Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Food Service
Serenade
Alan Victor, first prize winner in the
Freshman Talent Show, serenades diners
Wednesday night as University Food Service
presented its first candlelight dinner. Ac According
cording According to Food Service Director Robert
Overton, other motifs will be planned for
special meals, such as a western night,
complete with western music.

The Florida Alligator

V 01.59, No. 32

B&***<<**< f WI^P? '"
W?sfc 's* : m^+ **?.. m H

MRS. UF CONTESTANTS
First row (from left) Cheryl
Bledsoe, Patricia Glass, Johanna
Hudson, Lyn Mohr. Second row
(from left) Adyan Pipkin, Joan

Limit Use Os LSD
T o Therapy, Science

(All lights reserved by Uni University
versity University of Florida Law Re Review)
view) Review)
(In the second part of the
Alligators LSD series, au author
thor author Bob Rosborough explores
the legal consequences of LSD
use.)
By 808 ROSBOROUGH
Nonmedical experimentation
with LSD is highly concentrated
among the educated upper middle
class. It is they who suffer from
loss of identity and social discon discontent.
tent. discontent. Artists and scholars have
reflected this in their writings
about the quest for identity and
meaning, the decline of traditional
values and religion, and modern
mans deep sense of alienation.
It is not surprising that those who
suffer from a loss of meaning

PROFS DEBATE LSD USE
By JIM ME Y BAILEY
Alligator Staff Writer
A professor of religion and a professor of philosophy argued
the pros and cons of what has been termed this generations
marijuana LSD Wednesday night in University Auditorium.
. Dr. Thomas Hanna, chairman of the philosophy department
( SEE PROFS PAGE 2 )

would find the psychedetic exper experience
ience experience appealing.
They turn to LSD seeking some
unique creative experience that
will add meaningful purpose to
their lives.
Some hope to solve existing
conflicts while others take it out
of sheer curiosity. Nevertheless,
a com mom denominator is found

:*JP mi m Wi 'sw
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(Photo By Nick Arroyo)
' Shewbrooks, Georgia Goodling,
Carol Hall, Regina Carroll, Judy
Ledbetter, Katherin Kirk, Lana
Smith.

University of Florida

in the hope of discovering and ac activating
tivating activating personal aptitudes or po potentialities
tentialities potentialities which will enrich their
lives. It Is an exploration, an ad adventure,
venture, adventure, a trip. The goal is self selfgrowth,
growth, selfgrowth, enlightenment, a personal
renaissance.
Unfortunately the dissolution of
a personality that has been struc structured
tured structured to cope with the stresses
of life can, in some cases, prove
to be a nightmare. The upsurge
of repressed materials from the
subconscious may precipitate se severe
vere severe depression, psychosis and
even suicide. As possible post-
LSD psychosis cannot be reliably
determined with any degree of
predictive accuracy, most respon responsible
sible responsible authorities inveigh against
the unsupervised, self-adminis self-administered,
tered, self-administered, nonmedical use of LSD.
It should be absolutely under understood
stood understood that safe and effective work
with LSD (or other psychedelic
agents) presupposes specialized
training and experience. Yet
despite the warnings against non nonmedical
medical nonmedical use of psychedelics, the
practice will undoubtedly continue.
The seething push-pull at attraction
traction attraction of LSD has a magnetic
appeal. The promise of possible
reward outweighs for many the
inherent risks involved. As could
be expected the drugs popularity
has led to an alarming trend in
illicit use among young people.
(SEE CONTROLLED Page 3)

Graves Says
Wolfpack Cause
For Worry

I
By DICK DENNIS
Alligator Sports Editor
Does the nations eighth* ranked
_team have to worry about a game
against a team with a one and three
record?
Coach Ray Graves says yes.
North Carolina State mentor
Earle Edwards says don't carry
things too far.
Edwards wants to make it known
that this game is not States home homecoming
coming homecoming game. Graves doesnt
need that kind of propaganda. Our
dedication game (for new Carter
Stadium) was last week, and home homecoming
coming homecoming isnt until October 29.
On the other hand, Graves real realizes
izes realizes his team could be in for a
possible letdown. Earlier in the
week, Graves prodded his players,
sensing that they still remembered
last weekends battle royal with
FSU.
I believe the spirit and hustle
of the boys has picked up notice noticeably
ably noticeably in practice, Graves said
Thursday afternoon. The boys
are beginning to realize the type
of game they going to have to
play to whip a fired-up Wolfpack.
With rain predicted in Raleigh
Saturday, it will double the effort
needed to beat N. C. State, accord according
ing according to Graves.
Rain will' hurt the advantage
we have in speed and passing abi ability.
lity. ability. Os course, States strong
ground-gaining attack will be help helped,
ed, helped, and this is the part of our
defense that has given us the most
trouble so far this season. This
will mark the third straight road
trip for the Gators, who have a
chance to be 5-0 at a given time
for the first time since 1928, when
the team finished 8-1.
The series history is and old
but sporadic one. The first game
was played in 1927, and the Ga Gators
tors Gators hold a 6-3-1 edge overall.
The closest duel was in 1947, during
the Orange and Blues Golden
Era, when Florida prevailed, 7-6.
Revenge could be a motive Sat Saturday.
urday. Saturday. Last season, during Flor Florida's
ida's Florida's Homecoming, UF triumped
28-7. State didnt lose a game for
the rest of the season.
Many fans will recall Wolfpack
halfback Gary Howe, who rushed
for over 100 yards In lasi season's

Friday October 14, 1966

game. This year, Rowe is aver averaging
aging averaging 5.5 yards a carry, and has
caught 14 passes for 157 yards.
The workhorse of the ground groundgainers
gainers groundgainers is Don DeArment, who
leads the Atlantic Coast Confer Conference
ence Conference with 313 yards rushing. He
is the Wofpacks leading scorer with
24 points.
Two important Gators will be
missed Saturday. Sophomore Bill
Dorsey, a standout defensive guard
in the first three games, has come
down with an infection in an in injured
jured injured shoulder. Tailback Don
Knapp reinjured a chronic back.
Defensive back George Grandy,
who missed the FSU game, is back
at full speed. Soph Paige Cutcliffe
replaces George Dean at defensive
guard for Saturdays tilt.
United Has
Commitments
~ Johnson
By AGGIE FOWLES
Alligator Staff Writer
Six Legislative Council mem members
bers members have made definite commit commitments
ments commitments to affiliate with United Par Party,
ty, Party, according to Greg Johnson,
newly appointed United Party floor
leader.
Party affiliations will be declar declared
ed declared at the Council meeting Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday night. At this time United
Party will also officially elect its
floor leader.
At their first caucus United
Party assigned a plank of the
party platform to each member to
investigate, Johnson said. As a
result of this investigation, a bill
will be presented to the council
attempting to fulfill each plank,
he said.
United Party will definitely run
a full slate of candidates in the
spring elections, Johnson said.
We hope to clioose a pres- i
idential candidate when we have a
JOHNSON** IWGK



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Fridav. October 14,1966

Industrial Editors
Hold Conference
Hugh Sidey, White House re reporter
porter reporter for Time and Life for the
past 10 years, will headline the
third annual Industrial Editors*
Learning and Development Day
here today
Rae O. Weimer, director of the
School of Journalism and Com Communications,
munications, Communications, which sponsors the
tliree-day meeting, said Sidey has
agreed to discuss the thing he
knows best: Coverage of the White
House. He will speak at the meet meetings
ings meetings kick-off dinner.
Sorority Holds
Parents Weekend
Delta Phi Epsilon sorority will
hold its annual parents* weekend
this Friday and Saturday at the
Holiday Inn.

PROFS DEBATE LSD USE
( FROM PAGE 1 )
took the affirmative stand and Dr. Delton Scudder, chairman
of the religion department took the negative side.
Lysergic acid di-ethylamide-25 (LSD-25) was given a brief
description by Jack Zucker, chairman of the forums commit committee.
tee. committee. He described LSD as being colorless, odorless, and taste tasteless.
less. tasteless. He said LSD is not habit forming, but It distorts
time and place. One hundred thousand to one million people
have taken a trip(period of time under influence of LSD),**
said Zucker.
Hanna began his arguments by saying, We live in a psyche psychedelic
delic psychedelic (mind manifesting) world. It is an age in which large
numbers of people are turning away from traditional external
interests to a deeper internal study of man himself.
He continued, Users of psychedelic drugs are among the
most inteUectual. They take the drugs in an attempt to find
themselves. LSD is a fact and is readily available, especially
among college students.**
According to Hanna, a person must know all the facts con concerning
cerning concerning a trip, its effects, and results before its use is at attempted.
tempted. attempted.
One should not take a trip just for kicks. Ask yourself,
Do I need such a trip? Make sure you pass the six require requirements.
ments. requirements. If you qualify, take a trip, but this does not necessarily
make you a man, Hanna said.
Scudder, In rebuttal to Hanna said, LSD is said not to
have any after effects. This is questionable and false. It is
psycho- unpredictable.
Scudder said Congress passed a law in 1965 which forbids
the transport and sale of LSD across state boundaries.
It is unlawful to use this drug at this time, Scudder said.
It is immoral to take risks you cannot pay for and make a
mess of your life for others to have to clean up. By taking
LSD you just miss too much of real life, he said.
As for promoting creativeness, continued Scudder, this
is false. Einstein, St. Francis and many others didnt need it.
LSD just doesnt help.
Dr. Scudder closed by saying, LSD is the swindle of the
sixties, offering only a return to a form of barbarism and dis disappointment.
appointment. disappointment.
Johnson Says Has Commitments
(FROM PAGE 1)

convention, he said, but details
have not been worked out as yet.
We hope to have a dynamic
record which will make students
want to identify with the par party,
ty, party, Johnson said.
United party was not formed to
back a particular candidate, but to
make student government more re responsive
sponsive responsive to the students, he said.

Ite ru rtto mil IM Um right to rirt~T to* im* 1 ** 1 to** at *U Kwrtwwto ud
So vSraoiMculuujrTCC^tta*toMln*pototto* tollb*dmta*am poutbU.
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gnghtaal amn at nu*i* toMilto* tow atoto* la ***** to toa Ahvorttoto* Maaacar totoU
(1) om oar aftor tourtlnato **nn. immmat taatoto* at aa iJmlliiato
" rn 'rLOhIDA*ALUGAIT)R *la*to* ointo*l totoato *a*a*a**raf to* Otomtoty north* atoto
toOM torn to**tolr *ltort* Mar,Mm,aatf Jtojr*** Hl*pttttoaha*t-**toir. Oato
mniri- to* attotol *tow* totoato a*toira. Th* AMtotoar to atoar*< a* aa*d toa*a
at m a* WtolU mmtt H*oto to onaiatolla

" riMKTpB PLOT j HARW.Y, ROOIKJ/ GUESS
,T VWV? I WOULD BE A VIOLATION j 1 MUST
mm Ss. (UP THE THUGS, LET'S HAVE A TALK : 1 PRESUME ?/ TQ ME£T fl* M OGGP TROUBLB,AjAR LIP//

By having the students identify
with the ideals of the party in instead
stead instead of a particular candidate,
United hopes to have a party that
will last longer than just one year,
Johnson said.
The prime aim of the party is
to make student government work,
he said.

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Page 3

,Tho Florida Alligator, Friday, October 14, 19GG

Hie Florida Alligator
Ii Chu
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR DICK DENNIS
Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecessaniy reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is the editorial in the left
column.
\
'Master Plot
The element that sees a Red behind
every tree is once again making its
presence felt.
This time it has spied a conspiracy to
overturn the entire University system.
Someone is actually going to It y to change
the name of the yearbook.
It doesnt matter that the present name
Seminole has been out of date ever since
Florida State began playing football. This
is a time-honored tradition and nobody
goes around conspiring to change that.
One of the more influential groups in the
discovery was as anyone might have
guessed the Legislative Council. That
astute body passed a resolution that no
funds be given to any yearbook but the
Seminole. The Council didnt even con consider
sider consider that the Board of Student Publi Publications
cations Publications had already unanimously approved
a contest to change the name.
Others among the discoverers have
decided that this is some titanic struggle
to change things. After all, the student
number change just took place. We cant
afford to lose ANOTHER tradition.
For the information of all, Seminole
Editor Nel Laughon has worked on that
publication in an editorial position for
three years now. She has heard the
comments of students from every part
of the University on it. It was not without
careful thought that she brought the request
for name change to the BSP.
And the response has been good. More
than 200 entries have already been re received.
ceived. received.
/
In fact, if you judge by the response,
maybe the majority of the students WANT
to see the name changed.
But, then again, maybe theyre all
Reds.
Ripon Republicanism
The Ripon Society, the shining light
in the Republican Party, has taken a
stride forward one that may become
noticeable by the time of the 1968 presi presidential
dential presidential nominations.
Ripon which professes a progressive
doctrine has asked the party to seek
support from the followers of former
President Kennedy.
The obvious motive is to bring into
the Republican fold all those liberals who
dont like the Johnson image.
By doing so, Ripon might add some
strength to its faction of Republicanism
and thus prevent another catastrophe such
as 1964.
Ripon will be backing either Gov. George
Romney or New York Mayor John Lindsay
for president in 6B. Either of these men
would appear to be more acceptable to the
Kennedy supporters than President
Johnson.

