Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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Series To Explore
Insurance Policies
If you think you need life insurance, wait a minute.
About this time every school year four Gainesville life in insurance
surance insurance companies campaign to enlist graduating seniors in the
ranks of their policy holders.
Many students, like many other people outside the college
community, purchase life insurance without really knowing what
they are buying ... or why.
This week The Alligator will present a series of articles ex explaining
plaining explaining what life insurance is, how it is sold, what type of in insurance
surance insurance an individual needs and types available.
Some of these four Gainesville companies sell life insur insurance
ance insurance policies supposedly designed specifically for the college
student and graduate, and offer them special options and bene benefits
fits benefits because of their statistically longer and more prosperous
lives.
This upcoming series was prompted by complaints from stu students
dents students who felt they had received a bad deal on insurance they
had purchased. Also, local insurance agents have contacted The
Alligator to voice their opinion on the unethical practices engaged
in by one or more of the companies selling to UF graduates.
Even if an agent does employ unethical tactics, uses high highpressure
pressure highpressure selling and hides unfavorable characteristics of the
policy from prospective buyers, it is the purchaser who is at
fault for buying without knowing first what hes getting.

ON CAMPUS
United Fund Drive On

Canvassing for the UFs United Fund goal of $40,000 begins
today, Dr. Robert Wiegman, assistant dean of the College of
Education and chairman of the University drive, announced
Friday.
The United Fund effort on campus works in conjunction with
the United Community Fund of Gainesville to support 15 organ organizations.
izations. organizations.
The universitys target sum includes $9,000 to be sought at
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center and an additional $31,000
from the balance of the campus. James McLean is serving as
Health Center chairman.
Dr. Wiegman expects to select a number of division chairmen
throughout the university to assist in the contact and collection
process during the next month.
The drive will continue through Nov. 11.
Donors may signify the monthly amount to be withheld on their
pledge card, along with specific organizations they wish to support.
Fred Cantrell, general chairman for the Gainesville area drive,
joined Dr. Wiegman in urging university personnel to donate
through the campus effort. All contributors will receive a United
Fund receipt and decal.
The local drive has an ultimate goal of $150,000, up 10 per cent
from 1965.

MOMENTS OF GLORY
Baby Gator flanker Paul Maliska hauls down a pass from quarterback Jackie
Eckdahl in the P'roshs victory over the FSU freshmen. In the picture on the right,
varsity flanker Richard Trapp scores the game-winning touchdown against the
Wolfpack of North Carolina State.

The Florida
Alligator

University of Florida

Monday October 17 1966

, | <&**£* *|§
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9 Hfc : :
JAMES BROWN
...Frolics Attraction
James Brown
Here For
Fall Frolics
'.- Blues singer James Brown will
appear here at Fall Frolics Fri Friday,
day, Friday, Nov. 18.
Brown will be accompanied by his
band, The Fabulous Flames, and
will present a two hour show in
Florida Gym. He has been in show
business for 10 years and has re recorded
corded recorded 13 albums and numerous sin single
gle single records. He was a recent guest
on the Ed Sullivan Show and has
appeared in three movies.
Date of the ticket sale and price
will be announced soon, according
to Fred Baggett, IFC public rela relations
tions relations chairman. Baggett estimated
between 1,000 and 1,200 tickets
will be put on sale.
Brown was the second choice in
a poll conducted by the IFC last
year to determine this years Fall
Frolics show. The Rolling Stones
led the poll, but the IFC was un unable
able unable to sign them.

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||- *4 '^3B
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Gators Snap
Trap(p) On Pack
For Fifth Straight
By DICK DENNIS
Alligator Sports Editor
Head Coach Ray Graves said Wednesday he didnt know if
the players even knew where Raleigh, N.C. was located.
For three quarters Saturday the team was lost. After a lit little
tle little over three periods were completed Saturday, the score
stood 10-3 in favor of North Carolina State.
But the Gators sense of victory came through for still anoth another
er another last-minute come-from-behind win, 17-10 over the Wolfpack.
Early mishaps prevented State from tacking on six points to
their early margin. Two field goals tries, of 48 and 41 yards,
fell short.
UFs newest member of the exclusive Century Club, tailback
Larry Smith, capped the Gators first scoring drive in the fourth
quarter, with a one-yard plunge. Smith accounted for 29 yards
of the 74-yard march.
Overall, Smith rushed for 115 yards and passed for six more.
He had missed a day of practice early in the week, and looked
tired and drawn in the dressing room after the game.
Smith paused only to compliment N.C. State and praise his
blockers, before leaving the press room for a well-deserved
rest.
Linebacker Steve Heidt, who grabbed off a key last-minute
pass by FSU a week ago, intercepted a Jim Donnan aerial with
5:48 remaining and the score at 10-10.
Minutes earlier, Graves had demonstrated his confidence in
the teams ability to come-from-behind. After Smiths plunge
made it 10-9 with nine minutes to go, Graves went for the extra
point, and not for two. Graves knew there was still plenty of
time for a squad like the Orange and Blue.
After Heidt's interception, Graves charges were on their own
23-yard line. Six plays later, Richard Trapp was in the end zone,
faking his defenders off their feet for a 31-yard pass play.
Barfield kicked both extra points, as well as a first-half
three-pointer. The field goal carried 27 yards, struck the right
pole of the cross- bar, and bounced through.
For the Gators, the leading pass receiver was Trapp, with
four receptions for G 5 yards, including the 31 yarder good for
a tally. Tight end Jack Coons amassed six more receptions,
good for 43 yards. Coons garnered two aerials, for 24 yards
during the second TD journey.
Split end Paul Ewaldsen caught five passes for 38 yards and
carried tacklers several yards after the grab. His reception
netting 10 yards set up the winning bomb to Trapp.
Florida rooters at the game, including a large delegation from
the Leesburg Quarterback Club, were treated to a UF zip zipoffense
offense zipoffense in reverse late in the first half. State got the ball with
1:25 on the clock after Barfields FG.
A good return and a 15-yard penalty on the Gators gave the
Wolfpack the ball at their own 45-yard line. On third and 10
Donnan hit Bobby Hall at the 33.
Donnan faded back, bulleted one to speedy threat Rowe pn
the nine, and N.C. State had a touchdown, with a 7-3, and later
a 10-3 lead.
But, even though this lead loomed large for many agonizing
moments to Gator boosters, the fourth quarter eventually began,
and the Gators went to work.

(Photos By Nick Arroyo)



Page 2

i The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 17, 1066

'Mostellaria
To Begin
Wednesday
The Florida Players Drama So Society
ciety Society will open its 15GG-07 season
here with the Homan comedy,
Mostellaria, by Plautus.
The play runs from Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday through Sunday, in Norman
Hall Auditorium. Show time is
7:30 p.rn.on Wednesday.and Thur s sday
day sday and 8 p.m. on Friday and Sat Saturday.
urday. Saturday.
Two weekend matinees are sch scheduled
eduled scheduled at 2 p.m. Saturday and Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday.
Mostellaria, a farce set in
ancient Home, concerns the an antics
tics antics of a rascally slave, Tranio,
who corrupts his masters son,
Philolaches, while the master is
in Egypt.
Tickets may be obtained at the
Florida Union box office or Nor Norman
man Norman Ilall Auditorium prior toper-"
formances. Admission is 25 cents
for students (with ID cards),
85 cents for adults and 55 cents
for children.
Dr. Donald Borchardt is the dir director
ector director for Mostellaria.
A
BY
-GEORGE!-
(Send your problems to George.
It keeps his mind off his own
troubles.)
i i
DEAR GEORGE:
I would like to become a suc successful
cessful successful novelist, but my books keep
being rejected. Is it true you cant
get a book published these days
without a lot of sex in it? And,
if so, do you think it is worth worthwhile?
while? worthwhile?
D.F.
DEAR D.F.:
Do I think what is worthwhile?
Mind your own business, nosy.

DEAR GEORGE:
My husband says I talk too
much and when he comes in from
work he just grabs the paper and
answers me with a grunt and when
I try to strike up an interesting
conversation he just shrugs and
about the only thing he ever says
is females are too gabby and what
can you do with a man who wont
talk to you but just sits around
like a statue?
FRUSTRATED
DEAR FRUSTRATED:
Dont bug me. I had a hard day
at the office.

The Ftortto ,IM r* reeenree the right to reroute the typographical tone at ell advertisements end
to retono or tom away copy which It oo not do re objectionable.
MO POSITION B GUARANTEED, though desired pooltton will be riven whenever poeelble.
no Fto ride Alligator will not conelder adjuetmeote at payment for tap advertisement tnvoMnc typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or orrooooas leoerttoe ealooe notice la gtvoh to the Advortlaing Manager within
(1) oao day (Bar edvertleomeat eppeoxa.
The Florida Alllgeior wUI eat bo rwopomtole ter more thee aoo Incorrect leoerllcn o i on advorUoomoto
ochedtoed to no ooveral ttmos. Nattcea tor corrocdoa moot ho (trap Mm Ml tooorttoe.
me FLORIDA ALLIGATOR to too official otndeot nepsif to too University to Florida had to
pMMohed Ova tttooo weekly except dartnr May, Jaoe, aad Jtoy who* Mto> MU toil aoml-weekly. Only
ototortale repreeeet too official ope toons to toalr atohare. the Alptofto etoerod aa auood claao
atotor to toa Utotod Platoa Peat Offloe to Qalaaovtito.

I |/the STO-Es COOKIES J ; g ME /^VSS/PL£?\fVBJA//) MR.^^yo^'
\(l j £S AT a PA*TV. HE SAVE 1 S CUSTOMER
/ \I 7 as /Such 37 HIS NAME AS'-- < J*, (I \ WAS NOT

Bid Approved
To Convert
Building
A base bid of $588,300 to con convert
vert convert a three-story building for re research
search research and graduate student use
by the Department of Metallurgy
and Materials Engineering was
recently approved by UF.
The university recommended
that the Board of Regents approve
the bid of DeWitt, Furnell and
Spier of St. Petersburg for the
project.
Five estimates were evaluated
at the official bid opening. Robert
Gay Construction Company of
Jacksonville was the second low
bidder with an offer of $599,700.
The project will permit all me metallurgical
tallurgical metallurgical research and graduate
facilities to be combined under
one roof. They now are at six
different locations on campus.
Location of the building to be
remodeled is on the east side of
North-South Drive, south of the
College of Engineering building.
The space is now occupied by the
printing division and until recent recently
ly recently housed the central stores and
plants and grounds division offices.
One alternate, providing for ad additional
ditional additional laboratory casework cost costing
ing costing SIO,OOO, may be attached to
the original base bid if a match matching
ing matching grant can be obtained from the
U.S. Office of Education, accord according
ing according to John Nattress, activingdean
of the College of Engineering.
Terms of the contract call for
completion 210 calendar days from
the time that notice to proceed is
given. Construction is not expec expected
ted expected to begin before early 1967.
Facilities in the remodeled
building will include corrosion,
process metallurgy, melting, heat
treating, metallography, mech mechanical
anical mechanical deformation, powder metal metallurgy,
lurgy, metallurgy, x-ray defraction and spec spectrographic
trographic spectrographic laboratories for con contract
tract contract and graduate research work.
The building built around 12
faculty complexes, also will in include
clude include a departmental shop and oth other
er other necessary offices and facili facilities.
ties. facilities.
There are presently 34 graduate
students in metallurgy and mater materials
ials materials engineering -- the majority
doctoral students -- and 15 under undergraduates.
graduates. undergraduates.
The department is now engaged
in 17 contract research projects
with support funds from outside
sources.
Construction work is being
backed by $490,000 in state bond
money. The balance comes from a
National Science Foundation grant.
Total cost of the project, in including
cluding including equipment, architectural
and engineering fees and other con contingencies.
tingencies. contingencies. will be approximately
$651,000, Nattress said.

