Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
IMPROPER SCREENING THE REASON?

Back To Back Infirmary Tragedies

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the
second part of a three part ser series
ies series by Alligator Editor Eddie
Sears on UF Infirmary.)
By EDDIE SEARS
Alligator Editor
On September 23, 1965, Dr.
Samuel Martin, the provost of the
medical center called Dr. William
Hall, director of the infirmary to
see if there were any vacancies
on the medical staff.
Hall said that he did have an
opening.

Vol. 59, No. 39

GO ON SALE WEDNESDAY

HC Ducats Still Available

By STEVE HULL
Alligator Executive Editor
Three hundred extra tickets for
the Auburn vs. Fla. Homecoming
game will be made available to
students Wednesday, it was
announced Tuesday by Charles
Goodyear Assistant business
manager of the Athletic Dept.
Students may buy either date
tickets or student tickets from

(Photo by Nicfc Arroyo)
ALL NIGHT GRIND preparations for
Homecoming decorations really got under underway
way underway in earnest Monday night as fraternity
and sorority members began to put in the
all-nighters - the kind that usually result
in lower grades. Here, some KAs start
work on their decorations.

The Florida
Alligator

University of Florida

Good! replied Martin.lhave
an excellent physician for you.
Dr. Kent P. Bradley arrived at
Halls office with glowing letters
of reference. He was well liked and
respected by his fellow physicians.
However, Bradley had one
serious fault. His license to prac practice
tice practice medicine in the state of Florida
had been suspended in 1964 for
drug addiction. Bradley had spent
six months in the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center before applying for
the job at the infirmary.
HaU, knowing of Bradleys
serious problem, hired him.

the 300 extra tickets that will be
offered.
Ticket requests from frater fraternities
nities fraternities were filled Saturday after afternoon,
noon, afternoon, and an overflow of 1000
tickets remained to be allocated
among students and their dates.
Os the 1,000 tickets 700 were sold
Monday, leaving 300 for dis distribution
tribution distribution Wednesday.
Fraternites and the other 56
gro>ips requesting bloc seating

. 1
Two months later after corres correspondence
pondence correspondence with Dr. Homer Pearson,
head of the State Board of Medi Medical
cal Medical Examiners, Hall was instructed
to remove Bradley immediately
from practicing medicine.
Bradley remained on the infir infirmary
mary infirmary payroll, however, doing re research
search research for the infirmary and
working in cooperation with Dr.

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

tickets were alloted their de desired
sired desired tickets for the Homecom Homecoming
ing Homecoming game.
Aisle seats will have to lx
utilized to provide for the need needed
ed needed overflow to satisfy the bloc
seating allocation of seats, Good Goodyear
year Goodyear said. *'* 9050 were requested
by the blocs and all have been
filled.
Bloc seating groups should pick
up their tickets today and Wed Wednesday.
nesday. Wednesday.
Tickets for the Georgia game
have been selling at a brisk
pace in the morning but sales
have slackened off during the after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. A two dollar deposit fee
must be paid when Georgia tickets
are picked up. The deposit will
be returned Nov. 5, at the Ga Gator
tor Gator bowl, the day of the Georgia
game.
There is no need for students
to come early and stand in line
for tickets for the Georgia game.
Goodyear added. We have been
given 3,500 tickets, and if this
is not enough chairs will be set
up on the field.
Name Change
For Seminole
Vote Tonight
The fate of the yearbooks name
Seminole could well be decided
upon tonight.
A meeting will be held in the
Florida Union Auditorium at 7:30
to vote on a list of approximately
150 suggested names for the year yearbook.
book. yearbook. A representative from each
university organization will vote on
five names numbering them in
their order of preference.
If the majority is cast for
Seminole, said Nel Laughon,
1966-67 yearbook editor, then its
final the name wont change.
But if it doesnt get the ma majority,
jority, majority, then the top names will go
before a final committee chosen
by President Reitz and me.

Robert Cade of the medical center.
While he was doing research,
Martin called for a Board of Ex Examiners
aminers Examiners meeting designed to get
Bradley a license in the state.
The Board listened patiently to
the testimony of three psychia psychiatrists
trists psychiatrists and several other doctors
before determining that Bradley
was cured. His license to practice
was restored and Bradley after
two months returned to work.
Bradley was paid $2,400 for the
time he was not practicing for the
infirmary staff. His salary of $14,-

V< V'
Vi *!
V iV
X; Grievance Committee Twenty-one grievance com- ::
plaints against mcml>crs of the Florida Medical Assod-
X at ion have been considered by this Committee during
: the year. Quite voluminous I'ilcs developed from the in- *:
X vest iga lions of two or three. Twenty of the complaints :$
were referred to the county society grievance committees $
for review, and recommendation. On only a few have the
jjj county society committees not yet reported. All other X
::* complaints jiave I wen resolved and in only three cases
was further assistance from this Committee necessary to X
accomplish resolution. In general, complaints have been
j>r exceiientiy handled bv the local county societies. :>
X X

X* ftocomou:nUations: X
X X-
Tnis Comn.tue commends the county grievance com- XX
X mittocs invoivco lor their fine cooperation and successful X;
X; work. XX
jx Wj wish to suggest that county committeos that hava $
XX determined to a recommendation to ar to raprimand !v
* physician member should not sand exact copies of such
v! correspondence with the physician to the party making X>
X tne cotnpiatnt. X*
.v
V V*
Xj Comnmtec on Medical LicensureAs usual, wc have X:
$ bud a very active year. Wc have had TTvc full Board ;X

XX meetings and four hearings heard licforc one or more
X; members of the Boarrl appoinlrd as hearing officers. $
$ Wc have revoked four licenses, as follows* >!
§ Albert Reinherz ambulance chasing X;
;X Francis A. Brunson advertising the cure of ;X
$ asthma (alergimistf X*
X* Joseph KeKantunprofessional conduct, as con cong:
g: cong: tinuing prescribing narcotics for known ;g
$ addicts after several warnings. X;
X; Jesus C. Randolfoconviction of abortion $
three instances.
X Joseph H. Deatsch addiction :*
XX Tames }. Goodman voluntary suspension pending
X* request for compromise and settlement, >
XX which was denied, mental incompetency. X
XX Wc have on probation seven; reprimanded * X
X; probation continueifytrom I'Kd, nine. XX
XX The Board examined 520 applicants for licensure, and $
issued 510 licenses. jjjj

x Journal of Florida Medical Association
| Vol. 53 No. 7 July 1966 g

Gators Move To Seventh
In Latest UPI Poll

UFs unbeaten Gators leaped
over Nebraska to rank seventh in
this weeks UPI Top Ten Poll.
Florida scored its sixth victory
over Louisiana State in Tiger Sta Stadium,
dium, Stadium, 28-7, Saturday night, while
Nebraska narrowly triumphed over
Colorado, 21-19.
This is the highest UF has been
rated since mid-season in 1965,
when the Gators placed fifth.
Notre Dame, solidified its hold
on first place with a 38-0 thrash thrashing
ing thrashing of previously-unbeaten Okla Oklahoma.
homa. Oklahoma. The Sooners dropped out
of the ratings and were replaced
by 10th ranked Wyoming.

Inside Todays Alligator
f 1 Today the Bullseye focus is on UF riots of
1 J past. See page 12
Caped Crusader. 3
UPI News 4
BULLSEYEI They Screamed 5 I
Editorial pages 6,7
Sports 13, 14, 15

300 was scheduled to be raised to
$15,500 in 1967.
The disappearance of Bradley
from the infirmary was not
explained by Hall to the othei
physicians. They were told that he
was on special assignment/'
We were already a dretor oi
two short," one doctor said. Wher
Bradley- left we were extremely
overworked. I did not know until
later that Bradleys license was
under suspension. I always found
him a cheerful person and a good
physician."
(SEE INFIRMARY" PAGE 11>

Michigan State, in the second
spot, kept pace with a convincing
41-20 triumph over Bob Griese
and faltering Purdue. Purdue fell
to be replaced by ninth-ranked,
once beaten Arkansas.
UCLA, Alabama, Southern Cali California
fornia California and Georgia Tech, each
sporting perfect marks, remained
third through sixth, respectively.
The coaches in the poll awarded
Notre Dame 21 first place votes
and 333 points. Michigan State,
which held first place for three
weeks, trailed with 11 first place
markers and 315 points.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 25, 1966

ANNUAL GATHERING HONORS DADS N GRADS
. . honorary alums to be installed

Al umni Association To Present
Varied Activities Program

The UF Alumni Association will
present a varied program of ac activities
tivities activities Saturday as part of its
annual welcoming hospitality for
dads n grads.
The 1966 reunion, featuring
booths where each of the univer universitys
sitys universitys colleges and schools can re register
gister register alumni, will begin at 8:30
a.m. on the College of Law lawn,
adjacent to the Florida Showcase
tent exhibit area.
Coffee and doughnuts will be
served at the booths and the ac academic
ademic academic unit registering the great greatest
est greatest percentage of alumni will re receive
ceive receive a SIOO scholarship check
from Alumni Association Presi President
dent President Stephen C. OConnell.
Three new honorary members
of the Alumni Association will
be saluted at 10 a.m. as a part
of a special program just prior
to the John Marshall Bar Assoc Association
iation Association skits.
University President J. Wayne
Reitz, Athletic Business Mana Manager
ger Manager Percy Beard and former Flor Florida
ida Florida Gov. Leoy Collins will be
given recognition by OConnell.
Scholarships Awarded
Two special scholarships will be
awarded here Saturday as part of
UFs Homecoming weekend acti activities.
vities. activities.
The Eckerd Drug Company and
Publix Markets have contributed
SSOO apiece for a scholarship that
will go to the college or school
preparing the best exhibit in the
Florida Showcase.
Recipients of the two scholar scholarships
ships scholarships will be announced during the
reunion program which begins at
10 a.m.

1 UF 's EPRESENTATIVESI
X George Corl Mel Ward
Dan Wilkerson I
1636 W. Univ. Ave. I
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 376~! 208
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DEFERRED PREMIUM PAYMENTS I
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the rLORBU ALLIGATOR la (bo official atadaat ol (bo (Mworotty of Plorlda aad la
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The three recipients, all non nonalumni
alumni nonalumni of the university, were
chosen by the associations Hon Honorary
orary Honorary Membership and Special A Awards
wards Awards Committee from a list of
names recommended by local club
presidents, members of the Ex Executive

Homecoming Roundup

Medical School Graduates
To Gather At Homecoming

Members of the College of Med Medicine
icine Medicine Section of the UF Alumni
Association will take time out
for a scientific meeting during
Homecoming weekend.
Medical alumni, here for their
second annual Homecoming meet meeting,
ing, meeting, will be special guests at the
College of Medicines postgraduate
seminar on neurology and neuro neurosurgery
surgery neurosurgery Friday.
The seminar, designed for prac practicing
ticing practicing physicians, will include 17
faculty members from the college
and three guest faculty members:
Dr. Charles E. Brackett, Univer University
sity University of Kansas Medical Center;
Dr. David H. Reynolds, Univer University
sity University of Miami College of Med Medicine,
icine, Medicine, and Dr. Richard D. Wal Walter,
ter, Walter, University of California Med Medical
ical Medical Centers Neurological Insti Institute.
tute. Institute.
An informal reception for alum alumni
ni alumni is planned at 7 p.m. that day
at the Holiday Inn. The section
will hold a business meeting and
election of officers at 10 a.m.
Saturday in the auditorium of the

ecutive Executive Council and other alumni.
More than 3,500 alumni and their
families are expected to attend
the annual Homecoming barbecue
at Florida Gymnasium from 11:30
a.m. until 1 p.m.

J. Hillis Miller Health Center.
Alumni and their families will be
guests at a luncheon in the out outpatient
patient outpatient area of the Shands Tea Teaching
ching Teaching Hospital and Clinics before
the Florida-Auburn football game.
The class of 1961 will hold
its five-year reunion Saturday at
an informal reception given by
Dean Emanuel Suter and Dr. Hugh
M. Hill, assistant dean for student
affairs.
Officers for the College of Med Medicine
icine Medicine Section are Dr. Mark V. Bar Barrow,
row, Barrow, Gainesville, president; Dr.
Frank Fisher, Gainesville, pres president-elect,
ident-elect, president-elect, and Dr. Charles T.
Ozaki, Lake City, secmary-trea secmary-treasurer.
surer. secmary-treasurer.