RETROSPECTIVELY YOURS
- r ~ - -

Oh, Excuse Me! You Say You're Buddhist
Anti-American, Not Viet Cong Anti-American'*

Its a terrible thing, said
the Kindly Old Philosopher,
shaking his kindly old head. To
think the President himself would
be caught practicing nepotism in
private with his own son-in-law.
He what?
The newspaper, said the
Kindly Old Philosopher sadly,
says right here where that fine
lad, Pat Nugent, got a job with
that Johnson tee-vee station down
in Texas.
Oh, the Republicans are going
to make hay with this one. Prac Practicing
ticing Practicing nepotism in private! Its got
a sinister ring to it, all right.
If the President wants to practice
nepotism, he ought to do it in
public, like any honest, above aboveboard
board aboveboard politician would.
He could've just said, Son, I
think of you as a brother. So
I'm making you Attorney Gen General
eral General Folks would've understood
that.
* *
Wait a minute. What's so wrong
with the practice of nepotism in
private industry?
That shows you don't know a
thing about it, said the Kindly
Old Philosopher. Now in the old
days, you got a job without a lot
of nonsense. The President of a
firm would stare the applicant
square in the eye and say, Young
man, you got looks, breeding, a
good name and a fine family. Howd
you like to be vice president.'
The boy says humbly, Thanks,
Dad. And it's all smooth sailing.
But today, what does the lad
face? He faces Personnel. I see
by your rap sheet that you're a
grammar school drop-out, says
Personnel.
Give me a chance, pleads
the boy. After all, no job is too
menial for the son of the Chairman
of the Board.'
Youre hired, says Person Personnel.
nel. Personnel. Of course, to show no
favoritism, well start you at the
bottom so you can learn the busi business
ness business from the ground up.
So he starts as an office boy,
eager to learn the way modern
businesses are run. Hey, there,
get me a ham on rye, shouts
his boss. And make it snappy.
If you dont mind, please, sir. :
And all his fellow workers

Bring On The Lottery

Our Man Hoppe

By ART HOPPE
Alligator Columnist

smile at him politely. And shun
him like the plague. But he works
hard, does his best and, sure
enough, he gets a raise.
*1 am happy to inform you we
are doubling your salary in view
of the excellent record you have
compiled thus far,* says the boss.
And I hope you do even better
on your second day with the firm.*
So he fights his way up through
the ranks to the very top. In about
six weeks. But by that time his
nerves are shattered, his con confidence
fidence confidence is gone and he thinks the
companys being run by a bunch of
nuts.
No, sir, private nepotism is a
terrible thing for any lad to
go these days. And I say they
shouldve made that poor Nugent
lad Attorney General instead.*
* Hi
I said he was being unfair. Mr.
Nugent could easily get a job with without
out without any help.
Youre right there, agreed
the Kindly Old Philosopher. I*d
hire him myself. Hes a fine,
decent, bright-looking young man.
What's more, he's already proved
himself by meeting up with one of
lifes big challenges. And he did
mighty well.
Oh? What challenge was that?
The Kindly Old Philosophers
eyes took or a kindly old twinkle.
Getting married, he said.

Florida Alligator Staff
KICK ARROYO CAROL HEFNER GENE NAIL
Photo Editor Society Editor Editorial Assistant
JO ANN LANGWORTHY NEWT SIMMONS
General Assignment Editor Wire Editor
STAFF WRITERS -- Bob Beck, Sue Froemke, Barbara Gefen,
Maury Olicker, Kathie Keim, Jean Maml* Frank Shepherd, Aggie
Fowles, Justine Hartman.
ASSISTANT EDITORS Judy Redfern, Sherrie Braswell, Toni
Giliberti, Joe Torchia, Nick Tatro, Tyler Tucker, John Briggs,
KenGarst, Margie Green.
In order to better campus events the Alligator uses
reporters from the School of Journalism and Communications.
f Their bylines are followed by Alligator Correspondent.

By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Editorial Editor
The fusion between Bob High
and Scott Kelly is now complete.
And you can sure tell it by the
new High billboards going up
around the state.
They stick to
the old High slo slogan
gan slogan in big blue
letters with
The issue is
ALWAYS in- JM
tegrity. But the rj||^
signs are even I4L **
more akin to the lllllk.
old Scott Kelly
markers of the MOOR
spring primary.
High is pictured with all six of
his kids walking toward the on onlooker.
looker. onlooker. Kellys spring signs
showed him walking in the same
direction with two children ex except
cept except they werent his own.
The symbol of Kellys takeover
of much of the High organization
would be apparent except for one
thing. It would be preposterous
to put up a Bob High stands
Tall sign. High is a mere 5-
foot-6.
* *
Meanwhile, the states own self selfappointed
appointed selfappointed savior, Claude Kirk, is
accusing High of a tax-tax, spend spendspend
spend spendspend policy of running the state.
Kirks program as spelled out
in his White Papers, would use
revenues for the improvement of
schools and roads. You know 01
Claude wouldnt pull any of this
taxation bit.
Kirk is having trouble selling
his line to most urbanites and,
If you believe in Joe Abrams
Political Survey and Poll, he has
lost five per cent in the last month.
Highs lead in projected figures
is 88,000 votes about the same
figure he downed Ol Slick by in
May.
* *
One other interesting result of
Abrams poll has it that 72 per
cent of the people favor a state
sweepstakes. This is somewhat
surprising due to the expected
opposition in North and West
Florida.
But maybe the people have just
given up since theyve lost control
of the Legislature. Or maybe
theyre far-sighted enough to see
that Kirk will have to get his
money from SOMEWHERE.
After all, Claude couldnt go
back on his word about, taxation.
That would be deceiving the people.



Page 4

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 14,1966

. iV.v*?fK K^v;*J K l : |'XV.v.v
f /^^>N FROM THE |
\ VS22V WIRES OF /
* *
* *
*
International
ATTACKS PEKING POLICY...MOSCOW...Soviet Premier Alexei Kos Kosygin
ygin Kosygin niursday accused Red China of aiding the U.S. cause in Viet
Nam by blocking a united Communist front in the war. It was his
most bitter attack yet on Peking policy.
Had American imperialism encountered the joint rebuff of all
countries of socialism, and their united policy, a quick end would
doubtless have been put to American outrages in Viet Nam, and the
aggression cut short, Kosygin declared.
Kosygin said Communist Chinas position inflicts increasing dam damage
age damage to the interests of the Vietnamese people and of world social socialism.
ism. socialism.
He also confirmed that troops of the Hanoi regime were being
trained in Russia.
DESTROYS COMPLEX...SAIGON...U.S. 852 bombers and jet fighters
struck Communist forces in the demilitarized zone DMZ Thursday
while the heavy cruiser U.S.S. St. Paul shelled the area from off offshore.
shore. offshore. Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara toured close to the
scene. They wrecked oil storage units, blew up four Soviet-built
surface-to-air missiles SAMs and destroyed a vast underground
storage complex.
American military spokesmen in Saigon disclosed that 91 Amer Americans
icans Americans were killed in action in the week ended Oct. 8, eight fewer than
the previous week. They reported 1,471 Communist troops killed
last week, highest Red toll in almost two months.
NOBEL PRIZE...STOCKHOLM...Two American cancer researchers
Thursday were named winners of the 1966 Nobel Prize for medicine
or physiology. They are Prof. Francis Peyton Rous of Rockefeller
University York and Prof. Charles B. Huggins of the University
of Chicago.
Rous, 87, the grand old man of cancer research who discover discovered
ed discovered 55 years ago that the disease could be possibly induced by a virus,
has dedicated his life to virological research.
Huggins, 65, is known as the father of modern treatment methods
which use chemicals and hormones to combat the disease.
National
LANDMARK DECISION...NEW YORK...The U. S. Court of Appeals,
in a landmark decision, Thursday upheld the constitutionality of
the federal law prohibiting the burning of draft cards.
The unanimous decision rejected an appeal by David J. Miller,
24, of Syracuse, N.Y., who was the first man convicted and sentenced
for burning his draft card.
He contended that the burning of the card was a symbolic protest
against the draft, against UJS. military action in Viet Nam and against
the law forbidding draft-card burning.
G. E. STRIKE...WASHINGTON...Cabinet-level mediators, with time
working against them, met Thursday with top union and company
officials in an effort to head off a strike Monday by 120,000 General
Electric workers.
Their chances of success appeared dim.
With the 11 unions vowing to walk out at GE plants throughout the
nation at 12:01 a.m. Monday unless agreement is reached, the ad administration
ministration administration must decide quickly whether to invoke the Taft-Hart Taft-Hartley
ley Taft-Hartley Act or risk a strike.
Hie Pentagon has warned that the war effort would be damaged
if a strike of any length occurs at vital GE defense plants. The com company
pany company is the sole producer of certain types of aircraft engines used
in Viet Nam, and also is a major producer of weapons.
CHRISTMAS-TREE BILL...WASHINGTON...The Senate today approved
58 to 18 a Christmas tree bill to provide election year gifts for
doctors, lawyers, the elderly and dollar-short presidential candidates.
One major amendment would permit taxpayers to allocate $1
from their income tax returns for a federally controlled presidential
election campaign fund.
Sponsored by Chairman Russell B. Long, D-La., of the Senate
Finance Committee, the novel approach to financing presidential
campaigns would provide the major parties with a maximum of
$35 million each in 1968.
Florida
MORTAL BLOW...TALLAHASSEE...State Attorney Paul Antinorl told
the Florida Supreme Court today that creation of a new phosphate
port at Piney Point in Manatee County would strike a mortal blow
to the economy of Tampa.
Antinorl, asked the high court to refuse to validate $18.5 million
in bonds to finance construction of port facilities.
Antinorl said creation of the new port would take 90 per cent of
the phosphate shipping business away from the Port of Tampa.
But Richard Hampton, Manatee County attorney, said there was
nothing to show that Tampa would become a ghost town by creation
of the new port.
ENDORSES HIGH...MIAMI...The Miami News today endorsed De Democrat
mocrat Democrat Robert King High for governor in its early afternoon edition.
Hie Republican candidate Claude Kirk has no experience as an
elected official. He has not been really specific about what he intends
to do should he become governor. We dont know what he thinks about
the various state issues, even after a conversation with him just
this week, 1 the News editorial said.

KNOCK OFF COOL MILLION

Gang Busts Airport

By JAMES COSGROVE
United Press International
MONTREAL (UPI) Thieves
stole an estimated $1 million in
cash from a postal building at
Dorval International Airport ear early
ly early Thursday in a heist so silent
that employes in the next room
were unaware of the robbery.
As overnight postal workers took
their lunch break next door, the
fast-working gang cut through a
heavy mesh screen, seized 15
heavy mailbags, loaded them on
a waiting truck and drove off in
the pre-dawn darkness.
The robbery was not discov discovered
ered discovered for an hour, police said.
Postal officials began a compli complicated
cated complicated check to determine exactly
how much money was stolen.
Quebec provincial police esti estimated
mated estimated the loot at around $1
million, but a postal spokes spokesman
man spokesman said it wiU be a while be before
fore before were certain of the exact
amount.
Squads of detectives from the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
(RCMP), the Quebec provincial
force, postal service and Dorval
police converged on the postal
building about a mile from the
main passenger terminal.
While crime laboratory men
combed the postal building for fin fingerprints
gerprints fingerprints and other clues, the
RCMP threw up roadblocks and
checked all cars at roads lead leading
ing leading from the airports.
The 35 men at work in the
building when the thieves struck
at 4 a.m. EDT were questioned
HURRY
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closely but all apparently had been
unaware of the robbery.
No one ever heard them,
an airport policeman said. It
was a real quiet break-in.
The thieves worked with a pre precision
cision precision and daring that recalled the
$1,551,277 Plymouth, Mass., mail
truck robbery, the largest cash
holdup in the United States. No
arrests have ever been made in
that robbery, staged Aug. 14,1962.
The men responsible for both
the earlier $1,219,000 Brinks rob-

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bery in Boston and the $7 mil.
lion Great Train Robbery in
England in 1963 eventually were
arrested but the loot was never
recovered in either case.
May Rue It
WASHINGTON (UPI) Oh,
those aching teeth!
Thats one reaction to a re report
port report from the U.S. Childrens
Bureau. The report says about
half s the U.S. child population
under 15 never has been to a
dentist.