THREE PEDESTRIANS DIE
Accidents Claim Seven Lives

MIAMI (UPI) -- Trafiic acci accidents
dents accidents claimed at least seven lives
on Florida highways this week weekend,
end, weekend, including three pedestrians,
the State Patrol reported Sunday.
A Christmas, Fla. man, Rob Robert
ert Robert Alexander Belcher Jr., 20,
died Sunday in a two-car accident
two miles west of Titusville.
Another accident Sunday killed
Thomas Patrick Dee, 21, of West
Palm Beach, in North Palm Beach.
He was a passenger in the back
of a pickup truck, police said.
Four deaths were reported Sat Saturday:
urday: Saturday:
Oyd Oscar Gabins, 66, Bon Bonifay,
ifay, Bonifay, Fla., killed when he was
struck by a vehicle while walking
along a road north of Bonifay
Saturday.
-Mary Luise Henderson, 59, Ft.
Myers Beach, killed in an acci accident
dent accident early Saturday, 14 miles south
of Lake Wales.
-Elsie Eisner, 64, Richmond
Hills, N.Y., who died Saturday

t Luncheon Special
SEAFOOD
AUGRATIN OC
potato and vegetable
tossed salad, rolls & butter,
coffee or tea
Dinner Special
SWISS STEAKS f"
potato, vegetable, tossed salad,
rolls & butter, coffee or tea
AcuA' GOOD THRU SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23
the Smart place to go"
1 250 W. University Avenue

night in Tampa when she was struck
by a car while walking with a
companion. The companion, Car Carmela
mela Carmela Young, 64, also struck in
the mishap, was reported in fair
condition.

WINTERIZE YOUR CAR I
A COMPLETE CHECK OF THE
COOLANT SYSTEM.
-AND-
Allprd
AT
CAMPUS AMERICAN
At the corner of Univ. Ave. & 13th St.
We dont talk service we give it.
. §
YOU EXPECT MORE FROM AMERICAN AND YOU GET IT!*

-Manuel Cru/., 21, of D t i rav
Beach, killed in a piv-da\yn ac accident
cident accident Saturday when tlu> car j n
which he was riding as a pas passenger
senger passenger hit a bridge in Palm beach
County.



lenter the I
jiljopl
I FOOTBALL CONTEST I
I PRIZE: $25 in Men's or Ladies' Wear I
Place an "X"/in the box of the team you think will I
I win Saturday, Oct. 22 Estimate total yards to be I
I gained by Florida, which will be the tie breaker. I
O Florida vs. Louisiana State I
I Auburn vs. Texas Christian I
Z Duke vs. Z NorthCarolinaStatem
T orida vs. Z Mississippi State I
I Georgia vs. Kentucky I
/Jfjf *1
i V I
#vl# TBBimMBMWjk. -.. .-.:vV^taaSWgpl
ifSfe H
Jiff j!^l
I 'Jbbk jMEFMWr 1
jviui wHBf c
I cor]am I
| Phi Bates Easy Care Brogues! Made with the marvelous *:
man made material Corfam these shoes defy the
I elements Snow, ram. heat or cold, this Brogue can take them m
all and bounce back looking like new. And that's not all, when
I you step into a pair of Easy Care Brogues, you'll find they're
soft, pliable and weigh up to one third less than other shoe
material. Come in and see the shoe that's close to perfect for
any man. The Phi Bates Easy Care Brogue. £#)*V OC I:
jl DuPont trademark J Zs IJ ||
m
I Illinois vs. Stanford I
1 Ohio St. vs. O Wisconsin I
I Oklahoma vs. Z Notre Dame I
I Z Rice vs. Z Texas I
I Colorado vs. Z Nebraska I
Total Yards Gained by FLORIDA I
Entries must be deposited 1:: l She.;: \ y Fri., Oct. 21 I
I In case of tie. prize will be livid.-i o.;i:.k!y : ma ir -vii.r.-T',
I hr Imueraitij I
I IC2O West University Avenue. *- ll '' 1;:: rl 7 H
TRIES LIMITED, TWO PER PI KSON* HHHhI
UnivA d
Ext. xA fr
V Sa/t xxvVndtmoAiL

Says Freedom Messages
'Completely Unbiased

By BILL DOUTHAT
Alligator Correspondent
The Communists have been
working on our textbooks/'
charges the recorded female voice.
The voice speaks over Gaines Gainesvilles
villes Gainesvilles Let Freedom Ring' tele telephone
phone telephone number -- 372-3364. Two Twominute
minute Twominute messages on the Com Communist
munist Communist conspiracy in the United
States and other right-wing top topics
ics topics are recorded locally, but the
scripts are provided by the Let
Freedom Ring headquarters in
Sarasota.
A television repairman, Edward
S. Gocek handles the local re recordings
cordings recordings in his shop at 106 NW
Ist St.
The purpose of LFR, Gocek
said, is to get the people the
facts that newspapers dont give
them. AP (Associated Press) is
fidelity Union l ^f\l :l ifejnsurance
HHfif
376-1208

TO AIL STUDENTS U
wyjffi AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL T
W
\ Lunch a MiraMPHfe aa Dinner
I 11:30 2:00 CAKTERIA 4:30 8:00
|1212 N. MAIN St. (4 min. from campus) Gainesville Shopping Center

I I
ENGINEERING OPPORTUNITIES
for Seniors and Graduates in mechanical,
AERONAUTICAL, CHEMICAL,
CIVIL (structures oriented),
ELECTRICAL, MARINE,
and METALLURGICAL
ENGINEERING
. ; 1 ". , >...
ENGINEERING MECHANICS,
APPLIED MATHEMATICS,
CERAMICS, PHYSICS and
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19
Appointments should be made
in advance through your
College Placement Office
Pratt & U
Whitney p
Aircraft
j| An Equal Opportunity Employtr
SPECIALISTS IN POWER .. POWER FOR PROPULSION POWER FOR AUXILIARY SYSTEMS.
CURRENT UTILIZATIONS INCLUDE AIRCRAFT, MISSILES, SPACE VEHICLES, MARINE AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS.
i A

Monday, October 17, 1966, The Florida Alligator, 1

in cahoots with the Communist con conspiracy,
spiracy, conspiracy, he added.
Gocek. a short man with a nar narrow,
row, narrow, unswerving mustache, be believes
lieves believes he is performing a public
service with his telephone-mes telephone-message
sage telephone-message service. Its not just irres irresponsible
ponsible irresponsible people putting this stuff
out/' he declared.
Dr. William C. Douglas, a 40-
year old Sarasota surgeon, organ organized
ized organized LFR in 1962. He writes the
scripts and sells them to local
supporters for $24 a year. The
supporter must also furnish money

Campus Life Conference
Set For This Weekend

The Second Campus Life Con Conference,
ference, Conference, sponsored by the Uni University
versity University Religious Association, will
be held Friday and Saturday. Stu Students
dents Students and faculty members in po positions
sitions positions of leadership will be invited

for a telephone answering mach machine.
ine. machine.
Topics range from modern math
a tragic plan to destroy the Amer American
ican American intellect, to the Peace Corps,
a taxpayer financed, anti-Amer anti-American
ican anti-American brainwashing operation for
America s youth...something akin
to the Hitler Youth Movement.
Gocek claims the tape-recordings
are absolutely unbiased.
Until someone proves to
me that I am some kind of nut,
I will continue to support Let
Freedom Ring, Gocek concluded.

to take part in the program* which
has the theme of In Loco Paren Parentis
tis Parentis What Next?
Members of the president's ad administrative
ministrative administrative council have been in invited,
vited, invited, as have members of Legis Legislative
lative Legislative Council, officers in Stu Student
dent Student Government, sorority and fra fraternity
ternity fraternity presidents and represen representatives
tatives representatives from independent organi organizations.
zations. organizations.
The purpose of the weekend
conference will be to bring stu students
dents students and faculty together to ask
questions and to discuss decisions
and policies relating to the theme
of the conference.
Concert Tuesday
The UF Symphony Orchestra will
present a concert Tuesday, at 8:15
p.m. in University Auditorium.
Robert Foster, a member of the
department of music faculty, will
perform the soloists part in the
Trumpet Concerto.
Admission is free.

Page 3



Page 4

:, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 17, 1966

C FROM THE
WIRES OF
International
RELENTLESS CAMPAIGN...SAIGON...U.S. Air Force 852 bombers
from Guam blasted Communist stongholds near the demilitarized
zone Sunday in the relentless campaign to crush a feared North
Vietnamese offensive. Near Saigon, two U.S. Army reconnaissance
planes collided in flight with the loss of two American crewmen.
The huge eight-engine 852 s rained tons of bombs on Communist
troop areas where U.S. commanders say the Communists are plan planning
ning planning a major drive to coincide with the monsoon season, expected
to start in a few days.
ALTITUDE HURTS...MEXICO CITY...The United States, apparently
hurt by the altitude, turned in a mediocre showing in thelittle Olympics
Thursday, missing one of the best chances it will have to catch up
with the fastmoving Russians.
U.S. swimmers, main hope for a gold medal harvest, took first
place in only two of five events held Thursday, along with two second
places and one third.
SUMMIT TALKS OPEN...MOSCOW...Eastern Europestop Commun Communists
ists Communists headed toward Moscow Sunday for crucial summit talks open opening
ing opening Monday on what to do about Communist China and Viet Nam.
Hungarian party leader Janos Kadar and Polands Wladyslaw Go Gomu
mu Gomu lka were already in Moscow and they were to be joined by lead leaders
ers leaders from East Germany, Romania, Czechoslovakia and Bulgaria.
TEAMS REPLACE GUARD...HONG KONG...Communist China Friday
announced the formation of special propagation teams to support
pasty Chairman Mao Tse-tung and Defense Minister Lin Piao in
Pekings current political upheaval.
Formation of the Mao Tse-tung thought propagation teams was
disclosed by Radio Peking in a broadcast heard here.
It appeared the teams might be designed to take where the mil militant
itant militant Red Guards left off, using reasoning rather than violence to
overcome anti-party elements.
The development of the propagation teams seemed to be part
of the campaign to create a stronger public image of Lin as the No.
1 advocate of Maos thought and his heir.
ASKS FOR VOTE...ACCRA, Ghana... The leader of Ghanas military
regime said Sunday the army would turn over its authority only to
a democratically elected civilian government. He said voting will
have to be preceded by an acceptable constitution approved by the
people. Maj Gen. Joseph Ankrah, chairman of the National Liberation
Council which has been running this west African republic since
the ouster of dictator Kwame Nkrumah in February, spoke at a pa parade
rade parade by military cadets.
National
BACK TO ASIA...CHICAGO...GOP senatorial candidate Charles H.
Percy, appearing on nationwide television for the first time since
his daughter was slain, said Sunday the United States must shift
the initiative and responsibility for the Viet Nam war back to Asia.
Appearing on a network panel program CBSs Face The Nation,
Pen y repeated his call for an all-Asia conference on Viet Nam.
He said that even though the United States would not be a participant,
he had faith that such a conference could move toward ending
the war.
Sen Paul H. Douglas, D-111., Percys opponent, has criticized
the proposal on the ground that the United States would not be in invited
vited invited to such a conference. Percy listed issues in the campaign as
being to end the war, stop ruinous inflation and put some sense
into government.
MAMMOTH TASK...WASHINGTON...President JohnsonSaturdaysigned
legislation creating a new cabinet-level Department of Transportation
and assigned it the mammoth task of bringing order out of the
nations growing air, rail and highway chaos.
APPROVES 81LL... WASHING TON... The House Committee on Un-
American Activities Thursday approved a bill to outlaw acts of
violence or intimidation by such clandestine organizations as
the Ku Klux Klan.
Chances of the House acting this late in the session were consi considered
dered considered nil.
A clandestine organization is defined as a group which attempts
to conceal itsmembership and sctivities.
Penalties wbuld range from a fine of SI,OOO and two years in pri prison
son prison to death where the terroristic activities resulted in a killing.
CONSERVATION MILESTONE...WASHINGTON...President Johnson
approved seven bills Saturday to climax what he called a milestone
in the history of conservation.
He approved bills dealing with national parks, lakeshores, and
recreation areas at a cabinet room ceremony attended by members
of Congress.
Hie President said the present Congress had passed 20 major
conservation measures.