RED HOT SPECIAL
BIG BARNEY
AND SAVE 10c
Two big patties of
lean beef on a dou- v z
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TUESDAY yOc
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Honorary
To Initiate
Gov. Collins
Former Florida Gov. Leoy
Collins will become an honorary
member of Phi Delta Phi legal
fraternity Saturday after he deliv delivers
ers delivers a breakfast address to mem members
bers members and guests at the Ramada
Inn. The meeting begins at 7:30
a.m.
Collins is one of three speakers
on UFs Homecoming weekend
schedule Saturday. U.S. Supreme
Court Justice Thomas Clark will
appear at the Phi Alpha Delta
breakfast at the Student Service
Center and Republican guberna gubernatorial
torial gubernatorial candidate Claude Kirk will
be featured at Alpha Kappa Psi
business fraternitys breakfast
session at the University Inn.
A. J. Barranco Jr., magister of
Phi Delta Phi, said Collins initi initiation
ation initiation is scheduled in the College
of Law courtroom at 9:30 a.m.
following the breakfast and just
before Collins is slated to receive
an honorary alumnus award from
the Universitys Alumni Associa Association.
tion. Association.
More than 500 are expected for
the Phi Delta Phi breakfast, in including
cluding including U.S. Sen. Spessard Hol Holland,
land, Holland, and U. S. Representatives
Charles Bennett, Paul Rogers and
Sam Gibbons of Florida,Secretary
of State Tom Adams, Fletcher
Rush, president of the Florida
Bar Association, and Florida Su Supreme
preme Supreme Court Justices Campbell
Thornal and Stephen C. OConnell.
Clark To Speakj
At Dedication |
One of Americas most distin distinguished
guished distinguished jurists will help UF turn
the ground for its new $3 million
College of Law Center during
Homecoming weekend.
He is Thomas C. Clark, asso associate
ciate associate justice of the United States
Supreme Court.
Groundbreaking ceremonies for
the College of Laws new center
will be conducted at 3:15 p.m.
Friday on the Newberry Road site
near the northwest corner of the
campus.
Clark also will be principal
speaker at the Phi Alpha Delta
legal fraternity breakfast at 7:30
a.m. Oct. 29 in the Student Ser Service
vice Service Center. He is president of
the national chapter.

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Happenings this week-end deserve the most oeautuul
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Homecoming Happenings are being styled at Hide & Chic for
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Hyde & Chic styles Hair Happenings with 100% human
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WHERE HE 15 OF TENIWcitSSw BV DKSESTING EVERY KNOWN FACT ABOUT)

They 1 re Still Trying
To r Pep l Up Spirit
By JOHN MEDEARIS
Alligator Correspondent
The UF student body has been criticized for its lack of sch school
ool school spirit by SG Commissioner of School Spirit Leslie Mag Magnant.
nant. Magnant.
There is traditionally no school spirit at UF. Well just have
to break tradition to get some. The spirit is just not here,
Miss Magnant charged.
Miss Magnant, assisted by Barbara Bauber, has formed two
UF pep clubs but both failed due to non-support.
The latest effort originated after the second football game
this season. Plans were made for equipping and training up
to 200 students. Arrangements were readied for bloc seating
on the 50-yard line at all home games. Provisions for sign signing
ing signing up were organized at the Florida Union.
Only ten students showed up in the first meeting.
I want to have a pep club but I dont want to sit by myself
in a 2OO seat bloc. This school is just not emotionally ready
for a pep club. The question now is whether to go ahead with
another one or not, Miss Magnant said.
Meanwhile, Miss Magnant continues working on the project.
She has written to 13 colleges, including the University of
Miami and FSU, which have pep clubs in full swing. They hope
to determine why its not working out here.

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Tuesday, October 25, 1966, The Florida Allierator.

Sweetheart
Finalists
Visit Vets
JACKSONVILLE UFs Homecom Homecoming
ing Homecoming Sweetheart finalists raised the
morale of a group of wounded
marines at the US Naval Hospi Hospital
tal Hospital here Sunday.
Judy Silver, Carol Eastman and
Sharon Lynn visited with the
four Viet Nam veterans who will
be honor guests of UF and Blue
Key for Homecoming.
Its a great thrill," said Sgt.
John Looney, and a privilege
to meet these girls. I'm very grate grateful
ful grateful for the opportunity to part participate
icipate participate in the Homecoming festivi festivities."
ties." festivities."
This coming Homecoming
weekend wiU be Uke old times,"
said Lt. Robert Hunkapillar. This
is the first time that I have been
back to my alma mater since
graduation."
PFC Charles Ford said, The
guys sure got a big lift when the
sweethearts were here. It was won wonlerful."
lerful." wonlerful."
Summing it all up, Sgt. Wayne Wil Wilson
son Wilson said, Ive always been a Ga Gator
tor Gator fan and its just great, really
great!"
Math Meet
Wednesday
Pi Mu Epsilon, national math mathmetics
metics mathmetics honorary, will hold its
first meeting Wednesday at 7:30
p.m. in Walker 209.
All interestedripersons are asked
to attend and bring original prob problems
lems problems for discussion.

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 25, 1966

.
| / FROM THE
WIRES OF
International
STEP UP ATTACKS . SEOUL, Korea . With President John Johnsons
sons Johnsons visit a week away, North Korean soldiers are slipping across
the 151 mile long armistice line to attack South Korean military
men.
The United Nations Command said the forays occured with un unusual
usual unusual frequency in the past nine days.
The command said North Koreans had violated the military
demarcation line 10 times since Oct. 14 to kill, wound and kidnap
South Korean soldiers.
The U. N. Command said the latest foray occurred Friday when
armed Communist personnel ambushed a U. N. vehicle, killing
the South Korean occupants. It did not disclose the number of cas casualties
ualties casualties suffered.
A FRO-ASIAN SEMINAR .. KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia ..
Prime Minister Tengku Abdul Rahman opened a 15-nation Afro-
Asian seminar on national development Monday. It was hoped Pres President
ident President Johnson would meet some of the delegates during his stop
in Kuala Lumpur next Sunday.
Attending the meeting are delegates from the Philippines, South
Korea, Basutoland, Thailand, Ceylon, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Kenya,
Laos, Malawi, Singapore, Somalia, Tanzania, Malaysia and South
Viet Nam.
National
DECLARED SANE . CHICAGO . Six court-appointed psychi psychiatrists
atrists psychiatrists have decided that Dallas drifter Richard Speck is compe competent
tent competent to stand trial on charges of slaying eight nurses, the Chicago
Daily News reported Monday.
The newspaper said the psychiatrists concluded at a secret
meeting Saturday that Speck was able to cooperate with Gerald
W. Getty, the Cook County public defender who has been assigned
co defend him against charges of first degree murder.
The six did not complete their formal report in time for sub submission
mission submission to Criminal Court Judge Herbert C. Paschen at a court
hearing Monday, the Daily News said.
Paschen said the report of the psychiatrists decision was
a little premature.
PLEAD FOR RELEASE . WASHINGTON .. C. M. Gilmore,
the father of a young American being held by the Russians, came
to Washington Sunday to plead for the boys release on the grounds
of fundamental human kindness.
Craddock Gilmour, of Salt Lake City, and Buel Wortham, of North
Little Rock, Ark., were arrested by the Soviets Oct. 1 at the Fin Finnish
nish Finnish border on suspicion of theft after customs officials found
a bronze statue in their luggage.
The Russians have not yet filed any formal charges against
Wortham and Gilmour. But if they do, it is expected the charge
will be aggravated theft. U. S. officials feel that if the men
did take the statue, the case should be written off as a youth youthful
ful youthful prank.
a
STRANGLER SOUGHT. .CINCINNATI. .In the face of rapidly
mounting fear and suspicion, city officials took emergency measures
Monday in an effort to capture the Cincinnati strangler, who apparently
claimed his fifth victim.
Police were put on 12-hour shifts, authorization was given for a
speedy addition of 28 men to the force, and the public was urged to
institute a brothers keeper program -- especially for persons
who live alone.
City officials also announced after an emergency meeting they were
discouraging any type of vigilanteeism on the part of the public.
They urged citizens to cooperate with the police in reporting anything
suspicious.
SQUATTERS STILL SITTING . ALBERQUERQUE, N.M. Some 40
to 50 Spanish-Americans still were in their republic Sunday
in New Mexicos Carson National Forest, despite the presence of
FBI agents.
U. S. Forest Service officials said no attempts were made to
arrest the squatters when they returned to their republic Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, although warrants were issued by U. S. Attorney John Quinn
for the arrest of five members of the group.
The squatters are members of an organization called the Fed Federal
eral Federal Alliance of Land Grants, headquarters in Albuquerque, and
they claim ownership so some 500,000 acres of land around the
forest under old Spanish land grants. Last weekend They moved
into a rest camp in the forest, staked it out as a republic and told
everyone else to leave.

LBJ IN MANILA

Riots Greet Plea For Peace

MANILA (UPI) The worst anti-
American rioting of President
Johnsons Far East tour erupted
Monday night outside the Chief
Executives hotel after he issued
a new plea for peace in South Southeast
east Southeast Asia at the opening session
of the Manila summit conference
on Viet Nam.
A mob of about 3,000 Asian
students clashed with police in
front of the Manila Hotel, where
Johnson and the other heads of
government attending the seven sevennation
nation sevennation summit are staying. Fists
flew and at least seven gunshots
rang out as 150 police and army
troops battled the demonstrators.
About 12 hours earlier, the
President told his Asian colleagues
at the first session of the summit
he hoped their deliberations would
provide new fuel for the cause
of peace in Souheast Asia.
Gen. William C. Westmoreland,
U. S. military commander in Viet
Nam, gave the summit participants
a tough-turkey military briefing
and reportedly told them more al allied
lied allied troops would be needed to win
the war.
Parents Blame
Government
For Deaths
ABERFAN, Wales (UPI)-Grief (UPI)-Griefstricken
stricken (UPI)-Griefstricken parents Monday disrupt disrupted
ed disrupted an inquest into the slagpile
disaster in this Welsh village by
accusing Britains National Coal
Board of being responsible for
their childrens death.
The incident occurred when one
of the Welsh miners, whose fam family
ily family was wiped out in the slide,
insisted the coroner list buried
alive by the National Coal Board
as the cause of a sons death.
Hes right. They killed our
children, one woman shouted as
the inquest dissolved into an up uproar.
roar. uproar.
Meanwhile, bone-tired workers
continued to clear away the mud
and debris, which flooded this
coal mining town Friday. The
number of bodies recovered rose
to 145 with at least 35 persons
till missing.
The majority of the dead were
children, whose school was com completely
pletely completely buried when some two mil million
lion million tons of waste slag from the
coal pits tumbled down the moun mountainside.
tainside. mountainside.
Many residents of the town claim
the mine authorities should have
removed the danger of the slag slagpile
pile slagpile years ago. The miners re reflected
flected reflected this belief at the inquest.
RELIGION
NOT AIDED
BY STAMPS
McAllen, Tex. (UPI) Rev. Hen Henry
ry Henry V. Collins finished his sermon
Sunday, then handed out trading
stamps as his First Church of God
congregation filed through the
door.
It did not go over with a howl howling
ing howling success, Rev. Collins said.
He had offered 120 stamps to each
person to increase attendance. He
said attendance was about the
same, however.
I do not know why it did not
work. The holdback could have
been because people thought they
would be called old freeloaders,
the minister said.
Rev. Collins said he was try trying
ing trying to engrave the stamp of
Christ on hearts and minds to
redeem you in glory.

Johnson spoke last and tried
his best to avoid any suggestion
that he is dominating the summit,
declaring he came to Manila as
an equal among equals to share
with friends and allies our prob problems,
lems, problems, our plans and our hopes.
Attending the summit with John Johnson
son Johnson are the leaders of South Viet 1
Nam, South Korea, the Philippines,
Australia, New Zealand and Thai Thailand.
land. Thailand.
The rioting Monday night broke
out after the students had demon demonstrated
strated demonstrated in front of the U.S. Em Embassy,
bassy, Embassy, then marched on the hotel.
They were led by a vanguard of
about 400 who actually partici participated
pated participated in the fighting with police
and army troops.
The students shouted Johnson

