C. Foyer (3rd floor General Class Classroom
room Classroom Building) according to the following schedule:
all first term freshmen whose last names begin
with: (A-G) report Oct. 24-28; (H-P) report Oct.
31 Nov. 4; (Q-Z) report Nov. 7-11.
PRE-VETERINARY STUDENTS: Pick up applica applications
tions applications for the School of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn
University, in Dean Brookers office, 124 McCarty
Hall.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS, DEPARTMENTAL
SECRETARIES AND CLERKS: A training program
designed to assist new personnel in handling of bus business
iness business transactions will be held Monday, Oct. 31
Thursday, Nov. 3, in the Blue Room, Student Ser Service
vice Service Center, 9 11 a.m. Procedures regarding Fi Finance
nance Finance and Accounting, Purchasing and Personnel
matters will be discussed.
PROGRESS TEST: (Students in the following courses
are expected to take the following tests. Each stu student
dent student must bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will be
required to use his SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER.)
DISABILITY INSURANCE: The Insurance Company
of North America is currently offering long-term
disability insurance to University employees on a group
basis. All faculty and staff (ages 18-64) who earn
$650 or more monthly are eligible for this coverage.
The enrollment or refusal form should be completed
and sent to the Personnel Division, 109 Tigert Hall,
by Nov. 1, 1966. Before the plan is made effective,
75% of the eligible employees must enroll.

C*v
ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

Wednesday, November 2
Student Medical Association: The Doctor Draft,
guest panelists, Dr. R. L. Williams, Dr. N.C. Leone,
Lt. Col. P.P. Pierce, H-611 MSB, 7:30 p.m. All
Med. and Pre-med students are invited.
AIA Film Series: Mark Tobey, Artist, and a
Jackson Pollock film, 103-B AFA, 8 p.m.
AIA: r iliTi and Lecture on Mayan Architecture, 105-B
AFA, 8 p.m.
Block and Bridle: Mr. John Hursh, Carees and
Opportunities in the Feed Industry, 254 McC,
7:30 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: Auditions, 1826 W. Univ.
Ave., 8:30 p.m. Every kind of talent wanted.
Speleological Society: Group meeting, 212 FLU,7 p.m.
FLORIDA UNION BOX OFFICE: Tickets on sale
for Lee Luvisi, Gerald Ford, Jules Feiffer, The
Royal Ballet, and the Serendipity Singers.

FACULTY ASSEMBLY: A General Assembly for
faculty has been called by President Reitz for Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 4 p.m. in University Auditorium.
Progress Tests
MSIO9 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Nov. 1,7 p.m.
Students report to Walker Auditorium.
MS2OS PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Nov. 1,7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin with: (A) report
to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Peabody 1,2,
4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) report to Leigh 207; (D) re report
port report to GCB 121, 125 or 127; (E) report to GCB
113; (F) report to Matherly 213, 216 or 219; (G)
report to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; (H) report
to Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209; (I-J) report
to Flint 110 or 112; (K) report to Walker 301, 303,
307 or 308; (L) report to GCB 201, 203, 205 or 207;
(M) report to GCB 213, 215, 217, 219, 221, 223,
225 or 227; (N) report to GCB 233 or 235; (O) re report
port report to GCB 237 or 239; (P-Q) report to Flint 101
or 102; (R) report to Floyd 108; (S) report to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) report to GCB 101 or 109; (W-
Z) report to Walker Auditorium.
MS 208 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Nov. 1,7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin with; (A-L) report
to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14
or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly 102, 105, 108,
112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
General Notices
Membership to the New York Museum of Modern
Arts open to all students and faculty members at
a reduced fee. If interested come to meeting at
Architecture & Fine Arts Building, room 302 C, Oct.
31, 1:30 5 p.m. or call 378-5287.
MARKETING MAJORS: All marketing majors should
report to Matherly Hall, Room 209, to receive ap appointments
pointments appointments for counseling, scheduled for Oct. 31
through Nov. 8.