ARAB-RED WAR DRUMS
Incitement To War

By ELIAV SIMON
United Press International
JERUSALEM (UPI) Soviet
ambitions in the Middle East may
lead to a head-on clash between
rival Arab blocs and plunge the
strategic region into war again,
Israeli officials said Saturday.
The officials expressed concern
that Isreal may be dragged into
any conflict between rival Wes Western-Backed
tern-Backed Western-Backed and Soviet-Supported
regimes contesting for control of
the Arab world.
The recent series of Arab-Is Arab-Israeli
raeli Arab-Israeli border clashes was seen as
an outgrowth of the increasing
stresses between the Soviet Sovietbacked
backed Sovietbacked revolutionary regimes
of Syria, Iraq and the United Arab
Intra
Wiped Out,
Crisis Seen
BEIRUT (UPI) The Lebanese
cabinet scheduled another emer emergency
gency emergency session Sunday to approve
measures aimed at averting a fin financial
ancial financial crisis in the wake of the
run on Beiruts Intra Bank, one
of the largest private banking in institutions
stitutions institutions in the Middle East.
A statement issued after an all allnight
night allnight meeting of cabinet by Le Lebanon
banon Lebanon President Charlres Helou,
said:
Positive solutions were reach reached
ed reached to ensure the liquidity of all
banks and to preserve the econ economic
omic economic stability of the country and
the interests of depositors.
Local bankers said they would
not cpen Monday unless the gover government
nment government pledged cash backing. The
Lebanese stock market also asked
the government for permission to
remain closed Monday to avert a
crash.
The panic caused by the run
on Intra Bank, which wiped out
its liquid assests, already has
spread to eighboring Arab states
and elsewhere.
What actually caused the run
was < still somewhat of a mys mystery.
tery. mystery. Some major depositors
transferred their funds to the Uni United
ted United States, Europe, Japan and Ku Kuwait
wait Kuwait seeking higher interest rates.
But some observers said the fi financial
nancial financial crisis had political im implications.
plications. implications.

LEAVES TODAY
LBJ Set For Peace Tour

MERRIMAN SMITH
White House Correspondent
WASHINGTON (UPI) President
Johnson leaves for the Far East
Monday in search of a peaceful
end of the Viet Nam war and the
start of a better life for South Southeast
east Southeast Asias struggling millions.
The Chief Executive will deliver
a statement at Dulles Internation International
al International Airport in neighboring Virgin Virginia
ia Virginia before boarding the Presidential
jetliner, Air Force One, at about
9 a.m. EDT for a direct flight
to Hawaii, first stop on his 25,000
mile, 17-day journey.
The President lias stressed that
the Oct. 24-25 Manila summit con conference

Republic, and the more fonserva fonservative
tive fonservative countries such as Jordan and
Saudi Arabia.
Israel already has protested to
the United Nations against Arab
incursions. Israeli Foreign Min-
U Thant
Concerned
With Zions
UNITED NATIONS (UPI) Sec Secretary
retary Secretary General Thant Saturday ex expressed
pressed expressed concern over the in invasion
vasion invasion by young Zionists of the
Syrian U.N. mission Friday. He
promised to take up the incident
with the United States.
Thant assured a highly incen incensed
sed incensed Afro-Asian bloc he would meet
with U.S. Ambassador Arthur J.
Goldberg Monday to stress the
necessity of insuring the safety of
U.N. diplomats and their mission
headquarters in New York.
In the incident Friday, a group
of young prayer-chanting Jews in invaded
vaded invaded the 25th floor mid-Manhat mid-Manhattan
tan mid-Manhattan offices of the Syrian delega delegation
tion delegation to the United Nations to pro protest
test protest alleged Syrian attacks on Is Ismel.
mel. Ismel.
Police, acting on a complaint
signed personally by Goldberg, ar arrested
rested arrested 19 youths and charged them
with unlawful intrusion.

CHINA SAYS
U.S. Soviet Alliance!
To Conquer Europe I

TOKYO (UPI) Communist
China Sunday reiterated its
charges that the Soviet Union
and the United States were col collaborating
laborating collaborating and accused President
Johnson of drafting anaggressive
blueprint for the United States to
overrun the whole of Europe.
The Peking Peoples Daily, the
official newspaper of the Peking
regime, referred specifically to
Johnsons foreign policy speech
Oct. 7 and said it was one more
demonstration that a U.S.-Soviet
alliance is already in existence.
The statement was broadcast by
the official New China News
Agency, monitored here. It was

ference conference of seven nations involved
in the Viet Nam fight against Com Communism
munism Communism is not a council of war
to escalate the conflict.
And he has cautioned against any
high hopes for a dramatic new
turn toward a peaceful settlement
at the conference.
His Manila mission beganasone
of coordination of allied stra strategy
tegy strategy in Viet Nam. As the trip
was expanded to cover stops in
at least six nations, its scope also
broadened.
Johnsons objectives now extend
far beyond the Viet Nam war.
They center on his vision of a
cooperative community of non nonister

ister nonister Abba Eban told the Secur
ity Council Friday the terroris
raids from Syria are 'an incite incitement
ment incitement to war and urged U.N
aid in restoring peace and secur security
ity security along Israel's borders.
The assessment in authoritative
Israeli circles was that the per period
iod period of relative quiet which has
prevailed in the Middle East since
1956 may be coming to an end.
The latest assessment came less
than 24 hours after Arab terror terrorists
ists terrorists clashed with an Israeli pa patrol
trol patrol near the village of Kiriat Kiriatgat,
gat, Kiriatgat, four miles inside Israel, and
wounded three Israelis. The in incident
cident incident was called the worst in
more than a year.
Syria already has warned that
any Israeli military retaliation
could trigger all-out war between
the Arab states and Israel. The
leftist Damascus regime warned
Syria did not stand alone.
Soviet ambitions in thestra thestrategic
tegic thestrategic Middle East were considered
here as one of the major causes
for increased tensions in the re region.
gion. region. Israeli officials pointed to
the recent tour of the Arab world
by Soviet Deputy Foreign Minis Minister
ter Minister Vladimir Semenov as a pos possible
sible possible key to the situation.
TTiey noted Semenov visited
Cairo, Damascus, Baghdad and Al Algiers,
giers, Algiers, capitals of the revolution revolutionary
ary revolutionary Arab nations. In each case,
his talks dealt at length with de defense
fense defense matters, they said.

titled Confession of U.S.-Soviet
Collusion in a Big Scale.
It quoted Johnson as saying that
he wanted the Soviet Union anu the
nations of Eastern Europe to know
that we and our allies shall go
step by step with them as far as
they are willing to advance to ac achieve
hieve achieve East-West reconciliation.
The Peking regime charged that
the United States wants to tran transfer
sfer transfer the emphasis of its strategy
to the East and concentrate its
forces against China, continue its
aggression against Viet Nam
and its suppression of the nation national
al national liberation movement in Asia,
Africa and Latin America.

Communist nations allies and
neutralists alike working to
better their peoples way of life.
Tbe President will return to
the United States Nov. 2 six
days before the general elections
-- after having visited New Zea Zealand,
land, Zealand, Australia, the Philippines,
Thailand, Malaysia and South Kor Korea.
ea. Korea.
On the eve of the historic trip,
the longest to the Far East ever
undertaken by an American Pres President,
ident, President, Johnson attended Sunday
worship services at National City
Christian Church, where the min minister
ister minister prayed for his divine gui guidance
dance guidance on this momentous jour journey.
ney. journey.



NOT JUST POLICE PROBLEM

Marijuana: A Cult Within A Culture

(Part Three In A Series;
(All Rights Reserved By Uni University
versity University of Florida Law Review;
By BRIAN ROS BO ROUGH
Like marijuana, the psychedelic
agents are being treated as if
they were solely a police pro problem.
blem. problem. Since its inception Ameri American
can American drug law has had next to
nothing to do with medical opinion.
Efforts at narcotics control are
grounded upon the Harrison Act
of 1914 which was intended to
control the nonmedical use of
narcotics. Since then, narcotics
law has evolved into the prohibition
of nonmedical use as well as the
control of medical use. American
drug law operates from the prem premise
ise premise that it is possible to stop the
spread of drug use by criminal
sanctions. Deprivation of the drug
is sought by stopping the supply.
Punitive measures are felt to be
the best deterrent. Until recently

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little distinction was made be between
tween between addicts and non-addicts. The
exclusive emphasis has been on
the total elimination of addiction.
Despite the persuasive advocacy
of change, unbending adherence to
visionary goals of elimination and
cure have hindered much-needed
experimentation and police re reform.
form. reform.
With the passage of the 1965
Drug Abuse Control Amendments,
a similar campaign has been
launched to control the gross mis misuse
use misuse of amphetamines, barbiturates
and tranquilizers. While concern
in this area is certainly justified
and the act is tailored to meet
many of the existing problems,
there is still little recognition
that drug control is not solely a
police problem. Medical controls
continue to be more directive than
permissive. Research and experi experimentation
mentation experimentation are highly restricted.
Numerous drugs of different pro properties
perties properties have been lumped together
under a single set of controls.

As a result LSD and the hallu hallucinogens
cinogens hallucinogens have been squeezed into
a framework of regulations
designed for marketable stim stimulants
ulants stimulants and depressants. Failure to
fashion the controls after the drugs
may create more problems with
psychedelics than the act was in intended
tended intended to eliminate.
Marijuana is a mindful example
of what can occur when lawmakers
fail to make elemental distinctions
among drugs. Just as the hallu hallucinogens
cinogens hallucinogens have been grouped with
stimulants and depressants, so was
marijuana incorporated into ex existing
isting existing efforts to control narcotic
drugs.
Marijuana is a derivative of the
female Indian hemp plant which
grows readily in any temperate
climate. It has been used by man
as an intoxicant for thousands of
years. Its users experience a wide
range of effects including exhilar exhilaration,
ation, exhilaration, unusual sensitivity to sights
and sounds, ease in tension, re release
lease release of inhibitions, distorted
sense of time, and occasionally
hallucinations.
The marijuana cult is a culture
with a culture. It is impossible
to estimate its population. Both
young and old from every social
group defy the law for the exotic
experience.
Marijuana became popular in the
1930 s from its association with
Harlem jazz musicians. It was con controversial
troversial controversial from the outset. The
use of drugs for pleasure or for
the attainment of artificial tran tranquility
quility tranquility involved grave questions
of morality for many Americans.
Unsubstantiated rumors were
reenforced by alarmists and the
press. Mild concern turned into
general apprehension. Finally, in

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Monday. October 17, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

1937 Congress passed the Mari Marijuana
juana Marijuana Tax Act modeled after the
Harrison Act. While in theory a
revenue measure, the Marijuana
Tax Act was simply moral legis legislation
lation legislation leveled at deviant social
behavior.
Since that date this relatively
mild hallucinogen has been purged
and prosecuted as if it were a
narcotic. Even today penalty pro provisions
visions provisions applicable to marijuana
users under state and federal law
are about the same as those applied
to heroin users.
In comparison with alcohol,
another drug that alters the
mind, it becomes clear that
America discriminates among its
vices. For example, marijuna is
not physically addictive whereas
alcohol can be. While alcohol of often
ten often substitutes for food, mari marijuana
juana marijuana sharply stimulates the
appetite.
Where marijuanas physical ef effects
fects effects are rather trivial, alcoholism
is destructive of mind and tissue.
From the standpoint of public
health and socioeconomic conse consequences,
quences, consequences, alcohol is far the more
serious problem. Os 80 million
American consumers, six million
have some sort of dependence on
alcohol. In comparison, available
data indicates that there are only
5,000 chronic marijuana users.
Each year drunken driving
accounts for approximately 15,000
deaths and 200,000 injuries. One Onethird
third Onethird to one-half of traffic arrests
and nearly two-thirds of all ar arrests
rests arrests are attributed to alcohol.
Yet the use of marijuana is pun punishable
ishable punishable as a felony while alcohol
may be consumed with relative
impunity. Accordingly Americans
spend a staggering twelve billion
dollars a year on alcohol.

