Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
VoL 59, No. 30

REITZ BUDGET REQUEST
SUPPORTED BY REGENTS

By FRANK SHEPHERD
Alligator Staff Writer
The Board of Regents upheld
the UFs biennium budget re request
quest request presented to it by UF Pre President
sident President J. Wayne Reitz last Thurs Thursday
day Thursday and Friday in Tallahassee.
Hie Board of Regents did not
consider the Faculty-Senate re resolution
solution resolution abolishing compulsory
ROTC at its meeting last week.
Reitz said it would be on the
agenda for the November meet meeting
ing meeting of the Regents.
Significant among the items ap approved
proved approved by the Regents was a
salary increase for UF faculty and
staff.
On the basis of a rough an analysis,
alysis, analysis, the guidelines laid down
by the Board of Regents will
roughly approximate the same
final budget as we submitted to
them originally,* Reitz said.
The Regents will submit the
UF budget to the State Budget
Commission along with the bud budgets
gets budgets of all other state institutions
of higher education by November
15.
Commending the Board on its
consideration of the UF budget,
Reitz said that the Board of Re Regents
gents Regents gave a very realistic, con considerate
siderate considerate and understanding ap appraisal
praisal appraisal of our biennium budget
requests, and on the basis of
their recommendations, the UF
would be able to move for forward
ward forward significantly in faculty and
non-academic salary levels, in
providing additional faculty and
staff, and in meeting general oper operating
ating operating expenses.
It is quite significant, Reitz
said, that in the guidelines
established, recognition is given
to the role and scope of each
of the institutions under the jur jurisdiction
isdiction jurisdiction of the board of Regents.

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WENDY ROEDER a junior in Educa Education
tion Education from Fort Lauderdale. Her favorite
activites are water skiing and football,
and we promised not to write any silly
things about her having a pet mongoose
or 47 boyfriends. So we wont. ( Pho to By Nick Arroyo)

The Florida
Alligator

University of Florida

As an example, Reitz used the
faculty and staff salary increases
recommended by the Board of
Regents. The salary scale for
the UF and Florida State Univer Universities
sities Universities reflects a competitive level
among public institutions of 10,000
and more enrollment and award awarding
ing awarding more than 100 PhDs a year.
Also, in the case of expenses,
recognition is given to a large
proportional enrollment in the
biological and physical sciences
at the UF as compared with other
institutions, recognizing that

INFIRMARY ALTERS
EXCUSE PROCEDURE

By HARVEY ALPER
Alligator Staff Writer
UF students are no longer able
to obtain official written excuses
for time spent obtaining diagnosis
or treatment at the infirmary.
Dr. William Hall, director of
student health, has adopted the
Honor System for students who
now report to the* infirmary. It
is the students duty to honestly
report time spent at the infirmary
to their professors.
Persons enrolled in ROTC and
physical education may be the
hardest hit by this move. Parti Participants
cipants Participants in these programs will no
longer be able to present infir infirmary
mary infirmary excuses confirming illness
on their part. Instructors in
ROTC and physical education will
now judge the words of their pupils.

Wednesday, October 12, 1966

operating costs are higher in these
areas than other areas of the
University.
It is perfectly evident that the
Board of Regents is giving far farsighted
sighted farsighted and positive leadership
in the broad strengthening of the
institutions under its jurisdict jurisdiction,
ion, jurisdiction, Reitz said.
With guidelines now established,
we are now in the process of
final preparation of budgets
which must be in the hands of
the Budget Commission no later
than November 15, he concluded.

Doctors will not write notes af affirming
firming affirming that a_ student is ill.
Only patients who remain in the
hospital will be granted written
excuses.
This is in direct contrast to
the policy of written excuses main maintained
tained maintained at the infirmary last year.
Due to a snowballing of such
excuses the policy has been can canceled.
celed. canceled.
A representative of the infirm infirmary
ary infirmary said that last year students
visited the building, picked up
some aspirin, and received writ written
ten written verification that they had been
at the infirmary. Hence, students
received excused absences from
their instructors.
It is hoped that under the Honor
System this can be avoided.
In other action, the infirmary
has set nev. hours.
Schedule hours for weekdays are
now from 8:30 11:30 a.m. and
from 1:00 4:30 p.m. On Satur Saturdays
days Saturdays the infirmary will close at
noon.
Emergencies will be admitted
only through the emergency en entrance
trance entrance at the rear of the build building,
ing, building, on the ground floor. Anyone
reporting sick outside the regular
hours is considered an emergency
case.
To obtain emergency treatment
a student must ring a buzzer
at the rear door.
Residence hall assistants, and
fraternity and sorority house housemothers,
mothers, housemothers, are now requested to call
the infirmary and speak with its
representatives before sending a
patient to the infirmary, except
in the case of serious emergency.
// /J ///

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LSD Student Use,** will be the sub subject
ject subject of an informal debate tonight at 8:30
in the University Auditorium. Thomas
Hanna, chairman of the philosophy depart department,
ment, department, and Delton Scudder, head of the
department of religion, will lead the de debate.
bate. debate. A question and answer period will
follow the discussion. (Photo by Gerald Jones)

Graves Comments,
Tenner Was Out 9

Ray Graves, UF Athletic Direc Director
tor Director and Gator Football Head coach,
Tuesday voiced his opinion on the
recent controversy now raging
concerning whether Lane Fenner
was actually out of bounds when
he caught Gary Pacjics long pass,
in the final seconds of the FSU,
Fla. game.
As has always been my po policy
licy policy on judgement calls by offi officials,
cials, officials, Graves said, I had not
planned to make any further state statement
ment statement in regard to the disputed
call in the FSU-Florida football
game Saturday, Oct. 8.
The football game is over and
both teams should be moving on
toward another game but due to
the continued one-sided version of
the call by FSU officials and the
resulting public castigation of an
honest official, I feel it is neces necessary
sary necessary for me to make a state statement
ment statement for the students, alumni and
fans of UF.
After extremely careful study
of the films, the coaching staff
and I honestly believe the call
which was made was correct and
support the officials decision that
the play was absolutely not good.
The receiver session possession and control of the foot football,
ball, football, as required by the rules,
when he fell out of the field of
play.
Coaches have proper channels
for registering such complaints.
The Code of Ethics of the Am American
erican American Football Coaches Associa Association
tion Association censors this type of criticism
of football officials. In this re regard
gard regard I would refer to Article V,
Sections 4 and 5 of the Consti Constitution
tution Constitution and Bylaws of the Amer American
ican American Football Coaches Association:
Post Game Comments. Deroga Derogatory
tory Derogatory comments should be avoided.
It should be remembered that cri criticisms
ticisms criticisms once made can never be
retraced. Coaches must assume
full responsibility for whatever
comments they may make.

Use of Movies in Checking
Officials. It should be recognized
that slow motion study of contro controversial
versial controversial decisions by officials is
far different from on-the-spot de decisions
cisions decisions which must be made dur during
ing during the course of a game. To
show critical plays to sportswrit sportswriters,
ers, sportswriters, sports casters, Alumni and the
public, which may incite them to
label officials as incompetent,
must be considered unethical con conduct.
duct. conduct.
Ticket
Procedure
Explained
Percy Beard, asst, director of
Athletics revealed the guidelines
for purchasing football tickets to
Gator away games. We plan to
make available to all students ad advance
vance advance notice of when tickets will
go on sale and publish this list
in the said Beard.
Students on campus were not
aware that tickets for the LSU
game were up for sale, and were
surprised that they had been sold
out. The Gainesville Quarterback
club purchased a large block of
tickets in early spring for the
LSU game, Beard added.
There are plenty of tickets for
the North Carolina State game,
stated Beard. However, the number
of tickets we receive depends on
the student demand.
The same policy will exist on
the purchasing of tickets for the
Fla. vs. Georgia game. Student
tickets will go on sale two weeks
before the game, a small deposit
will be given the UF ticket dept,
for the game and the students will
be reimbursed for the purchase in
Jacksonville, on Nov. 5, the day
of the contest.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 12, 1966

Campus
Briefs
Ik j
Alpha Epsilon Delta will hold
its first open meeting on Wed Wednesday,
nesday, Wednesday, October 19, at 8:00 p.m.
in room H-611 of the Medical
Science Building. Dr. Edmund Ac Ackell,
kell, Ackell, dean of the college of den dentistry,
tistry, dentistry, will speak on the coming
dental school. All students and fa faculty
culty faculty are invited.
European Club will meet Sunday,
October 16, at 7:30 p.m. at the
International Center. There will be
a program and refreshments.
Noted childrens librarian, Mrs.
Eulalie S. Ross, will speak on
books and storytelling for child children
ren children at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Oct October
ober October 22, in the Fellowship Hall
of the First Presbyterian Church
of Gainesville. This program
should be of interest for parents,
teachers, librarians and all adults
who work with children.
The Naval Officer Recruiting
Team from Jacksonville will be
on campus Monday through Fri Friday,
day, Friday, beginning October 17, from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The
team will interview, counsel and
test eligible students, both men
and omen, for the officer pro programs.
grams. programs.
Exhibits currently on campus in include:
clude: include: Faculty Art Exhibit, Univer University
sity University Gallery. Faculty Art Collect Collections,
ions, Collections, Teaching Gallery. Oils by
Bob Sullins, Bryan Lounge, Flor Florida
ida Florida Union. Creative Photography,
North Wing Gallery, Florida
Union.

Anyone can
With Eatons Corrasable Bond Typewriter Paper, you
can erase that goof without a trace.
Not a telltale smudge remains. A special surface per permits
mits permits quick and easy erasing with an ordinary pencil
eraser. For perfect papers every time, get Corrasable.
In light, medium; heavy weights and Onion Skin. In
handy 100-sheet packets and 500-sheet ream boxes.
At Stationery Departments.
js> T J
Only Eaton makes Corrasable.
EATON PAPER CORPORATION. PITTSFIELD. MASSACHUSETTS
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TWC FLOBDI ALUCUkTOR > kTp!r pad |p
SmSis rr *" dj,,ty n**** *+**&. o*?

BATMAN

SG TREASURERS OFFICE
TO DISTRIBUTE $725,000

808 BECK
Alligator Staff Writer
This trimester a total of $125,860
will be handled by the Student Gov Government
ernment Government Treasure John Darlson.
This money is budgeted and made
available to all student organiza organizations
tions organizations that are sanctioned by the
University.
Organizations that need ad additional
ditional additional funds for special projects
can apply for the money through
the Treasure's office. This tri trimester
mester trimester $9,200 has been made
available.
Each student contributes $7.75
out of the fees paid during reg registration
istration registration to the budget. Student sal salaries
aries salaries are also paid out of these
funds.
Homecoming received $2,000
from the official budget, but
actually operates on a budget well
in excess $20,000. Many organ organizations
izations organizations have additional sources of
revenue.
The men's and womens Interhall
councils received $1,580 and SB2O
respectively. These funds are bro broken
ken broken down for a variety of pro projects.
jects. projects.
Murphree area will get a new
TV and furnishings for a TV lounge.

Tolbert area will receive Ping-
Pong tables and equipment. Gra Graham
ham Graham Area gets a new flagpole.
Twenty-five organizations, in:
all, receive funds ranging from
$30,125 to $314. Many of the or organizations
ganizations organizations such as the Gator Band,
Lyceum Council, and Florida Play Players,
ers, Players, receive money from other
sources.
Listed in the official budget the
following organizations will re receive:
ceive: receive:
Homecoming, $2,000; Gator
Band, $2,415; Cheerleaders,
$1,637; Debate, $1,760; Florida
Players, $5,000; Mens Glee
Club, $1,955: Women's Glee Club,
$1,500; Board of Int. Activities,
$870; Lyceum, $12,405; Live Livestock
stock Livestock Judging, $314; Moot Court,
$371; Special Fund, $9,200; Sym Symphony
phony Symphony Orchestra, $983; Univer University
sity University Religious, $2,000; Special
Projects, $11,674; University
Choir, $928; Mayors Council,
$1,875; Womens Student Asso Association,
ciation, Association, $393; Publications,
$25,450; Intramurals, $30,125;
Student Salaries, $10,105; Wo Womens
mens Womens Interhall, $820; Mens
Interhall, $1,580; and the Flor Florida
ida Florida Rifles, SSOO.

( DINE IN CANDLELIGHT TONIGHT;
\. AT THE MAIN CAFETERIA QF f
UNIVERSITY FOOD SERVICE \
f ENJOY OUR BUFFET \
L 5:00 to 7:00 P.M. \
1 STEAMBOAT ROAST BEEF (CARVED TO ORDER )
[ HUNGARIAN CHICKEN PAPRIKA
l FILLET OF FLOUNDER j
CHINESE SPARE RIBS (SWEET AND SOUR) J
V. PLUS 20 OTHER ITEMS TO
CHOOSE FROM
Mis SALADS VEGETABLES DESSERTS
lf> ASSORTED BREADS
| ALL YOU CAN EAT
1|52.25
l|* MEAL PLAN PARTICIPANTS SI.OO
V)
V FREE entertainment

A Trip Gets To Be Complicated
Thats why more people use the
services of the House of Travel
when they plan a trip. You dont
have to worry about reservations, s||
flights, or connections. 'Riatsall Hi HI
done for you. In todays complex ursi icc /-sc tba \/n
world of travel, dont go italone. nOUot OF TRAVEL
Take the advice of the people. 3415 W. Unlv. Ave.
at the House of Travel. 378-1601

GATOR ADS PAY!



CERAMICS CLASS
BEGINS TUESDAY
The Florida Union Craft Shop will begin a special advanced
ceramics class next Tuesday evening at 7:30 p.m.
A special class in advanced ceramics, designed for persons
with previous ceramics training, will be offered by the Florida
Union Craft Shop, beginning next Tuesday.
To be held from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. each Tuesday for eight
weeks in Room 120, the classes will emphasize advanced tech techniques
niques techniques in ceramic styling and will be taught by Mrs. Olive Briggs.
The registration fee for the course is SB. Registration for
the course may be made in the Craft Shop or by calling 376-
3261, extension 2951.