BETTER FOR ACADEMIC RECRUITING

Tigert Favors Switch To Quarter System

By FRANK SHEPHERD
Alligator Staff Writer
UF administrators generally are
in favor of the switch from the
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Want to change
the world?
Join the Peace Corps... or join General Electric

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Lets face it, the Peace Corps isnt
for everybody. (Neither is medicine,
law or social work.) But you can get
a lot of the same kind of satisfaction
from a job with General Electric.
Because we, too, are trying to i
make life on earth more livable. 1
That can mean a job designing a
new satellite to forecast weather. Or <

trimester to the quarter system
next September.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz
commented that the real signi significance
ficance significance of the quarter system is
to get us back into the academic
stream in the field of faculty con contracts.
tracts. contracts. This is very meaningful
in the academic world, Reitz
said.
Under the quarter system,
three quarters will approximate
two semesters. The similarities in
the calendar will assist in recruit recruiting
ing recruiting faculty, nils is very impor important,
tant, important, Reitz said, noting this was
only one consideration and exclud excluded
ed excluded the intellectual and ratrace
questions.
UF Vice-President Frederick
Conner, commented that although
he has never worked under
the quarter system, the quarter is

Progress Is Our Most Important Product
GENERAL# ELECTRIC

supplying nuclear reactors to gen generate
erate generate electricity more cheaply than
ever before. Or controlling smog in
ourcitiesand pollution in our streams.
It can mean better lighting to cut
down crime. It can mean new rapid rapidtransit
transit rapidtransit systems to unclog traffic.
All it takes is brains, imagination,
drive and a fairly rugged constitu constitution.

more satisfactory from what he has
heard.
The trimester tried to cov cover
er cover semesters work in a period
which was not as long as a se semester,
mester, semester, and it is my understand understanding
ing understanding that the proportioning of things
will relieve the pressure, Conner
said.
Dean of Student Affairs Les Lester
ter Lester L. Hale predicted success for
the quarter system at UF.
It has been successful at var various
ious various other schools, and I see no
reason why it cant be successful
at UF, Hale said.
Os course there will be prob problems
lems problems in making the adjustment,
but I am sure that we can do it,
Hale said.
He predicted less difficulty going
from the trimester to the quarter
than from the semester to the tri trimester,

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Bp H
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jb
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life.
life 3

tion. constitution. These qualities can get you a
job with General Electric or with
the Peace Corps.
If you choose the Peace Corps,
well understand. But when the day
comes that you leave the Corps, re remember
member remember us. Youll still be young, and
at General Electric, the young men
are important men.

mester, trimester, because we have already
broken away from the more lei leisurely
surely leisurely pace of the semester.
Courses will be more speci specifically
fically specifically designed for the quarter
whereas the trimester was more
like a bobtail semester, Hale
said. Courses will be redesigned
to more effectively comformtothe
quarter concept.
Dean of Men Frank T. Adams
predicted the quarter system will
not be much different from the se semester
mester semester system in the aggregate.
The time between classes dur during
ing during Christmas will be the same,
atad classes will begin at about
the same time as a semester would
begin, he said.
There will also be a reduced
final exam system. There are two
weeks of finals under the semester
plan, and there will be only five

Friday, October 14, 1966, Hie Florida Alligator,

days under uie quarter system.
One problem UF will have,
Adams said, is the moving of
some people into dormitories be before
fore before others move out because of
the overlap of finals and the be beginning
ginning beginning of terms in some quart quarters.
ers. quarters.
Personally, I like starting later
in September. Everyone has had
a negative attitude toward staring
early, Adams said.
It will also make it mandatory
for a revamp of orientation.
There will not be as much time,
so it will be a more substantial
orientation.
However, I don't think we will
be any more rushed under the
quarter than we are under the tri trimester
mester trimester system, Adams con concluded.
cluded. concluded.
Archeology
Conference
Set Here
The spread of early cultures in
North and South America will be
the principal subject of an invi invitational
tational invitational conference on prehistoric
archeology at the Florida State
Museum next Monday through Sat Saturday.
urday. Saturday.
Fifteen regional chronologies
will be studied by the participating
archeologists whose research
played a major part in determin determining
ing determining the earliest chronological
spread of Neolithic-level culture
through the Americas.
Hosts for the conference are Dr.
James Ford and* Ripley Bullen
of the Florida State Museum. Hie
conference is sponsored by the
Wenner-Gren Foundation for An Anthropological
thropological Anthropological Research of New
York.

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Its the latest hang-up. The psy psychadellc
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The current issue of The Sat Saturday
urday Saturday Evening Post takes you
on the rounds of New Yorks
total-environment night nightclubs.
clubs. nightclubs. Experience the frantic
kaleidoscope of flashing lights,
movies, slides, colored smoke
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Page 5



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Controlled Use
Uraed For LSD

While the interest in some cases
is academic, a great number of
youthful takers are simply look looking
ing looking for kicks something ex extraordinarily
traordinarily extraordinarily exciting. Govern Government
ment Government officials have viewed this
trend with a jaundiced eye. Ac Accordingly,
cordingly, Accordingly, steps are being taken
to control the psychedelic move movement.
ment. movement.
As the LSD eruption was con concurrent
current concurrent with federal efforts to
tighten existing legislative con controls
trols controls over depressant and stimu stimulant
lant stimulant drugs, Congress engrafted
hallucinogens into the Drug Abuse
Control Amendments of 1965.
The purpose of this act is to
stifle the rampant pill epidemic
in which Americans each year
swallow nearly 13 billion doses of
potentially injurious barbiturates,
amphetamines, and tranquili tranquilizers
zers tranquilizers over half of which are dis distributed
tributed distributed through illicit channels.
While in some respects the
psychedelic movement presents
a different problem, it does in involve
volve involve the nonmedical use of drugs.
For this reason Congress deemed
it expedient to write hallucino hallucinogens
gens hallucinogens into its new law.
Under the provisions of the bill,
depressant and stimulant drugs are
defined to include barbiturates,
amphetamines or any drug that
has a potential for abuse be because
cause because of its depressant or
stimulant effect on the central ner nervous
vous nervous system or its hallucinogenic
effect.
The regulation of these drugs
is authorized regardless of
whether they move in interstate
or intrastate traffic. The bill pro prohibits
hibits prohibits the manufacture, the sale,
or the disposal of depressant and
stimulant drugs except by per persons
sons persons expressly authorized. Addi Additional
tional Additional penalties are prescribed for
adults convicted of illegally sell selling
ing selling such drugs to minors.
Furthermore, unauthorized pos possession
session possession of depressant and stimu stimulant
lant stimulant drugs is prohibited ex except
cept except when the drugs are held for
use by the possessor, his household
or some animal owned by him.
The burden of proof that posses possession
sion possession did not fall within the listed
exceptions was laid to the govern government.
ment. government. Os those persons authori authorized
zed authorized to handle LSD, excepting li licensed
censed licensed practitioners, the bill re requires
quires requires that complete records of
drug stocks be compiled and held
for possible government inspec inspection
tion inspection up to a period of three years.
Finally; the act authorizes Drug
Abuse Control officers to carry
firearms, to execute and serve
search and arrest warrants, to
make arrests without a warrant
on probable cause, and to seize
contraband.
On January 18, 1966, the Food
and Drug Commissioner proposed
17 new drugs for specific con control
trol control under the 1965 Amendments.
Six of the 17 were hallucinogens
-- DMT (dimethyltryptamine),
LSD-25, mescaline and its salts
peyote, psilocybin, and psilocyn*.
On March 19, 1966, these drugs
were formally incorporated under
the umbrella of Drug Abuse Con Control
trol Control laws. Two months later in
May, the Food and Drug Com Comm
m Comm issioner followed through by add adding
ing adding lysergic acid to the list in
an attempt to dry up the sour sources
ces sources of this essential component
Ox LSD.
A number of citizens wrote the
Food and Drug Commissioner
questioning the inclusion of hall-'
ucmogenic drugs under the don dontrol
trol dontrol provisions of the 1965 Amend Amendments.
ments. Amendments.

Friday, Octeber 14, a, he Florida Alligator.

(FROM PAGE 1)

Generally, three objections were
voiced: Congress did not have the
authority to control psychedelic
agents.
There was insufficient proof of
actual danger to public safety
to justify control of psychedelic
agents.
The Food and Drug Adminis Administration
tration Administration had not laid down stan standards
dards standards for determining who was
an appropriate research inves investigator
tigator investigator of hallucinogenic drugs.
In each instance the objection
was summarily rejected for fail failing
ing failing to present adequate grounds
for a hearing on the matter. An
exception was made, however, for
peyote. TTie law was not to ap apply
ply apply to its non-drug use in bona
fide religious ceremonies of the
Native American Church. Never Nevertheless,
theless, Nevertheless, persons supplying peyote
to the church were directed to
register and maintain appropriate
records of receipts and disburse disbursements
ments disbursements of the article.
Prosecution of the revised drug
laws has been delegated to 300
freshly trained investigators who
operate out of nine Drug Abuse
Control Bureaus across the na nation.
tion. nation. Execution of the law marks
a culmination of twenty-five years
of exhaustive inquiry into non nonnarcotic
narcotic nonnarcotic drug abuse, a problem
that has been the perennial topic
of congressional debate and White
House conferences under the last
four Presidents.
The 1965 amendments are only
the beginning of what appears to
be a national campaign against
drug abuse.
The President has indicated that
he expects to double the current
Drug Abuse Control budget of $3
million dollars in 1967.
In addition the federal govern government
ment government has selected six states (Flor (Florida,
ida, (Florida, California, Georgia, New Jer Jersey,
sey, Jersey, New York and Texas) to
serve as proving grounds for the
new drug laws. Tbe Food and
Drug Administration will pilot the
program of state enforcement by'
providing funds and instructors
for the training of local investi investigators
gators investigators from their respective state
boards of health and pharmacy.
On the completion of training,
the states will assume the res responsibility
ponsibility responsibility for enforcing drug
abuse control laws. If success successful,
ful, successful, the decentralized program of
enforcement will be extended to
other states.
Developing, then, is a pyramid
of criminal sanctions which auth authorities
orities authorities hope will deter individuals
from experimenting with psyche psychedelic
delic psychedelic drugs for nonmedical pur purposes.
poses. purposes. Though the number of states
to legislate against LSD is small,
their propensity to employ pro prohibitive
hibitive prohibitive tactics sets a disturbing
precedent.
LSD has been branded as an
illegal drug. Before the scope
of the psychedelic problem has
even been determined, LSD is hav having
ing having to bear the brunt of mush mushrooming
rooming mushrooming controls while trying to
prove itself.
It is as if in fear of allowing
another thalidomide, author authorities
ities authorities have embarked on a course of
controls which will lead to a
second marijuana. 1 11 the
name of public safety lawmakers
have elected prohibition over tol toleration
eration toleration at the expense of crea creating
ting creating another deviant subculture.
If society is to derive full bene- 1
fit from future drugs, it must
avoid attaching social stigma to
drugs of promise. Inoffensive use
of drugs for nonmedical purposes
needs to be recognized.

Page 6



Graeffes
Really
All Right
DEAR YOUR STUDENT:
We feel compelled to make some
comment concerning the severe
criticism of Dr. Graeffes per performance.
formance. performance. Obviously, we are to
infer from your comments that
you are omnicient in the field of
music.
You did not, however, state your
qualifications or the basis on which
your judgments were made. What
you are forgetting is that the un untrained
trained untrained ear does not recognize
the possible technical errors.
Secondly, the outstanding feature
of Dr. Graeffes performance was
his establishment of a personal
contact with the average listener.
As a lecturer, he provided an
excellent audio-visual aid to the
student. This technique inspires
interest, preserves attention, and
encourages the student to supple supplement
ment supplement these introductory selec selections.
tions. selections. In our opinion, neither a
tape recorder or a proficient stu student
dent student could have accomplished these
things.
Finally, your emotional out outbursts
bursts outbursts were completely uncalled
for. You have defined Dr. Graeffes
actions by your own preconceived
ideas rather than letting Dr.
Graeffes actions stand alone.
TWO OTHER STUDENTS

$34 May Not Be Bad

MR. MORRIS:
Your article One Life equals
$34 apparently begins to raise
an interesting issue concerning
whether there has been a change
in particular values as a result
of the Vietnamese War. But you
say there has been a change of
values, and arrive at your
decisions by rather insane rea reasoning.
soning. reasoning.
You say the war is accelerating
degeneration of our conception
of human life. Is it? Somewhere
you found some source indicating
the U.S. has paid an average of
$34 to survivors of Vietnamese
peasants mistakenly killed by mis misdirected
directed misdirected air attacks. Then you
call this a pitiful display of
benevolence. But you dont stop
there. You even compare the human
life to the value of a rubber tree!
How ridiculous can you get.
Would you feel better if the
survivors were paid $3,000,000?
You seem to be placing a mone monetary
tary monetary value on human life yourself.
You are also trying to infer
something from statistical figures,
loaded with complex variables, and
treating your result as a sound
basis for your conclusion. If your
sense of values will allow the
comparing of life to money, have
you considered that $34 may be a
sizable sum to a Vietnamese pea peasant?
sant? peasant?
Are you really convinced that
draft-card burners are students
of Vietnamese affairs? Who are
we to say whether a card burner
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AMf' mi i min iiml r 111 mu mm m 1 n gonna MARK A^
KIN6riSH*HIGH OR] NO DEMOCRABS 1 "WRITE IN* BALLOT 1

EDITOR:
It is interesting to know that
the powers that be in Tigert Hall
have granted its subjects what is
supposed to be the First Amend Amendment.
ment. Amendment. (See Alligator, Oct. 7th,
First Amendment Policy Issued by
UF.) I emphasize the phrasesup phrasesupposed
posed phrasesupposed to be because in reality
what the Deans in Tigert are trying
to put over is closely related to
double think, namely that in a
successful manipulation of the
mind (such as the Deans are trying
to accomplish) the student is led
to believe the opposite of what is
reality, he is led to think the
opposite of what is true. Thus the
content of the First Amendment is
reversed into 9 its opposite, and yet
students are led to believe that the
ideology means what it says.
For example, under the First
Amendment, according to Tigert
Hall bureaucrats, Free Speech is
NOT challenging the existing regu-

is truly accepting in his mind that
he is facing severe penalties?
Some may very well be cowards.
Is accepting imprisonment a
heroic way to make his views
known?
Has anyone ever referred to a
reservist who enlists in order
to avoid the war (if that is pos possible)
sible) possible) as a true heroic
American?
Your article only tends to indi indicate
cate indicate that one of the casualties of
this war is the prevalence of such
distorted articles as yours.
SKIP FOWLER, ILW
CLARK WHEELER, ILW

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Tigert Officials And Doublethink

lation or authority which implies
that the First Amendment is sub subject
ject subject to all laws and regulations of
the university. Since existing uni university
versity university rules are for the most
part anti-libertarian, the content
of the First Amendment, if sub subjected
jected subjected to all laws and regulations
of the university, is invalidated.
But the wording of the First
Amendment remains the same.
Thus two plus two is five or
Slavery is Freedom.
Just who do they think they are!
Since when do university presi presidents
dents presidents and deans run around assum assuming
ing assuming the responsibilities of inter interpreting
preting interpreting the Constitution of the
United States and subjecting it to
university rules? Since when does
the university regulation and law
become more important than con constitutional
stitutional constitutional law?
I think it might be interesting
to take a look at the university
rules and regulations that, accord according
ing according to the powers to be in Tigert
Hall, supersede the laws and regu regulations
lations regulations granted to us under the
Constitution of the United States.
Students shall not be dis disrespectful
respectful disrespectful to a faculty, person an
officer of the University or some
- - -other Deity, pg. 13,
University Handbook.
Sales that pertain to advocating
ones beliefs are prohibited ex except
cept except by special permission of Dean
Hale which means that this one
has set himself up as the Campus
Censor.
Communists and any other po potential
tential potential campus speakers who do not
hold degrees from accredited
institutions are flatly prohibited
from speaking on campus. (I
believe President Reitz is respon responsible
sible responsible for this part of our NEW
First Amendment.)
And the list of these anti antilibertarian
libertarian antilibertarian regulations goes on
and on.