The chasm between marijuana
and alcohol has been perpetuated
largely through myth. Marijuana,
it is said, creates criminal ten tendencies,
dencies, tendencies, but the high percentage
of alcohol crimes makes this a
spurious distinction. Actually it is
because of marijuanas illegality
that its users are exposed to indi individuals
viduals individuals who are likely to be im immoral
moral immoral or unethical.
One must find the illicit source
in order to keep in supply. For
some this constitutes a major
step toward identification with un unconventional
conventional unconventional values and activities.
It is also said that the use of
marijuana leads to unpredictable
behavior whereas alcohol does not.
The principal reason a marijuana
users behavior is unpredictable
is because there is nothing to
indicate he has been taking a drug.
An alcoholic, on the other hand,
is betrayed by his breath. People
know what to expect. Furthermore
it is widely believed that mari marijuana
juana marijuana acts as anaphrodisiacwhile,
in fact, it dulls the sexual appetite.
As for the breakdown of inhibitions
alcohol has certainly played its
role. Finally, authorities argue
that marijuana is a stepping stone
to hard narcotics. While most
heroin addicts probably try mari marijuana,
juana, marijuana, the reverse is not true.
One writer indicates that very
few marijuana smokers go on to
heroin just as few cigarette smo smokers
kers smokers take up marijuana. What pro progression
gression progression there is can be attributed
to the contagious nature of
addiction. It spreads by asso association.
ciation. association.
The longer a marijuana smoker
associates with an opiate addict,
the more likely he will be prose proselytized.
lytized. proselytized. Progression, however, is
by choice and not from need of a
stronger agent. The real distinc distinction
tion distinction between alcohol and marijuana
lies in the label. The use of
alcohol is a moral decision
acceptable, social, and legal. The
use of marijuana is an act of
deviancy offensive, antisocial
and illegal. It is a distinction
without a difference.
Doubts Tickets
Available For
HHH Speech
Jim Crabtree, Banquet chairman
for the Florida Blue Key, an announced
nounced announced Thursday there will be a
limited number of tickets offered
to hear Vice President Hubert
Humphrey address Blue Key mem members
bers members and alumni at their annual
Homecoming Banquet.
Due to a lack of space facilities
at the Florida Gym, priority will
be given first to Blue Key mem members
bers members and guests. If there is any
remaining space, tickets will be
sold to the public. However, Crab Crabtree
tree Crabtree feels it is very doubtful
if any will be sold to the public.
UF faculty members may make
specific ticket requests to the Blue
Key Office for tickets.
Plans are still tentative for
Humphreys arrival. Secret Ser*
vice men reportedly are coming to
UF this week to lay out Humphreys
schedule.
There has been no announce announcement
ment announcement on what Humphreys address
will contain.

Page 5



Page 6

Hie Florida Alligator, Monday, October 17, 1966

The Florida Alligator
'A -Mojfrufij, Ii Ow Fkw_PfuiTiw.Tuiti.
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR DICK DENNIS
Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecessanly reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is the editorial in the left
column.
A Captainless Ship
When a ship sails without a captain
something is wrong.
Oh, the ship still sails and may even eventually
tually eventually reach its destination, but with without
out without the captains guidance, things go
wrong.
UKs College of Engineering is like a
ship without a captain.
When Dean Thomas L. Martin left for
Southern Methodist University, he noted
red tape could be one of the main rea reasons
sons reasons he was leaving the university.
But for whatever reason Martin left,
it is hurting the university and its engin engineering
eering engineering college which one dean recently
said ranks among the top in the South,
along with Georgia Tech, the University
of Texas and the University of North
Carolina.
This same dean also said he felt Mar Martins
tins Martins leaving was a tension-reliever
and was good for the university. This
may be true, but regardless of what
his leaving accomplished, we still dont
have a dean for the College of Engineer Engineering.
ing. Engineering.
Dr. Reitz and the Board of Regents
should start looking for a new dean as
soon as possible. Its one thing for a
small department to have an interim head,
but its another thing for one of the UFs
most dynamic colleges to have a tempor temporary
ary temporary dean at its helm.
Kudos To Servomation
When Servomation took over UF Food
Service, we were skeptical.
After all, why should the food get any
better? Most of the students who patronize
Food Service do so because it is quick
(sometimes) and convenient, not because
the food is anything special.
Thats why we were so surprised at
Food Services holding a candlelight buf buffet,
fet, buffet, complete with strolling violinist and
guitarist. And, amazingly enough, those
who attended said they found the food
good and the service excellent.
If youve been over to the Campus
Club lately, youll ~ also find some
changes -a new, bright decor, a wider
variety of selections and much better
food.
It appears as though Servomation isnt
content to uphold the old Food Service
tradition of greasy, grimy food and poor
service. They have made substantial im improvements.
provements. improvements.
We commend them.
%
No Dives In Carolina
North Carolina States new stadium was
a pond before it was decided to build
on it.
But, if you judge by Saturdays perfor performance,
mance, performance, the fact didnt induce the Wolf Wolfpack
pack Wolfpack to take a dive.

The Politics Os Florida

Remember Tippecanoe and
Tyler too or No Graft With
Taft? Weil, if you dont they were
slogans used in presidental elect elections
ions elections many years ago.
Fifty to 100 years ago almost one
half of the people in the United
States were comparatively il illiterate.
literate. illiterate.
These slogans were used so that
the illiterates would have some something
thing something to say if they were question questioned
ed questioned about their candidate. Imagine
the conversation between a citizen
of today and one of the 19th cen century.
tury. century.
20th Century: What are the is issues
sues issues in this election?
19th Century: NoGraftWith Taft.
20th Century: Thats great....but
what are the issues...l mean the
incumbent president stealing. ..
can you prove it?
19th Century: All I know is...
there will be no graft with Taft.
20th Century: Aren't there any
other issues?
19 Century: The issue is graft.
it must be there everyone keeps
saying it is. ..look at the signs,
see..No Graft With Taft. Its got
to be true... Signs dont lie.
20th Century: Forget it.
The above bit of trite conver conversation
sation conversation goes on even today:
Haydon: Whats the issue Bob?
Bob (looking toward heaven)
The issue is Integrity.
Haydon: Whose integrity?
Bob: Yours of course. .anyone
with hair like that has to be
dishonest.
Haydon: Can you prove anything?
Bob: I dont have to. ..Just look
at all those siens, signs dont
lie. Besides this is what Clam Clampette
pette Clampette and Haddad told me to say.
It should be quite obvious to the
observer of the past elections that
sloganism is becoming away
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
accepts all letters to the editor.
Due to space limitations, however,
we ask that letters not exceed
350 words. Typewritten and
double-spaced letters are prefer preferred,
red, preferred, and all must be signed. Names
will be withheld upon request. Ed Editors
itors Editors reserve the right to select
or reject letters for publication.

.By MIKE GARCIA,
Alligator Columnist

of life for our political aspirants.
Comes now Brother Claude and
the conversation goes like this:
Bob: Hi, Claude, whats the is isuse?
use? isuse?
Claude: (looking to the right)
The issue is Ultraliberalism.
Bob: Gee, thats great Claude;
But can you prove it?
Claude: I dont have to. .look
at the signs.
Bob: Clampette, Haddad, come
back. . I need a new slogan?
Clampette, Haddad: Just keep
saying the issue is Integrity. .
it worked once itll work again.
It would seem that after six
months of constant sloganeering
the people of Florida would want
to hear something concrete. It
would seem further that the candi candidates
dates candidates would have a debate of the
issues (hopefully not like the recent
Miami fiasco).
The slogans are getting so bad
that its becoming an insult to the
people who are forced to listen to
them. If you dont believe theyre
getting out of hand: go and look
at the wall on the east side of the
local High headquarters on Univer University
sity University and 13th.
In three-foot high letters is
written: Folks. .this is. .HIGH
country. That statement is enough
to make even the most ignorant
red- neck feel a little embarrassed.
I suggest they change it to:
Folks. .its pretty HIGH around
here.

Florida Alligator Staff
NICK ARROYO CAROL HEFNER GENE NAIL
Photo Editor Society Editor Editorial Assistant
JO ANN LANGWORTHY NEWT SIMMONS
General Assignment Editor Wire Editor
STAFF WRITERS Bob Beck, Sue Froemke, Barbara Gefen,
Maury Olicker, Kathie Keim, Jean Mamlin, Frank Shepherd, Aggie
Fowles, Justine Hartman.
ASSISTANT EDITORS Judy Redfern, Sherrie Braswell, Toni
Giliberti, Joe Torchia, Nick Tatro, Tyler Tucker, John Briggs,.
Ken Garst, Margie Green.
In order to better cover campus events the Alligator uses
reporters from the School of Journalism and Communications.
Their bylines are followed by ** Alligator Correspondent.

Campus
Mirror
By 808 MENAKKR_
Alligator Managing Editor
Whos on first? v
That used to be the thente for a
burlesque act put on by a famous
comic team. Olson and Johnson of
Hellzapoppin* fame. But today, it
could echo through the third floor
of the Florida Union and it would
seem apropos.
Whos going to run for president
of the student body in the Winter
elections. Many names have been
brought up, to be sure, but there
are no definite possibilities at this
moment.
W ild rumors abound, to the effect
that Steve Cheeseman might come
back from FSU or Ernie 1 itz may
run again. I dont think Cheeseman

will visit us
from the land of
the crying Semi Seminoles.
noles. Seminoles. As for
Litz, hes too
busy corrupting
the minds of
Gainesville High
sophomores in
h i s history
class.
One name that
keeps popping up

is that of Dick Thompson. Dick,
a man who knows the workings of
the St. Joe Paper Company inti intimately,
mately, intimately, was vice president under
Bruce Culpepper and would cer certainly
tainly certainly like nothing better than to
capture the top spot.
Fred Breeze would be a very
attractive candidate, and would
probably be the best SG president
in many years except for one
glaring fault. Fred is above
reproach. He doesnt play silly
little games on the third floor and
probably doesnt want to.
Another attractive candidate
would be Buddy Jacobs adminis administrative
trative administrative assistant, Charlie
Shepherd. Charlie is a very capable
person, but will probably wait'
another year before trying for the
top spot.
So much for the independents.
The Greeks can offer Bill Mc-
Bride, Steve Gardner and Hob Blue,
to name a few. Out of this crew
may very well come a presidential
of vice presidential candidate. You
know, balance a Greek with an
independent running-mate and
vice-versa.
One Greek whose name keeps
popping up is Clyde Taylor, IFC
president. Clyde is a strong, force forceful
ful forceful person who doesnt like to take
no for an answer. Thats one
reason were having James Brown
for Frolics. However, Clyde also
doesnt like to play those silly
little games, so he probably wont
run either.
That doesnt leave us with any
clear-cut, obvious candidate. So
look for a dark horse to come
blitzing out of nowhere and keep
asking yourself Whos on first?