. | PIZZA HUT
fSfQ I DINE IN CARRY OUT
: Tel. 378-5761
VA Order By Phone For Faster Service
i 7 L Allow Approximately 20 Minutes
i 1723 S.W. 13th ST.
Gajnesville, Florida
lenter t|
ipntbrrsitig jifynp
I FOOTBALL CONTEST
1 PRIZE: $25 in Men's or Ladies' Wear I
W Place an "X" if* the box of the team you think will
I win Saturday, Oct, 15 Estimate total yards to be
I gained by Florida/ which will be the tie breaker.
I Florida vs. North Carolina State
I Auburn vs. Georgia Tech
I Houston vs. Mississippi State
I Kentucky vs. Louisiana State
I Missouri vs. q Oklahoma State
I4k HEAR YE /
I HEAR YE/
I V WEATHER IS COMING
The Town Crier Is Proclaiming
The Honourable Merits Os The
I Wool -O' Lamb Sweaters At
I The 'U' Shop
Wrap Yourself In A Luxurious
Lambswool Os Plain Colour Or
I Heather-Tone By The Venerable
I Shearers: Jantzen, Robert Bruce
I Pringle Os Scotland. t
I O Notre Dame vs. Q North Carolina
I Ohio State vs. Michigan State
I Tennessee vs. Alabama
I Texas Tech vs. q Florida State
I Q Virginia Tech vs. q Vanderbilt
I Total Yards Gained by FLORIDA
I Entries must be deposited in l' Shop by Fri., Oct. 14
1 In case of tie, prize will be divided equally umon? winners.
I WINNERS NAMES TO BE POSTED IN:
I mt HmuerHitg
I i C2O West University Avenue Carolyn Plaza
city STATE
ENTRIES LIMITED, TWO PER PKKSONIIHHIHI

STATE

Water Shortage Problem
Has Political Aspects

By LE ROY POPE
NEW YORK (UPI) President
Johnsons plan for a 100-nation
conference on water supply next
spring highlights an important as aspect
pect aspect of the worlds water prob problem-that
lem-that problem-that it is as much political
as anything else.
The scientific breakthroughs for
providing an expanding global pop population
ulation population and industry with plenty of
fresh water for generations to
come have largely been made.
Its now primarily a matter of
money and engineering to conserve
Library Division
Fills Request
Approximately 1500 requests
a year from industry, business,
and federal government are re recieved
cieved recieved by the Technical Informa Information
tion Information Services Division of the Uni University
versity University of Florida Library.
J. R. Jones Jr., interlibrary
loan assistant said the three
significant services offered by the
division are interlibrary loan ser services,
vices, services, photocopy services and re referral
ferral referral and location services.
For the division Interlibrary
loan makes available collection of
books, monographs, documents,
technical reports and microtexts.
(Microtexts are microfilms and
photocopy.)
Xerox copies of articles pro produced
duced produced by the photocopy services
are mailed within 24 hours if
possible on receiving the request.
Publications hot available in the
UF libraries are identified and
referred to the nearest library
holding the requested material
Technical and Interlibrary re requests
quests requests for these services are nor normally
mally normally received by mail, long dis distance
tance distance telephone calls and tele telegrams.
grams. telegrams. A TWX system links the
library with many of the largest
university and technical libraries
in the U.S. and Canada.

rn
ENGINEERING OPPORTUNITIES
for Seniors and Graduates in mechanical,
AERONAUTICAL, CHEMICAL,
CIVIL (structures oriented),
ELECTRICAL, MARINE,
and METALLURGICAL
ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING MECHANICS,
APPLIED MATHEMATICS,
CERAMICS, PHYSICS and
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
I OCTOBER 19
Appointments should be made
in advance through your
College Placement Office
Pratt & jj
Whitney OtVISION OF COUP.
Aircraft
| An tqml Opftiity EjnpDwr
SPECIALISTS IN POWER ... POWER TOR PROPULSION-POWER FOR AUXILIARY SYSTEMS.
CURRENT UTILIZATIONS INCLUDE AIRCRAFT, MISSILES, SPACE VEHICLES. MARINE AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS.

Wednesday, October 12, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

and distribute the water properly
and to desalt vast amounts of sea
water so that many areas of the
planet that once were fertile and
have been turned into semi-des semi-desert
ert semi-desert by centuries of neglect can
be reclaimed.
Accomplishing the water cons conservation
ervation conservation and reclamation tasks the
engineers have in mind would take
many years and cost billions of
dollars, but the biggest hurdle to
leap is politics to overcome
local and national rivalries and
strike fair bargains that will treat
all the water users justly.
Plan for Continent
A dramatic case in point in involving
volving involving the North American Con Continent
tinent Continent is the proposed North Am American
erican American Water and Power Alliance
(NAWAPA) developed by the Ralph
M. Parsons engineering firm of
Los Angeles. This scheme would
tie the major river basins of the
United States, Canda and Mexico
into a redistribution network that
would control the level of the Great
Lakes, change the direction of flow
of some rivers and drain vast
amounts of water from Canada into
the United States. It would re reclaim
claim reclaim 56 million acres or 87,500
square miles of land to grow food
on.
NAWAPA would take 30 years
to carry out and cost an estimated
SIOO billion in todays-money, but
the Parsons engineers think it
would be self-liquidating because
it would produce power and water
revenues or $4 billion a yeqr.
Sen. Frank Moss of Utah is a
leading advocate of NAWAPA in
the United States. He debated Can Canada's
ada's Canada's elder statesman, the late
Gen. A. L. McNaughton, of NAW NAWAPA
APA NAWAPA before a royal society meet meeting
ing meeting this spring at the University
of Sherbrooke in Quebec. The sen senator
ator senator soon discovered that while
many Canadians are disposed to
give NAWAPA a hearing Prime

Minister Lester B. Pearson so far
has maintained a neutral attitude
others oppose it violenty.
For example, Premier W.A.C.
Bennett of Britist Columbia said
bluntly We will sell the United
States hydroelectric power but not
water/
Opposition Speaks
In a speech at Portland, Ore.,
last spring, Arthur Laing,
Canadas minister of northern af affairs,
fairs, affairs, denied categorically that
there is such a thing as a con continental
tinental continental resource in fresh water.
He said Canadas fresh water be belongs
longs belongs to her, not to the peoples
of North America.
Laing thus put his finger on the
touchstone, not only of NAWAPA,
but on the major stumbling block
to solving all the water problems
on the globe.
There are two kinds of water
on earth salt and fresh. No Nobody
body Nobody lays claim to all the oceans,
but traditional attitudes toward
land-locked, life-giving fresh wa water
ter water are entirely different. In gen general
eral general they were expressed in Can Canada
ada Canada Minister Laings statement.
Scientists, engineers, geogra geographers,
phers, geographers, econimists and some
statesmen are however, starting to
question the traditional view of the
earths fresh water resources.
They point out that many of the
fresh water systems of the world
are no subscribers to national
boundaries or national interests;
the headwaters of a great river
basin are in one country, the
people who need the water the most
in another.
Under such circumstances tra traditional
ditional traditional ideas of absolute sover sovereignty
eignty sovereignty over fresh water resources
are bound to come under attack
as the problems of global water
distribution become more acute.

Page 3



Page 4

1, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 12, 1966

FROM THE |
% WIRES OF
X UPI /
'#,
VSv.
*
I''' 1 ''' '
International
SIGNS AGREEMENT...The Soviet Union and France Tuesday signed
an agreement on a joint satellite launching and nuclear research
program.
The pact was the result of moves initiated in June during a visit
to Russia by French President Charles de Gaulle.
French Science Minister Alain Peyrefitte proposed that the joint
space shota French satellite on a Soviet rocket--be launched in
1970. He suggested it might be a lunar orbiter.
11 ~
FLOOD TOLL...The death toll in eight days of severe flooding in
western Algeria Tuesday stood at 40, authorities estimated.
Hie rains have spread into the south in the last 48 hours and com communications
munications communications were out in many regions.
PRISONER SLAUGHTERED. .American troops Tuesday overran an
underground Communist jungle prison on the central coastal area
and found 12 inmates who had been chained and butchered by their
fleeing North Vietnamese guards.
North Vietnamese prison camp bosses, fearful of being overrun
by the Americans rounded up 19 young Vietnamese prisoners, tied
and chained their arms together and threw them into a pit.
Hiey set up a machinegun, blasted the defenseless captives and
then tossed hand grenades onto the heap. Somehow seven survived.
BOURGEOIS PERFUME . Russian women jammed department
store counters Tuesday in Moscow to purchase a new perfume
imported from France called Bourgeois.
APPEALS TO SOVlET...British Foreign Secretary George Brown
put his six-point plan for peace in Viet Nam before the General
Assembly Tuesday despite its blunt rejection by Communist North
Viet Nam. Brown, speaking as one of the co-chairmen of the parley,
appealed from the assembly rostrum to Soviet Foreign Minister
Andrei Gromyko, the other co-chairman, to join in reconvening the
1954 Geneva conference which created the neutral states from
the former French Indochina.
AWARD WINNER...German industrialist Gunther Sachs, husband of
actress Brigitte Bardot, received an award Monday at the Interna International
tional International documentary film festival for a movie on the Riviera resort
of Saint Tropez.
National
&
*
PROBLEMS DISCUSSED . The State Department said Tuesday
some of the Misunderstandings preventing Soviet-American agree agreement
ment agreement on a treaty to halt the further spread of nuclear weapons were
removed during talks here with Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko.
The U.S. spokesman made it clear that a nuclear non-proliferation
pact is not imminent.
The major stumbling block so far has been Russias refusal to
sign a treaty which provides for the possibility of a NATO nuclear
force armed by the United States but still under American Veto.
Russia says this would constitute proliferation. The United States
says it would not.
APPROVES AND TABLES . The Senate approved a three-year*
$4.4 billion college aid bill Monday after shelving a rider to give
home rule to the nations capital.
Approval of the bill came on a voice vote in sharp contrast to the
heated fight over the amendment by Sen. Wayne Morse, D-Ore.,
to provide self-government for Washington, D.C.
The measure was the second major education bill passed within
a week by the Senate, which also approved a $6.4 billion aid author authorization
ization authorization for elementary and secondary schools last Thursday.
The Southern bloc in Congress adamantly opposes the home rule
proposal for Washington, whose residents are more than two-thirds
Negro.
HOLDS OFF . Director Sargent Shriver of the Office of Econo Economic
mic Economic Opportunity said Tuesday his agency would hold to its decision
to cut off anti-poverty dealings with the Child Development Group
of Mississippi, found guilty of financial irregularities totaling $654,-
000.
NEAR DEATH . Handsome aluminum heir R. Roland Reynolds
lay near death Tuesday from a head injury suffered when he walked
into the whirling propeller of a $70,000 Italian-designed airplane
he was showing to a girl friend.
A team of 10 neurosurgeons and physicians hovered over the 29-
year-old son of J. Louis, Reynolds, the millionaire industrialist who
helped build a fortune while making Reynolds Aluminum a house household
hold household word.

labels On Wrong Cans

Scolds Both Candidates

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (UPI)
Rep. Ralph Turlington, speaker speakerelect
elect speakerelect for the 1967 House of Rep Representatives,
resentatives, Representatives, scolded both gu gubernatorial
bernatorial gubernatorial candidates Tuesday for
unrealistic tax Dlatforms but di directed

RED GUARD
TAKES OVER

TOKYO (UPI) A black board
jungle is rising behind the Bam Bamboo
boo Bamboo Curtin, reports from Com Communist
munist Communist China indicated Tuesday.
Militant Red Guard teenagers
at a major Peking high school
were reported to have taken over
the school and demoted its prin principal
cipal principal and eight teachers to jan janitors.
itors. janitors.
The Kyodo news agency said
the students were angered because
of the principals interference
with their attempts to study the
thought of Mao Tse-tung. Some
of the insurgents are coeds, the
report said.

OBRIEN TAKES
MORALS RAP

LANSING, Mich. (UPI) A fourth
coed testified Tuesday that a Mich Michigan
igan Michigan legislator asked her to pose
for cheesecake and stag pic pictures
tures pictures and suggested a training
course for learning certain tech techniques.
niques. techniques.
Beth Shapiro, 20, an attractive
brunette from Brookline, Mass.,
said state Sen. Bernard F. OBrien
Jr., 31, asked her bust measure measurement
ment measurement and brassiere size and told
her the pictures would be shown
to executive meetings at New
York's Empire State Building.
Her testimony followed that of
three other girls, like Miss Sha Shapiro
piro Shapiro students at Michigan State
University, who said Monday that
OBrien asked them to have sex sexual
ual sexual relations with handsome mov movie
ie movie stars for filming of stag mov movies.
ies. movies.
Convicts Escape
Thru Sewer Line
MOUNDSVILLE, W. Va. (UPI)
Four convicts tunneled their way
under the outside wall of the West
Virginia State Penitentiary Mon Monday
day Monday night and broke through into
an old sewer line. Despite heavy
sewer gas, they apparently climb climbed
ed climbed to freedom through a manhole
about a block from the prison.
Prison officials, who earlier
had believed the convicts may have
been killed by the sewer gas, said
at 11 a.m. EDT that the mens
prison clothing was found in a
yard near the manhole. Muddy
tracks also were found in the
yard.
Warden Otto C. Boles said this
indicated the convicts may have
had outside help. He said they
may have had friends waiting near
the manhole with civilian cloth clothing.
ing. clothing.
William Wallace, a deputy war warden,
den, warden, said the convicts apparently
had been working on the tunnel
for weeks, perhaps months.

rected directed most of his fire at Re Republican
publican Republican Claude Kirk.
Turlington told the State Tax
Reform Commission that Kirk pro promises
mises promises hundreds of millions ofdol-

The takeover was said to have
occurred at a school of science
and engineering.
At least 16 of the schools teacn teacners
ers teacners have joined the Red Guards
of the student body, it was re reported.
ported. reported. The youths have been at
the forefront of the cultural re revolution
volution revolution now sweeping Red China.
The Red Guards said the prin principal
cipal principal and the eight teachers were
receiving the same salary but that
their pay in the future will depend
on the masses.
A report Tuesday by the New
China News Agency tojd how Red
Guard activists had sprung to life
on other campuses, exposing sur survivals
vivals survivals of the old society.

O'Brien, a father of four from
Detroit, was pointed out by Miss
Shapiro as the man who stopped
her on an East Lansing street
last June 2.