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Nobody Spared At Colorful Gator Growl

Gator Growl was a big joke. No Nothing
thing Nothing was spared by the humor,
satire and cuts of the Growl part participants
icipants participants Friday night.
Bearing the brunt of the attact
were the Auburn Tigers.
Announcement that Carol East Eastman,
man, Eastman, lUC, of Miami, was chosen
to reign as Homecoming Sweet Sweetheart
heart Sweetheart came after the Queen and her
court rode onto the field in a
coach of Disneyland fashion. Dres Dressed
sed Dressed in snow white, Miss Eastman

RITERTHE
Pitttamijj jiljflw
FOOTBALL CONTEST
PRIZE: $25 n Men's or Ladies' Wear
Place an "X" in the box of the team you think will
win Saturday, Nov. 5 Estimate total yards to be
gained by Florida, which will be the tie breaker.
Florida vs. Georgia
Auburn vs. Mississippi State
Alabama vs. Louisiana State
Army vs. Geo. Wash. JJ:
D Arkansas vs. O Rice
FINEST SELECTION OF STYLES & COLORS
CLASSIC CARDI'GANS SLIPOVERS
WARM HEATHERTONES
RIBAND CABLE KNITS I
MONOGRAM SER VICE I
I Florida State vs. n S. Carolina I
I Ohio State vs. Indiana I
I Princeton vs. Harvard I
Kentucky vs. q Vanderbilt 1
I Miami (Fla.) vs. Tulane I
I Total Yards Gained by FLORIDA I
I Entries must be deposited in U Shop by Fri., Nov. 4 1
I In case of tie, prize will be divided equally among winners. j
f WINNERS NAMES TO BE POSTED IN: 1
imtierflitji
I 1620 West University Avenue Carolyn Plaza 1
[name I
I address ' j
I CITY _____ STATE I
LIMITED, TWO PER PE RSONi^MftiM*l

fit the fantasy.
First place skit winner Phi Del Delta
ta Delta Theta brought to Growl the news
of the day by Chet Buntley and
Otis Hogs. The program, in off offcolor"
color" offcolor" featured the taming of the
tigers in an invention by Jiro
Screwloose, a tiger taming mach machine.
ine. machine.
In their skit the second place
Pi Kappa Alpha group zeroed in
on Gatorland. Complete with the
rah ta ta ta ta tah of Florida

Blue Key, the Pikes presented
a skit on Its Homecoming Time.
Did you know ... that for
every one of you out there, there
are two armpits? the audience
was questioned.
Snow Gator and the Seven
Regents was the story told by
Alpha Epsilon Phi, third place.
The WLSD trip to Fantasyland was

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(Photo By Nick Arroyo)
AEPHIS JUDY HARRIS TAKES A TUMBLE
... on way to Fantasyland
t Luncheon Special I
SOUTHERN FRIED CHICKEN I
potato and vegetable, j
tossed salad, rolls & butter, j
coffee or tea I
FLANK STEAK $1.75
potato, vegetable, tossed salad, I
rolls & butter, coffee or tea I
GOOD THRU SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6 I
"the Smart place to go" I
1250 W. University Ayenue I

Monday, October 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

set in none other than Beta Woods
where Snow-Gator triumphed over
the treachery of the wicked
witch.
Fourth place in skit competition
was awarded to Kappa Delta, Davy
Dumps the Tigers.
For A Disney Medley, Marty
Lawson, Cathy Dittmar and Rich-

Reitz 111 But
Nothing Serious
UF President J. Wayne Reitz
was admitted to the Health Cen Center
ter Center last Thursday afternoon for an
acute gastrointestinal upset.
As a precaution Reitz spent the
night at the Hospital and was re released
leased released early Friday after a check checkup.
up. checkup.
Reitz attended all the Homecom Homecoming
ing Homecoming festivities including the Blue
Key Banquet on Friday.
Officials said the upset was not
serious.

ard Sherman were Growls first
place talent winners.
Maureen Shannon won second
place. She sang Someday My
Prince Will Come.
You Cant Get A Man With A
Gun, talent by Barbara Allen,
received third place rating.