Friday, October 14, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

In reality the powers that be in
Tigert Hall have actually defiled
the United States Constitution by
subjecting it to university rules and
are, therefore, trying to limit its
effectiveness. In doing so, J. Wayne
and the boys have put themselves
in a position of defying a duly dulyconstituted
constituted dulyconstituted authority. And instead
of having a Supreme Court in
Washington, we now have one in
Tigert Hall.
If Berkeley style disturbances
do arise over this process of des destroying
troying destroying our Constitution and trying
to limit our Free Speech, it wont

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be due to supposed red trouble troublemakers,
makers, troublemakers, forlorn crackpots, and
lumpen-beatniks who supposedly
want nothing but a Caracas-style
university; but, Instead, it will be
due to the lack of responsibility
that is inherent in what the ex extremist
tremist extremist element in Tigert Hall
Is trying to do to the First Amend Amendment
ment Amendment of our Constitution.
I feel that I speak for quite a
few students when I say in the
words of Patrick Henry, Give me
Liberty or Give me Death."
JOEL STARKEY, 3BA

Page 7



Page 8

By CAROL HEFNER
Alligator Society Editor
(EDITORS NOTE: Gator groups
submitting information should
DATE their material and put it
IN the top drawer of the society
editors desk, not on top or in
an Alligator staff members hand.
This will prevent lost copy. Re Remember
member Remember deadline is Monday.)
GREEK COUNCIL
The Greek council has voted to
start a rotational service trophy
for the sorority contributing the
most service to the campus, com community
munity community and nation during the year.
This trophy will be award along
with the Klein H. Graham Memor Memorial
ial Memorial trophy which goes to the most
deserving fraternity.
The trophy has not been given
a name yet, but the council said
it will be named after a female
alumna or faculty member.
Other actions at the organ organizational
izational organizational meeting last Thursday
included the addition of the World
University Service to the councils
standing committees. A chair chairman
man chairman for WSO and the other three
standing committees (speakers
bureau, service committee, and
religious awareness committee)
will be elected at the next meet meeting.
ing. meeting. The second and last Tuesday
of each month were designated as
meeting dates.
KAPPA DELTA
Over a hundred faculty mem members,
bers, members, housemothers and sorority
and fraternity representatives at attended
tended attended the reception in honor
of Dean Betty Cosby at the KD
house last Thursday.
In social events this week the
KDs hit a double header with a
law school social Thursday night
and a PKA social Friday.
Added to the log of KDs on
campus this week are several or organizational
ganizational organizational memberships. Carol
Hazelwood, Jimmye Prescott and
Bobbie War lick became DTD little
sisters, and Cheryl Weihl and
Debbie Mochelle, PKP little sis sisters.
ters. sisters. Tina Lindbergh, Sharon Lynn
and Jimmye Prescott were named
Army sweethearts.
DELTA TAU DELTA
The Delts have tapped 15 girls
is founding sisters of their lo local
cal local and national Sisters of the Iris.
The girls tapped *just last Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday have already shown them themselves
selves themselves to be an asset to the frat fraternity,
ernity, fraternity, according to the Delt
press officer.
They have helped in the making
costumes for our Growl skit,
lelped refurnish our living room
md just added the sparkle to
:he Delt house that has long been
missing.
After two weeks of pledgeship
:he sisters will be initiated Oct October
ober October 20.
The sisters will serve the Delts
lomecoming banquet honoring
Justice Tom C. Clark, president
)f the national DTD chapter.
The Delts recently initiated fif fifeen
een fifeen brothers into the chapter.
\RNOLD AIR SOCIETY
The United Fund drive is well
mderway thanks to the Arnold
Mr Society pledge.
At the request of Lt. Col. Ka Kamon
mon Kamon Waldrop, USAF (lo t.), exo exocutive

A

l, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 14, 1966

Gator Groups Gathsr Awards

cutive exocutive director of the drive, the
pledges stuffed envelopes, counted
out thousands of bulletins for dis distribution
tribution distribution to Gainesville city
churches and placed 200 United
Fund posters in store windows
of local merchants.
ALPHA EPSILON PHI
This is the weekend that the
AEPhis roll out the red carpet
to their parents.
Parents are coming from as far
south as Miami Beach and from
as for north as Connecticut.
And it isnt likely that they will
be disappointed. Activities begin
Friday night with an open house
and continue until Sunday morning
at a brunch.
Honors coming to the AEPhis
this week are Susan Kalin named
ROTC sweetheart, Judy Marx
selected for the second year to

ALLIGATOR
SOCIETY

head the Gainesville Tutorial
Program and Babs Smith chosen
for part of Gator Growl.
Activities in the house this
week include several girls serv serving
ing serving as campus representatives for
the Peace Corps, informal pledg pledging
ing pledging of Debbie Spritzman, Edysse
Hirschbeim, Barbara Landers and
Nikki Nedbor, and the election
of pledge class officers. Ronna
Goldstein was elected president;
Jean Mamlin, Vice president;
Barbara Leavitt, secretary; Ar Arlene
lene Arlene Margolis, treasurer, and
Nikki Nedbor, parliamentarian.
TAU EPSILON PHI
The Teps were busy this week weekend
end weekend receiving I.F.C. recognitions,
initiating their annual service pro program
gram program and doing some civic work.
Split in three groups the brothers
at the I.F.C. retreat saw Steven
Bronis awarded one of the coun councils
cils councils five scholarships and Bill
Lichter elected district repre representative
sentative representative of fraternity road.
At the Sheriffs Boys Ranch in
Live Oak the TEPs planted grass
and played with the boys.
Back in Gainesville other mem members
bers members were busy changing the
grounds of the Jewish Community
Center from scorpion infested
weeds to a well landscaped lawn.
KAPPA ALPHA THETA
The kite fliers seen on Norman
field Tuesday were KAT neophyte.
As the sorority ushers in new
sisters they are also announcing
their new pledges: Lesley Ander Anderson,
son, Anderson, Debbie Bennett, Susie Clark Clarkson,
son, Clarkson, Mary Cooper, Cherry El Ellerbee,
lerbee, Ellerbee, Susan Erb, Kathy Glass,
Peggy Glavey, Jane Hancock,
Cindy Hoey, Ellen Jones, Mary
Kreps, Pat Lax, Donna Mor Morrison,
rison, Morrison, Sherri Richards, Bar Barbara
bara Barbara Robertson, Ann Valentine,
Linda Urbanek, Nancy Wilkins,
Nancy Wingate, Kit Zinzer, Val
Snelling, Sandy Howard, Toni
Eno, Donna Lough and Ter Terry
ry Terry Shamblin.
Two of the pledges, Susan Erb
and Ellen Jones, have already
begun campus activities with in invitation
vitation invitation to the DTD Sisters of the
Iris.
The first of this month the KAT
paused Ik*tween rush and horne-

coming to showoff their new house.
On Saturday the Ist they had a par party
ty party for fraternities and sororities
and on Sunday the 2nd had fa faculty
culty faculty and alumni over.
BETA THETA PI
Names in the news from the
Beta house are Bill Sparkman
and Dave Voslo newly elected
legislative council represent representatives;
atives; representatives; Jeff Klink recipient of
an I.F.C. scholarship and Mike
Gable recipient of a S6OO John
Riley Knox Scholarship; Capt.
Sherouse, of the ROTC staff,
selected faculty advisor.
NEWMAN CLUB
As usual the Newman Club
has another full calendar of ac activities
tivities activities for the coming week.

Tonight the group is having
a square dance at the Catholic
Student Center at 8 p.m.
Following the Fighting Gators
closely the club will tune into
the football with North Carolina
State this Saturday afternoon.
A spaghetti dinner will follow.
Sunday evening they will visit
patients at the hospital and Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday they will discuss Mor Morals
als Morals and the Church and the Bir Birth
th Birth Control Issue.
ALPHA DELTA PI
Os ADPis many honors to
announce this week the biggest
is Karen Roses nomination for
membership in Outstanding Young
Women of America.
Cynthia Gandee and Carol
Carey are newly appointed Ac Accent
cent Accent delegates and Linda Dent
has been selected as wn Army
Sweetheart.
New little sister members are
Janie Attridge and Susan Stewart,
DTD, and Dru Gunther has been
elected president of the Lambda
Chi little sisters.
PI KAPPA ALPHA
Pike neophytes serenading for
their canes have fade from the
scene and the KATs have a new
trophy.
The week of Pike neophyte ac activities
tivities activities ended Sunday with ini initiation.
tiation. initiation. The KATs managed to
collect the most canes from the
neophytes during the week and
won the annual cane-collecting
contest.
With these nine pledges out of the
way the Pikes now have 14 new
Little Sisters of the Shield pled pledges
ges pledges to initiate.
Officers of the fall pledge
class of the fraternity are pre president,
sident, president, Pep Hutchinson; vice-pre vice-president,
sident, vice-president, Don Lewis; secretary secretarytreasurer,
treasurer, secretarytreasurer, Joe Smerker; his historian,
torian, historian, Wyn Sargeant, and ser sergeant
geant sergeant at arms.
ZETA TAU ALPHA
The past week has been In Inspiration
spiration Inspiration Week for Zeta neo neophytes,
phytes, neophytes, and this weekend the
sixteen girls will exchange their

turquoise and silver pins for tne
ZTA shield.
The Zetas paused during the
week to celebrate Founders Day
with a banquet.
Zeta pledges recently elect elected
ed elected Sara Sanders president of
their pledge class and Gaye An Anderson,
derson, Anderson, secretary.
Keeping their team spirit high
the Zetas once again attended
the pep rally en masse.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
Over sixty parents have made
reservations for the Lambda Chi s
Parents Weekend tomorrow. The
guest list includes parents from
Gainesville to Grand Rapids,
Michigan.
The highlight of the activities
will be skits by the pledge
class and little sisters.
The little sisters officers are
Dru Gunther, president; Linda

Bennett, vice president; Jane
Shelly, secretary; Judy Rosen Rosenberger,
berger, Rosenberger, treasurer, and Jean
Neff, historian.
This Sunday the Lambda Chis
held a reception for their new
housemother, Mrs. Lenarue C.
Tarr. Mrs. Tarr is from Tam Tampa
pa Tampa and an active alumna of DDD.
CHI OMEGA
Chi Omega formally pledged
five more girls Monday night.
The new pledges are Cheryl
Heipt, Nancy Pratt, Diana No Noble,
ble, Noble, Peggy Renfranz and Jan Janie
ie Janie Williams.
Officers of the fall pledge class
are Cathy Moore, president;
Diana Leach, vice-president;
Mary Lassiter, secretary and
Theresa Desilts, treasurer.
ALPHA TAU OMEGA
The ATOs continuing their
service drive painted the ceil ceiling
ing ceiling of the recreation hall at
Flavett in last Saturday. They
also cleaned and raked the

Would You Believe
These
MaSCOtS?