FLORIDA NEWS
TALLAHASSEE. .Robert W. Sims, Floridas nationally known edu educational
cational educational computer expert, and his 12-year-old daughter were bound,
gagged and murdered in their home late Saturday night.
Sims wife Helen, 37, was also shot twice in the head and once in
the leg. She was in critical condition at a hospital and Leon County
Sheriff William Joyce said, I am surprised she has lived this lofag.
She has been unconscious since they found her.
Sims, 42, director of information systems for the Florida Depart Department
ment Department of Education, was shot once in the head at close range. The
daughter, Joy Lynn, was stabbed six times, three times each in the
abdomen and the leg.
WASHINGTON. .The Supreme Court Monday refused to prohibit
unlimited picketing of the Jacksonville, Fla, railroad terminal by
operating unions striking against the Florida East Coast Railway
FEC.
The court in a one-sentence opinion affirmed, by a 4 to 4 vote, a
ruling on the case handed down May 24, 1966, by the sth U. S. Circuit
Court of Appeals.
The sth Cin uit said the Norris LaGuardia Act, which bars federal
court injunctions in cases involving or growing out of a labor dis dispute,
pute, dispute, would not permit an anti-picketing order.
The lawsuit was started by two other carriers using the Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville terminal Atlantic Coast Line and Seaboard Air Line Railraods.
They said they had no quarrel with the unions, but the picketing,
started May 4, brought traffic over their. lines to a standstill.
JACKSONVILLE. .Florida financier Louis E. Wolfson said Monday
he is innocent of fraud and perjury charges against him and accused
the federal government of using underhanded methods in obtain obtaining
ing obtaining the indictments.
Wolfson was indicted by a federal grand jury in New York on charges
of selling $3.5 million of unregistered stock and allegedly lying under
oath when questioned about the deal.
I can only conclude that tactics have been used that are not the
democratic procedures on which this country was founded, but appear
to be the destestable smear method, Wolfson said in a statement
released by his office here.
Wolfson, chairman and major stockholder of Merritt-Chapman
and Scott Corp., said he was convinced a court will find him innocent.
TALLAHASSEE. .Florida State University officials say if everyone
shows up in 1975 as predicted by the State Board of Regents it will
need four million more square feet of buildings.
School officials added FSU also will not be able to handle the
predicted enrollment of 28,000 without more acreage to put new build buildings
ings buildings on.
FSU now has 330 acres for a campus and the school is purchasing
an additional 12 acres.
In addition the university has turned over to the regents proposals
for $44 million in construction for the coming two years.
SARASOTA. .Democratic gubernatorial candidate Robert King
High Sunday won the endorsement of the Sarasota Herald Tribune.
In a Sunday editorial the Sarasota Herald Tribune said has
had, it appears, considerable financial success in business, but he
has been markedly vague about his recent and current ventures abroad
and Kirks pronouncements on campaign issues have been conspici conspiciously
ously conspiciously broad and general.
Robert King High offers a record of experience in politics and
public office.
MIAMI. .Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Heitzman were saying goodnight
to some callers early Monday and nearly stumbled over a nine foot
shark.
This was five miles inland, on a lawn in a quiet residential neigh neighborhood.
borhood. neighborhood. Quiet, at least, until the hammerhead shark arrived. There
it lay, 350 pounds, quietly resting on a sheet of plastic.
We really cant figure out who did it or why it was done, said
Mrs. Heitzman.
Whoever put the shark on Mr. Heitzmans lawn was capable of
no mean feat. The city refuse department came by after daylight
to help the Heitzmans get rid of their fish.

go home! and Asian butcher!
and hurled bottles, rocks and fire firecrackers
crackers firecrackers at police. Johnson did not
witness the battle. His fourth floor
suite faces in another direction.
Five students were arrested as
leaders of the mob and charged
with disorderly conduct and brea breaches
ches breaches of peace. One was slightly
wounded by shots from a home homemade
made homemade zip gun fired by another
demonstrator.
Johnson spoke at the close of
the first full meeting of the sum summit
mit summit leaders. It lasted five hours
and followed an opening ceremony
in which Philippine President Fer Ferdinand
dinand Ferdinand E. Marcos called on Com Communist
munist Communist North Viet Nam to accept
the hand of conciliation.



They Screamed (Urp) For Ice Cream

<1
THE WINNER
...Jim Masalanka

Tender Care, Force Feeding And Sloppy Techniques Shown

Photos By
Nick Arroyo


Thursday night fraternity men gathered
at the Westgate Plaza to participate in an
ice cream eating contest, sponsored by Dip Dipper
per Dipper Dan. The winner of the contest was Delta
Tau Delta, which was awarded S2OO to use
in the Dollars for Scholars Drive.
'

5

I
c *1 a K il
liHinHHB
/ <:,. >#.;va v '.s^V?" : Jt "ft- JKk,
I ts .-
Cheering On A Brother

Tuesday, October 25, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 25, 1966

The Florida Alligator
'A Migwity Ii OuttAmPt M %iT*A'
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR DICK DENNIS
Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecessanly reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is the editorial in the left
column.
Party Loyaltv
You can tell Claude Kirk is working
hard in Burns Country.
Traveling through West Florida, one
sees about five large Kirk billboards to
every one for Robert King High. And all
of them have one dominant theme.
Youd think it would be a promote Kirk
idea behind them, but it comes out more
anti-High.
Sometimes party loyalty demands too
much, says one of the huge signs. The
others are along similar lines.
Os course, you cant quarrel with can candidate
didate candidate Kirks political savvy. He knows
he needs west Florida votes to win and
thats where he plans to get them. But
there is more than politics involved.
High -- who continues to run his cam campaign
paign campaign on very little despite party sup support
port support -- has one sign for all the bill billboards
boards billboards centering around his successful
integrity campaign. Kirk, on the other
hand, has not nearly so many party
supporters, yet his budget runs consid considerably
erably considerably more than Highs.
The Tampa Tribune which endorsed
the Miami mayor 10 days back -- has
commented that a vote for Claude Kirk
is really a vote for Haydon Burns. Could
it be that the Burns money has shifted
to Kirk to prevent Highs election?
Could it also be that the Burns stra strategy
tegy strategy of May has infiltrated Kirks cam campaign?
paign? campaign? (Remember both Kirk and Burns
have called candidate High an ultra ultraliberal
liberal ultraliberal on occasion. And Kirk has pro promised
mised promised to keep many Burns appointees
in their jobs.)
Candidate Kirk is right about party
loyalty -- sometimes it does ask too
much. So all Republicans maybe ought
to consider going out and
A Step Backward
Republican Joseph Yasecko, candidate
for state treasurer and insurance com commissioner,
missioner, commissioner, has come up with a proposal
to eliminate the office from politics.
He proposes to have the state insurance
commissioner appointed by the Legis Legislature,
lature, Legislature, rather than elected by the people
as is now the case. How anyone could
seriously suggest throwing an office into
the hands of the Legislature to eliminate
it from politics is beyond us.
We have always held the view that the
voting public is somewhat more divorced
from politics than professional
politicians -- and that important offices
should be filled by election rather than
appointment.
The inevitable result of such a move
would be to give the ruling faction of
the state legislature a rubber stamp
in the person of the states chief fiscal
officer.

Questions For Hubert

By DAVID MORRIS
Alligator Columnist
Dear Mr. Humphrey:
Since hearing of your impending
visit to the UF I have been await awaiting
ing awaiting the opportunity to ask you some
questions about our policy in Viet
Nam. However, since the luncheon
at which you will speak is closed
to outsiders (only FBK and its

2 A.M. Coffee Stain

Sam the Hairlip is wearing his
New York Yankee cap, has a New
York News folded under his left
arm and is standing in front of
Frank the Newsvendors newsstand
in downtown Miami. Sam the Hair Hairlip,
lip, Hairlip, as you may have already gues guessed,
sed, guessed, is a loser.
It is 2 a.m. on this particular
June night and Sam the Hair Hairlip
lip Hairlip is trying to get into an argu argument
ment argument with Frank the Newsvendor
about baseball. This is very
risky business, of course, be because
cause because Frank the Newsvendor has
at his disposal more than 25 var various
ious various sports magazines and record
booksnot to mention the 93 pa papers
pers papers from 42 states.
But Frank the Newsvendor has hasnt
nt hasnt been feeling too good lately,
and Sam the Hairlip knows this.
Sam takes the risk.
Whitey Ford, Sam begins,
is the best pitcher in baseball.
Frank the Newsvendor watches
the street cleaner up on Flag Flagler
ler Flagler Street. He is thinking about
New York Yankee fans. Frank has
stated many times before that there
are only two kinds of Yankee fans
the regular, quiet fans who
have been keeping their mouths
shut lately; and the obnoxious
Yankee fans, who think the Amer American
ican American flag should be pinstriped.
Sam the Hairlip, according to
Frank the Newsvendor, is to be
classified as the latter.
Whitey Ford, Sam tries again,
is the best pitcher ...
Sam, Frank the Newsvendor
says, Why dont you go on home.
Im ...
Whitey Ford is bettern this
guy McDowell with Cleveland. Whit Whitey
ey Whitey Ford is bettern KOUFAX! Sam
the Hairlip puts much emphasis on
that last staterhent, because it is
rather bold. Frank the News Newsvendors
vendors Newsvendors eyes make an Oh-Come-
Now stare at the early morning
sky.

I j few
j?' ' Jm Kvv-

By JAMIE JOBB
Alligator Columnist

euests) I must use this column
S lose my questions. I hope that
one of my readers will relay the
queries to you.
1. Why did Premier Ky, the
man we have given unqualified
support, state on July 4 1965
that I have only one (hero): Hit Hitler.?
ler.? Hitler.?
2. According to official U.S.

Sam the Hairlip has one more
punch; he throws it.
Whitey Ford is bettern ELROY
FACE!" This, of course, ignites
Frank the Newsvendor who is
from Pittsburgh and thinks the Pi Pirates
rates Pirates should be taught in Sunday
School.
It is June and the wind hurries
a paper cup down SE First Ave.,
months before the New York
Yankees will finish dead last in
the American League for the first
time since 1922; months before Dan
Topping, the only baseball man
left in the organization, will sell
out to CBS; months before Whit Whitey
ey Whitey Ford, the greatest pitcher in
baseball, will be put on waivers.
There is only one more blow
the resignation of Mantlebefore
they play taps for the Yankees.
Sam the Hairlip turns slowly and
smiles distantly. He has finished
what he started. Soon he will reach
Flagler Street and head on home.
The smile will still be on his face.
Sam the Hairlip, the obnoxious
Yankee fan, i S the last of a
dyinc breed.

Florida Alligator Staff
A i? OYO CAROL HEFNER GENE NAIL
o o Editor Society Editor Editorial Assistant
JO ANN LANGWORTHY NEWT SIMMONS
General Assignment Editor Wire Editor
M^ur^on^ Bob Beck Sue Froemke, Barbara Gefen,
Fowl J t Kathie Keim Jean Mamlin, Frank Shepherd, Aggie (
Fowles, Justine Hartman.
GUibprH NED i, TORS Judy Redfern, Sherrie Braswell, Toni
J w TorcWa N ick Tatro, Tyler Tucker, John Briggs,
ften Garst, Margie Green.
In order to better cover campus events the Alligator uses
reporters from the School of Journalism and Communications,
heir bylines are followed by Alligator Correspondent.

figures released March 18 the to.
tal number of civilian deaths cau caused
sed caused by American and South Viet*,
namese military operations is 109
(from August 1, 1965 through
March 1, 1966). Yet a House For Foreign
eign Foreign Affairs Com mittee headed by
Rep. Clement Zablocki reported
on March 17, 1966 that (l) there
had been 14,000 civilian deaths in
January and February alone and
(2) the number of civilians killed
was twice the number of Viet Cong
killed. Why such a discrepancy in
figures Mr. Vice-president?
3. Last year the United States
sent 200,000 men to SouthVietNam
to protect that country from the
scourge of communism. Yet during
the same period 120,000 South
Vietnamese soldiers deserted.
Could it be that the Vietnamese
people do not feel they have a
great stake in this war and that
they are willing to let us fight
their battles?
4. You, Mr. Humphrey, have
berated critics by stating that the
study of why and how we got
involved in Viet Nam is ancient
history. However, was it not
true that a week before John
F. Kennedy died, while South Viet
Nam was in a state of turmoil,
Kennedy ordered 10% of our troops
home? And was it not true that
in December 1963 President John Johnson
son Johnson ordered these troops, and
more, back? Was not this the real
turning point, not the ancient
history of 1954?
5. Could you comment on the
following statement made by Sen.
Stephen Young of Ohio last Nov.
21? The C.I.A. has employed
some South Viet Namese and they
have been instructed to claim they
are Viet Cong and to work accord accordingly
ingly accordingly . Several of these ex executed
ecuted executed village leaders and raped
some women.
6. You, among others, have sta stated
ted stated that the September elections
were an indication of the support
the South Viet Namese people have
given their government. Yet Dean
Rusk has admitted before the Sen Senate
ate Senate that the Vietminh movement
against the French (1948-1954)
was a popular Since almost
all of Kys advisers fought for
the French and against their own
people, why did these traitors
suddenly become so popular?
7. President Johnsons first
Honolulu conference was called
at a moment's notice, and coin coincidentally,
cidentally, coincidentally, on the same day that
Senator Fulbright was to begin
his televised hearings on the Viet
Nam war. Seven months later our
president once again ventures
forth, this time two weeks before
election time. Can we seriously
believe that these conferences are
little more than war councils and
propaganda stunts?