FLORIDA BRIEFS |
EXPENSES POSTED . Claude Kirk dipped into his campaign
pocket book twice as deep as his Democratic opponent, Robert
King High, last week, spending $34,552 on the race for governor.
It was the second week in a row that Kirk reported spending more
than High. High reported campaign expenses for the past week
totalling $14,634.
As it now stands, Kirk has spent more money since the campaign
went into the final stretch at the summers end.
CHANGES SIDES ... A key supporter of Democratic Gov. Haydon
Burns during the last two campaigns has decided to back Repub Republican
lican Republican Claude Kirk for governor in the November election. The new
Kirk ally was identified as George Peck, who was the North Pinellas
County campaign chairman for Burns during the past elections.
WINS AWARD ... A Cuban exile lawyer who claims he is no pro professional
fessional professional when it comes to writing has won the first annual Jose
Marti Award.
Mario Lazos article in English depicting the Cubans struggle
to oust the Fidel Castro regime was chosen as the best by a five fiveman
man fiveman panel Monday.
Titled "Decision for Disaster: At last the truth about the Bay
of Pigs, the article was published in a magazine in 1964. The award
is given for the "most distinguished article or essay in English
published in the United States.
CUBANS RESCUED . Seven Cuban refugees clinging to three
innertubes and an inflated plastic bag were picked up Tuesday by
a Coast Guard cutter in the Florida Straits.
The Cubans were apparently forced to abandon a boat fleeing
Fidel Castros Communist island, but the Coast Guard said it did
not have the details of the rescue.
DESTROYS FISHING . The growth of major ports as Florida
river mouths can have the effect of destroying valuables salt water
fishing resources, Department of Conservation Research chief Robert
Ingle said Tuesday.
Ingle didnt offer any solution to the problem, but urged controls
over pollution in port waters. River estuaries are the richest source
of marine life in salt water, Ingle told a public hearing for the
governors advisory committee.

lars In additional state spending
without additional taxes.
Tills Is a wholly absurd and
Inconsistent position," Turlington
said.
The speaker-elect added Demo Democrat
crat Democrat Robert King High is candid
enough to admit there will have
to be some additional tax sources
found, but is unrealistic in think thinking
ing thinking that elimination can carry most
of the burden.
High told the commission the
most talked about problem in the
state is real property taxes and
he urged some way to be found
to reduce them.
The Democratic nominee also
plugged his proposal that ad va valorem
lorem valorem taxes be payable on the in installment
stallment installment plan instead of in a lump
sum.
He acknowledged sales tax ex exemptions
emptions exemptions should continue for gro groceries,
ceries, groceries, medicine and a few other
categories but said many other
exemptions were due to lobbying
rather than logic.
He rejected the idea that the in intangible
tangible intangible tax could be eliminated,
since he said this would leave
state and county pension systems
without financial support.
Turlington said he had read
Kirks white papers* and found
they contained no support for the
position that increased services
could be provided without new
taxes.
The position can be explained
in just two ways, Turlington said.
One is ignorance and the other
is fraud.
He added, Mr. Kirks spend spending
ing spending promises far exceed Mr.
Highs, and for an ultra-conserv ultra-conservative
ative ultra-conservative to exceed an ultra-liber ultra-liberal*
al* ultra-liberal* gives us cause to reflect.
It makes us wonder if perhaps
the labels are not on the wrong
cans.



bye bye tri...

Quarter System Explained

Hie quarter system will replace
the trimester system on the UF
campus beginning in the fall of
1967. J.
This system will divide the year
into 4 academic quarters of equal
lenst}i. Each will consist of 10
weeks of instruction plus 1 week
of examinations.
Specific dates arent available

TO ALL STUDENTS I
AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL jl
1I
I VN Lunch m m m Dinner I
I 11:30 2:00 CAFETERIA 4:30 8:001
lZl^N^MADlSt^C^min^fromcampusJGainesvilleShoppin^Gente^B

PAN AMERICAN
PETROLEUM CORP.
* Oil exploring and producing
ffCW:\ subsidiary of Standard Oil
nftriyw Co. (Indiana), North America
wants to see YOU I
I /jil JR?' Friday GEOLOGISTS
I kliilSPPn Til geophysicists
I C§t geology, math, physics, EE majors
I i P:' Friday ENGINEERS
I \ rjTA OCTOBER 21 chemical, civil,
loi 3
T ObfakoKl Rig m dij u
MjH 5 "Jatce Ann sign up in Placement-Bldg. H
I PAN AM a dynamic growth
I company with an eye to the
I future and the young men who
I will shape it
I an equal opportunity employer

yet uecause the Senate hasnt acted
on the calendar, but according to
Roy L. Lassiter Jr., assistant
dean of academic affairs, the first
quarter will start sometime in late
September and end before Christ Christmas.
mas. Christmas. The second quarter will start
after Jan. 1, and finish in March.
The third will start in March
and end about June 1, and the final
quarter will begin early in June

and finish in the latter part of
August.
The quarter system will not
penalize transfer students coming
to UF from schools on the tri trimester
mester trimester system because the semes semester
ter semester hours will be translated into
comparable quarter hours, said
Robert R. Wiegan, assistant dean
of education.
The semester hour is 2/3 of the
quarter hour, according to Wieg Wiegm
m Wiegm an. (If a student transfered from
a junior college with 60 semester
hours, he would have 90 quarter
hours.)
Minimum and maximum load
requirements will remain un unchanged
changed unchanged under the quarter system.
The minimum hours a full-time
student must carry will still be
12, with the maximum for the
university, 20.
Wiegman also said that the nor normal
mal normal academic year for the student
will be 3 quarters.
fidelity Union Life Insurance
376-1208

Wednesday. October 12, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

CURRENT THEOLOGIANS
APPROVE OF CAPITALISM

By Louis Cassels
United Press International
i
Is capitalism a morally accep acceptable
table acceptable way of organizing man's
economic activity?
Had you asked that question
during the 1930s or 19405, most
leading Protestant theologians
would have answered with an em emphatic
phatic emphatic no.
Such giants of Protestant thought
as Karl Barth, EnHtT Brunner,
Paul Tillich and Reinhold Niebuhr
were outspoken in their criticism
of the capitalist system. They said
capitalism produced serious in inequalities
equalities inequalities in the distribution of
wealth, permitted the strong to
exploit the weak and put private
profit about the public good.
But capitalism, as practiced in
the United States, has undergone
tremendous changes in the past few
decades. And as it has changed,
so has the moral judgement which
Protestant theologians pronounce
upon it.
Hie shift in additudes was strik strikingly
ingly strikingly evident this week in a talk
delivered before the National In Industrial
dustrial Industrial Conference Board by the
Rev. Dr. John C. Bennett, pre-

sident of Union Theological Sem Seminary
inary Seminary *n New York. Dr. Bennett
belongs to the liberal wing of Pro Protestantism
testantism Protestantism which was most cri critical
tical critical of capitalism in the past.
He said modern capitalism is
morally tolerable partly be because
cause because of two developments that
have taken place over the stren strenuous
uous strenuous opposition of those who dom dominated
inated dominated our capitalistic insti institutions.
tutions. institutions. The developments are:
The rise of the labor move movenr
nr movenr ent to check the arvitrary pow power
er power of employers.
'J. The social legislation that
has gone far to create a wel welfare
fare welfare society and has corrected
many of the injustices of tradi traditional
tional traditional capitalism.
Management has also made a
significant contribution, he said,
by its growing acceptance of so social
cial social responsibility as one of the
factors that must be weighed in
business decisions.
Even the Communists have
helped to make capitalism more
attractive to moral theologians.
By demonstrating the evils of a
collectivism that centralizes poli political
tical political and economic power, com communism
munism communism has underscored the value
of the freedoms which are made
possible when there are many
centers of initiative and power.
Finally, said Dr. Bennett, any
fair moral judgement of contem contemporary
porary contemporary capitalism must recognize
that the profit motive for all
that it appeals to mans selfish
acquisitive instrinct nonethe nonetheless
less nonetheless imparts a creative dy dynamism
namism dynamism to American society.
The energies that capitalism
has stimulated because of its use
of the profit incentive have led to
the great benefits as well as to
the many ills of modern indus industrial
trial industrial society, he said. On ba balance,
lance, balance, the process has surely been
constructive.
ALUMNI
ELECTION
A meeting of the UF Alumni
Club will be held at 7:30 p.m.
tomorrow in the Medical Sciences
Building Auditorium oftheJ.Hillis
Miller Health Center on campus.
The business session will pre precede
cede precede a movie showing of the Flor Florida-Florida
ida-Florida Florida-Florida State University foot football
ball football game at 8 p.m.
The general meeting is being
held to elect club officers and
directors for the coming year,
according to Fred Clark, local
club president. Hie early vote
is scheduled so that those elec elected
ted elected may take office Jan. 1 to
correspond with terms for new
officers of the Alumni Associa Association.
tion. Association.
Everyone in the county who has
contributed to the 1966 Alumni
Loyalty Fund is eliglbletovote
in the election, Clark said.
Print Taken
From Exhibit
A print from the Sister Mary
Corlta exhibit was discovered
missing last Thursday after being
hung for one day in the Florida
Union.
The print is 30x36 and made
of white pellon material with the
words Open Wide written ap approximately
proximately approximately 20 high on it. A
quote from the 23rd Psalm and
one from President Johnson are
found on the lower portion of it.
Anyone having information con concerning
cerning concerning the print should contact
Anne Strickland, craft shop, phone
UF, extension 2951.

Page 5



Page 6

i, Hie Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 12,1966

The Florida Alligator
'AMiq wfij. L
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR DICK DENNIS
Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecessaniy reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is the editorial in the left
column.
No Need Not To
Controversy has stirred around the new newly
ly newly formed Florida Socialist Union since
its inception.
The very name of the organization
causes great alarm to some. Others have
found it a rallying point for their cause.
Consequently, many students and faculty
members are wondering whats going to
happen when it comes before the Commit Committee
tee Committee on Student Organizations in about a
week.
The committee will then decide wheth whether
er whether or not it should recognize the Soc Socialist
ialist Socialist Union and give it the benefits
reaped by other student organizations.
We think it should.
Dean of Men Frank Adams says that
other left-wing organizations, such as the
Student Group for Equal Rights and the
Student Peace Union, reflect the same
views of the Socialist Union.
Dean of Student Affairs Lester Hale
says he doesnt see the need for the
organization.
Dean Adams statement just doesnt
picture the situation properly. For in instance,
stance, instance, Jan Garrett secretary of the
Socialist Union was never a member
of either of the other two organizations.
Neither are the most members of SGER
or the Student Peace Union members of
the Socialist group.
Each of the three organizations is form formed
ed formed around one specific area, be it Civil
Rights, the war in Viet Nam or Social Socialism.
ism. Socialism. The students of one disagree with
members of another in many cases.
Dean Hale seems to be placing him himself
self himself as overlord of the situation when
he says he does not see the need for
the organization.
That, Dean Hale, is a matter of opin opinion.
ion. opinion. Is there a need for the UF Ski
Club or Caving Club? Certainly not any
more than the Socialist Union.
The Socialist Union was asked to throw
UF out of its title when it first formed
because an organization which uses the
University in its name reflects its views
to a certain -degree. It did so willing willingly.
ly. willingly.
Since the University is no longer tied
to the organization we see no reason
why it shouldnt be recognized.
There is no need that it not be.
Even Sorrier
Throw in the crying towel, FSU.
The game is over, the score is final
and still the controversy rages. Was Lane
Fenner in bounds or out of bounds when
he caught a pass from Gary Pajcic in
the last 17 seconds of Saturdays game?
Nobody knows, especially Seminole Head
Coach Bill Peterson, who, according to
a story in Tuesdays Miami Herald,wants
a rematch in the Gator Bowl.
Official Doug Moseley was in a good
position to make the call. Bill Peterson,
47,000 spectators and several newsman
were not.
We think Moseleys call made with
no hesitation at all ought to be honored.
Amen.

THINKING OUT LOUD
The Indians Coming

(EDITORS NOTE: Writer
Moorhead, a sensitive man, was
unable to abide the strain of bu bureaucratic
reaucratic bureaucratic cerebrations. He has
resigned his position as produc production
tion production manager of Student Publica Publications,
tions, Publications, now labors in quiet re repose
pose repose covering the beach blanket
bingo beat for the Associated Press
in Miami. For those interested
in keeping up with his journalis journalistic
tic journalistic progress, writer Moorhead gets
one byline on the third Thursday
of every monthPMs only.)
By JIM MOORHEAD
Alligator Columnist
MIAMI--- work in Miami? Os
course. I have always wanted to
work in a foreign country. It furn furnishes
ishes furnishes some of the best exper experience
ience experience a journalist can acquire.
And, it is nice to be able to
work in an alien land so close
to home.
fNo one is quite
sure just who Mi Miami
ami Miami belongs to.
Some say the In Indians
dians Indians retain title.
This is difficult tc
determine sinct
no one in Miam
will admit to be being
ing being an Indian
. I However, mam
Moorhead are in evidence
particularly in the Miami
Beach area . which they do
own, incidentally. Their dark
hair, impressive noses and gaudy
dress are unmistakable. Their cle cleverly
verly cleverly contrived accents, smack smacking
ing smacking heavily of New York, are a
thinly disguised attempt to throw
the curious foreigner off the track.
Indians have, of course, always
been good at covering their tracks.
Some ignorant observers con contend
tend contend that Fidel Castro is in con control
trol control of Miami. Nothing could be
further from the truth. It is true
that many of the prime minis ministers
ters ministers former friends and acquain acquaintances
tances acquaintances have hopped aboard their
small pleausure boats and skit skittered
tered skittered across the Florida Straits
by the thousands to take up re residence
sidence residence here.
But they consistently reject Fi Fidels
dels Fidels pleas to come along. Be Because
cause Because of his piggish ways, they
have told him they would take
south Florida and he can keep
Cuba for himself as long as he
doesnt try to come to Miami.
(The U.S. State Department seems
to look with favor on this arrange arrangement,
ment, arrangement, also.) They would like, in
the near future, to work a trade
with the bearded one. Until they
take actual control, this is some sometime
time sometime off . several months at
least.
Others say Miami belongs to
rich northerners. This is an in ingenious
genious ingenious illusion fashioned by the
Miami Chamber of Commerce and
seasonally cast like a spell over
the starry-eyed Yankee hordes.
These unfortunate souls are mes mesmerized
merized mesmerized as they arrive into think thinking
ing thinking they do own the town. By sea seasons
sons seasons end they literally do not own
the Solarcaine on their backs. The
hock shops back home do a land
office business. Then the pawn pawnbrokers
brokers pawnbrokers come south . and its
all a vicious circle.
Hie truth of the matter is tnat
the ownership of Miami is divided
between two groups--the George
Smathers Home for the Aged, and
The Miami Herald, which also
owns Latin America.
A third party has made ser serious
ious serious inroads into the fabric of this
Power Elite. In unwarranted haste,
the controlling interests have suc succeeded
ceeded succeeded in directing the third
partys appetites toward Tallahas Tallahas
Tallahas see. In the well-known manner of
such skull duggery, this situation
could backfire and lead Miami
to being shook loose from its

present state to actually become
a part of the State of Florida.
Modern historians are not sure