Page 15



Page 16

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 31, 1966

Hgf sRHL lj§
TIGER, TIGER BURNING BRIGHT
KDs worked on you all night

VETS ENJOY GATOR FOOTBALL
with lovely guide

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EVERYBODY GETS KIDDED
at JMBA skits

More Homecoming Memories

Its Work
But Its
Worth It

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... at hands of Pi Kappa Alpha

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. especially skirts

Skits decorations and Gator Growl they
all mean months of preparation and work
by hundreds of UF students. Forsaking stud studies
ies studies as Homecoming weekend draws near.
But when you look back on what transpired,
it looks like it all was worth it.



k) FACE BAMA?

Florida-Georgia Victor In Bowl Picture

By DAVID M. MOFFIT

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
I ATLANTA (UPI) The South Southjastern
jastern Southjastern Conference should cam-
Lign for a bowl game pairing
Bahama with the winner of this
taming Saturdays Florida-Geor Florida-Georia
ia Florida-Georia game.
Apparently, that is the only
ray the SEC can find its true
ihampion.
The seventh-ranked Gators
leeded another super effort by
Iteve Spurrier to pull out a 30-
17 victory over Auburn while 14th 14thanked
anked 14thanked Georgia rode the swiftness
if sophomore Kent lawrence to a
House of Cool
THE ORIOLE
COME TRICK OR TREAT
BIG BAND
HALLOWEEN BALL
Insure Seating:
Call 372-6500
For Reservations
N.W. 39th Ave.
2 Mi. West of I -75

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H M. Chitty & Co. Wilson DsjJt Store Kennedys, Ocala

28-3 victory over North Carolina.
Fourth-ranked Alabama dis displeased
pleased displeased coach Bear Bryant with
its effort this past Saturday, but
still played well enough to beat
Mississippi State 27-14 and stay
in a tie with Florida and Geor Georgia
gia Georgia for the SEC lead.
Spurrier Fantastic Again
Spurrier had a typically fan fantastic
tastic fantastic day. He completed 27 of 40
passes for 259 yards and one
touchdown, ran for one touchdown
himself, punted for a 47.5 aver average
age average and kicked! a 40-yard field
goal in the closing minutes to
win the game.
Spurrier now has completed
117 of 177 passes 66.1 per cent
for 1,397 yards in total offense for
seven games, and has a 41.5 punt punting
ing punting average.
The Georgia-North Carolina
game counted in the SEC standings
by official proclamation and set
the stage for a real shootout with
the Gators Saturday at Jack Jacksonville.
sonville. Jacksonville.

Rebels Blank Bengals
Mississippi, out of the SEC race
but very much in the bowl pic picture,
ture, picture, blanked Louisiana State
17-0; 11th-ranked Tennessee roll rolled
ed rolled to a 38-7 victory over pre previously
viously previously once-beaten Army.
Tulane edged Vanderbilt 13-12
in another outside game that counts
in the league standings and down downcast
cast downcast Kentucky was tied 14-14
by West Virginia.
Among the independents, sixth sixthranked
ranked sixthranked Georgia Tech swamped
Duke 48-7 for its seventh straight
victory; and Virginia Tech edged
Florida State 23-21 despite a
record-setting passing effort
by sophomore Gary Pajcic.
Southern Miss brushed aside
Richmond 27-0; and Memphis
State beat West Texas State 26-14.
Dont overlook Miamis great
upset Friday night. The Hurri Hurricanes
canes Hurricanes knocked off fifth-ranked
Southern California 10-7.
Wayne Trimble took over at
quarterback after Ken Stabler
couldnt move Alabama and the
senior reserve threw three long
touchdown passes to keep the