Insurance
Series Did
Good Job
EDITOR:
Kudos to Gene Nail for his
excellent series on buying life
insurance. As a college market
insurance broker I've long felt
that too many students buy life
insurance without fully under understanding
standing understanding what they are getting for
their premium dollars.
Many students buy insurance
with investment or profit" as a
major objective. Unfortunately, all
too often the agent selling them a
package policy" neglects to make
it clear that the package's
dazzeling array of optional (?)
benefits greatly increases the poli policys
cys policys cost WITHOUT increasing its
cash-value or investment.
I personally know of one such
package deal available on campus
that apart from making accidental
death, dismemberment, or
disability almost look attractive
to the unsuspecting student also has
upwards of 40 per cent of the
initial premium going into NON NONcash-value
cash-value NONcash-value benefits.
Another abuse perpetrated
against the unknowledgable student
is the college-men-omjMnyth. All
life insurance companies in the
USA use the same life expectancy
tables the 1958 CSO Mortality
Scale. This means that as far as
the insurance industry is concern concerned
ed concerned getting a college degree does
NOT add to anyones longevity!
In fact, I categorically deny that
there is any difference between
the insurability of a college man
and a non-college man of com comparable
parable comparable age, health, occupation,
etc. Any agent or company dis disagreeing
agreeing disagreeing with this opinion will find
me happy to debate the issue.
As a matter of fact, the UF is
currently blessed with one college collegemen-only
men-only collegemen-only package that is actually
more expensive and less profit profitable"
able" profitable" than other non-student plans
offered by the same company!
For several years I have given
talks to student groups on buying
life insurance. I have even com compiled
piled compiled a check list of questions that
I give to students who wish to
compare agents, companies, poli policies,
cies, policies, etc. before making 19 their
m inds as to what program they want
to buy. Since my average size sale
last year was for over $30,000 per
policy with over 90 per cent per persist?
sist? persist? icy, I know that shopping
arou. benefits both me and my
client.
For what its worth, my advice
to a student buying insurance is (a)
discuss your finances, objectives,
etc. with the agent; (2) ask the
agent to recommend a program
for you; (3) if the agent suggests
optional benefits, have him write
out the cost for each individual
benefit; (4) have the agent show
you the net cost for his proposal
based on the total premium for all
of the benefits he is trying to sell
you. Finally, if you still arent sure
of his proposal by all means you
should shop around and see what
other companies have to offer.
Always keep in mind, though,
that if what one agent recommends
as best" for your situation is
best, then he neednt fear that a
competitor will offer you a better
deal.
On the other hand, if an agent
is reluctant to have you take his
proposal, figures, etc. to another
agent for an outside opinion, then
youll probably do well to follow
the ancient rule of caveat
emptor."
RICHARD FAIRCLOTH

A.
D.

What About It Blue Key?

EDITOR:
Wanton lack of editorial responsibility for accuracy in cover coverage
age coverage of the Infirmary."
So said a petition" dated March 28, 1966 and signed by
nine student leaders," among them such as Buddy Jacobs,
Bruce Culpepper, Bruce Starling, Chip Block, Jane Kimbrell
and John Darlson demanding that Benny Cason be suspended
as editor of Tbe Alligator.
The wanton lack" Infirmary charge was one of seven dubious
items" listed by these student leaders" in demanding and
getting Casons head.
Now comes the new Alligator under Eddie Sears with a new
series of Infirmary stories, and these articles make previous
Infirmary exposes look mild indeed.

Blue Key Really Does Serve

EDITOR:
Unfortunately, most of the recent articles concerning Florida
Blue Key have been aimed at the destruction of its reputation
In my three years here, I have learned a great deal from my
various associations with many members of this organization.
I also learned that Ibe Alligator is responsible to report the
GOOD as well as the bad aspects of controversial groups.
That is not presently being done.
Though disturbed by these articles, it was not until I spoke
with numerous freshmen that I saw the seriousness of the situ situation.
ation. situation. They not only think of Blue Key as a group of selfish
politicians after personal gain at the expense of others, but
they have no idea what Blue Key is SUPPOSED to be.
The basic criticism is that as a service organization, they
KBF Describes

FBK Much Better
EDITOR:
I thought you might like to see the hlerarcny of top honors
that is present in the minds of a large number of students at
the University of Florida:
Ranking Honor Type
1 Florida Blue Service
Key
2 Congressional Bravery
Medal of Honor
3 Phi Beta Kappa Academic
Needless to say I am (censored) at this ranking.
The simple fact that F.B.K. wants to get paid for its ser service"
vice" service" to the University indicates that there are some bad
aspects to the word service," that Webster never thought of.
Maybe we should redefine service" in all the dictionaries to
imply that service is an act that someone or something does for
gain or profit, as opposed to an act done without regard to pay payment.
ment. payment. If most of Florida Blue Key members actually feel that
they deserve preferential seating more than any other students,
they are without doubt, a big bunch of fops.
I wiH admit, however, that F.B.K. has done a service to
students here at Florida. They have shown us just how far they
are from being a true service organization.
- As the Alligator is waging a war against student injustices,
maybe you could start a drive to reverse F.B.K. initials to
K.B.F. and give a truer description of F.8.K.: ie: Kruddy
bunch of fops.
MICHAEL NEGIN
SAUL GOLDBERG
S. P. CHAUDHURI

/arethose\ /todavS\ /faster plaiA
. .. /the NE\a)PLAVS\ (FOOTBALL.) [ FOR TCtJI&HTf
VnAJ

Tuesday, October 25, 1966. The Florida Alligator.

So are we now to assume that Mr. Sears' head should be
placed on the Florida Blue Key chopping block?! And will
Blue Key's personal faculty adviser J. Wayne Reitz
suspend Mr. Sears, too?
Or was that charge merely trumped up like the other six
charges to get rid of Cason then Andy Moor and Yvette
Cardozo because they wouldnt hue the Florida Blue Key Keyadministration-status
administration-status Keyadministration-status quo line?
What about it Florida Blue Key member Buddy Jacobs, Florida
Blue Key member Bruce Culpepper, Florida Blue Key member
Bruce Starling, Florida Blue Key President Chip Block, Florida
Blue Key member John Darlson and Florida Blue Key Faculty
Adviser J. Wayne Reitz?
CONCERNED

perform only service to themselves and disservice to every everyone
one everyone else. Here is the gross mistake. The service functions of
the members of Blue Key are performed BEFORE they become
members. It is in recognition of their great services that they
are tapped into the organization. Examination of their records
shows the invaluable services each has performed for the students
of the UF. THESE are the men who have built the
ternity Council, who have assured the success of Orientation,
who worked night and day to make Homecoming possible each
year, who labor with the Florida Union Board to present its
range of activities, who try to help Student Government accom accomplish
plish accomplish its goals. There is, in fact, no area of service they have
not participated in.
In addition, Blue Keys mere existence serves to provide a
high goal for the younger students. The worst mistake the
Alligator could possibly make is to destroy the leadership Blue
Key members provide. If SERVICE is the Alligators goal,
then it must promote Hie reputation of Florida Blue Key
because the members deserve the honor they have, and because
it serves as an inspiration to young men anxious to serve their
fellow students.
The benefits the whole student body derives from Blue Key
members efforts far outweigh their personal gains.
PETER M. WINOKUR, 3JM
(EDITORS NOTE: Where did you sit at the last home foot football
ball football game?)
He Wants To Remove
Stigma From Gridders
EDITOR:
I feel compelled to remove The Crown from the Fiasco
as it was placed there by Mr. Harrisons letter on Monday.
It is true (unfortunately) that some water balloons were dropped
on the people waiting in line and it is also true that these bom bombardiers
bardiers bombardiers were apprehended and appropriate action was taken
by the Dean of Mens office. It is also true that none of the in involved
volved involved were football players.
The purpose of this letter is not to try to paint an angelic
image of our football team but to set the record straight and
remove the stigma of a non-truth placed against a fine group of
young men by one student.
Our football team is NOT made up of a bunch of immature
little boys who think they have everything made grade-wise >
and socially. Our football team is, however, made up in part
of the 140 scholarship athletes we have at the University and
a finer group of young men would be difficult to find on any
campus in the nation.
DICK KRAUS,
Murphree Area Coordinator

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
TAPE RECORDER, stereorecord stereorecordplayback
playback stereorecordplayback with remote speakers,
microphones, free tape and other
accessories. Only two months old.
$175, call Sarge, 372-9220, room
671 Tolbert, HURRY! (A-38-st-c).
NEW YAMAHA 305, chrome, me metallic
tallic metallic blue, 4,000 miles, oil in injection,
jection, injection, $75 and take over pay payments.
ments. payments. Call Jim Glass, 378-1281.
(A-38-3t-c).
MOBILE Home, 10x46, 1965 Pace Pacemaker,
maker, Pacemaker, two bedroom. Reasonably
priced, fully furnished, lot 24,
Hickory Hill. Call 372-5841. (A (A---38-st-c).
--38-st-c). (A---38-st-c).
1956 MERCURY MONTEREY, hard
top, automatic transmission, full
power, $l5O. 1959 BSA 650 cc.
New engine $490.00 or best offer.
Call Mrs. Lennon, University ex extension
tension extension 2856. (A-39-3t-c).
1964 HONDA 50 cc. Sport Model
$125. Call 372-9216 and ask for
Bill. (A-39-3t-p).
GREY NAGUHYDE COUCH, good
condition, 378-6478. (A-36-st-c).
GIBSON JUMBO 12 string guitar
Plush case $225. Call Bernie,
372-7672. (A-36-st-c).
1962 VESPA: engine excellent,
body good, must sell SIOO or best
offer 376-0737. (A-35-st-c).
1964 250 cc. Allstate motorcycle,
9,000 miles $265. Call J. T. Lam Lambert
bert Lambert 372-6351 days or 376-8279
evenings. (A-4t-36-c).
1965 HONDA SUPERHAWK. 300 cc.
Excellent tires, new chain, only
250 miles since completion of a
top end overhaul including: new
pistons, rings, plugs, valves
ground. Call 376-0252 or 378-3781.
(A-37-3t-c).
BRUTE POWER! In compact
motorcycle. 900 cc. Harley David Davidson
son Davidson KHK. Excellent tires and seat.
NEW pistons, rings, battery, wir wiring,
ing, wiring, clutch. $425. Call 378-3781.
(A-37-3t-c).
1966 YAMAHA 305, low down pay payment.
ment. payment. 3131 E. Univ. Ave. No. 7
after 2 p.m. (A-37-3t-c).
1965 HONDA 50cc. Sport model,
>l5O. Call 372-2149 and leave
)hone number. (A-37-st-c).
for rent
WILLISTON MOTEL: Rooms by
week or month. Single or double.
Students rates. Television and
iaily maid service. Rooms avail available
able available for all University events.
Few rooms available for Home Homecoming.
coming. Homecoming. Sorry no phone calls.
(B-36-10t-c).

for rent
WHY PAY RENT? Have your own
trailer with cabana. Two bedroom,
air conditioned. S2OO down and S4O
a month or SBSO cash. Will con consider
sider consider all offers, 372-2914. (B (B---36-10t-c).
--36-10t-c). (B---36-10t-c).
PETgR PAN MOTEL, U.S. #4l,
North, Williston, Florida 2O
minutes from Gainesville, rooms
available for homecoming also two
bedroom trailer for rent, $45 a
month plus utilities. Phone JAck JAckson
son JAckson 8-3941. (B-35-Bt-c).
FOR RENT Trailer home 8x36
foot in Hillcrest Trailer Court,
call 376-2265. (B-35-3t-c).
HOMECOMING weekend lodging
have vacant apt. that will acco accommodate
mmodate accommodate 4 girls. Also apartment
for 2 boys, available Nov. 1. Call
James Smith 376-4722 after 5
p.m. (B-4t-39-c).
MALE STUDENT -- private room
and bath in NW area. Air condi conditioned,
tioned, conditioned, use of carport and phone.
Across from tennis courts. Call
372-4805. (B-39-st-c).
wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted; S4B
a month plus 1/2 utilities; air
conditioned, October's rent paid;
1716 N.W. 3rd Ave. Apt. 6 (C (C---31-10t-c).
--31-10t-c). (C---31-10t-c).
MALE roommate wanted to share
new modern air conditioned apart apartment
ment apartment at Summit House. 1700 SW
16th Court behind VA hospital.
378-6848 in the evening. (C-38-
3t-c).
WANTED to sublease one bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment in December or
January. Electric heat and air.
Three blocks from campus. Call
376-0359 after sp.m.(C-36-10t-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
roomy two bedroom house. Large
yard, TV, four miles out on the
Archer Road. S3B a month plus
1/2 utilities. Graduate student
preferred, immediate occupancy.
378-1138. (C-37-3t-c).