MENAKEK



EDITOR:
As a freshman here at the university,
I have found one of the greater joys of
life to be the progress test. This wonder wonderful
ful wonderful learning experience is considered
both a pleasure and a privilege by all.
There are some students, in fact, who
think that progress tests are much too
simple and should never betaken serious seriously.
ly. seriously.
Florida Blue Key, in its constant
endeavor to serve University of Florida
students, came through last Tuesday night

LSD Debate 6 Shoddy Goods 9

EDITOR:
At least one sound conclusion
can be drawn from the LSD debate
of the Forums Committee. Slick
packaging can sell shoddy goods to
a student audience as readily as
advertising and marketing proce procedures
dures procedures do to the general public.
As judged from the applause the
audience bought Professor Han Hannas
nas Hannas arguments wholeheartedly.
One can only hope it stops there
since the superficial package
hardly justifies the purchase of a
trip.
Too charmed by the presentation
I didnt take notes but my recall
goes something like this. LSD is

There Aint No Room
For Commuters To Park

EDITOR:
Seein as how I live ofl-campus
and seein' as how I have a dinky
VW, and seein as how I paid my
dues so the campus police could
serve Kool Aide to the rest of
the driving university public, so
they would pay their dues --hows'
cum I aint been able to park my
teensy VW on campus yet? Wanna
know why?
On account of. .there ain't no
room in the one commuter lot
thats anywhere within five miles
of the main part of campus (thats
if you attend classes in Peabody,
Matherly, GCB, Anderson and all
those other good buildings). Now
if you need to go to the Agricul Agricultural
tural Agricultural area, you got it made, pal!
I take it back about the one com commuter
muter commuter lot, I forgot the one-half
of the old orange grove lot --
but its always crammed too! Drat!
Anyway, the reason Im taking
the time to write youse-guys is
that I read in the Sept. 21 issue
of the Alligator, in an article on
Off-campus Housing, that half the
students enrolled dp not live in
campus housing which means
they live off-campus, and Ill bet
they all dont bomb around
Gainesville on roller skates!
Now, since this one-half of the
student body has to have some
place to park their roller skates,
motor bikes, VWs and other mis miscellaneous
cellaneous miscellaneous larger cars lm
sure they were as excited, elated,
overjoyed and relieved as I was to
TiHyTnfctSehool
Gainevi 11 e *s"" Ol desf
24 S.E. Bth St. 376-7806
7:l!j to 5:45 $27

Thank You, Blue Key

a natural consequence of our needs
to search for our true, honest and
wonderful selves in the midst of
this crass and ugly mess that the
nasty old haves (theadults)have
created. It is clearly not a dirty
drug since only sick people take
drugs but the elite (intellectuals
and college students) take LSD.
It is no more a moral issue than
driving a car since after all its
just a form of behavior. Whether
one drives or takes a trip is
simply a matter of a few quali qualifications
fications qualifications (which it is presumed
that the student can determine
since these were delivered into
their hands). Finally (apparently

see the announcement in the Sept.
28 Alligator that a Traffic Study
Proposal (has been) given Reitz,
and all our problems are solved,
(yuk!)
They didnt ask me, but since
Ive trotted four blocks from the
other side of the KA house to
Williamson every day (thats
pretty darn far!), Id like to be
the first to tell them that the cute,
little, white commuter sticker on
my little, ole VWs bumper hasnt
cleared too many parking spaces
on the big UF campus yet. (Would
you believe once??)
So, (and by the way, there is a
point to all this) I just thought
Id write and let you know that if
and when they clear the lot where
Benton stood, and if they kindly
provide all its gigantic space for
those ikky, green, area one stick stickered
ered stickered cars, Id like to ask one
small teensy, weensy favor --
How's about seein it clear to
loan the other one-half of the
old orange grove to us one-half
of the student body, who paid our
dues and keep hoping for a
parking space maybe two blocks the
other side of the KA house --
P-L-E-A-S-E!!!
IDA J. COOK, 3AS
KISERS SI.OO SALE
40 used desk trays, es-.-h SI.OO
500 sheets paper letter lettersize
size lettersize SI.OO
Card Files per drawer SI.OO
Typing Carbon per box SI.OO
30 used attache cases,
each j SI.OO
604 N. Main St.
Phone 372-9607

with a marvelous alternative to concen concentrating
trating concentrating on those silly tests. They decided
that for the benefit of those students takine
tests in Peabody hall and other buildings
near the Plaza of the Americas, they
would hold skit tryouts during the heights
of the prog. This provided just enough
noise to keep us from thinking too seri seriously
ously seriously about such a trivial subject as
American institutions.
I, for one would like to thank Blue Key
for their wonderful service to the student
body and commend them for their ex excellent
cellent excellent planning. Had they been so in inconsiderate
considerate inconsiderate as to schedule the tryouts an

as a form of expiation for the
speaker) it was noted that the same
thing can be accomplished by self
discipline, dedication and hard
work (you can pay more but not
necessarily get more).
I hope, stated in the way that I
have, the gimmicks shine through.
However let me make a few ob obvious
vious obvious points.
Black power, anarchy and Hit Hitlers
lers Hitlers youth movement follow from
the first argument equally well.
If the acid heads do indeed fall
among the elite they are cer certainly
tainly certainly on the fringe and may well
have even lost their elite union
card. Among the intellectuals I
have heard of no significant figure
advocating LSD from the arts or
the science side. On campus cer certainly
tainly certainly few if any of the elite-of elite-ofthe-elite,
the-elite, elite-ofthe-elite, the faculty, are
advocating LSD (and I really cant
believe Prof. Hanna is serious but
do believe he was carried away
by his topic and his joy of a good
debate). Frankly, as I look around
at the known LSDer they are a
pretty scruffy and marginal group.
To de-moralize LSD because it is
a mere behavior is to de-moralize
all acts. .suicide, murder, rape,
arson, cheating. If you need to do
it and you qualify is a pretty slen slender
der slender value line. The qualifications
cited were almost impossible to
meet and more impossible for the
person to judge. Do you really
qualify for an A in a course?
Most people dont and yet would
believe that they did if personal
justification was all that was re required.
quired. required.
I am not by this letter arguing
the value or non-value of LSD.
This issue will only be settled by
years of systematic research. I am
arguing against the implicit (if not
explicit) sanction dispensed by
Professor Hanna and its apparent
enthusiastic reception by the stu students
dents students in attendance. It was wonder wonderful
ful wonderful entertainment but certainly not
grounds for sound behavior.
A PROFESSOR

CLIP THIS VALUABLE COUPON!
SPECIAL! MONDAY & TUESDAY ONLY!
COL SANPIt'S
J REG. Sllfl BOX DINNER AOr WITH COUPON
COMPLETE DIN NEB IN- U WU
CLIDES: S piece* of Fried ff| |l
Chicken, PoUtoe*. 1111
Chicken Gmey, Fr*h W
& Cole Slnw end BolL V V
NO SUBSTITUTIONS. PON
so***; -tasty 'customh jf
I W
"ft*i finqnr Utkin* Gpnf
3 Locations: 214 NW 13th St. 376-6472
114 NW 34th St. 372-3649
207 NE 16th Ave. 378-2959
OFFER EXPIRES OCT. 31

hour or two later, all the progs would
have been turned in and nobody would
have received the full benefit of their fun
and games.
It is rumored that Blue Key has sche scheduled
duled scheduled some basketball games to take
place in the south end of Florida Gym
during Winter registration. I certainly
hope this is true, for Blue Key has an
excellent service record and I would hate
to see all their efforts go down the drain.
Damn the peons -- full speed ahead!
Right Blue Key?
NAME WITHHELD

Parking Lot
Discrimination
At Med Center
EDITOR:
At the UF Medical Center there
is a parking area provided for
patients. But dont let this fool
you. If you are a student at the
UF, as well as being a patient
receiving and paying for medical
treatment at the Medical Center,
you do not have the same pri privilege
vilege privilege of parking in the patient
parking area. You may be allowed
to park there if you get a written
letter from the Health Center stat stating
ing stating that you are a patient there,
and if you go to the university
police and get special permission
to park in the patients parking
area before each visit to the hos hospital
pital hospital (Some patients require fre frequent
quent frequent visits for treatment andj
if they are students, must get
permission for parking for each
visit).
To me, this is discrimination
against students. Non-student pa patients
tients patients are not required to either
show proof that they are patients
or to obtain special parking per permission.
mission. permission. Why then are these
regulations imposed on student
patients and not on non-student
patients? I would like to know
why such discrimination exists,
and what action the student gov government
ernment government has taken to combat it.
MRS. KAY B. COOK, JR.
PATRONIZE
'GATOR
ADVERTISERS

Monday. October 17, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

SEMINOLE
WAITING
LIST
The Following People
May Pick Up 1966
Seminoles This Week
Between 2 and 5 p.m.
In Room 12, Fla. U.
Susan Hand
Sherry Sandler
Peggy Perkins
Jeaimie Whitworth
Sid Stubbs
Eunice Tall
Lee Willis
Diana Shek
Bill Stewart
Nancy Davis
George Anderson
Jackie Modesitt
Susan Werner
Pamela Regan
Frank Glinn
Barbara Sands
Andrea Alter
Steve Miller
Clarice Kounijian
Edgar Tolle
Marvin Alford
Maury Blalock
Barbara Sue Hadley
JoAnn Stenger
Karen Harms
Barbara Shreeve
Fred Solomon
Beverly Bradburn
Alberto Laverne
Oreel Oolson
Don Nunneker
William Elliott
Betty Wolf
Bernice Kapp
Julio Sandinas
Suzi Rank
Reine Liedtke
Joan Gaston
Linda Greenan
Barbara Nattrass
Janis Mohrbached
John Gayle
Don Demnee
Sue Boutchyard
Raul Patterson
Daniel Hodge
Eric Kangas
Robert Kirk
Joanne Purcell
Carol Rose
Manuel Barro
James Meni
Marie Kinzie
Suzanne Smithson
Jo-Ann Rosenzweig
Leslie Marrich
David Bentley
Marilyn Warner
Norman Black
Susan Kendall
Chris Movesian
Susan Moss
Lisa Steinberg
Janis Mohrbacher
Thomas Renison
Jerome Greif
Murray Zolt
Diane Edwards
Magie Green
Shirley Covington
Diana Lenhardt
Ronald Teal
Bibb Allen
Brian Dunmyer
Charles Ferrara
Charles Saltzman
Frank Amato
Jeanne Hedge
Donna Sides
Bernie Winn
JoAnn Selleck
Julianne Belger
Cheryl Harris
Victor Stone
- Edward Wright
Ray Dorman
David House
Chumpol Aphibal
Michael Smith
Charles Nowlin
Diane Allen
Theodore Shore
Vicki Frees
Madelyn Levin
Lindi Schwab
William Wittstruck
Judith Meyer
Bobby Sistrunk

Page 7



IGATOR CLASSIFIEUSI

1 for sale
ONE ELECTRO-VOICE 12 tri triaxle
axle triaxle speaker in bass reflex cabinet
SSO. One 8 Frazer speaker in
enclosure S2O. Call 372-6018 after
5:30. (A-33-3t-c).
FOR SALE: TV set SSO; desk, in
good condition $30.00. Trans Transoceanic
oceanic Transoceanic radio $100; Hi-Fi; Study
lamp, table lamp. Call 372-5773.
(A-33-5t- c).
MARTIN-FRERES Woodwind
Clarinet, with case, like new $75;
Hilton Delude Trumpet, with case
good condition, SSO; Smith and
Corona (Classic 12) portable type typewriter,
writer, typewriter, standard size keyboard
with case, like new, SBS, after
5:30 p.m. 376-1469. (A-29-st-c).

If&i f^fll
I For Your I
I§l -. fsi
m
I To Reach I
mm
I i AUDiwcr' (I
I (jva/vJ \jOa>J|
I THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR I
j FEATURES TODAY AT: 1:20 3:25 j
Ew!l3thSt at 23rd Roadl f JMHBH
Telephone 378-2434 \ | 1
jjtfjj/Bf hhuml jPjl

for sale
YAMAHA motorcycle, 80 cc., less
than 1 year old, perfect condition,
3,000 miles, $250, call 378-5741.
(A-29-st-p).
v.
1965 HONDA 50 Driven on week weekends
ends weekends only by 83 year old racing
grandmother. Offers over $l7O.
Call Bill at 376-3694. (A-31-3t-c).
FOR SALE -- Salmer Bundy Flute,
good condition, $50.00. 376-0911
after 5 p.m. (A-31-3t-c).
1965 HONDA 90, excellent con condition,
dition, condition, low mileage, $2lO. Call
376-8484. (A-33-st-c).