' l'. A i ]
/ jKr JKg- Mn /I
R f fl
|fr Vj BS^^lafi3Bifc
Our Man Hoppe
By ART HOPPE ""
Governor Brown and Mr. Reagan have reached a statesman statesmanlike
like statesmanlike agreement not to discuss race riots including what causes
them, how to handle them and what should be done to prevent
them.
And you certainly have to hand it to both candidates for their
high degree of statesmanship in declining to debate an issue
that, no matter which side they took, could only cost them votes.
Os course, Governor Brown, a more experienced statesman,
feels the same way about crime, the courts, fair housing and
pot smoking at the University of California. Such issues, he
say, should not be injected into politics.
Mr. Reagan, whos learning, says that even elemental states statesmanship
manship statesmanship forbids discuss such extraneous topics of little inter interest.
est. interest. Like the John Birch Society. Or experience.
And each, of course, has made it clear time and again that
he will never stoop to engaging in personalities with his no nogood
good nogood mud-slinging opponent.
Well, with those matters disposed of, let us imagine a Great
Television Debate.
Hi, there, Ron, and my fellow Californians out there in the
television audience. Its certainly good to be here today to dis discuss
cuss discuss in statesmanlike fashion the issues we face.
Gosh, Governor, I feel the same way and Im glad you made
it.
Excuse me, Ron, youre not implying I was afraid to come
or that I might bumble around and not find the studio or some something?
thing? something?
Golly, no, Governor. I think of you as a courageous, intel intelligent
ligent intelligent and decisive leader.
Golly-gee, thanks, Ron. You know I feel the same way about
you. In my experience...
In your what?
(SEE OUR PAGE 7)
Florida Alligator Staff
NICK ARROYO CAROL HEFNER GENE NAIL
Photo Editor Society Editor Editorial Assistant
JO ANN LANGWORTHY NEWT SIMMONS
General Assignment Editor Wire Editor
STAFF WRITERS Bob Beck, Sue Froemke, Barbara Gefen,
Maury dicker, Kathie Keim, Jean Mamlin, Frank Shepherd, Aggie
Fowles, Justine Hartman.
ASSISTANT EDITORS Judy Redfern, Sherrie Braswell, Toni
Giliberti, Joe Torchia, Nick Tatro, Tyler Tucker, John Briggs,
KenGarst, Margie Green.
In order to better cover campus events the Alligator uses
reporters from the School of Journalism and Communications.
Their bylines are followed by Alligator Correspondent.

whether to compare this prospect]
with the Discovery of
or the Invention of Hie EdselJ



And What Will
It Be Next Year?
By JIM CALLAHAN
Alligator Columnist
Have the students of FSU degenerated to fanatics and name namecallers?
callers? namecallers? What was once a spirited rivalry seems to be turning
to a wild-eyed hatred. A student body which condones and part participates
icipates participates in the profanities and hatreds exhibited at the FSU-
Florida game, cannot be considered mature or responsible. The
Florida Flambeau, once considered a respectable representation of
college newspapers followed suite by printing *Go to Hell, Ga Gators'
tors' Gators' on their masthead, completely Ignoring journalistic ideals
and practices. A final and more damning blot on the character
of Florida State are the rumors (if true) that some Florida
students staying on the FSU campus, were mobbed and beaten
after the game.
A rivalry should not be typlified by the frenzied actions
of irresponsible students. When this balloons from remote
aspects to that of general acceptance, then someone is going
to be seriously hurt If this happens, I venture to say that this
prized and traditional contest between the two schools will be
terminated.
SPIRIT is a good thing, it increases pride in school and
builds the motivation necessary to play your heart out. Both
the Seminole and Gator teams had this spirit and it was possibly
the hardest fought game in the series' history. Won by a close
AND contested score, it was ecstasy for.the Gators and heart heartbreaking
breaking heartbreaking for FSU. Yet the Seminole flayers showed better
dlsipline and control than the students themselves, who weren't
involved in the action and therefore couldn't have experienced
the same deep disappointment as the players themselves. If
either of our schools repeat FSU's spirit-building" performance
in next year's game, it could easily erupt into uncontrolled
violence.
Admittedly, we ourselves, are not purity personified when
it comes to irresponsible actions. There have been many cases
involving the asinine actions of Florida students (excluding
mere practical jokes) over this and other issues. The so-call so-called
ed so-called *riot' on 13th street Saturday afternoon might be considered
an instance. I am of the opinion that, had it notbeen for arrival
of Dean of Student Affairs Lester Hale and his comrades in inarms
arms inarms (enter the Gainesville Police Department with snarling
German Shepard, billy clubs, emerald-green hogs and con contemptuous
temptuous contemptuous attitudes) that the riot would have been no more
than an unsactioned pep rally, which would gradually dispersed
when the ATO cheering section lost their voices. But there were
instances of irresponsibility and blind stupidity on the parts
of limited segments, within the group, such as the deliberate
smashing of the Colonial Manors glass entrance door.
The redeeming factor of our actions is that they were the
unthinking expressions of separate, uncoordinated and uncondoned
elements, rather than the actions of the student body in gen general.
eral. general.
As a resident of Tallahassee, I am deeply disappointed in
the actions of the students of FSU and tremendously glad that
Florida students showed the maturity of responsible people.
Our Man Hoppe
(FROM PAGE 6)
Whoops, sorry, Ron. No offense. I certainly wasnt going
to bring that subject up. Just a figure of speech.
Thats all right, Governor. But I think we should begin our
debate. What would you like to talk about?
WeU...No, I suppose we shouldnt get into that.
Well, how about.. No, theres no telling where that might
lead.
I know what, Ron. I could talk about my record.
Do you think thats fair, Governor?
Oh, I guess not, seeing you dont have a...1 mean, I suppose
youre right. That is, accurate, not right in the sense 0f...We11.
Why dont you talk first, Ron?
Well. All right. Ill come right out and say flatly Im for
good government. No offense, Governor.
No offense taken, Ron. And Ill answer you spiritedly by
saying Im for good government, too. Moreover, Im against
bad government.
Yes, me, too.
Well. .
We 11...
But lets have faith. Lets have faith that as the campaign
waxes hot both men will rise above statesmanship and achieve
the heights of true partisan politics including smears,
character assassinations and vicious counter charges. Theyre
the lifeblood of democracy.
Besides, theres always the off chance a candidate will get
so riled up that when an issue comes along hell forget to duck.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
accepts all letters to the editor. Due to
space limitations, however, we as hr that
letters not exceed 350 word Typewrit
ten and double-spaced letters are prefer preferred,
red, preferred, and all must be signed. Names will
be withheld upon request. Editors reserve
the right to select or reject letters for
publication.

EDITOR:
Re: Tom Cushmans Clear Con Conscience
science Conscience
In Mr. Cushmans letter, he attempted
to make us believe his replacements were
for the good of the student body. He
explained that vacancies must be filled
when an important bill is pending. Yes,
Mr. Cushman, perhaps they should but
with a lUC to fill Forestrys vacancy?
Did you fail to check Mr. Mark Arm Armstrongs
strongs Armstrongs classification or could it be you
were trying to put one over on the
student body? I dont believe I can re remember
member remember you even hinting to the Fores Forestry
try Forestry students that you were looking for
a replacement. How does this affect your
clear conscience? Perhaps this is why
you wouldnt let the president or vice
president know about the replacements.
I could go on with descrepancies in
your clear conscience, but it boils

LBJ Wants To Eat His Cake

EDITOR:
President Johnson wants to have
his rice cake and eat it too. There
appears to be developing two dia diametrically
metrically diametrically opposed policies with
regard to the Vietnamese war,
one being a second -peace of offensive,
fensive, offensive, the other being prepara preparation
tion preparation for a significant escalation of
the conflict.
It is generally agreed among the
Administrations knowledgeable
supporters and critics alike that
the current attempts to find some
basis for negotiations with Hanoi
are serious and sincere* Ambas Ambassador
sador Ambassador Goldbergs proposals at the
opening session of the UN Gen General
eral General Assembly, the numerous high highlevel
level highlevel Soviet-American talks held
last week in Washington and New

Kimball Doesn 9 t
Represent Him

EDITOR:
As a veteran, may I say that Bart Kimball (letter to the editor,
Oct. 10) does not represent my opinion when he lables anyone a
hack group of malcontents and unwashed protesters. Whatever
SERVICE to the community is, it is not calling someone a left leftwinger
winger leftwinger in a letter to the editor, or, for that matter, peon, right rightwinger,
winger, rightwinger, nitpicker, or ex-paratrooper (except where that term
applies).

In an effort to render a ser service,
vice, service, let me clarify the hopelessly
(judging from previous letters)
misunderstood proposed Auxiliary
Campus Police Unit. First, any r
one can volunteer, although per persons
sons persons over 21 are prefered. Second,
its primary function would be to
supplement the regular police in
an emergency. That is, the Aux Auxiliary
iliary Auxiliary Unit would be used to per perform
form perform normal police functions, such
as campus patrol, in non-emer non-emergency
gency non-emergency areas, so that the regular
police could deal with the emer emergency.
gency. emergency. An emergency might be
an explosion, a fire, the opening
of a sink hole under the Anthro Anthropology
pology Anthropology Departments office, a large
riot, etc. Auxiliary units with sim similar
ilar similar supplementary functions are
quite common throughout the coun country.
try. country.
If I may be allowed one jab,
I would suggest that before the
student body shouts anything about
mistletoe, for any reason, as sug suggested
gested suggested by Mr. Sinoff, they should
first get to their feet.
G. R. STRASENBURGH,
3AS

Cushmans Conscience

Wednesday, October 12, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

York, the scheduled meeting this
week of Soviet Foreign Min Minister
ister Minister Andrei Gromyko and the
President and Dean Rusk and
the superficially-explained post postponement
ponement postponement of the Manila war*'
chiefs conference until the end of
this month all indicate that the
Administration is trying every
acceptable avenue to reach some
understanding with North Viet
Nam.
Yet, the Administration doesnt
really anticipate any success
in this endeavor and is proceeding
on the assumption that it will 'ill.
This will probably prove to be a
selfulfilling prophesy. The Manila
conference is being held to solid solidify
ify solidify the support of those Asian na-

Cheerleaders
Doing Job
EDITOR:
We, the members of the per percussion
cussion percussion section of the Best
band in the SEC," The Gator
Band, would like to extend our
appreciation for the fine job that
this years cheerleading squad has
been doing at football games.
It is really a pleasure to work
with such a cooperative group.
While we agree that past char charges
ges charges made by the student body
against the cheerleaders have been
called for, we feel that this years
squad is the most effective and
best coordinated in years.
Because of this, we urge other
students to join in the cheers and
back the team. This year we have
an excellent chance to capture the
SEC crown for the first time
but not without student support.
Therefore we urge students to
work with this the best cheer cheerleading
leading cheerleading squad ever and show the
team that we are behind them
all the way.
GATOR BAND
PERCUSSION SECTION

down to the unethical political nature ol
your replacements. Mark Armstrong was
your qjioice, Mr. Cushman; he was cer certainly
tainly certainly not Forestrys.
Enclosed is a copy of a letter to
Fred Breeze concerning a Forestry nom nomination
ination nomination to Legislative Council.
CARLYLE SWOFFORD, Jr.
DEAR MR. BREEZE:
The School of Forestry has selected
Mr. John Berry, 6FY, as a represen representative
tative representative to the legislative council to fill
the unexpired term of Mr. Robert Per Perrine.
rine. Perrine. This selection has been made through
the Forestry Club which consists of the
students and faculty in Forestry.
WILLIAM F. BURNS,
President, Forestry Club

berg announces the new propos proposal,
al, proposal, Secretary McNamara an announces
nounces announces plans for stepped-up mil military
itary military purchases. To use the lan language
guage language of the Pentagons, this is
counter productive contingency
planning, while the White House
may argue that this is merely a
carrot-and-stick approach, show showing
ing showing Hanoi how good we can be
if they cooperate and how bad
we can be if they dont, the
North Vietnamese interpret this
inconsistent behavior as evidence
of our insincerety.
The problem with this peace
offensive," as with the one oi
last January, is the lack of pat patience
ience patience Washington can muster to
give Hanoi a real chance to
respond. Two weeks now, or
37 days before, is not necessarily
sufficient time for a sharp
shift in North Vietnamese policy
to take place. The United States
must not only continue to declare
its intention of bringing the dispute
to the conference table, but
it must also take positive action
to demonstrate this. Hie current
level of pressure which the Unit United
ed United States is applying to North
Vietnam and the National Lib Liberation
eration Liberation Front doesnt necessarily
have to be lowered, but stop stopping
ping stopping the increase of pressure
and holding the level constant
would be one way of demonstra demonstrating
ting demonstrating American intentions without
seriously endangering the posi position
tion position of the American forces there.
This, unfortunately, does not ap appear
pear appear to be forthcoming. The Ad Administration
ministration Administration is now trapped by its
own calendar. Unless Hanoi soon
accepts the Goldberg proposals,
and this appears to be unlikely,
the tempo of the war will be
radically stepped up by Washing Washington.
ton. Washington. The great danger is that this
open-ended escalation will begin to
snowball out of control.
ROBERT S. COHEN

tions now contributing to the Amer American
ican American effort. The ordering of one oneyear
year oneyear involuntary extensions of pi pilots
lots pilots /tours of duty in the Viet
Nam theater could be the first
step in a major escalation. The
Washington Post reported last
week that American officials
in Saigon believed the possibility
to be strong that American land
forces would make limited thrusts
into North Vietnamese territory
after the November elections.
Evidently President Johnson be believes
lieves believes it most expedient to pre prepare
pare prepare for both a significant im improvement
provement improvement and a continued worsen worsening
ing worsening in the prospects for a neg negotiated
otiated negotiated settlement. Thus, at the
same hour that Ambassador Gold-

Page 7



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silvermans
SUSAN Silverman models a sugar plum 100% wool Country set.
Blouse is cotton shallis paisley print with long sleeves and a tie
collar in a lilac and plum color. Susan also wears a Jockey cap in
matching plum. All from Silvermans. 225 W. Univ. Ave.
\
* -..1 flippy '% \ ii|
tropical pontiac
WORTH its weigrn in gola . tne uncomparaDie oeauty and styling
elegance of the Pontiac Bonneville for 1967. Tigress, Linda Rowland,
completes the captivating picture of a dream that could be yours!
Stop by Tropical Pontiac, 220 NW Bth Ave. and see the complete
line of new Pontiacs for *67.

4.
jerrys
FUN and food just togeuier and Jerry's
Is the place for both. Jerrys have 2 locations
to serve U of F students on North and South
13th Street. So for any meal, snacks or after
dates or parties, make Jerrys your head headquarters.
quarters. headquarters.

* JP+4+*****. s | M SMmM& ,-|

A TYPICAL GATOR DA*
GAINESVILLE N

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FALL days a
Donigans is re



KY with the help of
MERCHANTS

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donigans
days ahead and Carol Simpson is ready in a wool coat and matching handbag from Donigan's.
ans is ready to outfit you for fall and winter with the latest in campus sport wear.