LAST DAY "FANTASTIC VOYAG£-color-5:30-7:35-945|
rTtophonl;37Sm A rebel rocks anEmniri I
WjtZShm Fighting All Cartoon
DnTmT/tit WALT DISNEY'S I
WmrimXir I Jifl/yOc "winnie the pooh i
I nr ? nd the HONEY TREE"!
I 11:15-3:40-6:15-8:45 I

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 25, 1

Page 8

| wanted
WANTED -t wo Homecoming tick tickets;
ets; tickets; call Mike at 372-0049 between
6-9 p.m. (C-39-2t-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE La Fon Fontana
tana Fontana move in immediately 1/3
$145 plus 1/3 electricity. One
block from campus. Call Lou Ann
378-5174. (C-39-lt-p).
help wanted
NUMEROUS Part-time jobs (tech (technical
nical (technical and non-technical) for UF
students. For further information
report to room 183, Bldg. E on
campus. (E-37-7t-nc).
WANTED: CARRIER TO DE DELIVER
LIVER DELIVER THE' FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR WEEKDAYS MORN MORNNINGS,
NINGS, MORNNINGS, MUST HAVE IST THRU
3RD PERIODS FREE MONDAY
THRU FRIDAY. CONTACT MR.
MYKING AT 376-3261, EXT 2832.
(E-37-tf-nc).
MALE SUBJECTS 2l years or
older, for vocal x-ray, $5.00 per
hour, 10 maximum after screening
and teaching, call ext. 2039 and
ask for Mrs. Easom, 9-12 a.m.
and 1-5 p.m. (E-37-st-c).
OFFSET PASTE-UP ARTIST
needed by Student Publications.
Student only, experience prefer preferred
red preferred but not essential. Night work,
hourly wages. Apply in person
to Ed Barber, Room 9, Florida
Union Bldg., anytime between 8:30
a.m. and 5: P.M. or 9: P.M.
and 1: A.M.
(E-40-tf-nc)

LIMITED ENGAGEMENT!^
# I WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY
aHt JlllPr I A PERFORMANCES AT
1:30- 3:30- 5:30- 7:30-9:30
Tm- .. Douglas Netter presenis
I j/-, The j Jay Frankel Film of
Hf Production of
K SB y! Pe'er Hi h Tchaikovsky's
> O ( K'W (i [a 1 S
[JfjjTTjlj Jr %I My Th ls Ad and SI.OO Will
TI 111. 1/ rn yw Admit Any Bona Fide

help wanted
NEED EXTRA CASH? Local Co.
will hire 3 students part-time.
Working hours flexible. Income
dependent on your ability and
needs. See Bob Gaddy, 2224 N.W.
6th Street. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (E (E---
--- (E--- lOt- c).
Need part time waitress help
weekends and arranged to class
schedule. Good pay. Apply 1430
S. W. 13th Street or 1802 West
University Avenue. (E-39- 10t-c).
MALE -- have various full and
part-time openings cashiers,
grill and car service. Apply King
Food Hosts, 1430 SW 13th St. or
1802 W. Univ. Ave. (E-39-10t-c).
MAKE MONEY! Choose your own
hours. If you can spare a couple
of hours a day, well show you
how to make up to $75 a week or
more, performing a merchandising
service for businessmen in your
community. No experience needed.
For personal interview call Mar Martin
tin Martin Banks at "376-1661 on Mon.
or Tues. from 9 a.m. 6 p.m.
(E-39-lt-p).
Full or part time waitress opening
available at 1430 S.W. 13th Street
and 1802 West University Ave.
Good hourly wage, no experience
necessary. Apply Kings Food
Hosts, 1430 S.W. 13th Street in
P.M. (E-35-10t-c).
autos j
1966 MERCEDES BENZ, 200
Diesel. Take up payments. 372-
8369. (G-35-st-c).

autos
1964 VW, Excellent condition
extra clean. Call 376-0458 (q
39-st-c).
FOR SALE 1959 Austin Healy
Sprite, radio, heater, etc. Clean
good tires $475. Call 376-9700
alter 5 p.m. (G-39-st-p).
1963 VW, nice, well cared for,
charcoal grey, FM Radio, $l t ooo!
378-3886 or Ext. 5592, Dr. Skaja
(G-35-st-c).
1957 FORD, automatic, V-8. SIOO
cash. See at 218 NW 3rd Avenue
at 12:30 a.m. or after 5:30 p.m.
(G-38-3t-c).
FLORIDA STATE THEATRES
t MARLON BRANDO
appaloosa~
7:00-9:30
P^^THEATRE^?!
m They Say The Nile Still
,-sl Runs Red From The
Battle For Khartoum!
Hpiiflg *\ Charlton Heston
Laurence Olivier
ri
IHe"n mini rr lf j -r -r r***
Box Office Opens 6:30 1
Brand New First Run
f " I
the I
I
kaorj I
[ JHIIIES lOBURII I
pgpDHERTQM J
u,iP I
£ASn ICOU *At 7:07 & 10:55 1
CARYGRANT I
SAMANTHA EGGAR ]
JIM HUTTON I
SOL C. SIEGEL
MOOUCTNN
PANAVIStOhr IBjj|
1 |P



CLASSIFIEDS

lost-found
LOST Zippo lighter, initials
J.L.S. Lost in Browsing Room,
Library. Sentimental value. 378-
6027. (L-38-3t-c).
services
IN A HURRY? Passports and
application photos. Childrens pho photos,
tos, photos, commercial and special pro problems.
blems. problems. Call Wesley-Roosevelt
Studios, 372-0300 or see at 909
N.W. 6th Street. (M-30-10t-c).
I AVIATION GROUND SCHOOL*!
5-week course. Guarantee 8
youll pass your FAA written
exam (attend all classes). New
class beginning Wed. & Thur.
Enroll now.
CASSELS IN THE AIR Gville
Airport

Small Pizza And
Small pizza and soft drink of your choice only 97£, with
this coupon. Offer good only between the hours of 1:00-
4:00, Monday thru Thursday.
PIZZA HUT t d,n e 7
Tel. 378-5761
1723 S.V\L 13th ST n H h h f ,
Order by phone for faster
fiainpcvillp FlnriHa service. Allow approxi approxiuamesvme,
uamesvme, approxiuamesvme, rioriud mately 20 minutes.
WIN SSO I
UjK Yearbook I
Contest I
[y I Ist PRIZE SSO I
2nd I
3rd PRIZE S2O I
1 Enter the name you chose for I
the old Seminole on the form
below (or in a letter).
2. Mail your entry to "Yearbook
Contest", Room 12, Florida
f Union.
3. Winner will be announced at I
Homecoming, October 29,
1966. I
r ii.ll tills form lo "Yearbook Contest", Room 12,
* Florida Union, Unlv. of Florida |
NAME
A | ADDRESS
CITY
# a My entry for the |
mm 1 1967 Yearbook Is: ~
H ~ DEADLINE OCTOBER _J
_

services
VISIT Gator Groomer where ro romance
mance romance blooms. Next door to Uni University
versity University Post Office. Self Service
and Professional Laundry, dry
cleaning. (M-30-10t-c).
WANT TO LEARN TO PLAY THE
GUITAR? Folk guitar lessons,
call Robbie at 378-5126. (M-39-
lt-c).
LEARN TO KNIT! Morning or eve evening
ning evening classes. Begin November 1,
reservations limited, call today.
Anns Knitting Corner 378-3000.
(M-39-4t- c).
1966 VOLVO PIBOO, electric over overdrive,
drive, overdrive, Parelli tires, Bendix radio,
nice condition. Asking $3,600, will
consider trading. Call 376-3549
and leave your phone number.
(G-37-st-c).

Birdwatchers Headliners
For Homecoming Dance

By JEAN MAMLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Birdwatchers and Esther
Sutherland will be two main at attractions
tractions attractions for Homecoming brought
to UF by the Mens Interhall
Council.
Friday night, immediately fol following
lowing following Gator Growl, the Bird Birdwatchers
watchers Birdwatchers will play for an open
dance at the lower level of the
Hub. The attire will be the same
as worn to Growl and the band
which has appeared on Wherethe
Action Is, will play until cur curfew.
few. curfew.
Saturday night at 8:30, the Bird Birdwatchers
watchers Birdwatchers will be back to play in
the Architecture and Fine Arts
Plaza. Esther Sutherland, com comedian,
edian, comedian, singer and trumpet player
who has appeared on the Ed Sulli Sullivan
van Sullivan Show, will give three twenty
minute shows during the Bird Birdwatchers
watchers Birdwatchers band breaks. Sprites
and Cokes will be available and
the dress is informal.
The MIC is sponsoring this
weekend and Bob Imholte, a worker
for the project said, This is the
most fantastic thing that weve ever
had for the individual student. It
has taken the cooperation of the
entire university to put this
through, and it is a terrific thing
for the average student and fra fraternity
ternity fraternity man alike. There is no rea reason
son reason that at a time like Homecoming
all kids at Florida cant get
together for a great time.
DJ Prefers
( 50s Sound
In Music
By MATT SCHNEIDER
Alligator Correspondent
I like todays rock n roll music
but the sound of the sos cant
be beat. That is the feeling of
Don Reid, disc jockey for WGGG
radio station.
You might say todays sound
was greatly influenced by the Roll Rolling
ing Rolling Stones and the Beatles. He
is refering to the Mersey and Liv Liverpool
erpool Liverpool beat played by most of the
big recording groups.
Reid said some of his favorite
oldies are Dion and the Bell Bellmonts,
monts, Bellmonts, Dee Clark, the Fleetwoods,
the Royalteens, the Olympics.
There were hundreds of other
groups and individuals who made
one or two great records and then
faded into only a memory.
During this ( past summer, Reid
featured two nights of oldies.
Not the oldies from six months
or a year ago but songs from
1955 to 1960.
During one of the oldies shows
a fellow called and said that hear hearing
ing hearing some of the songs brought back
memories but his date being 19,
and four years younger than he,
had never heard some of the songs.
It made him feel old hearing songs
that seemed like he had heard
a short time ago but were up to
10 years old.
Reid only works Monday nights
and Sunday mornings since he is
a graduate student in broadcast broadcasting
ing broadcasting and works in the production
department for WUFT, the UFs
television station.
The biggest blooper Ive ever
pulled was starting a Jerrys com commercial
mercial commercial and finishing up by plug plugging
ging plugging Larrys Wonderhouse. That
cost me 15 dollars, I wont make
that mistake again.

Tuesday, October 25, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

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Student Voters May Lose
On-Campus Precinct

By ALAN PARLAPLANO
Alligator Correspondent
Poor voter turnouts may cost
UF students their voting precinct,
which includes the campus and
surrounding student residential
areas.
Unless the November election
shows a marked improvement in
precinct 31, says Mrs. Alma
Bethea, supervisor of elections for
Alachua County, I will recom recommend
mend recommend to the Board of County
Commissioners that this precinct
be absorbed into the surrounding
precincts.
At present, she continued,
this group does not vote in suf sufficient
ficient sufficient numbers and creates an
unjustifiable expense to the tax taxpayers
payers taxpayers of Alachua County.
It is required by law that all
voting stations have a clerk,three
inspectors and a deputy present,
all of whom receive not less than
$1.50 per hour, said Mrs. Bethea.
County records in the super supervisors
visors supervisors office at the court house,
show 1,157 registered voters in
precinct 31. Male Democrats num number
ber number 518 and females 445. There are
93 male Republicans and 90 fe females.
males. females. Also are listed are 20 male
and 13 female independents.
In the runoff between Haydon
Burns and Robert King High on
May 3, 311 votes were cast ir
this precinct, 289 for High and 22
for Burns. The presidential elec election
tion election of Oct. 13, 1964 showed 1,496
registered voters in precinct 31.
Os these 925 cast ballots, 528 for
Johnson and 397 for Goldwater.
National elections draw the
heaviest vote while local contests
are virtually ignored. In the Oct. 4
Democratic primary, 10 votes
were recorded in the precinct.
Three student freeholders they
own property in the county cast

THE BIRDWATCHERS
. .here Friday night

ballots on the school bond issue.
Some students do vote by ab absentee
sentee absentee ballot in their home
counties. No records are avail available,
able, available, but from the amount of ab absentee
sentee absentee forms picked up at the
supervisors office the number
would seem to be small.
4!?r -in- &
M ~
Hl ,1
j|&
TODAYS
GATOR GIRL
Todays Gator Girl is sopho sophomore
more sophomore Karen Reid. Karen is a Tri-
Delt who likes water sports and
being a member of SAEs Little
Sisters. She is a member of Angel
Flight and was a Homecoming
queen contestant.