~ The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 17, 1966

Page 8

for sale
1965 YAMAHA 80 CC. with Auto Autolube
lube Autolube $225. Phone 378-3148. (A (A---31-st-c).
--31-st-c). (A---31-st-c).
BEAUTIFUL 1964 10x50 Champion
Trailer. Two air conditioners,
carpeting, awning, tool house and
fully furnished. Lot 18 Hickory
Hill- Call 372-2896. (A-32-lt-p).
r
i
for rent
EFFICIENCY APARTMENT. Fur Furnished,
nished, Furnished, private bath, entrance,
drive. $65. Available October 18,
2225 N.E. 7th Street. (B-33-lOt-c).
SEEKING FOUR GIRLS to rent
apartment. Cooking facilities
available. Also telephone and tele television.
vision. television. SIO.OO per week per girl.
Contact 468-1409, Orange Heights.
(B-32-st-c).
S6O A MONTH, modern, nicely
furnished, one bedroom trailer.
Situated on large shaded lot in
Paradise Trailer Court. Perfect
for 1 or 2 people. Call 378-5134
after 6 p.m. Will also rent for
football weekend. (B-31-st-c).
FURNISHED apartment, available,
October 20, 1 bedroom, 11/2bath,
kitchen and living room, spacious
rooms quiet area. Couple or gradu graduate
ate graduate students preferred. S9O
monthly, 923 NE 3rd Ave. 378-
2436. (B-29-lot-c).
wanted
WANTED FEMALE Roommate, air
or interior design major pre preferred,
ferred, preferred, to share studio apartment.
S4O plus 1/2 utilities. Paula, 376-
3261, ext. 2601 or 376-1131. (C (C---33-st-c).
--33-st-c). (C---33-st-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted; S4B
a month plus 1/2 utilities; air
conditioned, Octobers rent paid;
1716 N.W. 3rd Ave. Apt. 6 (C (C---31-10t-c).
--31-10t-c). (C---31-10t-c).
HELP!! NEED MALE ROOM ROOMMATE
MATE ROOMMATE FAST. CALL 378-6265
EVENINGS. (C-31-3t-c).
WANTED 1 Dalmation or Boxer
puppy; Call 372-5135. (C-31-st-c).
WANTED: Portable Electric type typewriter.
writer. typewriter. 714 SW 16th Ave. Apt.
203. (C-30-4t-c).
situations
wanted
t
EXPERIENCED Bookkeeper wants
extra work to do in her home.
Call 372-6815 evenings. (F-31-
2t-c).
j plf Ihi pi laW SHOW 1
A J every I
frfuEWYLDa

heIp wanted
WANTED: CARRIER TO DELIVER
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
WEEKDAY MORNINGS, MIST
HAVE IST THRU 3 RD PERIODS
FREE MONDAY-FRIDAY. APPLY
ROOM 0, FLORIDA UNION. lE lE-3
-3- lE-3 ts-no).
HELP WANTED -- Male student
with car to work 7- 9 a.m. and
1 to 2 hours in afternoons each
day, Monday through Friday with
the Alligator. Apply Room 9, Fla.
Union. (E-32-tf-nc).
autos
1963 VW EXCELLENT Condition,
$9 5. Call 376-0077.(G-25-st-c).
1962 MONZA Convertible. S6OO.
Call 376-5457 after 5 p.m. (G (G---30-3t-c).
--30-3t-c). (G---30-3t-c).
1965 VOLVO P-1800S Sport Coupe.
8,800 true miles, super charger,
$2,750, call 372-4842 or 376-0611.
(G-30- lOt-c).
1959 CHEVY convertible, excellent
tires, top, and paint. 714 S.W. 16th
Avenue, Apt. 203, after 6 p.m.
(G-30-4t-c).
LUXURY 1959 CADILLAC
Fleetwood, 50,000 miles, air and
all the extras, perfect condition.
Call 372-9867 before 11 a.m. or
after 8 p.m. (G-31-2t-c).
1958 VOLVO, red, good tires,
new paint, rebuilt transmission.
Reasonable. 378-6144.(G-32-2t- c).
1957 MGA. Wire wheels. Body,
top, mechanically good. New
brakes. Tonneau. Best offer over
$475. See at Engineering Building
372-4509. (G-31-3t-c).
real estate
BRICK, three bedroom 1 1/2 bath,
double garage, fireplace, oak
floors, air conditioned, near
University. Univ. Ext. 2525 days;
after 5 p.m. and on weekends, 376-
8142. (I-29-st-c).
r
I BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30 I
iMWHVWMMiiV'I'MM Hi i
I STRICTLY I
I ADULT ENTERTAINMENT 1
I Euzhbeth I
RICHHRD I
I BURTON I
I Who's I
Hfrmd Dh
VIRCIMIR I
I Woolf? I
I AT 7:07 & 11:25 I
I ' PLUS 1
I r"l
II O BUT 9:34 H
II i THE 1
1 BRAVE"
II nmnuni ||

personal
HAROLD: Here's hoping you had
a peaceful 900th Anniversary
William and the Hastings gang.
(. J 33-lt-p).
MEXICO: VERY ECONOMICAL
assault being planned for Christ Christmas
mas Christmas break. Need several adven adventurous
turous adventurous guys to share expenses.
Call Dave Strickler 376-0942. (J (J---
--- (J--- 3t-p\
f
TWO MEDICAL STUDENTS ac accustomed
customed accustomed to variety of good food
and willing to pay for such, desire
evening meals. Call 378-2095. (J (J---32-3t-c).
--32-3t-c). (J---32-3t-c).
services
IN A HURRY? Passports and
application photos. Childrens pho photos,
tos, photos, commercial and special pro profa
fa profa le ms. Call Wesley-Roosevelt
Studios, 372-0300 or see at 909
N.W. 6th Street. (M-30-lOUc).
VISIT Gator Groomer where ro romance
mance romance blooms. Next door to Uni University
versity University Post Office. Self Service
and Professional Laundry, dry
cleaning. (M-30-lOt-c).
DIAL 372-3364 and hear a Pro
American Taped message Let
Freedom Ring. (M-33-3t-p).
Starts Tomorrow:
SHOP ON MAIN STREET J
, jr HUMPHREY
gdBOGAOT
LAST \* mn 2l
*|H(f 2:00-4:20-6:45-9:10
1 FLORIDA STATE THEATRES
THE CITY THAT BECAME
A TORCH -THE TORCH
THAT FIRED THE WORLD!
CHARLTON LAURENCE 1
HESTON OLIVIER I
IVAN TORS
FNISINTS
C h DISNEYS
ijj | j Jgf JOHNNY
W |Ji APPLE-



Orange

Campus Calendar

Advance Notice: Union Board: Hungarian Dinner, Hub
Banquet Room, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, October 22,
Entertainment
Monday, October 17
*
Florida Socialist Union: Dr. Kenneth Megill, Mar Marxist
xist Marxist Scholarship in the University Today, 116
FLU, 8 p.m.
Lutheran Student Association: Those who have been
sitting in our block have your brown I.D.s to
Don by Wednesday.
WSA: Meeting, 218 FLU, 8:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun: 215 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Reception: Univ. Womens Club, President Reitzs
Home, 3 p.m.
Society of Automotive Engineers: Film, Sebringl966
12 Hours of Endurance, 512 Eng., 7:30 p.m.
Collegiate 4-H Club of the Univ. of Fla.: 4-H
State Club Office, 7:30 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club: 527 Eng., 8 p.m. Every Everyone
one Everyone interested in amateur radio is invited.
Mensa: Daily luncheons from 11-1 for faculty, stu students
dents students and staff members. Reserved table in west
wing of Main Cafeteria.
Seminole Pictures: For Graduating Seniors and

RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS: Students interested in
applying for a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford Uni University
versity University contact Prof. A. A. Murphree, 202 Anderson
Hall before Oct. 22. Limited to male citizens of
at least junior standing who will reach the ages of
18-24 by Oct. 1, 1966. The scholarship is for
$2,800 per year, running 2-3 years.
SPEECH SCREENING TESTS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of college enrollment are re required
quired required to satisfy the speech screening requirement
before being admitted to the Advanced Professional
Sequence or enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400 and the
elementary block (EDE 300, 301 and 302). Appoint Appointments
ments Appointments are now being made in room 124, Norman
Hall.
GRADUATE COUNCIL MEETING: The October
meeting of the Graduate Council will be held Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, Oct. 20, at 1:30 p.m. in Room 235 Tigert Hall.
FORTRAN TEXT: Computing Center has a limited
number of preprint copies of the first five chapters
of Schrenk and Schrenk -- Introduction to FORTRAN
IV Programming. Price of the text, which is now
being used in the FORTRAN class, is $2.75.
LIBRARY BOOK DROP MOVED: The Drive-
Up book drop has been moved from the roadway
in front of the Main Library to the corner of the
parking lot immediately in rear of the Library
Building. Books that are now On Reserve may
be deposited in this book drop at any time. The
Reserve Book Drop remains in the outside north northwest
west northwest entrance of the College Library.

PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: (Students must be reg registered
istered registered with the University Placement Service to
interview. Sign-up sheets are posted two weeks in
advance of the interview date at Building H. All
companies will be recruiting for December, April and
August grads unless otherwise indicated.
hiring juniors for summer employment).
OCT. 14; ARMSTRONG CORK CO. Acctg, Gen
Bus, Ind Mgmt, Econ, Mktg, Lib Arts, Chem, ChE,
CE, EE, IE, ME.
OCT. 14; SCHLUMBERGER WELL SERVICES
EE, ME, IE, Ps. AIRESEARCH MFG. CO. OF ARI ARIZONA
ZONA ARIZONA AE, ME, ENG. SCI. MUTUAL OF NEW
YORK All majors. FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS
COMMISSION EE. JEFFERSON CHEMICAL CO.,
INC. ChE, ME, IE, ORG. CHEM.* CHARLESTON
NAVAL SHIPYARD EE, ME, MetE, CE, ChE,
NE, IE, Ps, Chem. CONTAINER CORP. OF AMERI AMERICA
CA AMERICA Acctg. Eng. Forestry.* SINCLAIR RESEARCH
INC. Chem, ChE, PAN AMERICAN PETROLEUM,

DEPOSITS ARE NO LONGER LIMITED IN YOUR CREDIT UNION I
I Building j Radio Road No | ncrease
I 01 5 yT" Serving Uof F Employees Since 1935 pSTL, I
I Paid Semiannually

Placement Notices

BLUE BULLETIN

Greeks, 200 FLU, every week day 12-5 & 6-9,
Saturdays, 10-1.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship: Prayer Meet Meetings,
ings, Meetings, 4th floor of the Library every Monday
and Thursday, 5 p.m.
AIIE: Meeting, 324 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, October 18
Alpha Zeta: Smoker, FLU Johnson Lounge, 7 p.m.
Dr. York and Dean Brooker will welcome new
Pledges.
Univ. Medical Guild: Antique Fair and Sale,
Old Elks Bldg., 10 a.m.
Business Administration Dames: Mary Turner,
Table Setting, Perry House, 8 p.m.
Childrens Concert: Symphony, Univ. Aud., 9:50a.m.
Univ. Orchestra Concert: Univ. Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi: Meeting, 116 FLU, 8:30 p.m.
All members and prospective members are ex expected
pected expected to attend, Trimester dues will be collected.
Wrestling Club: South end of the Gym floor, 4 p.m.
Student Finance Association: Group meeting, 212
FLU, 7 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi: 118 FLU, 7 p.m.
Tuesday Evening Supper Club: Presbyterian Student

Administrative Notices

LOST FILM: A film entitled Boy with A Blind Blindfold
fold Blindfold #4 has been lost. The film belongs to the
Eye Bank at the J. Hillis Miller Health Center and
was addressed to Janie Hough. If this film has been
delivered to another office on the campus by mistake,
please contact Photographic Services, Ext. 2450, or
the Eye Bank, Ext. 5402.
ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA: Girls with a 3.5 or better
average in any trimester of their freshman year may
sign up for Alpha Lambda Delta, National Scholastic
Honor Society, in the Dean of Womens Office, 123
Tigert Hall, Oct. 19-21. Transfer students are also
eligible.
WOODROW WILSON NATIONAL FELLOWSHIPS:
Oct. 31 is the deadline for faculty members to nomi nominate
nate nominate students for Woodrow Wilson Fellowships for
1967-68. Send candidates name, current mailing
address, college and proposed field of graduate study
to Dr. Robert Bryan, Graduate School, 235 Tigert Hall.
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJORS: Two assem assemblies
blies assemblies will be held Wednesday, Oct. 19, 4 p.m. and
Thursday, Oct. 20, 7 p.m., for questions on the new
quarter system. All elementary education majors are
urged to attend one of the sessions, to be held in Nor Norman
man Norman Hall, room 250.