.:/
record bar
EE CORDS records records . after all It is our first name. Come
in and browse as Marty Parrish, Tri Delt is, youll find music to
suit your taste and every need at the Record Bar.
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i
iohnston photography
THIS is a list of fraternity and sorority composites pnotograpned
by Sam Johnston last year: Phi Delts, ZTA, ATO, DX, Pi Lams,
AEPhi, Kappa Sigma, Sigma Kappa, AOPi, Lambda Chis, KD, Phi
Kappa Tati, SAE, Delta Tau Delta, ADPi, AEPi, DPhiE, and Sigma
Nu. Sam says For the very best composite U of F has ever seen,
please contact me soon and avoid the possibility of being left out,
time.
I can photograph and complete only 25 composites in a years time.
JH ':Vv -ilj^tt^u
H
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university city bank
LINDA McNulty KD learns the safety features of the time lock pro protecting
tecting protecting the money vault of the University City Bank cash and safety
deposit boxes. The time lock prevents premature opening of the
vault even if the right combination were known.



IGATOR CLASSIFIEDS I

for sale
NEW YAMAHA 305; chrome, me metallic
tallic metallic blue, 4,000 miles, oil
injection, $75 and take over pay payments.
ments. payments. Call Jim Glass, 378-1281.
(A-30-3t-c).
TWO SCUBA tanks, old double
barreled shotgun. Come to 404
NE 2nd Ave. 5-7 p.ro. (A (A---30-3t-c).
--30-3t-c). (A---30-3t-c).
MUST SELL 1955 Champion 8x42
one bedroom trailer, air condition conditioned,
ed, conditioned, nice, clean, roomy, $1 JO.
(A-30-3t-c).
1965 HARLEY Davidson 50cc. Must
sell, only 1,700 miles, perfect
chrome and paint. Terrific Motor Motorcycle
cycle Motorcycle for student use. $175, call
378-5339. (A-30-2t-c).
1965. STEREO tape deck, Muntz
Manual, includes four speakers,
tape and installation. Like New,
S7O. Call 372-9438 (Lester). (A (A---26-st-c).
--26-st-c). (A---26-st-c).
FOR SALE Hunter boat, 14
foot, three inches Boston Whaler,
tri-hull design with 35 horsepow horsepower
er horsepower Evenrude motor. Boat, trailei
and battery new. Will sell to first
reasonable ofTer. 372-4129, after
6 p.m. (A-29-4t-c).
MARTIN-FRERES Woodwind Cla Clarinet,
rinet, Clarinet, with case, like new $75;
Hilton Deluxe Trumpet, with case
good condition, SSO; Smith and
Corona (Classic 12) portable type typewriter,
writer, typewriter, standard size keyboard
with case, lik new, SBS, after
5:30 p.m. 376-1469. (A-29-st-c).
11 I
m
YAMAHA motorcycle, 80 cc., less
than 1 year old, perfect condi condition,
tion, condition, 3,000 miles, $250, call 378-
5741. (A-29-st-p).
1960 LAMBRETTE $l7O, excellent
condition, call 378-2986. (A (A---28-st-c)
--28-st-c) (A---28-st-c)
for rent
FURNISHED apartment, 3 blocks
from campus, air conditioned, S9O
a mo. all utilities except cooking
gas. Men only, call 372-8840 aft after
er after 5 and on weekends. (B-21-10t (B-21-10tc).
c). (B-21-10tc).
+* 1 ' i M. m*m
AIR CONDITIONED trailer and
cabana, 2 bedroom, in nice park
on busline. S6O monthly, avail available
able available October 1. Rent or sell.
372-2914. (B-22-10t-c).
Sparkling modern air conditioned
two bedroom apartment furnished.
Carport and storage, no lease, SIOO
for two, slls for three. 3314
NW 21st Street, 376-0894. 08-30-lOt-c).
30-lOt-c).
FIRST RUN INGAINESVILLE J
IriMX M
kOND/Mfe 1
feBIBHANoIf Paul]
BjimEuiiM Newman I
I STARTS FRIDAY I
"THE WILD ANGELS" I
also "FIREBALL 500" |

for rent
FURNISHED apartment, available,
October 20, 1 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath, kitchen and living room,
spacious rooms quite area. Couple
or graduate students preferred.
S9O monthly, 923 NE 3 Ave. 378-
2436. (B- 29-lOt-c).
wanted
WANTED: Female roommate to
share 2 bedroom apartment, rent,
S4O a month. Call 372-0317 after
5 p.m. or come to Summit House
Apt; Apt. E-10. (C-30-2t-c).
WANTED: Portable Electric type typewriter.
writer. typewriter. 714 SW 16th Ave. Apt.
203. (C-30-4t-c).
WANTED Photographers! Will
work with the Public Relations
committee of the Florida Union
Board. Contact Marvin Lyons at
378-3527 or Rick Dupuis at 378-
5529. (C-30- -c).
MALE roommate wanted to shar*
two bedroom air conditioned Sum Summit
mit Summit House apartment. S4O month monthly,
ly, monthly, plus 1/4 utilities. 376-8133.
(C-27-3t-c).
WANTED TWO FEMALE room roommates
mates roommates to share modern, air con conditioned
ditioned conditioned apartment. $45.00 monthly
plus 1/3 utilities. Call 378-3925
(C-28-st-c)
Privacy male roommate own
room, central heat and air, 1/2
block behind Norman Hall, call
Dalton, 378-4051. (C-29-st-c).
RIDE wanted to Athens, Georgia.
Weekend of Oct. 22. Contact Her Herbert
bert Herbert Bronwell, 1062 Hume Hall.
Phone 372-9460. (C-27-st-p).
lost-found
LOST Lafayette 12 transitor
AM/FM/SW radio at the FSU
game-Florida student section.
Please call Stuart at 376-7873.
REWARD. (L-30-3t-c).
LOST DOG, part collie, four mon months
ths months old, wearing red collar ans answers
wers answers to Ceasar. Reward call
372-5976 after 5 p.m. Brown and
white (L-28-3t-c)
I JjPwwWf.Jf
1 BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
H STRICTLY
|| ADULT ENTERTAINMENT
I Euzhbeth
Thvlor
Richhrd
Burton
IN ERNEST UMMUTS PRODUCTION
OF EDWARD ALBEE'S
I Who's
I Hfrmd Os
I Vhmsmuh
I WOOLF?
I At 9:10 Only
litokblot-^oT
II 07 THE BRAVE J
|*FBAJKOTffR^

Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 12, 1966

help wanted
WAITRESS WANTED Pizza Hut,
1723 SW 13th St. Contact Jack
Shelton between 1:30 and 4:30 af afternoons.
ternoons. afternoons. (E-28-st-c)
TWO needy male students repre representing
senting representing terrific new line of cos cosmetics.
metics. cosmetics. Must have needy female
students to demonstrate and sell
for them part time. Profits de depend
pend depend on initiative. Call 378-5432
after 7 p.m. (E-27-st-p).
WANTED: CARRIER TO DELIVER
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
WEEKDAY MORNINGS, MUST
HAVE Ist and 3rd PERIODS FREE
MON-FRIDAY. CONTACT BER BERNARD
NARD BERNARD MACKEY 376-3261, ext
2832 or 378-4052. (E-30-tf-nc).
autos
1955 CHEVY, V-8, Automatic, runs
good $295. Call Tom, 378-2259.
(G-30-2t-c).
1962 MONZA Convertable. S6OO.
Call 376-5457 after 5 p.m. (G (G---30-3t-c).
--30-3t-c). (G---30-3t-c).
MUST SELL 1963 MG Midget Road Roadster,
ster, Roadster, good condition, 33,000 miles,
S7OO. 372-7681, ask for Bob. (G (G---30-3t-c).
--30-3t-c). (G---30-3t-c).
1965 VOLVO P-1800S Sport Coupe.
8,800 true miles, super charger,
$2,750, call 372-4842 or 376-0611.
(G-30-10t-c).
1962 RAMBLER, good condition,
radio and heater, seat belts, S6OO,
376-5790. (G-30-3t-c).
1959 CHEVY convertable, excel excellent
lent excellent tires, top, and paint. 714
SW 16th Avenue, Apt. 203, after
6 p.m. (G-30-4t-c).
1963 VW EXCELLENT condition,
$995. Call 376-0077 (G-25-st-c).
1965 MUSTANG Convertible, V V-8,
-8, V-8, Stick Shift. $250. and take over
payments. Call 376-9545. after 5
p.m. (G-21-10t-c).

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autos
1960 MG 1600, engine rebuilt
this summer, new paint, new
tires, $495.00 376-4764 (G-28-
st-c)
'"3NJI I i .. !' i
real estate
BRICK, three bedroom 1 1/2 bath,
double garage, fireplace oakfloors,
air conditioned, near University.
University Ext. 2525 days; after
5 p.m. and on weekends, 376-
8142. (I-29-st-c).
personal
FREE kittens waiting for new
home. See after 2:30 p.m. 372-
8325. (J- 27-3 t-c).
NEEDED DESPERATELY cap capable,
able, capable, experienced person, to take
over my job as maid for three
coeds, while I am playing in the
football games on weekends. Du Duties
ties Duties Include grocery shopping, de defrosting
frosting defrosting refridgerator and as assorted
sorted assorted household chores. Contact
me, John (one of the three ori original
ginal original hog brothers) Preston, at
Sledd H, 372-9341. (J-30-2t-c).
/a\ /ajY
( 1:40 ){ 4:15 )
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trade
WANTED Austin 850 or Mini-
Cooper. Can trade American se sedan
dan sedan or English Sports Car. Call
Tom, 378-2750. (D-26-2t-c).
services
FLY for pleasure at worlds low lowest
est lowest cost. Join Trangle Flying Club,
372-0634. (M-27-4t-c).
IN A HURRY? Passports and ap applications
plications applications photos. Childrens pho photos,
tos, photos, commercias and special prob problems.
lems. problems. Call Wesley-Roosevelt Stu Studios,
dios, Studios, 372-0300 or see at 909 NW
6th Street. (M-30-10t-c).
VISIT Gator Groomer where ro romance
mance romance blooms. Next door to Uni University
versity University Post Office. Self Service
and Professional Laundry, dry
cleaning. (M-30-10t-c).
RUBY'S ALTERATIONS: 1238 SW
3rd Avenue; Call, 376-8506. (M (M---30-lt-c).
--30-lt-c). (M---30-lt-c).
FLORIDA STATE THEATRES
1:20 5:22
ps3*****34S 3:21 7:23
BBBainlH 9:24
MStmittt
HnnutiNn Bhmii
Eitrltitli!
w Janes Barter
%I1 Jeasmin
Snzane Pleslette
jrSf iiiilaiasHQ
DOWNTOWN
laj f 1.11 1m 1:20
J T 3:25 5;3q
NORMAN /iAILERS
BEST SELUNG SHOCKER
STUART WHITMAN JANET LEIGH
jub
BARRY SULLIVAN



If You're Still
Holding a Receipt
for a
1966 SEMINOLE
You Must Pick
Up Your Copy
THIS WEEK |
mmmm j 1 t
g nuH|
WHY
PATRONIZE
GATOR
ADVERTISERS?
II There are lots of good-reasons. They are a special I
|| group of people, who advertise in our Gator be- 1
II cause they like doing business with UF students, 1
H they deal in the goods and services that we spec 1
I ifically want, and they know this is the best way I
Ito get their message across to us. Most of all, 1
I their advertising contributes to The Alligators I
I success, so they are as much a part of The Alii 1
I gator gang as the editor and tne staff. If we, the 1
I students, are the backbone of the university |
I paper, then the advertisers are the life s blood. I
B So do business with them. Theylre^on^oar^i^-^^^

DISCUSS PROBLEMS
Landlord Meets Administrator

By FRANK SHEPHERD
Alligator Staff Writer
Off-campus landlords and UF
administrators met last Thursday
afternoon in Tigert Hall to dis discuss
cuss discuss off-campus problems in the
first of a series of meetings de designed
signed designed to help both groups become
more efficient in handling prob problems
lems problems when they arise.
Administration officials lead by
Director of Off-Campus Housing
Carl Opp expressed the Univer Universitys
sitys Universitys continuing interest in
landlords and all their problems,
including disciplinary.
Visitations of the opposite sex
in apartments late at night and
collecting rents promptly marked
some of the issues brought up most
frequently.
Concerning visits of the opposite
sex, Dean of Men, Frank T. Adams,
said that it (visiting) has been
with us since the Garden of Eden.
Supervision is the problem and
where does intrusion border on in invasion
vasion invasion of privacy. He went on
to point out that the Student Hand-
Pawnshop Collateral
NEW YORK (UPD What
articles do most people pawn
when they are in need of ready
cash?
Well, in New York City, the
items most frequently used as
collateral against loans at pawn
shops are diamonds, watches,
jewelry, furs, silver, cameras
and projectors, radios, musical
instruments, optical goods and
typewriters, according to the
New York Pawnbrokers Infor Information
mation Information Bureau

FELLA'S and GALS
MAKE SURE YOUR CLOTHES FIT PROPERLY
Look your best at all ti nes
Bring your garments to the U Sh' for complete
alteration services. For your convf ,ience we offer
fast service on men & ladies alterations 6 daya
week.
Youre dressed when your clothes come
from or are altered to fit properly by:
pnthcrsit^r
Carolyn Plaza
Bring your garments in for a free estimate.
Dippy Sell (C \
How about a delicious
Ice Cream Soda
Made with two scoops of
FRENCH Ice Cream
and topped with Real Whipped
Cream
only 24< today at
across from the Univ. City Bank

Wednesday, October 12, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

book discusses these regulations.
Some landlords, apparently dis dissatisfied,
satisfied, dissatisfied, called for a clearer,
more explicit policy statement by
the University.
One landlord said that one is
afraid to lay down the law be because
cause because others will not. We should
have more meetings to discuss
this problem.
Mr. Ralph Scrafford, operator of
a number of efficiencies for stu students
dents students said that lease-breaking was