Monday, October 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Crimson Tide on the trail of its
third perfect season in six years.
Lawrence, who runs the 100
in 9.5, scored two touchdown
while showing his heels to the
Tarheels. Bruce Newell threw
two touchdown passes, one a swing
pass that Bobby Wade caried 75
yards, in Ole Miss* victory over
the Bengals.
Dewey Waren, greatest passer
in Tennessee history, hit on 18
of 25 for 250 yards against Army.
Bobby Duhon scored both of
Tulanes touchdowns as the sur surprising
prising surprising Green Wave raised its re record
cord record to 5-2.
Sophomore quarterback Larry
Good, filling in for injured Kim
King, passed and ran for 161 yards
as Georgia Tech ran up its high highest
est highest score in the 34-year Duke
series.
FSUs Pajcic completed 28
of 53 passes for 312 yards in a
great losing effort.
This coming weekend, high highlighted
lighted highlighted by the Florida-Georgia
game, has Alabama vs. LSU at
Birmingham, Mississippi State vs.
Auburn at Jackson, and Vanderbilt

"at Kentucky.
Tennessee hosts little Chattan Chattanooga,
ooga, Chattanooga, Georgia Tech hosts to
Virginia, Florida State plays at
South Carolina and Miami is
at Tulane in the lone night game
on the all-Saturday calendar.
wt* 11
SEC Standings
Cons. All
FLORIDA 400 700
Alabama 400 600
Georgia 400 610
Tennessee 210 420
Mississippi 220 520
Louisiana State 120 331
Kentucky 130 241
Auburn 030 340
Miss. State 030 250
Vanderbilt 030 150
Independents
W L T PF PA
Ga. Tech 7 0 0 199 45
Memphis St. 5 1 0 74 48
Va. Tech 5 1 1 137 60
Tulane 5 2 0 126 120
Miami 4 2 0 83 56
Fla. State 3 3 0 128 119
Sou. Miss. 3 3 0 72 43
&
The Partys Not Over, Its
I Just Beginning With Our
New Holiday Collection
I G&
I glea f Blehlgaa
Open 9:30 AM 6:00 PM
I franklins
1 'CJouin College fibop"
a mtmmm im
2401 S.W. 13th. St.
Across the street
from Jerrys South
C Call 372-4606

Page 17



Page 18

1, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 31, 1966

Goal Posts Wide Enough For SteVe

No Worries For Gators
With Spurrier Kicking

With the score tied, Florida's super star got tired of passing,
so he calmly kicked a 40-yard field goal to sew up a last minute
conference victory Saturday over Auburn.
I wanted to go for the field goal, said quarterback Steve Spurier,
as he passively sipped a cold drink in the Florida dressing room.
He added with v a grin, Those goal posts are plenty wideif
you kick them right theyll go through.


Gator Ray
Elated
Afterward
That was one hellacious
kick, exclaimed Head Coach Ray
Graves Saturday in the Florida
dressing room.
Graves was refering to Steve
Spurriers game-winning field
goal, which came in the last two
minutes of the game.
I cant award Spurier the
Heisman Trophy, I know, but if
1 could Id give him two of them,
Graves said. He is absolutely
the greatest clutch athlete Ive
ever seen.
I think he was the calmest
person on the field in the fourth
quarter.
These rallies he puts on are
great for the fans and ticket sales
but they cut this one a little too
close to suit me.
Amidst interuptions from such
figures as U.S. Senator George
Smathers (D.-Fla.) and Auburn
President Hart Philpott (former
UF vice-president) Graves contin continued
ued continued to praise the Gators.
Weve still got a great foot football
ball football team, he said. I feel we
can win any ball game any time
out. Im as proud of this foot football
ball football team as Ive ever been.
Philpotts jube It was a great
robbery prompted Graves to
praise Auburn.
Auburn was a well-prepared,
fired-up team, Graves comment commented.
ed. commented. Youve got to give Shug Jor Jorden
den Jorden a lot of credit. With all the
bad breaks he has had during the
season his team still played a
great game. Auburn was as tough
a team as weve played all year.
Graves said he would have the
team spend more time on kick kickoff
off kickoff coverage to prepare for the
Georgia game in the Gator Bowl
this Saturday.
We were just overunning our
kick-offs, he explained. We got
down among their blockers and got
cut off from the man carying the
ball.
Graves praised fullback Tom
Christian, who filled in for Lary
Smith when Smith became exhaus exhausted
ted exhausted during the gme.
Tom had the bad break of hav having
ing having that Auburn man (linebacker
Gusty Yearout) steal the football
flroiD him and run for a touch touchdown,
down, touchdown, Graves said, but he came
back and played a fine game. Tom
Christian grew up and became a
man today.
Graves also had some bad news
tor the sportswriters who crowd crowded
ed crowded the dressing room.
Graves said linebacker Wayne
KcCall suffered a shoulder se separation
paration separation and might be lost for
&e rest of the season. He also
said defensive tackle Brian Jeter
kad a dislocated finger but would
be able to play against Georgia
bis week.