CORP. Geol, Eng Sci, Chem, Ps, EE, ChE.
VETERANS ADMINISTRATION CE, EE, ME, Arch.
OCT. 17: GENERAL DYNAMICS CORP. AE,
EE, CE, Math. W. R. GRACE & CO. -- Chem.
CORPS OF ENGINEERS Arch, CE, EE, ME, Eng.
Sci.*
OCT. 17, 18: BELL TELEPHONE LABORATORIES
EE, ME, Eng. Mech, Ps, Math. RADIO CORP.
OF AMERICA EE, ME, Physics, Bus. Ad., Lib.
Arts. GENERAL DYNAMICS CORP. AE, ME,
EE, IE, MetE, Eng. Sci., Math, Physics. U.S. ATOMIC
ENERGY COMMISSION All majors. TEXAS IN INSTRUMENTS,
STRUMENTS, INSTRUMENTS, INC. Bus., Math, Eng.*
OCT. 18: SOUTHWIRE CO. ME, EE, IE, Bus.
Ad.* DEPT. OF STATE All majors.
OCT. 18, 19: TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY
-- All majors. U. S, ARMY MATERIAL COMMAND--
All Eng., Math, Physics. ARO, INC. -- AE, EE, ME,
Eng. Sci., Eng. Mech. NALCO CHEMICAL CO. --
Chem (Org. & Phys), ChE, Lib. Arts.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

Monday, October 17, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Center, 6:30. Non-denominational, everyone single
and over 21 invited.
Union Board: Bridge Lessons, 215 FLU, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, October 19
Childrens Conceit: Symphony, Univ. Aud., 9:50a.m.
Engineering Dames meeting: Charlie Woods guest
speaker, Univ. Womens Club. 8 p.m.
AIA Film Series: "Pierre August Renoir, 103
B AKA, 8 p.m.
Fla. Players: Mostellaria, Norman Aud., 7:30p.m.-
Alpha Epsilon Delta: Dr. Edmund Ackell will speak
on the coming Dental School, 11-611, MSB, 8 p.m.
All students and faculty invited.
Univ. Medical Guild: Antique Fair and Sale,
Elks Bldg., 10 a.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: Auditions. 1826 W. Univ.
Ave., 8:30 p.m. Every kind of talent wanted.
Speleological Society: Group meetings, 212 FLU,
7 p.m.
Spanish Conversation Club: Informal gathering, FLU
Johnson Lounge, 8 p.m.
FLA UNION BOX OFFICE: Tickets now on sale
for A1 Capp and MOSTELLARIA. Student tickets
for Lee Luvisi go on sale Tuesday, October 18.

PROGRESS TEST: (Students in the following courses
are expected to take the following tests. Each student
must bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will be required
to use his SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER).
CHN 251 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Oct. 18,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Peabody
1,2, 4,5, 7, 10, 11; (C) report to Leigh 207; (D)
report to GCB 121, 125 or 127; (E) report to GCB
113; (F) report to Matherly 213, 216 or 219; (G)
report to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; (H) report
to Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209; (I-J) report
to Flint 110 or 112; (K) report to Walker 301, 303,
307 or 308; (L) report to GCB 201, 203, 205 or 207;
(M) report to GCB 213, 215, 217, 219, 221, 223,
225 or 227; (N) report to GCB 201, 203, 205 or 207;
225 or 227; (N) report to GCB 233 or 235; (O)
report to GCB 237 or 239; (P-Q) report to Flint
101 or 102; (R) report to Floyd 108; (S) report
to Walker Auditorium; (T-V) report to GCB 101
or 109; (W-Z) report to Walker Auditorium.
CHN 252 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Oct 18,
7 p.m. Students whose K) last names begin with: report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6, 7,8,9, 10, 11,
12, 13, 14 or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly 102,
105. 108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
CEH 131 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Oct. 20,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Peabody
1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) Leigh 207; (D) GCB 121,
125 or 127; (E) report to GCB 113; (F) report to
Matherly 213, 216 or 219; (G) report to Peabody
101, 102, 112 or 114; (H) report to Peabody 201,
112; (K) report to Walker 301, 303, 307 or 308;
(L) report to GCB 201, 203, 205, or 207; (M) report
to GCB 213, 215, 217, 219, 221, 223, 225 or 227;
(N) report to GCB 233 or 235; (O) report to GCB
237 or 239; (P-Q) report to Flint 101 or 102; (F)
report to Floyd 108; (S) report to Walker Auditorium;
(T-V) report to GCB 101 or 109; (W-Z) report to
Walker Auditorium.
General Notices
TENNIS MEETING: Men interested infreshmanor
varsity tennis teams please meet in Room 208,
Florida Gym, Monday. Oct. 17 at 5 p.m.
INDEPENDENT LEAGUE: Tuesday, Oct. 25,5 p.m.
is the deadline for signing-up football teams in the
Intramural Office, Florida Gym, Room 229, or call
Ext. 2912. A team consists of seven members. All
persons not affiliated with Dormitory or Fraternity
Leagues are eligible.

Page 9



Page 10

i, Hie Florida Alligator, Monday, October 17, 1966

Graves Happy
With Victory Drive

By DICK DENNIS
Alligator Snorts Frtito'
RALEIGH An illegal pro procedure
cedure procedure penalty should have been
assessed against the sports writers
flooding the Florida dressing dressingrooms
rooms dressingrooms Saturday afternoon. The
reporters flow of motion all went
in one direction -- toward where
a tired but relieved Richard Trapp
stood, answering a volley of ques questions.
tions. questions.
It seems like every team is
'up for us, Trapp said. We
werent expecting State (N.C.) to
throw as much on us as they did.
State completed 15 of 31 passes
for 159 yards. Trapp caught the
winning pass for the Orange and
Blue, a 31-yard bomb coming with
3:07 left on the clock.
It was a simple down and stop
pattern. I had a little bit of run running
ning running room (Trapp caught the pass
on the 20 and outraced two defen defenders.)
ders.) defenders.) and didnt see the guy be behind
hind behind me. When I turned around,
he was down on the ground. (Aft (After
er (After a Trapp fake with the hips).
It was an instinctive fake; I
was just trying to get away from
the one guy who caught hold of
me.
When asked why the offensive
lines pass protection didnt seem
to be holding up, Trapp countered,
The tackles, a guard, and the P

...But Edwards Sad
After Scenting Win

By TYLER TUCKER
Assistant Sports Editor
RALEIGH Silence filled the
new Carter Stadium after N.C.
State dropped a 17-10 decision to
the Florida Gators. In the dress dressing
ing dressing room the quiet lingered as
coach Earle Edwards analyzed the
loss.
Were proud of this team even
in defeat, Edwards said solemn solemnly.
ly. solemnly. We had a good effort and
the boys tried very hard to the
end.
The Bth-ranked Gators came
from behind in the second half
to steal the victory from thePack.
A one-yard slant by tailback Lar Larry
ry Larry Smith and a 31-yard broken
field run by eel-like flanker Ric Richard
hard Richard Trapp produced the winning
scores.
When you have a G-4, 215
pound back like Smith, Edwards
added, who can run as fast as he
can, you're pretty fortunate.
Smiths ground efforts were
complemented by 191 yards of
passing.
Graves keeps you guessing on
pass plays, Edwards said. You
have to cover your receivers
quickly. At times you may leave
a man open for an easy pass play.
Edwards found several dif differences
ferences differences between this year's Gator
squad and the squad of a season
ago which beat the Pack 28-6
at Florida Field.
They had more experienced
men last year, Edwards said.
But this year they are getting
a good effort out of these new
men. Florida has a fine team
as we knew they did.
With the score knotted 10-10
late in the game, the Gators drove
down field and set up a scoring
play on the 31 yard line. Flank Flanker
er Flanker Trapp caught a pass in the
flat. Trapp eluded defensive back
Greg Williams and sprinted in for
the touchdown.
When the time came, they took

linebackers were firing in cons constantly.
tantly. constantly. Theyre hard to block be because
cause because you never really see them.
Offensive backfield coach Fred
Pancoast said Trapp and tailback
Larry Smith turned in tremendous
performances, but did not comment
on the play of others.
Head Coach Ray Graves added,
We had to work hard for this
win, our third straight on the road.
When you are nationally ranked you
must get a good effort every week
to win because you are a big tar target.
get. target.
Steve Heidts interception was
the turning point. (Heidts snare in
the fourth quarter set up the win winning
ning winning 77-yard touchdown drive.)
This is the second week in a row
he has come up with a key play.
(Heidt broke up a late FSU rally.)
John Preston, offensive tackle,
echoed he was glad to get the
State game under his belt.
They were stunting a lot more
with their linebackers than we had
expected. All the game films we
watched showed them in a straight
5-4 defense almost exclusively.
Coach Kensler, offensive line
coach, agreed with Pancoast in
saying it wasnt one of the Ga Gators
tors Gators best performances.
Sure we had a lot of yard yardage
age yardage (340 overall), Kensler said,
But we had a lot of drives that
fizzled out.

us apart, Edwards said. Their
ground game and pass game real really
ly really hit us hard late in the game.
I didnt know he was behind
me, defensive back Williams
said. I just took off for him.
But he was between the two zones
and was in with the touchdown.
The defensive secondary em employed
ployed employed a zone pass coverage for
most of the game. Each back would
take a particular zone and would
take responsibility for any
receiver entering that zone. Trapp
penetrated the border between the
zones, making it more difficult
for the secondary coverage.
Trapp ran between the zones,
Williams said. Florida hits its
receivers as soon as they break
so it is really tough to cover.
In the opening minutes of the
game, Trapp ran his pattern into
the open behind the secondary.
The pass was off Trapps finger fingertips
tips fingertips preventing a possible score.
The first Trapp play was a
mistake, Williams said referring
to the play. But, it didnt change
our defense. We used the zone
and also the man-to-man later in
the game.
Junior quarterback Jim Donnan
activated the Wolfpack offense with
his passing and play-calling. The
195 pounder completed 13 of 27
passes for 140 yards.
They put a heavy rush on me
late in the game, Donnan said,
but I don't think it had much
to do with the result of the game.
The Gator defense rushed its
linebackers late in the game to
disturb Donnanstiming.Wewere
using longer patterns, Donnan
said. The longer patterns made
the difference, not their rush. We
thought Florida had the easiest
pass defense we have faced all
season.
They (Florida) dont have the
speed and power Michigan State
has/ Donnan said. But Florida
has a real good ball team.