Have you ever heard of anyone
having a mole for a mascot? Beta
Theta Pi has.
Their mascot is a 1 1/2 foot
long, brown, fuzzy mole named
John Reilly Knox. He was given
to the house by the winter pledge
class of 1966.
John Reilly Knox is only one of
the several different fraternity
mascots.
The Theta Chis have a big,
brown and white St. Bernard,
Duke, who was donated by Dr.
Marvin Fleming, the Theta Chi
national vice president.
PLP (pronounced plip),thePi
Lam s mascot, is a black-eyed,
bushy-tailed mut. Jeff HI urn, owner
of the dog, said, l found this
sick dog one day, took care of
him and all of a sudden everyone

General area aroung the hall
and laundry.
Also this weekend the ATos
began their little sister rush
The ATOs are proud of their
group which includes the reign reigning
ing reigning Miss University of Florida
two cheerleaders, and several
Army Sweethearts.
ALPHA CHI OMEGA
Recent AXO honors are Cindy
Klausner, Army Sweetheart; Nan Nancy
cy Nancy Bradley, DTD little sister;
and Bonnie Sampson and An Annette
nette Annette James, PKP little sisters.
New pledges are Rita Car Carmona,
mona, Carmona, Debbie Jones, Gae Lynn
McHose, Pat Spain, Kathy Ry.
an and Sue Trottnow.
CHI PHI
Chi Phi Jim Dickenson has
been awarded the I.F.C. Flemming
Scholarship for academics and
service to the fraternity. Jim
has a 3.3 average and is house
manager.
DELTA PHI EPSILON
% A few more D Phi E's have
found a campus active. Lynn
Marks, a freshman pledge, has
begun working on the Accent
staff. Maida Sokal and Dianne
Baron, also freshmen pledges,
have become Army Sweethearts.
PHI EPSILON PI
The Phi Epsilon Pi chapter has
been awarded the Abram Leon
Sachar Award for the Peep chap chapter
ter chapter that evidences the greatest
participation and finest achieve achievement
ment achievement in religious affairs on their
campus. The award was pre presented
sented presented at the fraternities recent
convention in Atlanta.
BOWLING LEAGUE
Looking for a bowling league?
The bowling league sponsored
by the Recreation Committee of
the Florida Union Board for Stu Student
dent Student Activities is open for new
members.
The league bowls every Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday afternoon at 4 at the Pal" 1
Lanes. Transportation is provided.
The fee is $1.50 for three games.

in the house loves him.
Tbe Phi Kappa Taus dont have
names for their mascots. The} re
two baby squirrels who fell ou
of a tree near the house.
Chi Phis Blackball is an
All American dog, 1 l/2-years l/2-yearsold.
old. l/2-yearsold. A Chi Phi brother remarke
-A few of us went to the urTial
Society, he came crawling ~
us and we fell in love with hi
Wolfgang is the Sigma Nu
5-week-old German Shepherd, w
was bought by the brothers in
house.
Sigma Phi Epsilon has a Blac
and white dog named Sam
say hes part Dalmation and pa
mean. ~
Tiffany" is an 18-week -o
beagle whose home is the
house. / as



DELT SISTERS--Newly chosen Sisters of the Iris are (front row,
left to right) Mary Jean Boreman, Jimmye Prescott, Bit Boales, Carol
Haselwood, Bobbie Warlick, Ellen Jones, Carol Eastman, (back row)
Nancy Bradley, Marti Cox, Carol Maslanka, Karen Gerlin, Randy
Roehl, Janie Attridge, Suzanne Stuart and Susan Erb.
Siss May Lose Appeal
Contrary ToCurrent Trend

By JOE F. BENNETT
Alligator Correspondent
Little sister organizations will
soon begin to lose their appeal
to college girls because the or organizations
ganizations organizations are becoming so num numerous
erous numerous on campus, according to a
fraternity president^
Raymond DeCastro, president of
Phi Delta Theta, agreed with Bill
Mcride, Alpha Tau Omega, and
added that his fraternity did not
have a little sister organization
and did not want one, because they
are no longer novel.
Despite this feeling, Mcride
and other fraternity leaders said
they were glad to have the organi organizations
zations organizations which sponsor many worth worthwhile
while worthwhile projects for the fraternities
and community. No one expressed
a desire to disband their program.
The fraternity little sister
organizations started on campus
five years ago and now number
nine with several more currently
being formed.
The number has grown steadily,
and enthusiasm seems to be
growing.
John Morton, who is head of the
Pi Kappa Phi little sister program
said the girls organized games,
decorated for parties and did other
work for the brothers.
Bill Nesmith and several of his
fraternity brothers of Phi Kappa
Tau pointed out that their little
sisters encouraged good manners
and behavior in the fraternity
house, gave picnics for pledges and
threw parties for the children at
S unland Training Center.
Mcride said one of the more
important functions of the little
sisters in his fraternity is giving
parties for children of married
students on campus.
Again the fraternities were in
common agreement on what they
looked for in a girl when con considering
sidering considering her for a little sister.

FOREIGN SERVICE I
careers I
Mr. Rudy Fimbres, Foreign Service Officer ft
will be on campus October 18 to discuss I
career opportunities. 1
A film, "In Search of Peace," will be I
shown. See your Placement Advisor for ( I
details.

The qualities mentioned were ap appearance,
pearance, appearance, personality, leadership
ability, and sociability.
The fraternities that have little
sister organizations are Alpha Tau
Omega, organized in 1962; Delta

Most Greeks Agree

On Need To Expand

With 27 fraternities and 13 sororities on campus, every interested
student can find a niche somewhere in the Greek system. A nice
thought, all right. But, is it just wishful thinking?
That malingering old question still stands do UF Greeks meet
the need?

Not yet is the word from
the officials. Harvey Sharron,
assistant dean of men and adviser
to fraternities, said he felt the
existing fraternities should ex expand
pand expand to meet the need. Dr. Betty
Cosby, dean of women and Pan Panhellenic
hellenic Panhellenic adviser, said she thought
sorority quotas should be in increased
creased increased and an additional sorority
brought here.
Now the Greeks have their way.
A random sample taken this week
among fraternity and sorority
presidents yielded need for im improvement
provement improvement comments. The sys system
tem system should change but opinion
was divided on whether to attract
new organizations or to have the
present ones grow in size.
Douglas Wilkinson,- Delta Sigma
Phi: Speaking as the president
of a small fraternity, with 27
fraternities here, it's difficult
enough as it is to make a name
for yourself. Im not anxious to
see more on campus now for that
reason. The problem in smaller
houses and those off campus (not
on fraternity row) is that we dont
get the flow of rushees that come
through. We want to increase in
size, and that takes a lot of hard

Tau Delta, 1963; Kappa Sigma,
1966; Lambda Chi Alpha, 1965;
Phi Kappa Tau, 1963; Pi Kappa
Alpha, 1965; Pi Kappa Phi, 1966;
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 1961, and
Alpha Epsilon Pi, 1965.

By STEFANIE JARIUS
Alligator Society Writer

work. We try to make a big effort
in the beginning of the term and
get our name in front of the stu students.
dents. students.
Jean Burkholder, Kappa Al Alpha
pha Alpha Theta: I think it would be
easier to get more sororities on
campus than to make chapters
larger. Chapters have member memberships
ships memberships of some 75 girls, but the
houses were made for about 40.
So thats how it stands with some
of the Greeks. Most think some
kind of expansion, internal or
external, is needed. Will it come?
That remains to be seen.
Next week: The Independent
Viewpoint.
I BAND I
I TONIGHT I
I GATORLAND I

V^H
fltwfcfc o rsi
FOR MEN vlflk
After Shave Lotion $3.75 |J flp
Cologne for Men $5.00 X/ 1
Deluxe Gift Set $8.75 PfBJJJJI
WMW

I I
I CLICKS ON CAMPUS I
I The Purist* Button-Down I
I 1 gian whoseeks perfection I
JH v/ robe. Shirtmanship at its
MCliajrdxSero.
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Frlday, October 14, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I for sale
* new YAMAHA 305; chrome, me metallic
tallic metallic blue, 4,000 miles, oil
injection, $75 and take over pay payments.
ments. payments. Call Jim Glass, 378-1281.
(A-30-3t-c).
TWO SCUBA tanks, old double
barreled shotgun. Come to 404
NE 2nd Ave. 5-7 p.m. (A (A---
--- (A---
MUST SELL 1955 Champion 8x42
one bedroom trailer, air condition conditioned,
ed, conditioned, nice, clean, roomy, $1,500.
(A-30-3t-c).
FOR SALE Hunter boat, 14
foot, three inches Boston Whaler,
tri-hull design with 35 horsepow horsepower
er horsepower Evenrude motor. Boat, trailer
and battery new. Will sell to first
reasonable offer. 372-4129, after
6 p.m. (A-29-4t-c).
MARTIN-FRERES Woodwind Cla Clarinet,
rinet, Clarinet, with case, like new $75;
Hilton Deluxe Trumpet, with case
good condition, SSO; Smith and
Corona (Classic 12) portable type typewriter,
writer, typewriter, standard size keyboard
with case, like new, SBS, after
5:30 p.m. 376-1469. (A-29-st-c).
YAMAHA motorcycle, 80 cc., less
than 1 year old, perfect condi condition,
tion, condition, 3,000 miles, $250, call 378-
5741. (A-29-st-p).
1960 LAMBRETTE $l7O, excellent
condition, call 378-2986. (A (A---28-st-c)
--28-st-c) (A---28-st-c)
HONDA 50, excellent condition,
$l7O. 372-5962. (A-31-2t-p).
FOR SALE Salmer'Bundy Flute,
good condition, $50.00. 376-0911
after 5 p.m. (A-31-3t-c).
1965 HONDA 50 Driven on week weekends
ends weekends only by 83 year old racing
grandmother. Offers over $l7O.
Call Bill at 376-3694. (A-31-3t-c).
1966 HONDA SUPER HAWK, Blue,
excellent condition, new Pirelli
Universal tires, reasonable 378-
6144. (A-31-2t-c).
1965 YAMAHA 80 CC. with Auto Autolube
lube Autolube $225. Phone 378-3148. (A (A---
--- (A---
BEAUTIFUL 1964 10x50 Champion
Trailer. Two air conditioners,
carpeting, awning, tool house and
fully furnished. Lot 18 Hickory
Hill. Call 372-2896. (A-32-lt-p).
for rent
SEEKING FOUR GIRLS to rent
apartment. Cooking facilities
available. Also telephone and
television. SIO.OO per week per
girl. Contact 468-1409, Orange
Heights. (B-32-st-c).
S6O A MONTH, modern, nicely
furnished, one bedroom trailer.
Situated on large shaded lot in
Paradise Trailer Court. Perfect
for 1 or 2 people. Call 378-5134
after 6 p.m. Will also rent for
football weekend. (B-31-st-c).
TiNvTTfeySehool
Goinevilie's Oldest
|24 S.E. Bth St. 376-7806
7:15 to 5:45 $27.50!

1 9
for rent
FURNISHED apartment, available,
October 20, 1 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath, kitchen and living room,
spacious rooms quite area. Couple
or graduate students preferred.
S9O monthly, 923 NE 3 Ave. 378-
2436. (B-29-10t-c).
wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted; S4B
a month plus 1/2 utilities; air
conditioned, October's rent paid;
1716 N.W. 3rd Ave. Apt. 6. (C (C---31-10t-c).
--31-10t-c). (C---31-10t-c).
HELP!! NEED MALE ROOM ROOMMATE
MATE ROOMMATE FAST. CALL 378-6265
EVENINGS. (C-31-3t-c).
WANTED 1 Dalmation or Boxer
puppy; Cal 372-5135. (C-31-st-c).
EXPERIENCED Bookkeeper wants
extra work to do in her home.
Call 372-6815 evenings. (F-31-
2t-e).
WANTED: Female roommate to
share 2 bedroom apartment, rent,
S4O a month. Call 372-0317 after
5 p.m. or come to Summit House
Apt; Apt. E-10. (C-30-2t-c).
WANTED: Portable Electric type typewriter.
writer. typewriter. 714 SW 16th Ave. Apt.
203. (C-30-4t-c).
WANTED Photographers! Will
work with the Public Relations
committee of the Florida Union
Board. Contact Marvin Lyons at
378-3527 or Rick Dupuis at 378-
5529. (C-30- -c).
WANTED TWO FEMALE room roommates
mates roommates to share modern, air con conditioned
ditioned conditioned apartment. $45.00 monthly
plus 1/3 utilities. Call 378-3925
(C-28-st-c)
WANTED 1 ticket and riders to
LSU game. Leaving Thursday,
October 20, about noon and re returning
turning returning Sunday. Call 378-5170 or
378-3854. (C-32-lt-c).

> FEATURE AT
1:15 3:20 5:30- 7:30- 9:45
>7wj3thSnt23r?Road|^^M|PPj||^^B
IVI r I M
Stephen Boyd, Raquel Welch. Edmond

Page 10

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 14, 1966

help wanted
WAITRESS WANTED Pizza Hut,
1723 SW 13th St. Contact Jack
Shelton between 1:30 and 4:30 af afternoons.
ternoons. afternoons. (E-28-st-c)
WANTED: CARRIER TO DELIVER
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
WEEKDAY MORNINGS, MUST
HAVE IST THRU 3RD PERIODS
FREE MONDAY-FRIDAY. APPLY
ROOM 9, FLORIDA UNION. (E (E---30-tf-nc).
--30-tf-nc). (E---30-tf-nc).
HELP WANTED Male student
with car to work 79 A.M. and
1 to 2 hours in afternoons each
day, Monday through Friday with
the Alligator. Apply Room 9, Fla.
Union. (E-32-tf-nc).
autos
1962 MONZA Convertable. S6OO.
Call 376-5457 after 5 p.m. (G (G---30-3t-c).
--30-3t-c). (G---30-3t-c).
MUST SELL 1963 MG Midget Road Roadster,
ster, Roadster, good condition, 33,000 miles,
S7OO. 372-7681, ask for Bob. (G (G---30-3t-c).
--30-3t-c). (G---30-3t-c).
1965 VOLVO P-1800S Sport Coupe.
8,800 true miles, super charger,
$2,750, call 372-4842 or 376-0611.
(G-30-10t-c).
1962 RAMBLER, good condition,
radio and heater, seat belts, S6OO,
376-5790. (G-30-3t-c).
1959 CHEVY convertible, excel excellent
lent excellent tires, top, and paint. 714
SW 16th Avenue, Apt. 203, after
6 p.m. (G-30-4t-c).
1962 VW, 29,000 miles, clean,
one owner $825. See at 1246 N.E.
17th Ave. Call 372-7760. (G-31-
2t-p).
LUXURY 1959 Cadillac Fleet Fleetwood,
wood, Fleetwood, 50,000 miles, air and all
the extras, perfect condition. Call
372-9867 before 11 a.m. or after
8 p.m. (G-31-2t-c).
1963 VW EXCELLENT condition,
$995. Call 376-0077 (G- 25-st-c)

autos
1960 MG 1600, engine rebuilt
this summer, new paint, new
tires, $495.00 376-4764 (G-28-
st-c)
1958 VOLVO, red, good tires,
new paint, rebuilt transmission.
Reasonable. 378-6144.(G-32-2t-c).
1957 MGA. Wire wheels. Body,
top, mechanically good. New
brakes. Tonneau. Best offer over
$475. See at Engineering Building
372-4509. (G-31-3t-c).