By MIKE WILLIARD
Alligator Sports Writer

Were his teammates as con confident
fident confident in the closing seconds? Cen Center
ter Center Bill Car summed up the teams
attitude this way:
If it had been anyone else
but Spurier, we would have been
worried.
The Gator rifleman, who has
led the team to seven victories
this year, coming from behind in
four, said he had some trouble
keeping Tiger linebackers off of
him, in the 30-27 encounter.
The linebackers would rush
every couple of plays. I would
have to keep them honest with
quick drop back passes.
With a wide smile on his face,
wingback Richard Trapp talked of
Floridas first six-point step to toward
ward toward victory.
I dont know what happened
to the guy that was covering me,
commented the elusive flanker who
Friday was a doubtful starter due
to flu symptoms. I just faked
one way, the Auburn man went
the other and the ball was in my
arms.
Although he didnt score, end
Paul Ewaldson was on the re receiving
ceiving receiving end of five Spurrier pas passes
ses passes for 53 yards.
They had double coverage on
me about three-fourths of the
time, he said. This was good
because it usually meant Trapp
could find an opening.
A sore spot in the Gator de defense
fense defense during the first half of play
was kickoff coverage. With less
than two minutes of the first quar quarter
ter quarter gone, Auburn recaptured a
touchdown with an 89 yardrunback.
They were double teaming our
first and second men downfield on
kickoff returns, said end Don
Barett, who kicked off twice in
the encounter. This left an alley
up the middle.
Gator tailback Larry Smith,
whos fumble deep in Florida ter territory
ritory territory set up an Auburn field goal,
said he was disappointed with his
play.
I didnt really fumble it, he
said. He just came up and took
it out of my hands.
Although homecoming and main maintaining
taining maintaining national ranking helped
spur the Gators to victory, per perhaps
haps perhaps these words written on a
locker room sign also contributed
Theyll be as tough as you
let them remember last year,
it read.

Sellers Market Saturday

It was strictly a sellers market outside the
gates of Florida Field prior to yesterdays home homecoming
coming homecoming clash with Auburn.
Hundreds of fans surounded the stadium as
early as 10 a.m. in search of ducats. Evidently
not a one expected to have any trouble getting
them but they did.
Homemade I need two tickets signs could
be seen above the masses crowding around the
various stadium entrances. The going price before
kickoff -- if you could fine one at all was up
to S3O apeice due to the more than packed house
crowd of 60.511.
I spend two hours out here without any luck
at all said one signholder. This is the worst
mess Ive ever seen.
The signholder related that hes been coming

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TRAPP SCORES HIS SEVENTH ~TOUCHDOWN OF YEAR
. . Gator flanker leads SEC with 44 points

Jordan Spied Weaknesses
In Gator Kickoff Defense

ELLIS ROMPS
. . 89-yard return

to Florida games for 20 years and always bought
his tickets on the day of the game.
This has never happened before, he said.
Another unhappy fan approached a program-sel program-seller.
ler. program-seller.
Have you seen any tickets? he said.
Are you looking for some? he was asked.
Who isnt looking for them? the'fan asked
as he strolled down the line looking for a seller.
_Just before kickoff the line alongside the sta stadium,
dium, stadium, formed by people without tickets, had reach reached
ed reached 100. All looked unhappy and not one was
optimistic about getting to see the Gators play
Auburn.
The jam up outside the stadium should have been
expected. The game had been a sellout for two
months.