(Photo By Nick Arroyo)
LEFTY QUARTERBACK JACKIE ECKDAHL
. . follows his interference through defenders-
Baby Gators Blast FSU
On 4th Quarter Surge

By JIMMEY BAILEY
Alligator Sports Writer
Floridas Baby Gators un unleashed
leashed unleashed their own passing whiz,
Jackie Eckdahl, and scored three

fourth period touchdowns to over overcome
come overcome the Baby Seminoles of Flor Florida
ida Florida State.
Florida State also provided an
aerial show of their own, with
Tommy Warren in the spotlight.
The final score of this high-scoring
offensive battle was a 34-20 vic victory
tory victory for the Baby Gators.
Florida State started the scor scoring
ing scoring parade after a wild exchange
of three fumbles inside the Gator
30 yard line. Warren, a former
Coral Gables star, rolled to his
right and tossed a five-yard scor scoring
ing scoring pass to Phil Abraira for the
first score of the game.
The Gators came right back with
a score of their own. Eckdahl,
a Gainesville High product, con connected
nected connected on two of four passes dur during
ing during a drive that covered 60 yards
in 11 plays. Eckdahl also chipped
in with runs of nine, eight, and
five yards.
The clincher came as Eckdahl
hit Paul Maliska in the end zone
for the first Baby Gator score.
Bill Bridges kick for the PAT
was wide. FSU had split the up uprights
rights uprights on their extra point try
and still stood on top, 7-6.
Florida States second score
came as they capitalized on an at attempted
tempted attempted interception. With a little
over eight minutes remaining in
the first half Warren fired a pass
to Abraira in the left flat.
Skip Albury, a teammate of War Warren's
ren's Warren's in high school, dove in front
of the Seminole receiver in an
attempt to steal the pass. He
missed and Abraira caught the
pass and raced untouched down the
west sidelines to paydirt. Abraira
was so far in the clear that he
taunted and teased Floridas Lar Larry
ry Larry Williams, Ft. Walton Beach,
for the final 20 yards.
The Baby Gators finished first
half scoring on a 43-yard drive
that was concluded by Steve Tan Tannens
nens Tannens diving catch in the end zone.
VISIT
3%e &eb Hion
Where Everyone
Meets

A try for a two point conversion
failed when Eckdahls pass fell in incomplete.
complete. incomplete.
The first half ended and the
SEC Statistics
W L T
V
Florida 2 0 0
Alabama 2 0 0
Georgia 2 0 0
L.S.U. 1 0 0
Tennessee 11 0
Mississippi 1 2 0
Kentucky 1 2 0
Vanderbilt 0 1 0
Auburn 0 2 0
Miss. State 0 2 0
Volleyball
Tourney
Returns
The Orange League volleyball
tournament returns to Florida Gym
tonight as the four bracket winners
meet in the semi-finals.
Phi Kappa Tau meets Pi Lamb Lambda
da Lambda Phi in the opening game at
7:30 while Tau Epsilon Phi plays
Sigma Chi in the nightcap of the
doubleheader at 8:30.
Tau Kappa Epsilon and Phi Gam Gamma
ma Gamma Delta will vie for the Blue Lea League
gue League championship Tuesday night at
8:45 p.m. in the Florida Gym.
The Orange and Blue Leagues flag
football draw will be held at 4 p.m.
today in room 229, Florida Gym.
XEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, 10? ea.
20 & Over, 9?
Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE

Baby Gators headed for their
dressing room trailing the Baby
Seminoles by a score of 14-12.
The second half began with the
Gators receiving the kick-off. They
failed to mount a scoring drive.
The third quarter remained score scoreless,
less, scoreless, setting the scene for the mag magnificent
nificent magnificent comeback staged by Eck Eckdahl
dahl Eckdahl and Co.
Eckdahl, who passed for three
touchdowns, made another on a
one-yard plunge, and directed a
third drive of 77 yards that cul culminated
minated culminated in a one-yard plunge by
Robbie Rebol for the final Gator
score of the game.
Florida completely dominated
the game statistics. Eckdahl com completed
pleted completed 23 of 31 passes' for 273
yards and three touchdowns. Flor Florida
ida Florida had 24 first downs to States
nine.
8 Go Togethers: A
| Some Better than others
K but there's no denying
$ the right look that Fre Fre\
\ Fre\ macs combination of For-
| tune penny loafers, and ]8;
trim tapered slacks give Si
| the young man on the
$ Penny Loafers ..13.98 V
JS Slacks from
| 6.00 to 12.98
m rrwtMAcsj jj
|j| 112 W. Univ. Ave. jjj



*||| /' E 1
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THE MANY MOVES OF RICHARD TRAPP

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GATORS TRAIL 10-3
. . despite near block by Rittgers

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PUNTING IN POSTS SHADOW
56-yard kick bailed Gators out

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.. Killer ,, Richard gave Wolfpack fits all day

Monday, October 17, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Photos By
<*
Gerald Jones,
i
Carson Johntry
\
.
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>Y' '' -,':v''
a B B m w iB
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HEIDT SMEARS WOLFPACK QB
. . this one went incomplete

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 17, 1966

AFTER BEATING HUMPTIES

Triple-Threat Gators Must Prepare

The Gators are over the hump(ties).
Led by pin-point passing, the running of Larry
Smith, and the receiving of Richard Trapp, the come comefrom-behind
from-behind comefrom-behind gridders have won their way to Floridas
best start since 1028.
But several state sportswriters predicted before
the campaign began that the Orange and Blue would
have to be 5-0 in order to finish with a respectable
mark of 7-3 or 7-2-1.

Floridas eighth- ranked Gators have shown promise,
power, pride and punch during the first half of the
season. This beginning, however, was not as dif difficult
ficult difficult a schedule as the remainder of the season
appears. Perhaps it is fortunate that Coach Ray
Graves talented, but still developing sophomores have
had this five-week training session.
Graves himself would be the first to say that
this unit can ill afford to look back at what it has
accomplished thus far and feel completely satisfied.
A lot of work still needs to be done.
The Orange and Blues first five opponents have
a combined record of 7-11-1. Yet, the Gators had
to come-from-behind to whip two foes (FSU and N.C.
State).
On the other hand, Floridas future opponents have
compiled a favorable mark of 13-6-1.
Graves said that a Southeastern Conference game
has a little more riding on it than a non-conference
tilt. Thus far, the Gators have played only two SEC
foes, with four remaining.
The game this Saturday could do more to spell
out the Gators real potential, talent, and desire than
any game. Louisiana State seems back to the status
of a big-time football power, and is ready for action.
In August, this LSU team was picked by many

CrOSSWOrd by William Lutwiniak
So to speak ....

1 Roma.
6Character in
(irncsis.
10 Simulate.
15 Organize.
20 in the dark.
21 Handout.
22 Isolate.
24 (lot up.
25 The status bit.
29 Sea eagle.
30 Balance.
31 Cave: poet. /
32 Big lake. \
33 Home, for some.
34 Abstruse.
36 Individual.
37 Eclipse.
38 Summons.
39 Police: si.
40 Vibrant sound.
42 Nonsense
creature.
43 Usage.
44 Unrefined.
45 City officials.
47 Witnesses.
49 Lady.

1 Formed a
compact mass.
2 Grenoble's
river.
3 A bourse.
4 Surpass.
5 Eagerly
expectant.
6 Moving
gradually.
7 Fruitless.
8 Cylindrical
oenochoc.
9 Emulate
Dorcas.
10 Hoving's
former
employer.
11 water.
12 Catchers gear.
13 Somewhat:
sufT.
14 U.S. writer.
15 Courage.
16 Before: poet.
17 To outrun.
18 Exhaust.
19 Bores.
23 Throw out.
26 Middays.

Across

51 Solo.
52 One who
reunes.
53 Narrow way.
54 .Thematic.
56 To laugh: Fr.
57 Go up & out.
58 Cast aside.
59 Demonstra Demonstrative.
tive. Demonstrative.
60 Dissemble.
61 Chatter: si.
XB2 Besmirch.
k. 63 Chess
\ denouement.
65 Hoad: Fr.
66 Shop.
68 Pro .
69 See 52 Across.
70 row to hoe.
71 Agreeing to
forget
differences.
76 StiH-r clear.
77 His: Fr.
78 The Mouse,
to the Dutch.

Down

27 Shelter from
the cold.
28 Tree.
35 Call up.
37 Adventurous.
38 Caliber.
39 Moslem
leader.
41 Exist.
42 Growl.
43 Departed.
44 Engrossed.
45 Mrs. Colum.
46 Inter.
47 Uttered.
48 Garden green.
49 Chateau
feature.
50 d'hotel.
52 Leaving.
54 Bulletin
board item.
55 Yorkshire
town.
57 Promptly.
58 Aeronautic
acronym.
59 Loyal.
62 Moved
smoothly.

PUZZLE

79 Jam.
80 Early Briton.
81 Poet.
82 Be angry.
83 Upper case,
for short.
84 Trouble.
87 Stationery
item.
88 Long scarves.
89 Forward
90 Pouches.
91 Type size.
92 What Our
Town had
not.
94 Departed.-
95 Politically Politicallymotivated
motivated Politicallymotivated ap appropriations.
propriations. appropriations.
96 Gets along.
97 Elevate.
98 Heady to
believe.
100 Teen-agers.
101 Pallet.
102 Adorn.
103 Drudge.

63 Gaspar & Co.
64 Clerical
vestments.
65 A grand.
67 Have :
tackle.
68 U.S. miler.
69 example.
70 Long time.
71 lazuli.
72 Show.
73 Gil .
74 Lugs.
75 Barks.
81 Classify.
82 Musical group.
83 Nader's
target.
85 Champagne
bucket.
86 Young woman.
S 8 Strike: si.
89 Literary work.
90 Personifica Personification.
tion. Personification.
91 Sudden fright.
93 Celia.
94 Fortitude.
95 Petit .
96 Douglas .

Dick Dennis Ky

to be the Gators toughest opponent. Nelson Stokley,
Bengal quarterback, 1965 SEC sophomore of the year,
was primed to lead a talent-laden LSU squad to the
runner-up spot behind Alabama in the conference.
But Stokley was hurt during the 28-12 opening vic victory
tory victory over South Carolina, and the news that he would
miss the entire season rocked the LSU team morale.
For several weeks, LSUs offense floundered.
Sportswriters began to envision the easy win the
Gators would get over no-offense LSU. LSU fell to
then little-regarded Rice, 17-15, outlasted Miami,
10-7, and then was tied by Texas A&M, 7-7.
But all LSU lacked was a field general. The tough,
tenacious, conditioned defensive wall, two deep in
every position, was still there. The huge, swift
running backs still ground out yardage, but there
was little offensive leadership.
Sophomore Fred Haynes, 5-9, 165, came to the
forefront as signal caller for LSU Saturday night.
He guided his cohorts to a 30-0 stomping of Coach
Chalie McClendons alma mater, Kentucky.
Now it can be definitely said that LSU does have
an offense, and their defense is as tough as ever.
This fact, by personal observation, is already wor worrying
rying worrying at least two varsity gridders. No longer will

104 Typographi Typographical
cal Typographical term.
105 Cheers.
107 Blow a horn.
108 Playthings.
109 Chemin de .
110 C'ut of meat.
113 Fraternity
letter.
114 Epochs.
115 Porous t
limestone.
116 River to the
Slave.
118 One of the
Gabors.
119 HUAC et al.
124 Provoke.
125 Present
formally.
126 The fourth
base.
127 Slants.
128 Bea Lillie et al.
129 Sound of
contempt.
130 Angered.
131 Trial.

sis Traverses.
99 True.
100 Thanks, in
Paris.
102 Breakfast
item.
104 Wrinkled.
105 Sum up,
in short.
106 U nited.
107 Italian
numeral.
108 Piano .
109 Pafisienne.
111 Mrs. Hobby.
112 French
phonetician.
114 Goes wrong.
115 Uproar.
116 Less than
adequate.
117 Diminutive
ending.
120 Colloid.
121 Motel,
of yore.
122 Fraternity
letter.
123 Poetic
contraction.
i

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LSI' be looked on as a good chance for victory.
Now the Gators must face an uphill battle. LSU
is 3-1--. and is jelling, improving with every game.
The Tigers, like the Gators, are undefeated in SEC
competition. The only really tough conference game
after the Gators is against Alabama, and the game
will be in Baton Rouge.
This last fact gives the Bayou Bengals a big edge
over the Orange and Blue also. The seniors on the
19G6 Fightin Gators will tell you there is nothing
quite like playing in the Tiger Uen. Year after year,
the Tigers do as well at home as almost any other
team in the nation.
The stadium seats G 7,500 people, and the seats
are almost on top of the field. At night games, the
crowd noise of the totally-partisan fans is unbearable.
The team mascot, a huge tiger, roars over the loud loudspeaker
speaker loudspeaker several times during the play, which serves
to unnerve the visiting team.
The Gators success in recent years may work
against Graves charges. Only one team has bested
the Bengals three times in a row during the last
11 seasons. Florida trounced the Tigers in 1964,
20-6, at Baton Rouge.
Last season, the Gators won the game with a fourth
quarter score, 14-7. Revenge, plus conference glory,
will be emotional elements McClendon will draw on.
LSU has not won a national championship since
1958, and the days of journeyman coach Paul Diet Dietzel.
zel. Dietzel. The team has begun its drive, and now has the
quarterback necessary to challenge all comers, in including
cluding including the Gators.
LSU wants this game badly, wants to built up its
reputation, and wants to beat Florida.
The Gators must respond to this challenge.