FLORIDA
STATE f \
theatres / Hes the BIG GE S T \
HERO
MliJuljrj ON EARTH!
'Twin jkJjry
IVAN TORS
craata> a!
W COLOR BY DELUXE 1
American Legend comes
/ to Life in Music and Animation!
* M/a£t'Dum&tf&
W§oohMy Ptppleseed
TjMyTHyT ONLY! /
DOWNIOWjj^^
MWflffl THE MIGHTY CONFLICT BEGINS!
Ip f|l 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
P^THEATRT^iI
jp; :
GORDON DEFENDED KHARTOUM IN THE NAME OF HIS EMPIRE!
$ \ /* t l|,
THE MAHDI BESIEGED KHARTOUM IN THE*NAME OF HIS GOD'
. .WlA I ''-"-,..-,
ayr:: ., charm Laurence
. r% A w HISION OUVB
RICHARD JOHNSON
P^^j^iaiiabiiHf

real estate
BRICK, three bedroom 1 1/2 bath,
double garage, fireplace oakfloors,
air conditioned, near University.
University Ext. 2525 days; after
5 p.m. and on weekends, 376-
8142. (I-29-st-c).
FOUR BEDROOM, 1 1/2 bath,
plus 10x20 extra room, stove,
dishwasher, two air-conditioners,
clean, large lot. Near Elemen Elementary,
tary, Elementary, Jr. High and Parochial
schools. $650 down and assume
$12,975 mortgage; sll per month
including all. 1246 N.E. 17th Ave.
Call 372-7760. (1-31-2 t-p).



CLASSIFIEDS

[ost-found |
KBuND 1 pair black rimmed pre-
BH-iption glasses, also black case
H&h Cleveland, Ohio. Found in
|Knch Quarters apartment. Call
||K- 5469. (L- 32- lt-c).
Kt Lafayette 12 transitor
|H/FM/SW radio at the FSU
|Bie- Florida student section.
JKase call Stuart at 376-7873.
WARD. (L-30-3t-c).
y I BvlfJllHvlflN
I'l
1 jmj^HUsrnM^2iLSi^S!l
BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
I STRICTLY
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT
I B Wm?
nncniD Or
Virciium
I WDOLF?
I. AT 7:07 & 11:25
i -* PLUS I
||?WR AT I
|l J; THE I
I1 r BRAVE" 1
I 1 FRANK SISATRA (

.THRU IHPIi mMA 1:40 6:40
SAT. j TOM 4:15
Measure ofSiebraM
,M wt wwlswS
ANGELS IIDID 1
TOMMff r'nnfifr' iS^^feof
s^^wXS^MsMsmgHMWfk FUNICELLO & 10:35
*Swkam rADiay *FIRE_
|-ASIAN g ALL goo

Friday, October 14,1966, The Florida Alligator,

[.services
IN A HURRY? Passports auu *r *rplications
plications *rplications photos. Childrens pho-
tos, commercias and special prob problems.
lems. problems. Call Wesley-Roosevelt Stu Studios,
dios, Studios, 372-0300 or see at 909 NW
6th Street. (M-30-10t-c).
*
VISIT Gator Groomer where ro romance
mance romance blooms. Next door to Uni University
versity University Post Office. Self Service
and Professional Laundry, dry
~ cleaning. (M-30-10t-c).
-
personal
i
SINGLES PARTY POSTPONED
TILL WEDNESDAY BEFORE
HOMECOMING WEEKEND BE BECAUSE
CAUSE BECAUSE OF THE SHAKESPEAR
PLAY FOR SOPH. AND FRESH FRESHMEN
MEN FRESHMEN BEING HELD THE 14TH OF
OCTOBER. (J-31-2t-c).
' -- - i-
HOT AIR rises tonight (Friday).
All members U.U.F.F.0.0. meet
at Apt. 108, Building 712 Uni University
versity University Gardens by 10:30 P.M.
B. Bennis. (J-32-lt-c).
TWO MEDICAL STUDENTS ac accustomed
customed accustomed to variety of good food
and willing to pay for such, desire
evening meals. Call 378-2095. (J (J---
--- (J--- 3t-c).
MEXICO: VERY ECONOMICAL
assault being planned for Christ Christmas
mas Christmas break. Need several adven adventurous
turous adventurous guys to share expenses.
Call Dave Strickler 376-0942. (J (J---
--- (J--- 3t-p).
-7>
| ...
IN MEMORIUM: Harold Godwin,
who died in defense of his country,
Hastings, Oct. 14, 1066. (J-33-lt (J-33-ltnc).
nc). (J-33-ltnc).

Page 11

I A GOOD^
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Must Place Deposit
<5
iFor Georgia Tickets

Students planning to attend the
Georgia game must place a $2
deposit, between Oct. 24-28, when
they pick up their seat assign assignments.
ments. assignments. The deposit is to give an
advance stadium count. Hie depo deposit
sit deposit will be refunded at the tic ticket
ket ticket booths north of gates 8-9
in Jacksonville, the day of the
game.
Reserved seats for foot football
ball football games must be purchased the
week prior to each game and pick picked
ed picked up at the Gate 2 ticket win-
SPRO Changes
Banquet Site
SPRO, Student Public Relations
Organization, will hold its ban banquet
quet banquet in Dubs Steer Room at 6
p.m. today instead of at the Uni University
versity University Inn as previously an announced.
nounced. announced.
li i
HURRAH FOR
RED BARN!
Football baroai, cheerleaders,
the Big Man on campus ...
everyone goes for Rad Bern's
tasty
BIG BARNEY
39*
Double hemburger sandwich
two pure beef patties, creamy
cheese, pickle and a savory
sauce a in a -toasted double*
decker bun
RED
BARN
2037 NW 13_ST.

(
All your ideal dates
S) 3 from your own area ... and
c(? S)d your one best date
from the entire country
c/? S)d for only 3 dollars!
O CONTACT
5> COMPUTER
DATING
s <
( Im convinced! Please rush my free
Contact Questionnaire to:
I NAME |
I
COLLEGE
I -ADDRESS I
I
CITY STfcTE ZIP I
1 SEND TO: CONTACT COMPUTER DATING
755 BOYLSTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 02116 J
* j

dows. The best seasts are given
out first each day. The windows
are open Monday, Wednesday and
Friday mornings and in die af afternoon
ternoon afternoon on Tuesday and Thurs Thursday.
day. Thursday.
Date tickets must be purchased
the same time deposits are made.
They will not be sold in Jack Jacksonville.
sonville. Jacksonville. Georgia would not agree
on a student reduction so date
tickets will cost $6. Tickets for
all other home games will sell
for $3.

14 COEDS
HONORED
Fourteen UF women with out outstand
stand outstand scholastic records in the Sc School
hool School of Journalism and Commun Communications
ications Communications have been tapped for the
schools professional honorary
sorority.
They will be installed into the
UF chapter of Theta Sigma Phi
during a special ceremony next
trimester.
To qualify, pledges must have
maintained a 2.6 (or B minus)
overall average with a 2.8 jour journalistic
nalistic journalistic average.
The pledges are: Rebecca Ann
Enneis, Sheryl Gold, Sherrill
Garcia, Pat Cullen, Rita Green Greenberg,
berg, Greenberg, Susie Smith, BarbaraShas BarbaraShas
BarbaraShas hy,~ Margaret OBrien, Grace
Spiller, Thelma Mossman, Su Susan
san Susan Smith, Eunice Tall, Ann
Bardsley and Donna Jean Hoehn,
Theta Sigma Phi was founded in
1909 by seven women students
at the University of Washington in
Seattle, with its expressed ideal
that from its membership would
come the great writers of the
future. Today the organization
has 5,500 professional, honorary
and student members.
Discussion
Set For Book
A discussion of the book "Loy "Loyalty
alty "Loyalty in a Democratic State will
be held Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
in room 423 of the General Class Classroom
room Classroom Building. This is the first
in a series of evening discussions
which will raise and consider prob problems
lems problems and issues pertinent to our
times. Discussion is open to all
interested students.



Page 12

FU'mda Alligator. KrutayyiVtotvi* M, isHU*

Orange a nd

Campus Calendar

Special Notice: U of F Faculty Club Western Party
scheduled for Friday, October 15 was held Saturday,
October 1.
Friday, October 14
Union Board Dance: Jennings Hall, 8 p.m. Live
Band, The Sides of Life
Murphree Area: Dance, Club Rendezvous, 8 p.m.
FLU Fine Arts: The Tempest, Univ. Aud., 8:15p.m.
Young Republican Club: Guest Speaker, Jack Grantham,
Ballot Security Officer for the State Republican
Committee, Guaranty Federal Bldg., 8 p.m. All
Republican workers should attend
Movie: Donovan's Reef, 7 & 9:30 p.m., MSB Aud.
Chess Club: Chess Club, 215 FLU, 7 p.m.
Newman Club: Square Dance, Catholic Student Center,
8 p.m.
Saturday, October 15
Newman Club: Listening party, Catholic Student
Center, 1:30 p.m.
Phi Lambda Theta meeting: Guest speaker, Dean Betty
Cosby, FLU Johnson Lounge, 10 a.m.
FLU Fine Arts: The Tempest, Univ. Aud., Eve.,
8:15 p.m., Mat., 2 p.m.

RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS: Students interested in
applying for a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford Uni University
versity University contact Prof. A. A. Murphree, 202 Anderson
Hall before Oct. 22. Limited to male citizens of
at least junior standing who will reach the ages of
18-24 by Oct. 1, 1966. The scholarship is for
$2,800 per year, running 2-3 years.
SPEECH SCREENING TESTS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of college enrollment are re required
quired required to satisfy the speech screening requirement
before being admitted to the Advanced Professional
Sequence or enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400 and the
elementary block (EDE 300, 301 and 302). Appoint Appointments
ments Appointments are now being made in room 124, Norman
Hall.
GRADUATE COUNCIL MEETING: The October
meeting of the Graduate Council will be held Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, Oct. 20, at 1:30 p.m. in Room 235 Tigert Hall.
FORTRAN TEXT: Computing Center has a limited
number of preprint copies of the first five chapters
of Schrenk and Schrenk -- Introduction to FORTRAN
IV Programming. Price of the text, which is now
being used in the FORTRAN class, is $2.75.

PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: (Students must be reg registered
istered registered with the University Placement Service to
interview. Sign-up sheets are posted two weeks in
advance of the interview date at Building H. All
companies will be recruiting for December, April and
August grads unless otherwise indicated.
hiring juniors for summer employment).
OCT. 14; ARMSTRONG CORK CO. Acctg, Gen
Bus, Ind Mgmt, Econ, Mktg, Lib Arts, Chem, ChE,
CE, EE, IE, ME.
OCT. 14; SCHLUMBERGER WELL SERVICES
EE, ME, IE, Ps. AIRESEARCH MFG. CO. OF ARI ARIZONA
ZONA ARIZONA AE, ME, ENG. SCI. MUTUAL OF NEW
YORK All majors. FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS
COMMISSION EE. JEFFERSON CHEMICAL CO.,
INC. ChE, ME, IE, ORG. CHEM.* CHARLESTON
NAVAL SHIPYARD EE, ME, MetE, CE, ChE,
NE, IE, Ps, Chem. CONTAINER CORP. OF AMERI AMERICA
CA AMERICA Acctg. Eng. Forestry.* SINCLAIR RESEARCH
INC. Chem, ChE, PAN AMERICAN PETROLEUM,

I
I Building J Radio Road K . I
I fV *rl H Rate No ncrease I
I SV*% Serving Uof F Employees Since 1935 LTono. I
I PqU Semiannually Gainesville Florida Loans!!! j

Placement Notices

BLUE BULLETIN

Newman Club: Spaghetti Dinner, Catholic Student Cen Center,
ter, Center, 5 p.m.
Football: Fla. vs. N.C. State at Raleigh
Childrens Ceramic Class: FLU Craft Shop, 9 a.m.
Movie: The Long Ships, MSB Aud., 7 & 9:25 p.m.
Sunday, October 16
Newman Club: Hospital Visits, meet at Center, 7:30
p.m.
AIESEC: Group meeting, 212 FLU, 4 p.m.
Lutheran Student Association (LSA): Pancake supper,
at Center, 6 p.m.
Mrs. U of F Pageant: Homemaking skills, Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville High, 1 p.m.
Unitarian Fellowship: Church services, FLU Aud.,
11 a.m.
Union Board: Duplicate bridge, 215 FLU, 1:30 p.m.
Monday, October 17
Reception: Univ. Womens Club, President Reitzs
Home, 3 p.m.

Administrative Notices

LOST FILM: A film entitled Boy with A Blind Blindfold
fold Blindfold #4 has been lost. The film belongs to the
Eye Bank at the J. Hillis Miller Health Center and
was addressed to Janie Hough. If this film has been
delivered to another office on the campus by mistake,
please contact Photographic Services, Ext. 2450, or
the Eye Bank, Ext. 5402.
ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA: Girls with a 3.5 or better
average in any trimester of their freshman year may
sign up for Alpha Lambda Delta, National Scholastic
Honor Society, in the Dean of Womens Office, 123
Tigert Hall, Oct. 19-21. Transfer students are also
eligible.
WOODROW WILSON NATIONAL FELLOWSHIPS:
Oct. 31 is the deadline for faculty members to nomi nominate
nate nominate students for Woodrow Wilson Fellowships for
1967-68. Send candidates name, current mailing
address, college and proposed field of graduate study
to Dr. Robert Bryan, Graduate School, 235 Tigert Hall.
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJORS: Two assem assemblies
blies assemblies will be held Wednesday, Oct. 19, 4 p.m. and
Thursday, Oct. 20, 7 p.m., for questions on the new
quarter system. All elementary education majors are
urged to attend one of the sessions, to be held in Nor Norman
man Norman Hall, room 250.