Page 9



Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 25, 1966

'SQUEEZED FOR SPACE

UFs Graduate School Bursting At Seams

By 808 MENA T SR
Alligator Managing Editor
UFs Graduate School is grow growing.
ing. growing. In fact, it may be growing too
much.
According to Dean L. E. Grinter
the Graduate School is literally
bursting at the seams.
Were squeezed for space for
graduate research in at least two twothirds
thirds twothirds of our departments, he
said. Were getting in trouble.
He pointed to the physics de department
partment department as an example of the
over-crowding which exists in
many areas. Two years ago, the
physics department had 30 grad graduate
uate graduate students, Grinter said. Today
the department has reached a sat saturation
uration saturation point with 90.
Were overloaded. Were
simply going to have to expand,
he said. Were becoming more
selective, but this is not the ans answer.
wer. answer. The solution is more expan expansion.
sion. expansion.
Last year the chemistry depart department
ment department was unable to take any more
graduate students because there
was not enough room. Now that
the flew chemistry research unit
has been built, Grinter says, there
is room for additional students.
Psychology and engineering, to
name a few, are still at the satur saturation
ation saturation point, he said, and the only
answer is to build.
One new building he feels will
help UFs overcrowded graduate
program is the NASA building. It
will house graduate research fa facilities
cilities facilities in the fields of physical
and biological sciences. The new
building, one of seven such NASA NASAsponsored
sponsored NASAsponsored centers in the country,
vill also house UFs computer cen cener,
er, cener, which is currently housed on a
!Arm unit in the Agriculture Col-
New Union
Theatre Plush,
Professional
By HARVEY ALPER
Alligator Staff Writer
When the new Florida Union
pens next term students will
)e treated to a modern, and com comfortable
fortable comfortable motion picture theater,
according to Joe Mota, chairman
)t the Florida Union Films Com Committee.
mittee. Committee.
The new union will have a film
luditorium for 350 persons, and
vill be equipped with a ticket
>ooth, coat check, wall to wall
carpeting and regular theater type
.'eclining seats, Mota stated.
Moreover, the new theater will
feature sound proofing, and
a cinemascope screen that will
rival a local theaters screen in
size.
Operating on a budget of $7,200
>er year, the films committee is
i busy organization. This year it
>ought a new $1,500 projector in
ddition to two new cinemascope
enses costing almost S3OO.
The committee uses theequip theequipnent
nent theequipnent to project such films as
'The Unsinkable Molly Brown,
Flower Drum Song, Lilies of
he Field, and The Guns of
tavarone, to name afew, each Fri Frilay
lay Frilay and Saturday night at the Med Medcal
cal Medcal Centers auditorium.
In the future, the committee an anicipates
icipates anicipates using this new equipment
) its full capacity at the new
-iir- stated there is talk
co.i.mitte- members of
howing films in the new theater
very day, in a manner simi simiar
ar simiar to that of commercial opera operaons.
ons. operaons.

GRINTER
getting in trouble
lege. According to Grinter, this
will make the computer more
readily available for research use.
We are making progress
towards alleviating overcrowding,
but more space is needed, Grinter

I FREE MONOGRAMS I
I ON ALL I
I SHIRTS AND LONDON FOG I
I COATS AND JACKETS I
I SOLD DURING OCTOBER I

I c)iiwhMfUiVL \V
I a full complement _ I
I of dress shirts LORD JEFF
I stripes, of course, and solid colors. Button-downs Free and easy... is how you feel in this fine gauge
I and snap tabs, plus the new buttoniess button-down cardigan. Lambs wool makes it weightlessly
I collars (that you can pin or not as you choose). And warm. Lord Jeff tailors it with a light hand
I dont forget white shirts for important dress-up occa- Slim border, slim trim. Lighthearted colors
I sions. Let us fill you in now. Hathaway, Manhattan,
I Donegal, and Madison. .priced from $5.00. .$17.95
I Other sliper and cardigan
I Lord Jeff sweaters from $13.95 to $35.00
I UNIVERSITY StfoerUtoCUl 4
I AVENUE OF THE
I (iMi Cmim/mVwdkyitTo\ store

added. The state and federal
governments must provide us with
funds if we are to keep pace in
our building program and with
other graduate schools.
Another proposed unit, one
Grinter says UF will give top
priority with the 1967 Florida
Legislature, is the Graduate School
and International Studies Building.
The unit will be added onto the
north wing of University Auditor Auditorium.
ium. Auditorium.
$550,000 has been earmarked
through a bond issue for the
building already, he said, and we
plan to ask the U. S. Education
Office for $400,000. If we get this,
we will ask the 1967 legislature
for SBOO,OOO to complete the nec necessary
essary necessary funds.
$50,000 already has been ap appropriated
propriated appropriated for plans for the
building by the 1965 legislature,
so I am sure it will go through,
he said. We should let the con contract
tract contract by July 1, 1967.
The graduate facility will pro provide
vide provide much-needed space for grad graduate
uate graduate seminars, Grinter said. We
have no space for seminars now.
Theyre spread all over campus
and its ridiculous.

Room also will be provided for
administration, research and
international studies, which will
encompass all graduate programs
dealing with international subjects.
The new graduate research li library,
brary, library, soon to be completed, will

lf- M"
for the men
Try an } J
unconventional \
approach # ,f* \
Let the other guys in /s&t \
your fraternity house ~gr
run after that new
doll on campus. V
Relax, shell pick \MbpmrssM£&. //.&; \ m
you out from the
crowd when you m f£ sf|
wear a Cricketeer X 0 £3^
Scotsweigh Tweed >\*wr ***ss-* ~**Jm
Sportcoat. Shell \\ ... 1 $
really be impressed
Shetland fabric and V J
the bold heather jp
colorings. Looks like §L*
youll be sharing her / I /
notes in no time I i M?
at all. .$40.00 l\ v&
Handsome, trim slacks
to complement your coat. WL
USE YOUR STUDENT CHARGE ACCOUNT

provide working tools for the
social sciences.
The new library will be the
equivalent of a laboratory for hu humanities
manities humanities and social science. Its
impact on the graduate school
will be enormous, Grinter said.



(From Page 1)
[He was also very popular with
students, the doctor con conned.
ned. conned. However, removing him

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JILLIARD^
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I * In
Are you I I
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Does water pollution bug you? Or smog? Does it
concern you that some places in the country never
have enough teachers? Or nurses? And when you
read about the growing pains of a developing na nation,
tion, nation, do you wish you could do something?
You can. Thousands of General Electric people
are helping to solve the problems of a growing,
changing world.
Generating more (and cheaper) electricity with
nuclear reactors. Controlling smog in our cities
and pollution in our streams. Using electronics to
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classrooms at once, the trained eyes of a nurse
into many hospital rooms at once.
If youre not content with the world as it is ..
and if you have the brains, imagination and drive
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See the man from G.E. during his next campus I
visit. Come to General Electric, where the young
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Progress k Our Most Important Product
GENERAL ELECTRIC I

Infirmary:

from the staff and not replacing
him -- or filling the other po positions
sitions positions badly overworked our
small staff.

A Tale Os Two Doctors

In June, Bradley left the infir infirmary
mary infirmary for the University of Indiana
where he now practices.
Shortly after Bradley left, Dr.
Thomas Ariail, 41 and a UF grad graduate,
uate, graduate, applied for a job at the
infirmary.
Hall did not check Ariails back background.
ground. background. He, too, had excellent
letters of recommendation from
fellow physicians.
What Hall did not know was that
Ariail had not practiced medicine
since Marc h when he suffered self selfinflicted
inflicted selfinflicted gunshot wounds. Also
Ariail did not have a license to
practice in Georgia where he lived.
His license expired Dec. 31,
1964 after he failed to pay his
$lO medical dues. Ariail, how however,
ever, however, did have a Florida license.
Hall said he did not know that
Ariail had attempted suicide in
March.

Tuesday, October 25, 1960, The Florida Alligator,

Had I known that he would
never have been hired, Hall said.
I only knew that his reference
letters were in good shape and he
was a good doctor.
But on Monday, Sept. 12, Ariail
left the infirmary at noon leaving
a note that he was going to the
bank. He never came back.
Ariail went home, packed his
.32-caliber pistol in an overnight
case and drove to Athens, Ga.
Ariail had been separated from
his wife who lived in Atlanta, but
had a girl friend at the University
of Georgia in Athens. He arrived
at her apartment that night and
she reluctantly admitted him.
Minutes later, the 26-year-old
coed fled screaming from her
apartment. As she ran toward the
door of a neighbors apartment
Airial emerged from her room and
shot her in the arm.

The neighbor hid the terrified
girl in a closet and told Ariail
that the girl had run outside. When
he left, she called the police.
When Ariail rushed out on the
apartment house lawn he was met
by two Athens policemen. He stop stopped,
ped, stopped, looked around, then quietly
pointed the gun at his heart and
pulled the trigger.
Ariails death was known by Hall
three days later, but he denied
knowing anything about it when con contacted
tacted contacted by the Alligator 12 days later
when the news finally filtered into
the state.
The thing is the time
it took for the information to get
back to Florida. In an obituary
that appeared in the Alligator two
days after the death neither the
place, the method or the time of
the death were given. It was almost
impossible to track down what had
really happened. Hall refused to
talk.
Ariail and Bradley might have
been tragic back-to-back mis mistakes.
takes. mistakes. But improper screening or
lack of screening by the infirmary
and Martin would be a more likely
reason.
(Wednesdays conclusion deals
with the infirmary itself. What can
be done? Where is it going? Is
money more important than student
health?)
Confers
With Arrested
Students
Dean of Men, Frank T. Adams,
conferred individually Monday with
each of the five students arrested
Saturday night in connection with
the victory celebration on the cor corner
ner corner of University Avenue and 13th
Street. t r
Described as preliminary
interviews" by Adams, further
conferences will be held with each
of the students Wednesday at which
time it will be decided what actions
will be appropriate in each of the
situations.
The actions could include an.
appearance before the faculty dis discipline
cipline discipline committee and possible
expulsion from UF.
The students Frederick Koe Koenig,
nig, Koenig, James Hafemeister, Julian
Morrow, Dennis Parker, and Wil William
liam William Witt will appear in court
next Tuesday on charges of dis disorderly
orderly disorderly conduct. Maximum penalty
is SSOO and/or 60 days in jail.
In other action, local newsman
Bill Breeze, was arraigned in
circuit court Monday on charges
of resisting arrest with violence
and injuring a police officer. His
bond was set at $4,000.
Bomb Scare In
Graham Hall
Approximately 250 women were
evacuated from Graham Hall Sun Sunday
day Sunday night at 9:50 p.m. while cam campus
pus campus police searched the area for a
bomb reported planted there.
According to Campus Po Police
lice Police Chief Audie Shuler,. Mrs*
J. Wayne Reitz reported to the
campus police at 8:30 p.m.
She had received a phone call
from an unknown male that a bomb
would go off in Graham hall at
11:00 p.m., Shuler said.
Everyone stayed out of the build building
ing building as 10 campus policemen
searched the library, lobby and
trash shoot areas, he said.
When nothing happened or was
found, it was deemed safe for the
women to return to the building,
Shuler said.
They re-entered at 11:15 p.m.

Page 11



Page 12

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 25, 1966

MRS. UF CROWNED The Mrs. Uni University
versity University of Florida crown went to GailMcFall
Moses Saturday night (center) wife of Michael
Roger Moses, a student majoring in business
administration. Runners-up were (from left,
clockwise) Georgia Goodling, Panama City,
fourth, Linda Simmons, Starke, first; Janice
Beckenbach, Sioux City, la., third, and
Carolyn Hufty, Miami, second.

Riots Just Arent What
They Used To Be At UF

By PHIL COLLINS
Alligator Correspondent
Riots at UF just arent what
they used to be!
The riot after the Oct. 8
Florida- FSU football game this
year brought back shades of
the past. A few minutes after the
Gator victory, some 1,500 students
gathered on U.S. 441, setting fires.
The riot was broken up with without
out without any arrests or injuries.
In the past, riots which occur occurred
red occurred because of too much school
spirit, alcholic beverage regula regulations
tions regulations or panty raids were not
so easily quelled.
A decade ago,
Gainesville police
had to use tear
gas bombs to ( m p \
break up a bon- 1 I
fire riot which J
was believed to
have grown out of
a pep rally. RIJIICCYFI
In the May 1958 *****
beer riot,
some 600 students participated
in a mass demonstration which
grew from a group protesting the
enforcement of state laws which
prohibited sale of alcholic bev beverages
erages beverages to minors.
One year later in May of 1959,
1,000 students took part in a
panty raid of Broward Hall
and Sorority Row. Two students
were seriously injuried, two jail jailed,
ed, jailed, three expelled and one suspend suspended
ed suspended from school.
In the fall of 1960, under the
direction of Dean of Student As Asfairs

fairs Asfairs Lester Hale, an advisory
committee on the prevention and
control of crowd demonstrations
was set up.
The committee was made up of
officials from the city of Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, UF administration, faculty
and student government.
Its purpose was to prepare re recommendations.
commendations. recommendations. Later a riot
memo was released to stu students:
dents: students: Any student found to
be an agitator, participant or
just a spectator at any crowd
gathering that has been declared
by authorities to be an unlawful
assembly will be subject to im immediate
mediate immediate suspension or expulsion.
In April of 1960, a four part
series ran in the Alligator which
was intended to bring to the
attention of students the dan dangerous
gerous dangerous aspects of student de demonstrations.
monstrations. demonstrations.
The series stated that the
first incidence of on-campus
trouble came with the entrance
of girls /to the University in
1952. The boys mobbed on cam campus
pus campus instead of downtown as they
had done before.
As the University grew, stu student
dent student loss of identity was blamed
for some riots. The theory was
that students felt safer in large
groups because it was harder to
pick out individuals.
The sociology department at the
UF reviewed the causes and ef effects
fects effects of student crowd action in
the series. In their study it was
explained what constituted un unlawful
lawful unlawful assembly and what interact interacting
ing interacting forces are called into play.