Professor Defends
Insecticide Usage

A UF entomologist said he will
oppose proposed legislation to ban
the sale of DDT pesticide in the
United States.
Dr. William G. Eden, entomo entomology
logy entomology department chairman with
the Universitys Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences, said,
The ban would impose a serious
handicap on Florida Agriculture.
Eden pointed out that a U.S.
Senator is calling for the aban abandonment
donment abandonment of the most widely used
pesticide in Florida and the nation
at a time when Americas food
reserves are fast disappearing and
food shortages could become a rea reality
lity reality within the next five years."
The U.S. Department of Agri Agriculture
culture Agriculture is also opposing the legis legislation.
lation. legislation.
The bill was introduced by Sen Senator
ator Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin
who said that DDT has polluted
the environment on a world basis.
The Senator also indicated that
he has only begun to fight by say saying:

his biggest problem. Dean Adams
said that about the only action the
University can take is the use of
moral persuasion and/or putting
the violation on a student's re records.
cords. records.
Taking it from the student's an angle,
gle, angle, Carl Opp noted that he also
receives complaints about land landlords.
lords. landlords. These include dirty apart apartments
ments apartments on moving in, insufficient
furnishings, repairs, leases, and
roommate problems'

ing: saying: There are probably hundreds
of registered pesticides that should
not be used. This is an area that
I intend to follow up later.
If enacted, the bill would amend
the Federal Insecticide, Fun Fungicide,
gicide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act. Its
provisions are that after June
30, 1967, it shall be unlawful for
any person to distribute, sell, offer
for sale, ship or deliver for ship shipment,
ment, shipment, or to receive in any state,
territory, or the District of Col Columbia
umbia Columbia from any state, territory,
or foreign country the chemical
known as DDT.
However, the provision does not
prohibit the sale or shipment of
DDT to a foreign country. Thus,
the use of DDT in only the U.S.
and its territories would be pro prohibited.
hibited. prohibited.
The bill has been referred to
the Senate Committee on Agricul Agriculture
ture Agriculture for appropriate action.
industry observers do not give
the senator's proposal much
chance of passage by the Senate,
particularly since it was intro introduced
duced introduced so late in the session.
Eden said the indiscriminate use
of any pesticide can produce un undesirable
desirable undesirable results, but when the
benefits of pesticides such as DDT
are weighed against the risks as associated
sociated associated with careless use, pes pesticides
ticides pesticides ire invaluable.
Ar erlcans take for granted
an agricultural abundance that
would be impossible without pes pesticides,
ticides, pesticides, Eden said.
Larrys Lights
On All Night
The lights are on all night at
Little Larrys Restaurant when
UF students gather for all night
study sessions and midnight
snacks.
I cant stand the dorms, said
Jack Dunlop, a 3AS student, from
Daytona Beach. I study at the
main library until it closes and
then spend the rest of the night
here, if I have a big exam.
At 2 a.m. most of the custo customers
mers customers have a book in one hand
and a cup of coffee in the other.
A few people are getting a head
start on breakfast by putting
awty a steak.
MI enjoy watching the people
that come in here more than any anything
thing anything else, said Darryl Hansen,
a 3BA student.
One student commented, "I do
my best studying when I'm up all
night, and where else can I gain
weight and Improve my mind at
the same time?
XEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, lOCsa.
20 Over, 9$
Copies Made While Toe well
Sendee Available From
9 a.m. to 11 p.e.
SEVEN DATS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE

Page 11



Orange and

Campus Calendar
Wednesday, October 12
AIA Film Series: Toulouse-Lautrec/' 103-B AFA,
8 p.m.
Collegiate Council for U.N.: Group Meeting, 116
FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Veterans Club: FLU Aud., 8 p.m.
Music Dept.: Childrens Concert, Woodwind, Univ.
/ Aud., 12 p.m.
FLU Forums Debate: Dr. Thomas Hanna vs. Dr.
Delton L. Scudder, L.S.D. Univ. Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Association for Computing Machinery: Mr. J. T.
OConner, Real-Time Reservations System, 105-
B AFA, 7:30 p.m. The public is cordially invited.
Latin American Colloquium: Mrs. Helen King Cor Corpeno,
peno, Corpeno, The Process of Political Integration of the
Guatemalan Indians, 215 FLU, 8 p.m. All inter interested
ested interested are invited to attend.
Arts and Science Dames: Capt. Cortney Roberts,
Art of Self Defense, Home of Mrs. John Flowers,
2815 S.W. 8 Drive, 8 p.m.
General Notices
INFIRMARY HOURS: EXCEPT FOR EMERGEN_
CIES, the Infirmary will close at 4:30 p.m. on week weekdays,
days, weekdays, at 12 noon on Saturday and will be closed all
day Sunday. Scheduled hours for weekdays are from
8:30 11:30a.m. and from 1- 4:30 p.m. EMERGEN EMERGENCIES
CIES EMERGENCIES will be admitted through the emregency en entrance
trance entrance at the rear of the building, ground floor.
It is only necessary to ring the buzzer. VISITORS
ONLY will be admitted at the front door between
7-8 p.m. at night and between 2-4 p.m. on Sat Saturday
urday Saturday and Sunday and will sign in at the reception
desk. Residence hall assistants and fraternity and
sorority house-mothers are requested to call the In Infirmary
firmary Infirmary and speak to the physician or nurse on
duty before sending a patient to the Infirmary ex except
cept except in the case of a serious emergency.
SPEECH SCREENING TESTS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of college enrollment are re required
quired required to satisfy the speech screening requirement
before being admitted to the Advanced Professional
Sequence or enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400 and the
elementary block (EDE 300, 301 and 302). Appoint Appointments
ments Appointments are now being made in room 124, Norman
Hall.
E.T.S. GRADUATE RECORD EXAM: October 14,
is the deadline for applying for the Graduate Record
Examination to be given October 29. Application
must be received by the Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, New Jersey on or before October 14
for the applicant to take the exam.
LOST FILM: A film entitled Boy with A Blind Blindfold
fold Blindfold #4 has been lost. The film belongs to the
Eye Bank at the J. Hillis Miller Health Center and
was addressed to Janie Hough. If this film has
been delivered to another office on the campus by
mistake, please contact Photographic Services, Ext.
2450, or the Eye Bank, Ext. 5402.
HELP AND REVIEW SESSIONS: Help sessions in
American Institutions will be held weekdays at 2:30
p.m.; biology sessions at 7 p.m. Meeting places are:
Mondays Hume Hall Conference Room; Tuesdays
-- Rawlings Hall Conference Room; Wednesdays
Tolbert Hall Lounge; Thursdays Jennings Hall
Recreation Room; Fridays Mallory HU Recreation
Room.
COMPUTING CENTER NOTICE: Thursday, Oct.
13, will be a meeting for all persons interested
in Remote Consoles, 4 p.m., room 1038 in the Col College
lege College of Architecture and Fine Arts.
FLA. vs FSU FOOTBALL FILM: Color film of
Floridas 22-19 victory over Florida State University
will be shown Thursday, Oct. 13, 8 p.m., Medical
Sciences BuUding Auditorium.

no longer limited in your credit union I
I Building J Radio Road Kl 1
I Dividend Rate TT rn r> I o* No Increase
I SW* Serving Uof F Employees Since 1935 r I
I Pa : d Semiannually Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union # # Loans 111 I

BLUB BULLETIN

Young Democrats: Film, Star Spangled Extremists,
121 FLU, 7:30 p.m. All interested are invited.
Speleological Society: Group Meeting, 212FLU,7 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: Auditions, 1826 W. Univ.
Ave., 8:30 p.m. Every kind of talent wanted.
Univ. Womens Club Arts and Crafts group: FLU
Craft Shop, 9:30 a.m.
Thursday, October 13
Game Films of Fla. Football: Fla. vs. FSU, MSB
Aud., 8 p.m.
Painting for Fun: 215 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
FLU Fine Arts: The Temoest,Univ. Aud., 8:15p.m.
Mrs. U of F Pageant: Individual judgings, Univ
Womens Club, by appointment.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship: Prayer Meetings,
4th floor of the Library every Monday & Thursday,
5 p.m.
Wrestling Club: south end of the Gym floor, 4 p.m.
Christian Science Organization: Group meeting, 121

Administrative Notices

PROGRESS TEST: (Students in the following courses
are expected to take the following tests. Each student
must bring a No. 2 lead pencil and will be required
to use his SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER).
CET 141 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Oct. 13,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
REPORT TO Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Pea Peabody
body Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) report to Leight
207; (D) report to GCB 121, 125 or 127; (E) report
to GCB 113; (F) report to Matherly 213, 216 or 219;
(G) report to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; (H)
report to Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209;
(I-J) report to Flint 110' or 112; (K) report to
Walker 301, 303, 307 or 308; (L) report to GCB
201, 203, 205, or 207; (M) report to GCB 213, 215,
217, 219, 223, 225 or 227; (N) report to GCB 233
or 235; (O) report to GCB 237 or 239; (P-Q) report
to Flint 101 or 102; (R) report to Floyd 108; (S)
report to Walker Auditorium; (T-V) report to Gcb
101 or 109; (W-Z) report to Walker Auditorium;
CET 142 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Oct. 13,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A-
L) report to Matherly 2 3,4, 5,6, 7,8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly

PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: (Students must be
registered with the University Placement Service to
interview. Sign-up sheets are posted two weeks
in advance of the interview date at Building H.
All companies will be recruiting for December,
April and August grads unless otherwise indicated.
lndicates hiring juniors for summer employment).
OCT. 12; MCDONNELL AIRCRAFT CORP.
AE, CE, EE, IE, ME, Eng, Sci, Met, ChE, Ps,
Math.
OCT. 12, 13; PROCTER & GAMBLE CO. &
BUCKEYE CELLULOSE CORP. All Engineers.
OCT. 12; PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS CO. ~
Chem, ChE.
OCT. 12 & 13; ALLIED CHEMICAL CORP.
Chem, ChE, ME, CE, IE, EE, MBA. LOCKHEED LOCKHEEDGEORGIA
GEORGIA LOCKHEEDGEORGIA AE, EE, ME, Math, Ps, Acctg, Bus,
Stat, Ind. Rela, Mktg.
OCT. *l2, 13, 14; ARMSTRONG CORK CO.
Acctg, Gen Bus, Ind Mgmt, Econ, Mktg, Lib Arts,
Chem, ChE, CE, EE, IE, ME.
OCT. 13; SYAKA & HENNESSY, INC. __ ME, EE.
WEST VIRGINIA PULB & PAPER CO. ChE, ME
Chem. GEORGIA KRAFT CO. ChE, ME, CE,EE.
OCT. 14; SCHLUMBERGER WELL SERVICES
EE, ME, IE, Ps. AIRESEARCH MFG. CO. OF AR_
IZONA ae, me, eng. Sci. MUTUAL OF NEW
YORK All majors. FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS
COMMISSION EE. JEFFERSON CHEMICAL CO.,
INC. ChE, ME, IE, ORG. CHEM.* CHARLESTON
NAVAL SHIPYARD EE, ME, MetE, CE, ChE,
NE, IE, Ps, Chem. CONTAINER CORP. OF AMERI_
CA Acctg. Eng. Forestry.* SINCLAIR RESEARCH
INC. Chem, ChE, PAN AMERICAN PETROLEUM,
CORP. Geol, Eng Sci, Chem, Ps, EE, ChE.
VETERANG ADMINISTRATION CE, EE, ME, Arch.
OCT. 17: GENERAL DYNAMICS CORP. AE,
EE, CE, Math. W. R. GRACE & CO. Chem.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES

Placement Notices

Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 12. 1966

FLU, 5:15 p.m.
Circle K: Group meeting, 212 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Phi Chi Theta: Group meeting, 208 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club: 121 FLU, 7:30 p.m. Everyone
welcome, no experience necessary.
Adult Ceramic Class: FLU Craft Shop, 7:30 p.m.
Young Republican Club: Group meeting, 218 FLU,
7:30 p.m.
Friday, October 14
FLU Fine Arts: The Tempest, Univ. Aud., 8:15p.m.
Murphree Area: Dance, Club Rendezvous, 8 p.m.
Young Republican Club: Ballot Security & Poll Watch Watching
ing Watching Program, Guest Speaker, Jack Grantham,ballot
Security Officer for the State Republican Com Committee,
mittee, Committee, Guaranty Federal Bldg., 8 p.m. All Re Republican
publican Republican workers should attend.
Movie: Donavans Reef, MSB Aud., 7 & 9:30
p.m.
Chess Club: Chess Games, 215 FLU, 7 p.m.

102, 105, 108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or
119.
CHN 251 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Oct. 18,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Peabody
1,2, 4,5, 7, 10, 11; (C) report to Leigh 207; (D)
report to BCB 121, 125 or 127; (E) report to BCB
113; (F) report to Matherly 213, 216 or 219; (G)
report to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; (H) report
to Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209; (I-J) report
to Flint 110 or 112; (K) report to Walker 301, 303,
307 or 308; (L) report to GCB 201, 203, 205 or 207;
(M) report to GCB 213, 215, 217, 219, 221, 223,
225 or 227; (N) report to GCB 233 or 235; (O)
report to GCB 237 or 239; (P-Q) report to flint
101 or 102; (R) report to Floyd 108; (S) report
to Walker Auditorium; (T-V) report to BCB 101
or 109; (W-Z) report to Walker Auditorium.
CHN 252 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Oct. 18,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A-L)
report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11,
12, 13, 14 or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly 102,
105, 108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.

CORPS OF ENGINEERS Arch, CE, EE, ME, Eng.
Sci.*
OCT. 17, 18: BELL TELEPHONE LABORATORIES
EE, ME, Eng.Mech, Ps, Math. RADIO CORP.
OF AMERICA EE, ME, Physics, Bus.Ad, Lib. Arts.
GENERAL DYNAMICS CORP. AE, ME, EE, IE,
MetE, EngJSci, Math, Physics. U.S. ATOMIC ENERGY
COMMISSION All majors. TEXAS INSTRUMENTS,
INC. Bus, Math, Eng.*
.OCT. 18: SOUTHWIRE CO. ME, EE, IE, Bus.
Ad.* DEPT. OF STATE majors.
OCT. 18, 19: TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY
All majors. U.S. ARMY MATERIAL COMMAND
All Eng, Math, Physics. ARO, INC. AE, EE, ME,
Eng. Sci, Eng. Mech. NALCO CHEMICAL CO.
Chem (Org. & Phys), ChE, Lib. Arts.
OCT. 19: ARMY & AIR FORCE EXCHANGE SER SERVICE
VICE SERVICE various fields. RING, MAHONEY & ARNER
Acctg. FACTORY INSURANCE ASSOCIATION
ChE, CE, EE, IE, ME. WARNER ROBINS AIR MA MATERIAL
TERIAL MATERIAL AREA AE, EE, IE, ME. PRATT & WHIT WHITNEY
NEY WHITNEY AIRCRAFT ME, AE, ChE, EE, Eng. Sci,
Eng. Phy, Eng.Mech, MetE, Chem, Math, Physics.
SOCONY MOBIL OIL CO. Geol, ChE, CE, EE, IE,
ME.
OCT. 19, 20: LEHIGH PORTLAND CEMENT CO.
Mktg, Gen. Bus, Lib. Arts, Econ, IE, CE, ChE.
OCT. 20: ALUMINUM CO. OF AMERICA MetE,
EE, ME, ChE, IE. KIPPERS CO., INC. & SINCLAIR
KIPPERS CO. Chem, ChE, CE, EE, MetE, ME.
NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO.
majors in sales & sales Mgmt.* GENESCO, INC.
Bus.Ad, IE, Math, Acctg, Lib. Arts, Econ. NAVAL AIR
DEVELOPMENT CENTER AE, EE, ME, Eng.Mech,
Physics. U.S. FOREST SERVICE Forestry.* CE CELANESE
LANESE CELANESE CORP. Acctg, Chem, ChE, Physics, Eng.
Sd, Eng.Mech.