CORP. Geol, Eng Sci, Chem, Ps, EE, ChE.
VETERANS ADMINISTRATION CE, EE, ME, Arch.
OCT. 17: GENERAL DYNAMICS CORP. AE,
EE, CE, Math. W. R. GRACE & CO. Chem.
CORPS OF ENGINEERS Arch, CE, EE, ME, Eng.
Sci.*
OCT. 17, 18: BELL TELEPHONE LABORATORIES
EE, ME, Eng. Mech, Ps, Math. RADIO CORP.
OF AMERICA EE, ME, Physics, Bus. Ad., Lib.
Arts. GENERAL DYNAMICS CORP. AE, ME,
EE, IE, MetE, Eng. Sci., Math, Physics. U.S. ATOMIC
ENERGY COMMISSION All majors. TEXAS IN INSTRUMENTS,
STRUMENTS, INSTRUMENTS, INC. Bus., Math, Eng.*
OCT. 18: SOUTHWIRE CO. ME, EE, IE, Bus.
Ad.* DEPT. OF STATE All majors.
OCT. 18, 19: TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY
All majors. U. S. ARMY MATERIAL COMMAND
All Eng., Math, Physics. ARO, INC. AE, EE, ME,
Eng. Sci., Eng. Mech. NALCO CHEMICAL CO.
Chem (Org. & Phys), ChE, Lib. Arts.

address all administrative notices and general
NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

Society of Automotive Engineers: Film, Sebring 1966,
12 Hours of Endurance, 512 Eng., 7:30 p.m.
Everyone welcome, refreshments
AIEE: Meeting, 324 FLU, 7:30 p.m. All Engineering
students welcome
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship: Prayer meetings,
4th floor of the Library every Monday & Thursday,
5 p.m.
Seminole Pictures: For Graduating Seniors and
Greeks, every week day 12-5 & 6-9, Saturdays
10-1, 200 FLU
Mensa: Daily luncheons from 11-1 for faculty, stu students
dents students and staff members. Reserved table in west
wing of Main cafeteria
Gator Amateur Radio Club: 527 Eng., Bp.m. Everyone
interested in amateur radio is invited
Collegiate 4-H Club of the U of F: 4-H State Club
Office, 7:30 p.m.
6
Advance Notice: Engineering Dames Meeting: Guest
speaker, Charlie Woods, Wednesday, October 19,
Univ. Womens Club, 8 p.m.
FLA. UNION BOX OFFICE: Tickets now on sale for
THE TEMPEST, AL CAPP & MOSTELLARIA

PROGRESS TEST: (Students In the following courses
are expected to take the following tests. Each student
roust bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will be required
to use his SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER).
CHN 251 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Oct. 18,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Peabody
1,2, 4,5, 7, 10, 11; (C) report to Leigh 207; (D)
report to GCB 121, 125 or 127; (E) report to GCB
113; (F) report to Matherly 213, 216 or 219; (G)
report to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; (H) report
to Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209; (I-J) report
to Flint 110 or 112; (K) report to Walker 301, 303,
307 or 308; (L) report to GCB 201, 203, 205 or 207;
(M) report to GCB 213, 215, 217, 219, 221, 223,
225 or 227; (N) report to GCB 201, 203, 205 or 207;
225 cr 227; (N) report to GCB 233 or 235; (O)
report to GCB 237 or 239; (P-Q) report to Flint
101 or 102; (R) report to Floyd 108; (S) report
to Walker Auditorium; (T-V) report to GCB 101
or 109; (W-Z) report to Walker Auditorium.
CHN 252 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Oct. 18,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11,
12, 13, 14 or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly 102,
105, 108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
CEH 131 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Oct. 20,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Peabody
1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or U; (C) Leigh 207; (D) GCB 121,
125 or 127; (E) report to GCB 113; (F) report to
Matherly 213, 216 or 219; (G) report to Peabody
101, 102, 112 or 114; (H) report to Peabody 201,
202, 205, 208 or 209; (I-J) report to Flint 110 or
112; (K) report to Walker 301, 303, 307 or 308;
(L) report to GCB 201, 203, 205, or 207; (M) report
to GCB 213, 215, 217, 219, 221, 223, 225 or 227;
(N) report to GCB 233 or 235; (O) report to GCB
237 or 239; (P-Q) report to Flint 101 or 102; (R)
report to Floyd 108; (S) report to Walker Auditorium;
(T-V) report to GCB 101 or 109; (W-Z) report to
Walker Auditorium.
*
General Notices
INDEPENDENT LEAGUE: Tuesday, Oct. 25,5 p.m.
is the deadline for signing-up football teams in the
Intramural Office, Florida Gym, Room 229, or call
Ext. 2912. A team consists of seven members. All
persons not affiliated with Dormitory or Fraternity
Leagues are eligible.



Th Store For
OODROwJj In Gainotvillo I j
=U Q
digan Sweaters JSL
OHAIR A WOOL Mffflh
.PACA STITCHED
Assorted Colors
Permanent Pressed
Long Sleeve Sports
B§sh Shirts
jfikiM Button Down Collar
Solids & Plaids $3.99 & $4.99
"Gambler Stripes" $3.99
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER

I ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS:
I H
I WHERE THE ACTION IS!
You and your ideas are needed to help fulfill our many
and varied programs.
advanced programs
I SPACE
I IMK MISSILE SYSTEMS
I B|nH| BORON FILAMENT
, r %sr*'*A l I
I PLACEMENT DIRECTOR
*
v. VfcftEft* MiMI
GENERAL DYNAMICS
| Fort Worth Division

CLASH IN KNOXVILLE

Tide, Vols Battle For Crown

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
UPI Sports writer
ATLANTA Third-ranked Ala Alabama
bama Alabama runs into the major road roadblock

TO ALL STUDENTS jj| I
AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL j|
IfU* I
\ia Lunch a Dinner
I 11:30 2:00 CAFETERIA 4:30 8:00|
|1212 N. MAPi St. (4 min, from campus) Gainesville Shopping Center I

Friday, 14, MS, t 'll m AlMe*"',

block roadblock on its trail to a third straight
Southeastern Conference grid tit title
le title Saturday when the Crimson Tide
visits 13th-ranked Tennessee.
Its the pivotal game for both

teams. Neither has an out-of out-ofstate
state out-ofstate conference game remaining
and It's a safe assumption that
Saturdays winner will wind up
with at least a share of the SEC
crown.
Only a share is at stake at pre present
sent present because it appears that the
winner of the Nov. 5 game be between
tween between Bth-ranked Florida and 11th 11thranked
ranked 11thranked Georgia, neither of which
play wither Alabama or Tennessee
this year, will get the other half.
At the moment, Florida and
Georgia, both 4-0 over-all, share
the SEC lead at 2-0. Alabama
(4-0) and Tennessee (2-1) are both
1-0 in the league.
Florida and Georgia go outside
the conference this week to play
North Carolina State and Miami
respectively. So the winner of the
Alabama-Tennessee clash will
move into a three-way tie for first.
Alabama-Tennessee has long
been a Southern classic but this
years game could be the highlight
of the series.
Seventh-ranked Georgia Tech
put a damper on the game by up upsetting
setting upsetting then 7th-ranked Tennessee
6- this past Saturday. But it still
shapes up as the top game in the
South this season.
Consider these facts:
Alabama leads the nation in
scoring defense with an average
yield of 2.3 points per game. Ten Tennessee
nessee Tennessee is second at 3.0.
Tennessee is second in the SEC
in offensive yardage. Alabama is
third.
Tennessee also is second in
the conference in defensive yard yardage.
age. yardage. Alabama is fourth.
Tennessee, paced by Dewey
Warren who has connected on 62
per cent of his passes, is second
in the SEC in passing. Alabama,
with Ken Stabler hitting on
an amazing 78 per cent, is third.
Tennessees Ron Widby leads
the SEC in punting with a 42.4
average. Alabamas Steve Davis is
close behind at 41.1 and the
Crimson Tide leads the nation in
yards given up on punt returns
only a total of three yards on
19 kicks.
Last year, these two teams bat battled
tled battled to a 7-7 tie. Alabama, which
went on to an 8-1-1 record and
an Orange Bowl victory, dominated
the statistics. But Tennessee,
7- and Bluebonnet Bowl winner,
took advantage of the breaks.
This time, Alabama is favored
by a touchdown. But the game is
being played at Knoxville and that
shortens the odds.
Anytime you play Tennessee,
its tough, said Alabama coach
Paul Bryant. This is especially
true at Knoxville.
The college football weekend in
the Southeast opens Friday night in
the Orange Bowl at Miatni where
Georgia is a slim favorite over the
Hurricanes (1-2) who are back at
full strength for the first time since
their opening win over Colorado.
Saturday afternoon, Georgia
Tech, the Souths top independent,
is favored over Auburn (2-2), mi minus
nus minus running leader Tom Bryan,
at Birmingham. --
Florida, paced by Steve Spur Spurrier,
rier, Spurrier, is favored at North Carolina
State (1-3); Ole Miss (2-2) is
favored over Southern Mississippi
(2-2) and Vanderbilt (1-2) is un underdog
derdog underdog to Virginia Tech (2-1-1)
at Richmond.
PATRONIZE
ALLIGATOR
ADVERTISERS

Page 13



Super-lens Makes Johntry
' v U
A Genuine Gator Fan
s
Cfj TYLER TUCKER
Hj ASST. SPORTS EDITOR j

Carson Johntry Is a dynamo
of energy. In his red Plymouth,
he explodes across the highways
following the Florida Gators.
He is a genuine Gator fan. He
would follow the team through the
sewers of defeat and over the crest
at success mountain. People who
know him can only sketch him. De Describing
scribing Describing him is like explaining the
gaseous tail of Haleys -comet.
Carson is probably a myth.
Discussions about him fail to es establish
tablish establish his entity. Just when some someone
one someone thinks he is real, he concocts
more bizarre antics. When he em embarks
barks embarks to a football game, he can
be detected by his violin case con containing
taining containing his 1200-mil limeterlens
for his 35-millimeter camera.
With his four-feet-long lens, he
will probably photograph the North
Carolina State game from the South
Carolina mountains. If anything

By Albert the Alligator as told to 808 LABREC
Old Albert had a record last week of 14-6-2. This brings his
overall standing to 68-23-2, for a .747 percentage.
Albert takes particular pride in the fact that both of his up upsets
sets upsets of the week (Oklahama over Texas and Illinois over Ohio
State) were right. (Its easy to pick all of the favorites.)
Here we go again with Uncle Albert's fearless upsets of the
week.
Tennessee over Alabama Tennessee's defense will be too
tough. 14-7.
Miami over Georgia The Bulldogs arent used to night
games.
And now for Hie rest of the games.
Florida over North Carolina St. I havent been wrong with
the Gators yet. 28-14.
Florida St. over Texas Tech They'll win easily if they
can keep their passes in bounds.
Arkansas over Texas-Neither one impresses me much.
Georgia Tech over Auburn The Tigers are toothless, and
Tech is lucky.
Duke over Clemson Bums!
LJ3.U. over Kentucky More bums.
Purdue over Michigan Dont be too surprised if Im wrong.
Syracuse over Boston College I dont feel too witty today.
Sorry.
Houston over Mississippi St. Possible upset.
Missouri over Oklahoma St. Missouri could lose this one.
U.S.C, over Stanford The Trojans are overrated.
Washington over California Not many good games this week.
Illinois over Indiana lndiana has got a hot passer watch
out.
Oklahoma over Kansas The Sooners remain undefeated
until they play Notre Dame.
Nebraska over Kansas St. Would you believe 93-3?
Notre Dame over North Carolina Notre Dame is pro probably
bably probably the best team in the country next to the Gators.
U.C.L.A. over Penn St. What a tough schedule.
South Carolina over Wake Forest Don't Pine for the Trees,
theyll be one of the few teams in the country with a perfect
record.

SPORTS

Page 14

l, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 14, 1966

happens, he will be on the spot
to record it.
Carson was glaring down the
neck of Lane Fenner with his
400-millimeter attachment last
Saturday. He was clicking the
shutter as fast as possible, not
knowing he was out of film.
I saw it, Carson told the
press. M I saw the play. And Im
tellin ya it was close.
This threw Carson into the tu ena
of controversy. He was attacked
from all sides. Neither side thought
it was close. Both sides thought
it was definite.
Had Hie Gators lost, Carson and
only a few thousand loyal sup supporters
porters supporters would have had kind words
for the squad. The game against
FSU taught everyone a valuable
lessonthis season will a season
of inches and defeat will be breath breathing
ing breathing down the Gator collars all
season long.
Carson Johntry will be in Raleigh
Saturday. Somewhere in Carter

stadium, he will be maneuvering
his camera to capture the Gator
play.
The Gators have proved them themselves.
selves. themselves. They have proved their
ability to themselves and to their
followers. At the seasons in inception,
ception, inception, the team was pasted to together
gether together with sophomores. Few peo people
ple people gave it a chance.
The Gators have played deter determined
mined determined football up to this point.
They are serious. But, as they are
aware, tomorrow is a long, long
time. Its a long time to the
final whistle of the Miami game.
Coaches and players dont want
to look any farther than the
next play.
Any ideas about a bowl game
should be obliterated from play players*
ers* players* and students minds.
The team will have to continue
riding the streetcar named de desire
sire desire if it intends to finish the
season with success comparable
to the success of the seasons be beginning.
ginning. beginning.
The team will need the continued
support of its followers.
Carson Johntry is a genuine
Gator fan.
But, he is probably a mirth.
Erratic Miami
Tests Georgia
In Night Game
MIAMI (UPp Miami rolls
its Gatling-gun offense into the
Orange Bowl Friday night hoping
it wont look like a pea shooter
against Georgias tank.
Georgia is unbeaten in four
games, thanks to its knock-em
down run over-em offense,
while Miami carries a 1-2 re record,
cord, record, both losses by a total of
five points into the 8 p.m. EST
kickoff.
Better than 45,000 are expect expected
ed expected for the game, many who paid
their money in 1963 to see Lar Larry
ry Larry Rakestraw complete 25 of 38
passes for 407 yards when the
Bulldogs thrashed Miami and
George Mira, 31-14.
This time its different, al although
though although the Georgians are just as
powerful. Georgia is a smashing,
running team which passes on
occasion addle Miami is a pass passer
er passer which sports fast running backs
to vary the attack.
Quarterback Kirby Moore, who
South Carolina coach Paul Deit Deitzel
zel Deitzel calls the quickest quarter quarterback
back quarterback Ive eVer seen, fullback
Ronnie Jenkins and sophomore
flash Kirby Lawrence lead the ball ballcontrol
control ballcontrol Georgia attack which has
rammed the pigskin down the
throats of Mississippi State, VMI,
South Carolina and Ole Miss.