Prof Has Big Problem
He Studies The Universe

By JUSTINE HARTMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
A UF professor is dealing with
the biggest problem in the universe
the universe. Dr. G. C. Omer,
a cosmologist, studies the
structure of the universe using the
48-inch Schmidt telescope at Mount
Palomar, Calif., to take pictures
of various galaxies. Dr. Omer may
study and analyze six photographic
plates a year, each plate containing
thousands of galaxies. The galaxies
occur in clusters and by determin determining
ing determining the density of the galaxies
in clusters and their distribution,
information on the structure of
the universe is obtained. Dr. A.G.
Smith, chairman of the department
of astronomy said, Its like count counting
ing counting blood corpuscles. Through
analysis of the plates, information
on how the earth was formed,
how long ago, and whether it is a
steady state or still changing and
evolving is obtained.
Cosmological research is just
one area in the physics and
astronomy department which has
been strengthened with funds from
the National Science Foundation
Center of Excellence grant, re received
ceived received by UF in June, 1965.
"We have developed no new re research
search research areas with the funds, said
Smith, but have built on the
strength of the already existing
areas. He feels this attitude was
instrumental in obtaining the grant
for UF -- Any institution can
say Give us money and well do
great things but UF already had
a successful research program as
a foundation, he said.
The physics and astronomy de department
partment department received about $1 million
of the $4.2 million grant, which
was shared with mathematics,
chemistry and four areas of en engineering.
gineering. engineering.

The series appealed to the stu students
dents students emotions. Thedemonstra Thedemonstrations
tions Thedemonstrations over the past years have
been detrimental not only
financially but personally, physi physically
cally physically and reputation-wise as well.
Dean of Men Frank Adams said,
that after the riot educational
series ran we grew up andriots
were cut to a minimum.

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SPECIAL ATTRACTION The
Serendipity Singers, sponsored
by Lyceum Council as a
special attraction, will appear
in Florida Gym, Saturday, Nov.

The idea of the grant was to
give institutions a steady push
upwards by extending them enough
money to make a difference, said
Smith. Physics and astronomy has
made a large jump by bringing in
10 new faculty members.
A 30 inch reflecting telescope
purchased with grant funds and
two and one-half times as large
as the present telescope in the
department, is being built in Cali California
fornia California for the University.
In the future, computers may
have larger memories as a
result of the phenomenon of su super
per super conductivity. Low temperature
solid state physics studies
matter at almost Zero degrees
(Kelvin scale) to learn its atomic

Holding r ound-Up
For Stray Greeks Here
Stray Greeks, like wandering Ulysseses, are being rounded
up on the UF campus. So far, most of them have eluded the net
put out be Marie Dence, Phi Mu, organizer of the Greek hunt.
There are many members of Greek societies here on the
campus without local chapter houses/ declared Miss Dence.
She said these waywards are not represented in student ac activities
tivities activities and should have a voice in student government.
Our purpose in getting them together is a social one. Per Perhaps
haps Perhaps they might form some sort of a group, she added.
Other universities have these groups. They are called Stray
Greeks, Alpha Omegas or sometimes Sigma Gammas for the
S and G in stray Greek.
A ten-year old Seminole gave Miss Dence the idea for the
round-up.
At that time, UF had an organization of these strays. Appar Apparently,
ently, Apparently, they disbanded due to a lack of interest.
If we can find enough from one sorority or fraternity, they
might open a chapter here at Florida, said the Greek-seeker.
So far, five girls have called me, she said.
The Inter-Fraternity Council has received one call, according
to Mrs. Mona Tichenor, of the IFC office.
Miss Dence has put notices in the Alligator and in local papers
and has requested public service announcements from area
radio stations.
The Panhellenic and Inter-Fraternity Councils are obligated
to take care of the members of Greek societies, even if they dont
have chapters here, she said.
According to Miss Dence, these strays are mostly transfer
and graduate students who live off-campus.
Interested stray Greeks should contact Marie Dence or Tippy
Bretz, president of ADPi.

12, at 8:15 p.m. The urst hau;
of the show will feature a reg regular
ular regular concert performance by
the Serendipity Singers.

structure. Super conductivity,
which is the loss of all resistance
to electricity in metals, means
metals can conduct current
forever. It occurs at this low
temperature. This ability of metals
to endlessly conduct electricity
may possibly provide a memory of
infinite capacity for computers.
More powerful magnets may also
be created due to this phenomenon.
Research in quantum theory, a
theoretical approach to studying
properties of matter by using
mathematical equations to repre represent
sent represent atoms, is being conducted by
Dr. John Slater, quantum physicist,
and Dr. Per Oliv Lowdin, quantum
chemist, as part of the graduate
research program.



horton, McDaniel work hard

B-Team Football Not Just A Free Ride

John Horton and Wayne McDan McDaniel
iel McDaniel have been practicing football
plays with the Gators four years
now, but theyve never played a
game.
Theyre red-shirted--thats
football slang for being on the
B team. Since theyre both sen seniors,
iors, seniors, theyll probably never play.
McDaniel a quarterback, ex-
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plains the activities of the B
team, Opposing teams are scout scouted
ed scouted two or three weeks ahead and
we get the scout report and run
their plays against the varsity de defense.
fense. defense. Its not exciting since all
you do is practice four days a
week.
Horton, a guard, says, In a
sense, theyre paying you to do
a job. They give you up to $6,000
or SB,OOO for your college expenses
on a scholarship.
You work for it though. Its
not just a free ride. If they didnt
have somebody to do it, it would be
rough to prepare the team.
Both were outstanding high sch school
ool school players in their home state
of Georgia. Horton feels about
always being on the sidelines,

I guess I just wasnt good enough.
You always hope youll get to play
because thats what you came
here for.
McDaniel says, You get
depressed like when youre not do doing
ing doing anything. Its a letdown from
high school where you were the
center of attention. It takes some
adjustment.
He continued, I played var varsity
sity varsity my freshman year. Then they
red-shirted me. Injuries and the
breaks have kept him on the
B team ever since.
A lot of it has to do with if
youre looking good when the coach
is watching. You might not be
having a good day, McDaniel
added.
Id do it all over again, says
Horton, It all just depends on
the breaks. Most of the guys
have almost equal ability. Every Everybody
body Everybody gets a fair shake from the
coaches no matter what posi position
tion position he plays.
McDaniel says, You really
cant express how you feel. You
do get some satisfaction.
Neither of the players ever
dresses out for the games, in
fact, they usually dont even go
to away games, that is, except for
the Georgia game. Most of the
time, as Horton puts it, You
have the weekends off.

Tuesday, October 25, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

JOHN HORTON

Familiar Grounds
Welcome Gators

Having closed a successful foot football
ball football road show the Florida Gators
finally return to more familiar
grounds Saturday to face Auburn.
It will be Homecoming Day for
both the old grads and the young
Gators.
Florida, now 6-0 overall and
3-0 in the SEC, is in much the
same situation facing the arch archrival
rival archrival Tigers this year as the Gators
were in 1965.
Florida is favored, Auburn is
evidently an injured Tiger and
struggling. Last fall the script in
pre-game talk was the same but
the outcome saw Auburn win, 28-
17, knocking the Gators out of the
SEC title in the process.
Auburn is tough on defense, as
usual, and will make it difficult
for us, says Gator head coach

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WAYNE MCDANIEL

Ray Graves. They have been
making some mistakes but one of
these days they are going to put
everything together at the same
time and I would hate to be playing
them then."
Florida enters the contest in
good physical condition with no
serious hurts in the LSU game
and the possibility of getting at
least one key boy back off the
injured list.
Linebacker Steve Heidt, ori originator
ginator originator of many big plays for the
Gator defense this year, didnt
even dress out at Baton Rouge but
might be ready this week.
Defensive guard Bill Dorsey, a
sophomore, is still nursing an in infected
fected infected shoulder and is listed as
extremely doubtful again this week.

Page 13



FURMAN
Atlanta Journal Sports Editor
Bishers Almanac
Is Kind To Dumb
Animals And...
By FURMAN BISHER
Atlanta Journal Sports Editor
This is my day to be kind. Be kind to dumb animals. Be kind
to smart animals. Be kind to other drivers. Be kind to white
sidewall tires when parking.
Be kind to Boy Scouts. Be kind to Girl Scouts. Be kind to
old ladies, young ladies, middle-aged ladies, anything thats fe female
male female and breathes, dogs, cats, elevator operators who cant
hit the floor with their hat.
And be kind to the Atlanta Falcons.
All right, so they played San Francisco like they were just
home from the American Legion convention. Theyre sorry.
They want you should forgive them. They promise to do better.
Lets talk about other things and get our minds off it. The
Falcons arent the first team that never won a game.
Some team somewhere must not have won a game sometime.
To keep the topic out of conversation, let me share with you
some helpful little hints and newsy little gems today, direct
from the Handy Bisher Almanac, as follows:
The Ferris wheel was invented by a man named Ferris.
Casey Stengel spells his first name C-h-a-r-l-e-s.
No horse has ever successfully defended his Kentucky Der Derby
by Derby title.
Chinese home runs are not necessarily home runs hit by
Chinese.
Coffin corner is not a drive-in mortuary.
Swimming was thought up on the spur of the moment sev several
eral several centuries ago when a paleolithic man fell into a river.
It was a matter of creating a new sport or drowning, and so
swimming was born.
A big leaguer from Texas is not a ball player, but a guy
with 12 oil wells, four Cadillacs and a hotel suite in every city.
Steamshovels are toys made for grown men.
A horse named Stand Alone was left at the post twice at
Saratoga in 1939.
An auxiliary woman in Sodom and Gomorrah was not nec necessarily
essarily necessarily a member of the womans auxiliary.
Each person in the United States eats an average of four
gallons of ice cream a year.
All Yankees do not come from Yankee Stadium.
Hie Mongoose is a sociable enough kind of fellow, except
in the company of cobras.
Dope addicts often turn out to be great jazz musicians, or
vice versa.
The leech possesses from four to 10 pairs of eyes, which
seems like more than his share.
It takes four and 2/5 seconds to complete a routine double
play in baseball.
Grant Park was named for a guy named Sam Park.
Once upon a time it rained 1.23 inches in one minute in a
town formerly known as Unionville, Md.
The late Mrs. Arthur Millers ex-husband once played center centerfield
field centerfield for the New York Yankees.
Twins occur in thoroughbred breeding only once in 10,000
births.
Wilt (The Stilt) Chamberlin has a very unusual build, until
you are seven feet tall.
Until a few years ago screwdrivers were used to tighten
screws, open stubborn jars, jimmy locks and fix things. Now
they can be drunk, another example of mans progress through
chemistry.
A quarterback sneak is not a dirty rat who plays quarterback.
The rest of the nation does not necessarily go as Maine goes.
Football is played for fun, usually at a price of $6 a head.
Basketball was invented by a man named Dr. James A. Nais Naismith
mith Naismith with the help of two peach baskets, who preferred to
remain anonymous.
Alumni are specialists trained by colleges in the inhumane
methods of tormenting football coaches.
Females born in Norway can expect to live to be 72.65 years
old, and now women are expected to flock to Norway to be born.
A fellow named Frosty Peters once dropkicked 17 field goals
in a college football game in Montana. Honest.
People who live in glass houses should not throw stones
unless they carry insurance.
If blondes really have more fun, why dont they start proving it?
For venison steak, use a two-inch-thick cut from the leg of
a young deer, but make certain the rest of the deer is detached.
A reliable survey shows that nobody ever really walked a
mile for a camel, upper- or lower-case.
Fr*Bk Merriwell is said to have attended Yale without a
scbolaftUp. Honest, said old Coach Put, he just came out
for the t
UF Judoists
Host Tourney
On Saturday
By RICHARD SHELTON
Alligator Correspondent
The UF Judo Club will host an
intercollegiate, invitational judo
tournament Saturday, November
19, at the UF gymnasium.
According to W. Martien Car Carroll,
roll, Carroll, president of the club, the
tournament will begin at 12:00
a.m. Saturday. Eliminations will
begin with the 135 pound weight
division and will continue through throughojt
ojt throughojt the day, including contests
in 150 pound, 165 pound, 180
pound, 200 pound and over
200 weight divisions.
The highlight of the tournament
will be a final elimination con contest
test contest with each weight-division win winner
ner winner competing for the tournament
grand championship.
According to Carroll, the
championship elimination is sch scheduled
eduled scheduled to begin at approximately
5:30 p.m. and will be followed
by the presentation of awards to
all winners.
Most of Floridas larger col colleges
leges colleges will be represented in the
tournament, Carroll said, includ including
ing including Florida State University, Uni University
versity University of Miami, Florida South Southern
ern Southern College, Jacksonville Uni University
versity University and -University of South
Florida.
The UF will be well represented
in the tournament.
Members of the local club are
entered in most of the weight
divisions and have good chances
of winning weveral of the awards.
We have an enthusiastic, hard hardworking
working hardworking club, Carroll said, and
some of the members are among
the best judo players in the state.
Carroll, a second-degree black
belt (expert), is one of the more
advanced members of the club.
He is a former Florida Intercol Intercollegiate
legiate Intercollegiate Judo Champion, All-
Florida Judo Champion and South-
Eastern United States Judo
Champion.
The UF Judo Club was organized
in 1959 and now has some 40 mem members.
bers. members. The club is open to all
interested students and previous
experience in judo is not requir required.
ed. required. The presept membership
includes varying degrees Os skill,
from beginners (white belts) to
experts (black belts).
The club practices in the Uni University
versity University gym every Monday, Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday and Friday from 4:30
to 6 p.m., Carroll said. Judo
is a demanding sport and it us usually
ually usually takes from two to three
years of constant practice to ac acquire
quire acquire proficiency, he added.
Judo is growing in popularity,
Carroll continued, and was in introduced
troduced introduced as an Olympic sport in
1962. Contest skills however, are
only a part of judo. The basic
aim of judo is to achieve maxi maximum
mum maximum use of mind and body, and
to promote self-discipline and
training.