STUDENT RIOTING
DISAPPOINTS HALE

By FRANK SHEPHERD
Alligator Staff Writer
Dean of Student Affairs, Les Leser
er Leser L. Hale, expressed great dis disippointment
ippointment disippointment over the student up upising
ising upising after the Fla.-FSU football
fame Saturday afternoon.
I was very disappointed that
he ATO and Phi Delta Theta
raternities would show their vic vicory
ory vicory exuberance by taking the ini iniiative
iative iniiative to start fires, Hale said,
everyone was happy and no one
yas denying the studentsprivilege
o display enthusiasm, but start startng
ng startng fires in the street cannot oc oc;ur,
;ur, oc;ur, and those fraternities knew
t.
Hale said that the two frater fraterities
ities fraterities have been reported to the
FC and that it would be up to
he IFC to decide in what way
hey would handle Saturdays
ccurence. The ATOs and Phi Del Dela
a Dela Thetas, according to Hale were
part of the initial stages of
he spirit display.
Hale said that he was at the
ITO House within three minutes
fter the end of the game and saw
he ATOs taking lumber out of
tieir house. He explained his early
resence at the unplanned display
aying that he went because I
new the game had been exciting
nd that there was a dramatic
ictory. I wanted share the stu stuents
ents stuents enthusiasm and keep it from
eing improperly displayed.
I thought the police department
howed exceedingly good judgment
n being patient and tolerant, and
hey even joined in some of the
mthusiastic atmosphere, Hale
;aid.
TiityTnfyfSehool
Gaineville's Oldest
24 S.E. Bth St. 376-7806
7:15 to 5:45 $27.50
mo.

I Cable stitched heather car-
I / V'trWwy/ \ digan matched to its own
f Shetland wool skirt and
Open 9:30 AM
To 6:30 PM
franklin's
"Bourn 4 College Shop*
2401 S.W. 13th. St.
Call 372-4606

But when it became apparent
that the students would persist,
and mindful to the fact that these
(fires) always lead to a deter deterioration
ioration deterioration of the situation, they (the
police) went to work forcefully and
effectively.
I was proud of the way it was
handled, Hale said.
FRATERNITY
OFFICERS
COMMENT
Officers of the fraternities sad saddied
died saddied by Hale with the responsibity
for the riots, did not seem to be
unduly disturbed when contacted by
the Alligator.
Jim Clark president of Phi Del Delta
ta Delta Theta, said that he has not been
officially informed that the matter
was taken to the IFC. However,
he said there will probably be
no action by the IFC because there
is nothing to take action on. The
riot was more a spontaneous thing,
that cannot be fairly blamed on
either fraternity since other 1 frat fraternity
ernity fraternity men as well as independents
participated.
The police did not even clas classify
sify classify it as a riot, he said, and
did not seem overly upset about
the incident. Clark said that upon
Hales request to disperse, the frat fraternity
ernity fraternity men returned to their
houses.
Richard Lawson, ATO Vice
President, said, action should be
taken by the Administration against
certain individuals who were
caught in the riots.
But, he continued, the matter
shouldnt have been brought before
the IFC because it is unfair to
take action against the fraternity
as a whole; the fraternity did not
participate as an organized
group.

I

Only the Trashcan Knows

Who Took Architecture Projects?

By JUSTINE HARTMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Dempsey Dumpster is the
only villain identified thus far in
the alleged theft in the College
of Architecture and Fine Arts.
Like the majority of the colleges
officials, the Dumpster, whose
cavern supposedly consumed many
invaluable projects belonging to
landscape architecture students,
refused to comment.
A multitude of projects, tools,
drawing instruments, and personal
objects disappeared sometime
during the break between the
end of B term and the present
trimester. The objects had been
left in personal lockers and desks
of'the architecture students dur during
ing during the short break. Upon their
return they discovered locks had
been taken off desks and lockers
and the contents had been removed.
There waj just no one around
during the break to prevent this
happening, said Tim Anderson,
4AR. According to Anderson, How Howard
ard Howard Sebold, professor of landscape
architecture had retired during
the summer and the B team in instructor
structor instructor left for England at the
finish of the team. The disappear disappearance
ance disappearance had already occurred when
James Pollack and Herrick Smith,
new professors in the department
of landscape architecture, arrived
at the university.
I still havent been able to
determine everything taken, said
George Parrish, SAR. Everytime
I reach for something while work working,
ing, working, its just not there. Parrish
had at least 10 projects taken from
under the lid of his desk.
The students usually keep pro projects
jects projects which are not to be thrown
out under their desks. These pro projects,
jects, projects, each consisting of a scale
drawing, reference notebooks and
accompanying history notes, are
the work of Parrishs entire jun junior
ior junior year, and half of his senior
year in architecture.
In addition to his projects, an
expensive lettering guide, seven
dollars, a radio and a set of

&
GEORGE S. LOSEY
MANAGER-GAINESVILLE OFFICE
Mr. Losey is new to Gainesville but an old hand with
Goodbody & Co. After sixteen years in the securities
business, it's his job to supervise the service to every
customer.
He is happy to talk over your investment ideas and I
will be glad to recommend one of our registered
representatives to help you now, or in the future with ;
your purchases of stocks, bonds or mutual funds.
GOODBODY & CO.
ESTAILISHKO I**l
Mombors of hading Stock and Commodity txchangm
1M WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE, SAINESVILLE
04-376-45 M
OUR 75TH YEAR OF SERVICE TO INVESTORS

Wednesday, October 12, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

drawing instruments and other
equipment were removed from
Parrishs desk, which was locked
when he left. Since the radio and
money turned were turned in to
the main office by the janitors,
Parrish feels that the desk had
been broken into sometime before
the janitors arrived.
Clyde Dobbs, head janitor at
the College of Architecture and

LIMIT APPROVED
ON UF FRESHMEN

By T. H. MARLOW
Alligator Correspondent
Florida may soon be a univer university
sity university of upperclassmen. The Board
of Regents recently approved a
limit of 25,000 students for the
Gainesville campus. But, freshmen
will be limited to 2,800.
It is hoped the community or
junior college boom will take care
of students not able to attend a
four year university. Students will
live at home and commute to their
studies under this system.
In 1970, 200,000 men and wo women
men women may be attending junior col college,
lege, college, said Kimball Wiles, dean
of the College of Education.
To take care of those who wish
to complete college or go on with
graduate studies, a huge expan expansion
sion expansion program in the upper div division
ision division at the university must be
undertaken, he said.
Because of our facilities and
the need for instructors in this
college, we are right now unable
to fill the teaching needs of this
state. Wiles Indicated that ad admission
mission admission requirements will be
tougher, especially for upper div division
ision division applicants.
To cope with the rapid expan expansion
sion expansion needed in the upper division
and graduate programs, more
money will be needed. Wiles will
present his college's needs to the
legislature in November.

Fine Arts, said the money and
radio were the only objects in the
desk when the janitors began clean cleaning
ing cleaning out the room. The janitors
threw out only the trash lying
around the room, according to
Dobbs.
James Lendrum, chairman of
architecture, not only refused to
comment, but also hung up on the
Alligator reporter who phoned him.

There was a 30 per cent in increase
crease increase in the upper division last
year. This college does not have
the necessary teaching staff
to meet the projected increase in
junior college students who will
enter in 1970, he said.
We will have a different kind
of undergraduate too, Wiles said.
With a steady limit on freshmen
entries, the student body will be
older. The main increase in the
university will be re-admissions
from those who have attended the
year before.
Lester Hale, dean of student
affairs, seconds Wiles. We would
have a different student commun community,
ity, community, due to the smaller admis admission
sion admission rate in the lower division,
he said. Hale indicated that plans
were under study to cope with
the change.
The housing problem, already a
headache, may be aided by con construction
struction construction companies building living
areas staffed by supervisory per personnel
sonnel personnel reporting to the deans of
men and women. FSU has such
a living area now.
The rise in the upper divi division
sion division will be a problem and an
advantage to fraternities and sor sororities,
orities, sororities, Hale said. The Greek
societies will have to adjust to
an older age group.
Perhaps the student will pledge
in September and be initiated in
December, he said.
According to Hale, the organ organizations
izations organizations should benefit f-om the
older student coming from a jun junior
ior junior college. A man who will pled pledge
ge pledge as a junior should be more
mature, he said.
But he won't fiddle around
with a sophomore society, Hale
added. The fraternities will have
to mature due to the older age
of pledges.
NEED CASH
IN YOUR POUCH?
_ SELL THOSE THINGS
YOU DONT NEED
WITH
GATOR
ADS
i

Page 13



Baseball Not Dead,
Os Livened It Up

By MILTON RICHMAN
NEW YORK (UPI) They say
baseball is dying, so how do you
explain:
More than twice the number of
people welcomed the beaten Dod Dodders
ders Dodders back to Los Angeles than
greeted them after they won the
National League Pennant .
Baltimore, a city which is sup supposed
posed supposed to recognize only football,
Gator Rifles
Beaten Again
By Seminoles
Bv JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Sports Writer
Although firing their highest
total of the season, the Florida
Rules were edged by a power powerful
ful powerful FSU squad this past Saturday.
The men have nothing to be
ashamed of, said Major Harvey
Dick adviser to the Gator marks marksmen.
men. marksmen. Our 1056 score is top topnotch
notch topnotch shooting.
Dick further stated that the Sem Seminoles
inoles Seminoles this year probably have one
of the top five rifle teams in the
nation.
FSU has outstanding front-line
shooters and tremendous depth in
their team, Dick said. You just
have to look at their 5-0 record
to see that.
Leading the Rifles against the
Seminoles were Toby Muir with a
270, Bill Stark with a 263, Mim
Waugh with a 259, and Lee Young
with a 254.
Supplying FSU with their winning
total of 1069 were Bennv Hai Haimovitz
movitz Haimovitz with a 277, John Niles
with a 276, Jeff Long with a
267, and Tiro Thomas with a 249.
The Seminoles* score was the
highest fired against the Rifles
this season.
We lost in Tallahassee two
years ago, but bounced back to
whip FSU in the All-Florida that
same year, said Nave. I dont
think the 13 point difference in
this match is an indicator of the
outcome of the All-Florida match
later this season. <
The Rifles will take their 3-
record on the road this Saturday
to Raleigh, North Carolina in a
three-way match with N.C. State,
Tennessee, and nationally second secondranked
ranked secondranked Citadel.
Blane
Receives
SEC Honor
ATLANTA (UPI) Georgia
Tech linebacker W.J. Blane was
named southeastern lineman of
the week Tuesday by United Press
International for his outstanding
performance in Techs 6-3 upset
of Tennessee.
Blane, a 196-pound senior
from Roanoke, Va., made two cru crucial
cial crucial pass interceptions one
setting up Techs winning field
goal and the other halting a late lategame
game lategame Tennessee drive l3 tac tackles
kles tackles and, while playing all the
way on defense, also was the
offensive center during Techs
punts.

staged one of its noisiest demon demonstrations
strations demonstrations ever because the local
baseball team happened to win four
games .
A TV network was all set to
offer $200,000 for the rights to
one weekday baseball game, a
makeup contest between the Giants
and Reds had it become necessary,
one day after the regular close of
the season .
No one in any other sport, not
Cassius Clay, Johnny Unitas or
Wilt Chamberlain, ever attracts
the kind of crowds Sandy Koufax
does inside or outside the arena...
An eighth place club hooked up
with a ninth place one at Shea
Stadium in the season finale with
nothing at all at stake and 40,-
409 fans turneut .
ALWAYS A GAME
Baseball is played every day
of the year some place, whether
its in Puerto Rico, Panama, Ven Venezuela,
ezuela, Venezuela, Australia, California,
Florida or some other part of the
U.S. ...
The good people of Atlanta re recently
cently recently rediscovered the Braves
when they made that late season
run after many of the experts put
it down that the city was only
interested in pro football .
Despite the millions there is to
be had on the golf circuit or for
signing with some of those foot football
ball football clubs, many boys still accept
a lot less to play baseball .
Here the pro football season
is in full swing and the pro bas basketball
ketball basketball season is about to start,
but the chief topic of conversa conversation
tion conversation in most bars is: Could the
Dodgers really have beer* that
bad? ...
Year after year, more people
watch the World Series on TV
than anything else .
A major league ball players
face serves as his credit card
in most places in the land. Hiat
doesnt work so readily with ath athletes
letes athletes in other sports .
i
And finally, if as they say,
baseball is dying, how can you
explain the following episode:
A man rushed up to the New
York Mets' advance ticket win window
dow window the last day of the season
and plunked down a check for
SI,OOO. He wanted some season
box seats for 1967.
I was afraid, he said, I
might be shut out.

TRACK...
Floridas cross country team
won their second meet in as many
attempts against FSU Friday. The
score was 22 to 39. The Gator
freshmen beat their FSU counter counterparts
parts counterparts 25 to 30.
Frank, Lagotic placed first in
the varsity meet with a time of
22:16 over the 4.3 mile course.
Marcus Williamson of FSU was
second at 22:23.
The frosh squad had to hustle
to win their 17th meet in a row
covering the last three years.
BOWLING
All those interested in bowling
are invited to join a bowling lea league
gue league sponsored by the Recreation

The Huddle

(Photo By Gerald Jones)
STEVE HEIDT INTERCEPTS
... to halt fourth quarter Seminole drive

Wolfpack Running Game
Tightens Gator Margin

k ( ||p
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GARY ROWE
. . running threat

Committee of the Florida Union
Board for Student Activities. The
games are to be held at Palm
Lanes every Thursday afternoon
at 4. Transportation will be pro provided
vided provided from the Union at 3:45. The
fee for three games will be $1.50.
SOCCER .
The UF soccer club staged
a comback Saturday to tie a sur surprisingly
prisingly surprisingly well-conditioned FSU
squad.
This was the first match of the
year for the Gator Booters while
the Seminoles were facing their
sixth opponent.
The nexf Gator soccer match
will be Oct. 14 against St. Leo
Junior College.