Auburn coach Shug Jordan
formed a half-smile, half-frown
when he spoke of his teams 30-
27 defeat by Florida. It looked
as though he didnt know how to
react to the loss.
I felt like we played good
enough to win, Jordan said. I
certainly didnt think we would
lose.
Jordan was proud of his team,
but sad at the loss.
Still, he managed we did bet better
ter better than any this year. In fact
we did everything better.
Jordan singled out the play of
linebacker Gusty Yearout, whose
91-yard fumble return gave Au Auburn
burn Auburn an early 14-7 lead. His fum fumble
ble fumble recovery deep in Gator ter territory
ritory territory set up the score that tied
the game at 27-all late in the
fourth quarter.
Yearout was the best lineman
we had, he said. He kept us

in the game.
That Graham McKeels a fine
football player and Spurrier can
punt well he said.
Jordan then told of his teams
Injuries.
Collins (junior Charles) is, in
my opinion, one of the best tack tacklers
lers tacklers in the conference, he said.
And we lost him to injury.
As for kickoff returns, the one
offensive factor Florida had trou trouble
ble trouble with all day, Jordan admit admitted
ted admitted hed spied a weakness on the
Gators films.
We noticed they never had more
than four men on the left side,
he said. So we always ran in
that direction. I think it was a
good move.
Nobody would argue with
him there. The Tigers returned
six kickoffs for 219 yards and
one touchdown. Two more almost
went for the route but safety Lar Larry
ry Larry Rentz made last-man tac tackles
kles tackles on both.
There was a lot of kicking
and gouging on both sides, Jor Jordan
dan Jordan charged. Little of it was
called.
Jordan said he didnt change
his game plan at halftime, when
Auburn held a surprising 17-13
lead.
We just rested and came out
again, he said. We thought our
game plan was sound.
The Auburn coach ended his post
game statement with what could
be termed a challenge.
It seems like all Auburn-Flor Auburn-Florida
ida Auburn-Florida games are like this, he said.
I wonder whatll happen next
year.



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SMITH SECOND EFFORT GAINS THIKD iu
. . his seventh of season

SPURRIER AND TRAPP COMBINE: ONE OF NINE SATURDAY

LARRY SMITH MOVES FOR 53 --passes line of scrimmage (above left), breaks
to outside (above right) and romps down sidelines, (below right).

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Monday, October 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

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Game Photos By
Gerald Jones,
Nick Arroyo
V

Page 19



Page 20

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 31, 1966

GEORGIA, TULANE, MIAMI

On Come The Winning Records

Ray Graves is known to divide his season into two parts.
Before the season began, observers felt Florida needed to
sprint off to a good start.
The Gators raced to five quick victories, and then squashed
an outmanned LSU, 28-7.
Saturday's triumph, brilliant as it was, should point out to
everyone that the Gators still have three tough games remaining.
Only one of the seven teams defeated so far had a winning
mark (LSU 3-1-1) All three future foes have outstanding marks.
The three marks total 16 wins, 5 losses.
Georgia, which could crack the nations top ten this week,
is only two points from a 7-0 slate. The Bulldogs fell to upset upsetminded
minded upsetminded Miami, 7-6. _The Hurricanes have lost two games by
a total of five points, and vanquished fifth-ranked Southern
California from the unbeaten ranks.
Even Tulane, which would like nothing bearer than to avenge
last seasons humilitation, is riding along on a 5-2 mark.
The LSU romp resembled the Northwestern rout. But
the Gators struggled through Vanderbilt, Florida State, and
North Carolina State. Graves charges will have to play their
best every Saturday if they hope to protect what they have thus
far accomplished.
Georgia will be fighting for a share of the conference crown
Saturday. Like Florida, Vince Dooleys boys own a 4-0 record
in league action.
Georgia does not play Alabama, nor does Florida, so both
teams need a victory. A tie would virtually cinch the title for
the Crimson Tide.
Alabama has SEC matches left with down-trodden LSU (in
Birmingham), and South Carolina. Thats right, South Carolina.
It seems Bama scheduled only five SEC encounters, so the
SEC Commissioners Office will count the Gamecock trampling
as Bear Bryants neccessary sixth game.