SPORTS

Page 14

They Play All Day-
Soccer That Is
The sun never sets on the game of soccer. The only truly
international team sport, it is played in 95 countries with the group
at Gainesville composed of nearly 65 students from 16 different
lands, and nine states including Florida.
At times a team with players representing 10 countries has
taken the field for a local game.
So big is soccer, it provides the game for the worlds largest
stadium in Rio de Janeiro which seats close to 200,000 making
our Rose Bowl with 102,000 capacity small in comparison.
Soccer came to the Sunshine State of Florida with the formation
of the UF Club in September, 1953, under the guidance of the
Department of Intramural Athletics and Recreation of the Col College
lege College of Physical Education and Health.
A major contribution of foreign students to the athletic life
of the campus, the group was organized to give those boys who have
an active interest in the game a chance to practice and participate.
The club is also open to newcomers who are willing to learn the
fundamentals of the game.
Celeo Rosa of Honduras, one of the Clubs organizers in 1952,
was president and captain of the group 1953-56 and his untiring
interest was instrumental in the progress and growth of the or organization.
ganization. organization.
Alan Moore, Assistant Professor in the Department of Re Required
quired Required Physical Education, has been faculty advisor since the
club was formed. Moore received All American recognition
while playing soccer at Springfield College in Massachusetts
and is a former soccer coach at the University of North Carolina,
and brought his love of the game to Gainesville.
Recently, he cited soccer as a growing sport in America,
saying that many small colleges have picked the game up when the
prohibitive cost of football made it necessary to drop that sport
from intercollegiate competition.
Rollins College, Stetson University, Miami University, Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville University, University of South Florida, Miami-Dade Jr.
College, Embry-Riddle Aero Institute and Florida Southern play
soccer as a varsity sport.
The highlight of last season was the winning of the Florida
Sunshine Tournament in St. Petersburg, April 1966, where the
Clubs 101st win was made.
It is interesting to note that the UF Soccer Club has been de defeated
feated defeated only nine times since 1953, the present record reading
101 won, 9 lost and 9 tied.
Track In October?
Just Ask Carnes
Whoever heard of track in October?
Coach Jimmy Carnes and his 80 trackmen have. They are already
preparing for the 1967 track season.
While the Florida football players ready themselves for each
Saturday, the trackmen are running two sets of 660 yards on Mon Monday,
day, Monday, ten 220s on Wednesday and are easing off on Friday with ten
110s. Tuesdays and Thursdays are dedicated to lifting weights.
A few years ago all that was necessary to be a fair trackman was
to come out a month before the first meet, said Carnes, but now
things are different. In order to meet the ever increasing com competition
petition competition a trackman must be ready to run year round.
These boys realize this and are working for both an undefeated
year and national prominence.
Florida has thirteen boys back from last year. Among them are
four record holders and two who are almost certain to set marks
in this season.
The four who hold records are Scott Hager who ran a 52.0 in the
440 yard intermediate hurdles and 14.0 in the 120 yard high hur hurdles,
dles, hurdles, Harry Winkler who threw the javelin 221 feet 11 inches, Dieter
Gebhard with a 1:51.0 in the half mile and Frank Lagotic with a 4:15.1
in the mile.
The two newcomers are John Morton who has thrown 177 feet in
the discus in practice and Frank Saier who high jumped 6 foot 11
in practice. Mortons toss breaks the old record of 160 feet 7 inches
set by Walt Buettner. Saier is an inch and 3/4 better than Jim
Richesons jump last year.
Along with the thirteen lettermen there are 20 non-scholarship
and 47 sophomore boys preparing for this season.
Some of the outstanding sophomores are Clint Fowles who holds
the freshman 440 intermediate record of 54.8, Joe Schillar who ran
14.5 in the 120 high hurdles -and Mike Burton with a 24 foot broad
jump.
Others who are expected to do well include Tom Brown, Kent
Heiser and Ken Littlejohn in the sprints and Steve Atkinson and
Chris Hosford in the distances.
Our sophomores should add a great deal to the success of the
squad, reported With the boys we have I expect we will
have a chance for national recognition in all of the relays.
What Carnes failed to point out however, was that the path to this
recognition begins now.
Whoever heard of track in October? Floridas trackmen have and
they plan to demonstrate the results this spring.

1, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 25, 1966



Chapter Closes
For Casares..
A Living Legend

By BUDDY MARTIN
TODAY SPORTS EDITOR
In about as routine a manner
as turning off the television after
a good movie, the books were clos closed
ed closed last week on a living foot football
ball football legend.
RICK CASARES
. .ponders future
To many, the Miami Dolphins'
release of Rick Casares may have
been just another story of a 35-
year-old pro football player who
didnt have it anymore.
To those who remember Casares
as a muscular, sometimes-con sometimes-controversial
troversial sometimes-controversial University of Florida
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fullback, it was the end of the
chapter in the legend of Rick Ca Casares.
sares. Casares.
Florida will never have another
Rick Casares. There may be bet better
ter better football players--Steve Spur Spurrier
rier Spurrier of today, for instance instancebut
but instancebut never another Casares. His
Physical appearance was that
of a Greek god. His nature
was that of a court jester. The
only thing Rick liked better
than scoring touchdowns was scor scoring
ing scoring with a prank on one of his
buddies.
One of the best-remembered
stories about Casares was the
night he chased a fellow athlete
around the dormitory with a
rifle. After cornering his prey
inside a large metal disposal
for trash, he fired bullets that
zinged around the inside, rico ricocheting
cheting ricocheting off the walls.
Finally, when the cornered vic victim
tim victim betan crying, Casares let him
go.
The stories started about Ca Casares
sares Casares when he came to Flor Florida
ida Florida as a freshman. In Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville today, they still tell Ca Casares
sares Casares tales. U-F publicist Norm
Carlson, in fact, was a school schoolmate
mate schoolmate of Casares and manages to
slip in an occasional anecdote now
and then.
People had the wrong idea
about him, recalls Greiner, now
an upstate clothier. He wasnt
a hood or a wise guy. He just
liked a good laugh now and then.
His teammates liked and respect respected
ed respected him.
Rick is the only guy I ever play played
ed played basketball with who felt that
when he was on the court, nothing
could go wrong. And we felt that
way, too. When Rick was there,
everything was going to be OK.
The best description I know of
Rick was that he was a swinger.
I never saw him in a fight.
I never saw him in serious
trouble. He just liked a good time
out of life.

SPURRIER COMPLETES ONE OF 90
. .sets up TD against LSU

FOR THIRD TIME
Spurrier Back Os The Week

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA (UPI) Florida quar quarterback
terback quarterback Steve Spurrier has one
fault; he takes all of the suspense
out of the weekly contest to pick
the best back in the Southeast.
It thus comes as no surprise
that he was selected again
Monday as Southeastern Con Conference
ference Conference back of the week by Unit United
ed United Press International for the
third time this season.
Spurriers latest honor comes on
the heels of his tremendous per performance
formance performance in the Gators 28-7
victory over Louisiana State at
Baton Rouge. In that game he com completed
pleted completed 17 of 25 passes for 208
yards and two touchdowns, ran for
21 yards for a 229 total and had
a 43-yard punting average.
Florida Coach Ray Graves pretty
well summed up the situation re regarding
garding regarding the 200-pound senior from
Johnson City, Tenn., when he said
following that game: Im running
out of adjectives to describe him.
SON OF MINISTER
Spurrier, son of a Presbyterian
minister and a leader in the
Fellowship of & Christian Ath-

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Tuesday, October 25, 1966, Hie Florida Alligator,

letes, won UPls weekly award
after the opening game of the sea season
son season when Florida crushed North Northwestern
western Northwestern 43-7 and again last week
when he led the Gators to a come comefrom-behind
from-behind comefrom-behind 17-10 victory over
North Carolina State.
In between, he was runnerup
twice and nominated again the oth other
er other time while pacing the unbeaten
Gators to their finest showing in
38 years.
Spurrier is head and should shoulders
ers shoulders above other southern backs
in his bid for all-America and
the coveted Heisman Trophy. In
his first six games this season
he has completed 90 of 137 passes
better than 65 per cent for 1,138
yards and 13 touchdowns and has
1,194 yards in total offense an
average of 199 yards per game.
Thus, Spurrier, who set the
SEC record for average yards
per game 212.3 last season while
rolling up 2,123 yards, now has
gained 4,415 yards in 2 1/2 sea seasons
sons seasons and needs only 410 in his last
four games to surpass Georgias
Zeke Bratkowski 1951-53 record
as the greatest yardage gainer in
SEC history.
NO RUNNERUP
There was no runnerup to Spur Spurrier

rier Spurrier for the UPI award this week
but three other SEC backs turned
in performances worthy of men mentioning.
tioning. mentioning.
Safetyman Lynn Hughes took
over at quarterback when Kirby
Moore was injured and led Geor Georgia
gia Georgia to a come-from-behind 27-15
victory over Kentucky.
Quarterback Dewey Warren
passed for two touchdowns and
scored one himself in Tennessee's
29-17 victory over South Carolina.
And Wayne Trimble, filling in
early for Ken Stabler at quarter quarterback
back quarterback for Alabama, passed for two
touchdowns and scored one in the
Crimson Tides 42-6 rout of Van Van'derbilt.
'derbilt. Van'derbilt.
Walking
Race Set
Alpha Kappa Psis second annual
walking race is part of your pre pregame
game pregame entertainment this Saturday.
UF fraternities and campus or organizations
ganizations organizations are entering members
to compete for first place and best
costume trophies.
The starting gun will sound at
1:00 and the competition promises
to be tough, as the participants
heel toe it around Florida Field.
Participants will assemble at
the southeast corner of the field
at 12:45 after entering the stadium
through their ticket gate. Fans are
invited to come to the Homecoming
game early and cheer their fav favorite
orite favorite organization onward.
OAK L ADS GET
RESULTS FAST!

Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 25, 1966

PL A YER QFIHEWEEKXM*,
Be the vigorous a sporting W £ green
blood, a subtle approach to jacketry is rec- ,
ora mended. Those points beige,
worsted woollens, are typical of a generous j& Jh
array the j_
$1777
Sdagnlrag
13 West University JflCk Coni 6th St. & Univ. Ave.
The Alligators choice as Player of the Week for Florida : : :;: : :::::r:r:r:r:r:: :-:*:-:i:-:-:*:*:*:>*::::::>:::::::::::::::::::^:::;:::::::::::::>>::::>::>:;:*:*:*:>*: : : : :
in the smashing 28-7 victory over LSU didnt score a touch touchdown
down touchdown or do any of the tilings you hear so much about offen- j
sively. A^
He was dwarfed b y the Slant Tigers but 004 impressed (A
gyVl with their credentials as the SECs number one running team V/jZ^
JQ Jj and the result was perhaps the best game 158-pound linebacker
Jack Card has ever played for the Gators. )
Card made the big plays on defense. He came up with eight /. U-/
tackles and his overhauling of Tiger quarterback Freddie
Haynes on a sweep probably saved a touchdown.
Jai from behind for a one-yard loss on a play from the Gator (/
J 22-yard-line. Films show the Gator halfback being taken into XT /XX
the middle of the field by a pass receiver and nothing but in -/IIS*
daylight for Haynes down the sidelines. f J Jy f
Card also made two other tackles for losses, both in key t if*
situations, and played pass defense in the style for which he t W
l 'M Bb I f is known, which is good. *
tm-JmJ W ma m\m Floridas big win was primarily a team effort and the
Alligator wishes to recognize several others whose play was y
worthy of player-of-week honors, too. The list includes split
end Paul Ewaldsen, the entire offensive line, John Preston,
Bill Carr, Jim Benson, J. D. Pasteris and Jack Coons,
m flanker Richard Trapp, quarterback Steve Spurrier, tailback *9M 4 4 44 }
Larry Smith and fullback Graham McKeel. alll* 11 4 4 r #l% All C
_ Defensively, tackle Don Giordano, guard Red Anderson, end PPPPPPPPP VP PV" P X
TAW W% Don Barrett linebacker Wayne McCall and halfback Tom
| VpF *nP a I Hungerbuhler draw mention. Pnone: 376-0444 1127 West University Avenue
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