This is your chance,
Student #7026941.
Drink Sprite and be
somebody. MR.BIG
Take heart. Take a dime.
Then take a bottle of Sprite
from the nearest pop
Suddenly
your hand. Cold. 41
tingling. You
cackle fiendishly f
and rub your
together. (You g M&M m
should; they're B Bprobably
probably Bprobably chilled to
the bone by now.) F
You tear off to a §
corner, alone, but #
within earshot of 1 m
your fellows. #
W 1 And then? And then? And then you unleash it.
SPRITE I It fizzes! It roars! It bubbles with
good cheer!
Heads turn. Whisperings. "Who's that strangely
fascinating student with the arch smile. And what's
in that curious green bottle that's making such
a racket?"
And you've arrived! The distinctive taste and
ebullient character of Sprite has set you apart.
You're somebody. uh...uh, whoever-you-are.
Wr* SPRITE. SO TART AND
Uni || II m TINGLING, WE JUST COULDN'T
KEEP IT QUIET.
SPRITE IS A REGISTERED TRAOE MARK
make the
SEBRING slacks by
HIGGINS are blended ,) HI lll^B^
with DACRON 9 polyester jl K|p
to keep them looking jj \
new and creased. jl^Bl
Young-cut, with the
right taper and up to
the minute colors.
HIGGINS SLACKS P;Hj
~~ I DuPont Reg. T.M.
ad m & 9****'



Gator Staffers And Guests Pick The Winners

I THE WEEKS I Dick I Bob I Nick I Andy I Judy Ed I Mike I Bob I Marshall I Don I Bill I Lester j
I I Dennis I Menakerl Arroyo I Moor I Redfem Sears I Willard I Beck 18. Jones \Federman tMcCollumw Hale I Consensus
TOUGHEST I I | | | I | | j |
TWENTY I 59-19-2 I 57-21-2 I 57-21-2 I 56-22-2 I 55-23-2 54-24-2 I 53-25-2 I 53-25-2 \ Dept, of \stud. Asst.\ Kirk YDeanStudA 54-21
.756 j .730 I .730 \ .718 | .705 .692 | .679 | .679 Dept.\Campaign\Affairs
at N.C. State I F I F F l 7 I I F I F I 7 P
l Oregon at Air Force I A 1 0 1 A I A I 0 o| a JA I I I I I
Llflftawa at Tennessee I A I I A I A I A A I A I A I A I A I T I I
rfeansas at Texas I A I I I I I T I I I I I^l
Lutom at Georgia Tech I G | g | g | G | G G | G | G | G | G | G | I
I California at Washington \ W \w\w\ C \ c C | C | G |^|^|^| C |^
|£>ufee at Clemson |C I D j D j f I D C | D | £> | C | C | C | I
hlorida State at Texas Techi F m F F I I F I F I F I F I I**
GeorgTa at Miami (Fla.) I M Jglglmlg A *| a *| G | G | G | G | I
\ISU at Kentucky |L I I I I I I
Lgs( Virginia at Maryland I M A *|A*| M | M | Af | M | I
I Purdue at Michigan |pJp|Af|p P J I I I I I I
havy at Pittsburgh P I* \ \ *\ N * P P
LiceatSA/G P B I s | S I s R I s I S I S I I S I I S
\ T CU at Texas A&M I A&M I A&M TCU A&M A&M A&M TCU A&M I A&M TCU A&M A&M A&M
11 I lolclc c I 19 15 l l l l^
at Boston College I S I S I s I* I 5 I s I j
LississiMri St. at Houston Iff I I H I" I I I I I
St. at Missouri I M | M | o |m_| M M |mI m | m | M | I I
IffSC at Stanford Iff I I ff I B " '
fIfI If t |r|T|F|7' | T | f | f
I Furman at Tampa | F | F I [ F__lL_

AGAINST THE SEMINOLES
Interception Sparks McCalls First Start

The Florida State football game
was full of firsts for Wayne Mc-
Call.
The 6-1, 185 junior from Ocala
started his first game as a var varsity
sity varsity linebacker. More important
he made a key interception of a
Seminole pass, also his first.
It was really nice to intercept
it, McCall said. But I felt a
little tired afterward. I had to run
hard for the ball and harder after
I caught it.
McCall, son of Dr. Wayne Me-

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Call, a member of the Board of
Regents, has been a steady de defensive
fensive defensive performer for the Gators.
He is also versatile. A linebacker
thus far he is being switched to
the halfback position for the Wolf Wolfpack
pack Wolfpack game.
I was a safety in high school
and the coaches think that I can
help the defensive secondary at
halfback, McCall explains.
Our defensive team is a little
disappointed with its showing
against FSU. Offensively, we play played

ed played a great game, but they moved
the ball too much on us, he
continues. We know what weve
got to do, but we have to start
doing it a little better. Our de defense
fense defense must show improvement.
The new Gator defense this sea season
son season originally presented a problem
for McCall
Our defense this season oper operates
ates operates with a split-six setup, instead
of the old 5-4. We had to re relearn
learn relearn our jobs. It caused a read readjustment
justment readjustment problem for me.
But, according to defensive

w
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coach Gene Ellenson, McCall has
fully adjusted to the switch.
Wayne is a really fine boy,
he said. He is intelligent and
aggressive. He is a proven contact
football player. Against FSU he
made about seven tackles and
throughout the year he has helped
our defense considerably.
McCall emphasizes the im importance
portance importance of a strong defensive
effort against NC State.
We have to stop their running
game. They've got a good offense.
We have to get Steve (Spurrier)

the ball. I think our offense can
hurt them, but we have got to get
the football.
Reports that State has red-clr red-clrm
m red-clrm .JK
< '' '"l****
WAYNE MCCALL
. . defensive halfback
cled the Florida Game which is
their homecoming contest do
not bother McCall.
Last season we played one
of our best games against Ole Miss
and that was their homecom homecoming
ing homecoming game. We just make e&ch game
the big one. Each one represents
the whole season.
Each game becomes more of a
challenge to the Gators, according
to McCall.
Being undefeated, who ever we
play will be up for us. We can cannot
not cannot afford to be down. We have
to be at our best each week.
visit
Bet) Uton
Where Everyone

Page 15



Page 16

*. V**r a t*t%i:i\ c \Vitlvt I I,

HONDA 450 (444 cc)
The Harmon Football Forecast
TOP 20 TEAMS (Forecasting Average: 576 right, 194 wrong 743) Vm|Spy\lLyJ Ij
1- MICH. STATE 6 SOUTHERN CAL 11 MISSOURI 16 BAYLOR 3?%1\ 1 /
2 NOTRE DAME 7- FLORIDA 12 HOUSTON 17 WYOMING VWwMiwiil
3-ALABAMA 8-PURDUE 13-NEBRASKA 18-OKLAHOMA &
a aia aim. 4-U.C.LA. 9-TENNESSEE 14-S.M.U. 19-AIRFORCE MMSSIi" $
A BIG BIKE 5-GEORGIA TECH 10-ARKANSAS 15-GEORGIA 20-TEXAS If
Saturday, Oct 15 Major Colleges /
Air Force 22 Oregon 6 HIGHLIGHTS .. *f | /
Alabama .* 14 Tennessee 8 i, i : j
e!!y** ~~ a SSSw'"B Last year's Arkansas- Texas game has been \> il
sowjins onen g = l7 s - }J called one of the finest college football games
" ,,n !SSie ::::::: It K, ==::8 gone from the 1966 version, the game this Strcnght-Flare
Colorado 20 lowa state 17 Saturday could compete for the same honor.
Cornell 24 Harvard 20 The 10th-ranked R3.zorba.cks will stop the The collar of this versatile Gant
SlSSm"..= 8 ViiSSwi f Longhorns by just four points in a typical Shirt can be flexed straight or flare.
A fclA aSTtSSSiSi- 8 gs*.=F Southwestern Conference cUff-hanger. And It keeps either shape through throughftllv
ftllv throughftllv P1 ITf Florida 28 North Carolina 7 If the Rfcme in the Southwest isnt the out the day. Extra dividend: Straight-
WIV mvh ~ 8 mSS.Sm. = number one game, then the Alabama-Tenne- Flare can be worn with a pin. In
Georgia Tech 30 Auburn 7 ssee clash in Knoxville could very well be. luxuriant English cotton broadcloth.
Houston SS ... 25 M?ss?ssippi ,V state 7 Alabama, in third, rates a slight favorite Red, blue or olive stripings. Tapered
Streits g&teEEs I Vols Volsww
ww Volsww nw. n asSSSS SKTviriini, 8 Tw * ln B Tcn " TOl ,e **>
JKIjHL m Vli Miami, Ohio 27 Marshall o dog Michigan State with Ohio State, and
MiSlta State 26 lowa State 13 Purdue, #B, with Michigan. The Spartans HON IG ANS
' KJ Mississippi 24 Southn Miss 6 should bump the Bucks by 20 points, and 1 *"
0,0 ... a Navy 21 Pittsburgh 14 the Boilermakers will slip by the Wolverines IIOQ \a/ i imi\/ a\/C
010 W. University Ave. Nebraska 28 Kansas State 0 bv a touchdown W. UINIV. AVt.
Northwestern 21 Wisconsin 13 Just a note in passing: This is the first
| a. Ohio University 14 Xavier 8 time m our ten years of forecasting that
IhA 1 aIIaMA I Iff A Oklahoma 25 Kansas 8 there are only two teams from the Big Ten
ViPllwy Lira Paeffic 25 Montana 113 in the top 20 teams. Being an old Minnesota
Football Forecast 8 Gopher, It almost makes a grown man cry!
Wlllllll South Carolina 21 Wake Forest 6 Some Os the big powers should ease through' ffli ''in f#'i
iM!u? rn Cal If US 10 1 ..::::::::::::::it Saturday without difficulty. 4th-rated ; h f*:3M
fimna Se la *' lege U.C.L.A. will be a big 24-point winner over
t!c!u? 14 TexTs a A & m io Penn State. .Georgia Tech, #5, should win <
T^ane WeStm '. 26 cmKati 6 over Auburn by 23. .Nebraska, ranked 13th,
Tulsa 21 North Texas 7 will coast by Kansas State by 28 points. .
vifginfa It v*m". state it and Florida should numb the woifpack of 7ZI3MBK
'-\ T V-P.i. 14 Vanderbilt 8 North Carolina State by 21. The Gators are
\ A Washington 21 California 9
Washington State 17 Utah 7 ranked #7.
wm?am e & S Mary 25 ?iSTcitSdei 8 North Carolina runs into trouble Saturday
Wyoming 31 New Mexico o against 2nd-ranked Notre Dame. The Irish
# yjPBPB Yale 25 Columbia 7 are favored by seventeen points. And Southern
Other Games East Cal, #6, will roll over Stanford by 22. | J
Alfred 30 Brock port o Here are two games that leave very little |/
THE GAMES Bat rst 20 A^e h r?can r intr o breathing room between opponents. 15th-
Connecticut 14 Maiiw 13 ranked Georgia and S.M.U., rated 14th, could
Florida vs. North Carolina State Ithaca 33 Susquehanna 0 slip into upset-land against Miami and Rice.
Miami vs. Georgia LatajSte 2? Tufte'* Until they sli P the victors will be Georgia
po 11 fc TflV#c r r i A/.fi Massachusetts 33 Rhode Island 7 and S.M.U. by eight. \*l
r.a.u. vs. Texas lecn Middlebury 16 Hamilton 13 r i rn llt nrn ln K .. . mJM
Alabama vs. Tenn. Norwich 20 st. Lawrence 13 Elsewhere, 18th-ranked Oklahoma is 17
Georgia Teen vs. Auburn g? SSL 'ZZ 8 S, K U Points better than Kansas. .Missouri, #ll, {
Kentucky vs. LjS.U. Springfield 24 Northeastern 12 will beat Oklahoma State by 16. .and
U. of Michigan vs! Purdue u 3 il L?ioming .14 Houston, 12th on the national ladder, should
Notre Dame vs. North Carolina vemiont 22 New Hampshire 12 tumble Mississippi State by eighteen points. g
Arkansas vs. Texas west Chester 28 Bioomsburg 6 Finally, 17th-ranked Wyoming will whip D.-
Miss. State vs. Houston wiluSms 2? eSdofn l New Mexico by 31 points, and the 19th-rated
Other Games Midwest tween* Academy should clip oregon by
Alma" 15 Ohvet Z.V.Z.Z.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' 13 AHY
Baldwin-Wallace .... 21 Wittenberg 10
Ball StatC 24 DePauw 7
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Houston Houston Houston m JUST SOUTH OF CAMPUS ON 441