Crossword by Jan & Mike Dubin

1 Area.
6 Appendage.
9 Average.
15 Covers.
20 Impregnable.
22 Anti.
23 Slangs.
25 Courtroom
procedure.
27 Forty winks.
28 Golf term.
29 Seasoning.
30 Ways.
31 Scrap.
32 Depot: abbr.
33 Like certain
evergreens.
34 Essays.
35 Soup.
37 Rodrigo Diaz.
38 English
counties.
41 Russian
community.
42 Reversed.
44 Article of
wear.
45 Fishermans
boot.

1 Type of lit literature:
erature: literature: Abbr.
2 Regarding.
3 Hedoniat cry.
4 Chineae
measures.
5 Detailed
report.
6 In a permis permissive
sive permissive manner.
7 French state.
8 Ruby.
9 Ty pe of
residence.
10 Duck.
11 Abhors.
12 Flower.
13 Soldiers hang hangout:
out: hangout: Abbr.
14 Hands.
15 Hallowed.
15 Gab.
17 Representa Representative:
tive: Representative: Abbr.

Across

46 Vault.
47 Pertaining to
bone.
48 Therefore.
49 Nautical term.
50 Moved.
52 Psychologic
term: Abbr.
53 Undressed
kids.
55 Mountain
dew: colloq.
57 Part of the
head.
59 Branch.
61 Receptacle.
62 Body of
land: Abbr.
63 Main.
65 Frogs.
67 First century
date.
68 Toward the
mouth.
70 Mysterious.
71 Vamps.
72 Vehicle.
73 Exclamation.
74 Austrian river.

Down

18 Kind of plane
trip.
19 Writing Writingmaterials.
materials. Writingmaterials.
21 Relies.
24 Tool.
26 Turkish inn.
31 Russian city.
33 Spruce.
34 Distinction.
35 Kitchen
gadgets.
33 Deprecatory.
38 Hindu priest.
39 Crowns.
40 Global strife:
41 Repairers.
43 Indian.
44 Pronoun.
46 Part of the
leg.
47 Harem room.
48 Vessels.
50 Building.

1 H IK U

PUZZLE

75 Tribe.
76 Stuffs.
77 Egress.
78 Microscopic
alga.
80 Spore-cases.
81 Ground swell.
82 Formula:
Abbr.
83 Erring.
84 Transient.
86 Edge.
89 Peruvian
tuber.
90 Opera.
91 Spoil.
93 Else.
95 Morose.
97 Anglo-Saxon
consonant.
99 Mountains.
101 Eye.
102 Tease.
103 French city.
105 Dream: Fr.
106 One of the
Barrymores.
107 Moroccan
coin.

51 Slippery.
53 Lapses.
54 Cut.
56 Horse Horsemackerel.
mackerel. Horsemackerel.
58 Abyssinian
vizier.
60 Scream.
64 Malicious
burning.
66 German
neurologist
(1860-1919).
69 Deserter.
72 Container.
73 Those who
Ssrform.
ne: Ger.
76 Contented
sound.
77 Cupid.
78 Ancient Greek
patriot.
79 Weight: Abbr.

108 West Indian.
109 Exist.
110 River in
Missouri.
111 Arabian
mountain.
112 Astronaut.
113 Hindu temple
entrances.
116 Tribe.
117 Armed
force: Abbr.
118 Possessive
pronoun.
119 Came up.
120 Pitfall.
121 Tree.
124 Spruce up.
126 Mysterious.
130 Wandering.
131 Prompt:
2 words.
132 Rear.
133 Divisions.
134 Book.
135 Subway
system:
Abbr.
136 Stop.

80 Continent:
Comb. form.
81 Spies.
83 Printers
direction.
85 Biblical
pronoun.
87 Atoll.
88 The reebok.
92 longa, vita
brevis.
94 Odin.
96 Diamond .
98 Norse goddess
of death.
100 Missing judge.
103 God of war.
104 African.
106 Ran out. j
107 German
province.
108 Adheres.
110 Sow.
112 Belgian city.

The Gators must buck a strong precedent in Jacksonville.
Only one Graves-coached squad has beaten both Auburn and
Georgia. In 1960, Lary Libertore guided his teammate to a
9-2 season, but a loss to Auburn cost the Gators the SEC crown.
In 1961, 1963 and 1965 UF fell victim to the Cliff Hare Stadium
jinx.
The encouraging factor here is that Florida has already
gotten past Auburn, and Graves boasts a 5-1 mark against the
Bulldogs.
In 1964, a fluke gave Georgia the victory, 14-7. Bobby Etter
scooped up a botched field goal attempt and scooted 10 yards
for the winning score. Etter, now a senior, led the SEC with
10 FGs.
Last years battle of course, was a close one.
Steve Spurrier, who was the coolest person in Florida Field
last Saturday, struck for 78 yards on two passes with less than
four minutes to go against Georgia. The rapid-five, pulsating
score gave UF a 14-10 come-from-behind win.
Georgia has beaten Mississippi State, VMI, South Carolina,
Mississippi, Kentucky and North Carolina.
Big 6-0, 210 poind Ronnie Jenkisn, SEC sophomore of the
year in 1965, anchors the Bulldogs rushing corps, which ranks
second in the conference.
Lynn Hughes, who doubles as safety, replaced injured Kirby
Moore to come-from-behind and whip Kentucky, 27-15, two weeks
ago.
Saturday, Georgia rolled over North Carolina 28-3. Sopho Sophomore
more Sophomore tailback Ken Lawrence sped for two scores on runs to 37
and five yards. Jenkins also tallied.
The series history, one of the Gators oldest, reaches back
to 1904. The Bulldogs hold a 27-16 overall edge, with one tie.
But Florida has captured 11 of the last 14 contests. Saturday's
game should follow the recent trend.

| 1 "5 "S 4 3 m? 7 8 mp 10 11 12 13 ~TT~ i7
I '2O ~ 2 1 ~ ~ ~ ~ In ~
I 25 26
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I 38 39 40 *|pl UK 43
I 75 1*46
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I "55 56 M 1*
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73
77
I 82 7 87 88
I 79 *a9T~ 92 *93
I 95 96 *97
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1 107 ~*j^ff
I in nT ii 4 ns *^^6
I 117
124 125 l26 127 128 129 ~
I Uo Witt
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114 Frenchman.
115 Turkish unit
of money.

116 Top.
119 Ecclesiastical
proceedings.

120 Norse god bf
war.
121 D
122 Medicinal
plant.
123 Texas county.

*
Wizard
Spurrier
( FROM PAGE 1):
onds with an 89 yard kickoff re return.
turn. return.
In the second quarter, lineback linebacker
er linebacker Gusty Yearout stole the ball
in mid air and ran 91 yards for
a 14-7 lead. Speedy Trapp al almost
most almost caught him, but could not
avoid two blockers.
Yearout put Auburn into a 27-
27 tie by grabbing a loose ball
at the 16-yard line late in the
final period.
Spuriers 27 completions (in
40 attempts) sets an SEC record.
Against Georgia, the Heisman Tro Trophy
phy Trophy contender should break Zeke
Bratkowskis career total offense
record. Spurier needs approx approximately
imately approximately 170 yards, and is aver averaging
aging averaging 208 yards a game.
Sophomore Lary Smith display displayed
ed displayed rugged endurance. Several
times he seemed out on his feet
yet still staggered for vital yard yardage.
age. yardage. He broke loose for his lon longest
gest longest run this season in the sec second
ond second quarter, when he raced 53
yards.
For the game, he amassed 102
yards in 22 carries. He scored
one touchdown, sending Florida
ahead, 20-17. On this 14 play drive
he caried seven times for 38
yards of the 69-yard march.
VISIT
QTfje Hum
Where Everyone
Meets

125 Edge.
126 Comparative
suffix.

127 Direction.
128 Terminal.
129 Wrath.