SPORTS

:, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 12, 1966

Page 14

By EVAN LANGBEIN
Alligator Sports Writer
The Florida Gators disgruntled
defense, still recovering from
FSUs strong offensive assault,
faces another stiff challenge in
North Carolina.
The Wolfpack at N.C. State
emphasizes the offense. And the
offensive personnel is good. Ga Gator
tor Gator Coach Dave Fuller, who has
watched State, attests to this.
State lost two games to arch archrivals
rivals archrivals North Carolina, 10-7, and
South Carolina, 31- 21. But the Wolf Wolfpack
pack Wolfpack outplayed both teams. Their
other loss was to Michigan State,
28-10, the number- one team in
the nation.
Against North Carolina, the
Wolfpack ground out 278 yards on
the ground. They added 77 in
the air for a total offensive out output
put output of 355 yards.
In the South Carolina ball game,
State demonstrated again a gruel grueling
ing grueling offense scoring on three long
drives. South Carolina scored four
times, three times on long bombs.
One Gamecock TD was produced
on a 98-yard punt return when
states punt-coverage team thought
the ball would go into the end
zone.
N.C. State will employ one of
the fanciest offenses the Gators
will oppose all season. State use
both the I-wing formation with the
fullback directly behind the half halfback
back halfback and the straight wing. Their
offense will usually operate to
whichever side they flank the wing wingback.
back. wingback.
The Wolfpack is full of tricks.
They will reverse to the wingback
coming around. They wilj use re reverses
verses reverses and fake reverses in the
backfield.
State has a speedy badkfield to
accomplish these feats. At quart quarterback
erback quarterback is Charlie Noggle and Jim
Donnan. Both are 6-1 and both
weigh close to 200 pounds. Both
are fast ball carriers and fine
passers.
Alternating at the important
wingback position will be Paul
Rowe and Wendell Coleman. They
are both fast. Rowe is a danger dangerous
ous dangerous threat in all situations. He
has the best set of hands on the
team and is the Wolfpacks break breakaway
away breakaway runner.

State will center its offense
around the running game. The two
running backs, Don DeArment and
Bill Wyland could provide the
strongest running game the
Gators have faced so far. De
Arment is 5-10, 190 pounds. He
is short and stocky and very ex explosive.
plosive. explosive. He is averaging close to
five yards a carry this season and
he rush about 15 times a game.
Wyland is 5-11, 205 pounds and is
about the same type of runner as
DeArment. Last season he averag averaged
ed averaged 3.5 yards a carry. He was
hurt against Michigan State, but
played the entire game against
South Carolina last week and will
be at full speed for the Gators.
It is certain that State will run
the ball against Florida. They
want to dominate the ball, keeping
it away from Steve Spurrier. Pas Passing
sing Passing they usually concentrate on
short tosses to the wingback.
Tbe Wolfpack has a very good
reason for keeping the football
away from the Gators. The coaches
are rebuilding the defensive
secondary. They lost All-ACC de defensive
fensive defensive back Tony Golmont and
Larry Brown, who set a school
record of 23 pass interceptions
graduated. Their secondary is in inexperienced,
experienced, inexperienced, and the Gators will
no doubt attempt to take advantage
of it.
Defensively, State has not shown
much strength this season. Tliey
do have a few standout linebackers
in Charles Amato, Ron Jackson and
Dave Everett. Defensive weak weaknesses
nesses weaknesses have turned all of State's
games into offensive contests.
I would say that our game with
them will be an offensive ball
game, say Fuller. We can ill illafford
afford illafford to take this teams offensive
ability lightly. They can beat us.
Our boys must stick to their de defensive
fensive defensive responsibilities and disre disregard
gard disregard fakes.
The Wolfpack would like nothing
better than to pull the trick on
Florida. The game will be the
Wolfpacks Homecoming battle
in their brand new stadium in Ra Raleigh.
leigh. Raleigh.
If the Gators thought that their
problems were over when they
squeezed past FSU, they could fird
them just beginning against N.C.
State.



Gators, Seminoles
Tangle Once More

The Gators of the future, this years freshman squad, marched
to a resounding 20-0 victory over Auburn Saturday at Florida
Field. With a victory over the Plainsmen now safely tucked
under their belts, the Baby Gators now face a foe that will be
out for blood Florida State.
After the loss to Floridas Bull Gators the Seminole tribe
will certainly have their warpaint on and their tomahawks shar sharpened.
pened. sharpened.
States freshmen have already taken a 16-2 drubbing from
Miamis Baby Hurricanes, but freshman coach Gene McDowell,
a former FSU gridder in his first year as coach, said, I dont
think Ive ever seen a bunch of boys pick themselves up the
way this group has since that game.
They got a taste of losing in Sarasota (the Miami game was
played there) and they didnt like it at all. Our practices since
that game have been the best all year, McDowell continued.
McDowells biggest worry is getting the Tribes offense
rolling. The Seminole freshmen were held throughout the Miami
contest by the big Hurricane defense, and FSUs lone score
was a fourth quarter safety.
Miami Edisons All-Southern High School standout, Tommy
Warren, will get the starting nod at quarterback for the Semi Seminoles
noles Seminoles Saturday.
Warren made a strong showing against Miami, and proved
that he has the capability to be a good quarterback, said
McDowell. Even though he missed a lot of the pre-season
drills because he was hurt, he learned the plays well and im impressed
pressed impressed the coaches with his ability to pick out secondary re receivers
ceivers receivers when his prime targets were covered.* Warren con connected
nected connected on six of 14 passes in the Miami game.
Punter Bill Cheshire from Jesup, Ga., was given an out outstanding
standing outstanding rating for his play against the Hurricanes. Not only
for his kicking ability where he averaged 45.2 yards for five
boots, but also for his all around play.
Well stick pretty much with our present offensive attack.
We just have to pick it up and do the job better. The boys we
have out there are real winners and they act like they arent
going to lose another one, said McDowell.
The Seminole team, however, is one of the smallest in several
years and has a definite depth problem.
FSUs youngsters are led by a fine array of runners with
Doug Mitchell from Williston, Ronnie Montford from Blountstown,
and Ed Gibson from Orlando Boone. Running is not their only
mode of transporting the football from goal to goal.
With three capable passers in Mitchell, Warren, and Bay
Gruber from Ft. Lauderdale, the Tribe will be taking to the air
lanes quite frequently. The receivers are led by Paul Abraira
from Ft. Lauderdale.
This has the makings of a fine football game. And with the
Gator varsity playing North Carolina State in Raleigh most of
the student body will remain on campus.
Florida Field will be the battleground for another UF-FSU
heartstopper.

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/ m
GUY MCTHENY
. . sweeps right end
Bauer Wins
AL Manager
UPI Award
By FRED DOWN
UPI Sports Writer
NEW YORK Hank Bauer, the
Baltimore Orioles blunt but af affable
fable affable field leader, was named the
American Leagues Manager of
the Year.
The United Press Internationals
baseball experts selected him
Tuesday.
The 44-year-old native of East
St. Louis, 111., led the Orioles
to their first American League
pennant and a four-game sweep
of the Los Angeles Dodgers in
the World Series.
He was selected by 13 of the
24 experts who participated in
UPl's annual post-season survey.
Alvin Dark of the Kansas City
Athletics received eight votes and
Bill Rigney of the California An Angels
gels Angels got three.
A much-decorated Marine dur during
ing during World War n, Bauer played
in nine World Series with the New
York Yankees during a 14-year
big league playing career.
He became manager of the Or Orioles
ioles Orioles in 1964 after managing the
Athletics in 1961 and 1962.
A manager who mingles free freely
ly freely with his players, he looks like
a typical Marine drill instructor.
Bauer has a simple and direct
approach to managing. No base baseball
ball baseball thinker, he believes, all
managers are approximately equal
in making technical decisions. He
feels the important phase of man managing
aging managing is handling the players. The
few rules of conduct he has are
elastic.

WEDNESDAY
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2 Fish Fillets, Hot Rolls, Cole Slaw, French Fries
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Wednesday, October 12, 1966, Hie Florida Alligator,

Brave McTheny
Chooses Gators

By GEORGE ADKINS
Alligator Correspondent
Guy McTheny of Sarasota had
his lifetime ambition fulfilled. A
major league baseball club was
knocking at his door, bet he turn turned
ed turned down the Atlanta Braves to
come to UF.
I thought if I ever got an of offer
fer offer I'd take it, said McTheny,
but after talking it over with
parents, teachers and .coaches,
I decided a college education would
be more valuable in later years.
So last December the high school
All-America quarterback signed
the dotted line on a UF athletic
scholarship, turning down offers
from FSU, Miami, and several
other schools.
To make postponement of col college
lege college worthwhile, I couldnt accept
less than $50,000, mused
McTheny. Atlanta wasnt willing
to go that far.
Hie 1966 graduate of Sarasota
high school played shortstop, hit
four home runs, and batted .480
in his senior year. He hopes to
play for the UF baseball nine if
it doesn't interfere with Spring
football.
The 6-0, 190-pound freshman
spends his afternoons this Fall

Graves Questions
States Three Losses

The Florida Gators received a
stern warning from head coach Ray
Graves Monday to forget the FSU
victory and concentrate on North
Carolina State, a foe who will
be nothing but tough.
I've said all along that this
Florida team is one which is go going
ing going to have to scratch around,
get big plays and fight for its
life every Saturday, said Graves.
N.C. State is a well-coached,
physically tough ball club who can
beat us in a hurry if we are
not careful.
Our boys are looking at movies
of State and are wondering, as
our coaches are, how in the world
this football team has lost three
games. This is no crying tactic
but an honest opinion that N.C.
State is a good football team and

practicing with the Baby Gators.
He was the starting halfback Sat Saturday
urday Saturday when the first-year grid gridders
ders gridders defeated the Auburn frosh,
20-0.
I was really looking forward to
that first game, said McTheny.
Coach (Larry) Travis worked us
real hard, and we were in good
shape.
Its been a big help for the
freshmen to practice with the var varsity
sity varsity squads. We have a real good
team.
McTheny led Sarasota Highs
football team to an undefeated
season in 1966. He admits things
are different in college ball.
You have twice as much phy physical
sical physical conditioning in college, he
said. The competition is much
stiffer and contact is rougher.
I expect to be red-shirted next
year. Its hard to play behind a
runner like Larry Smith.
Professional sports is still Mc-
Thenys big ambition, after grad graduation.
uation. graduation.
After I get a degree in bus business
iness business administration, I hope I'll
get offers from the major leagues.
If I can develop in football, I'd
like to play that too.

one which will be most difficult
to whip Saturday.
Hie Gators came out of the
FSU contest in relatively good
physical condition and Graves is
hoping sophomore Bill Dorsey will
be back at right guard this week
to help fortify the Gator middle.
A
El
Pm
BILL DORSEY
The Raleigh, N.C. game will
serve as Homecoming Day and
Dedication Day for the new N.
C. State stadium, further incentive
for Coach Earle Edwards' crew.
We have a football team which
is surviving by being a team,
said Graves. We get .big effort
out of boys who just hustle and
fight for their lives and this keeps
us in contention. Then we get big
plays out of some truly great
athletes. We cant relax this Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, or any Saturday this sea season,
son, season, because we are a team that
can be beaten on any Saturday we
are not fighting and scratching to
win.
They have better personnel
than Vanderbilt and will be just
as worked up about playing us,
said Graves. Frankly I have been
worried about this game since last
year and am worried now.
Added to Graves concern is
the fact that the game is sand sandwiched
wiched sandwiched in between FSU and LSU,
a perfect spot for an opponent to
be in against the Gators.

Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 12, 1966

Traditions Will Come
With Winning Bartlett

Basketball Coach Tommy Bart Bartlett
lett Bartlett is all for tradition but hes
for winning even more.
We cant get tradition until
we start winning, he stated. If
we get that, then tradition and
everything else will follow.
Bartlett, who is starting his
first year as Floridas basket basketball
ball basketball coach, said that he had been
very impressed by student support
for basketball in the past and he
knew it would continue.

Wisconsin Petitions
Court For Baseball

Wisconsin took its fight to the
UJS. Supreme Court Tuesday in
hopes of returning big league base baseball
ball baseball to Milwaukee.
Atty. Gen. Bronson C. Lafol Lafollette
lette Lafollette and officials of Milwaukee
County claimed the National Lea League
gue League and its 10 members violated
Wisconsin anti-trust laws when the
Milwaukee Braves went to Atlanta
with no provision for a team to
replace them.
F. Robinson
Outstanding,
Gets Corvette
NEW YORK (UPI) -- Frank Rob Robinson
inson Robinson of the Baltimore Orioles
Monday was named Sport Maga Magazines
zines Magazines Corvette Award winner as
the outstanding player in the 1966
World Series.
Robinson, who was the series
leader in home runs and runs
batted in, will receive the award,
a 1967 Corvette, at a luncheon
in the New York Hilton Hotel on
Oct. 12.
The hard-hitting Baltimore out outfielder
fielder outfielder got the Orioles off swing swinging
ing swinging in the first game of the ser series
ies series by belting a two-run, first
inning homer off Don Drysdale to
lead the Birds to a 5-2 rout of
the Dodgers.
In the fourth game, Robinsons
game-winning homer in the fourth
inning, again off Drysdale,
provided the only run in the Or Orioles
ioles Orioles 1-0 victory, enabling the
Birds to complete a four-game
swee"
! NEED ZIPPY |
| RESULTS? I
jv £
GATOR
j CLASSIFIEDS |

I hope we can have a small
pep band and some majorettes at
the games this year. This sort
of thing keeps the fans entertained,
gives the players more spirit and
it bothers the other team.
Bartlett said that he was im impressed
pressed impressed with the job that previous
basketball coach Norm Sloan had
done with the team and with UF
basketball in general.
He did say Sloan had provided

The decision of the Braves to
move was made in secret and de deceitfully
ceitfully deceitfully denied, thus misleading
the consuming public, the peti petition
tion petition for Supreme Court review
said.
The Wisconsin Supreme Court
ruled on July 27, 1966, that the
transaction did violate state law.
But the state court held further
that the U.S. Constitution bars state
jurisdiction.
Die majority of the state court
ruled Supreme Court decisions
and congressional inaction consti constituted
tuted constituted a national policy to null nullify
ify nullify state anti-trust laws so far
as baseball is concerned.
The court also held the com commerce
merce commerce clause in the Constitution
bars Wisconsins enforcement of
its own anti-trust law, because
that might conflict with other
states enforcement of their laws.
Lafollette said organized base baseball
ball baseball was originally held by the
Supreme Court in 1922 to have
too little involvement in interstate
commerce to permit the exercise
of federal jurisdiction.
Yet the court below now holds
that organized baseball has so
much involvement in interstate
commerce that the state\is con constitutionally
stitutionally constitutionally powerless to protect
its public from what the court
below characterized as the indus industrys
trys industrys arbitrary and unfair deal dealing,
ing, dealing, La Follette said.
Baseball thus becomes the only
non-regulated industry in the Uni United
ted United States, completely free to dis disregard
regard disregard both federal and state anti antitrust
trust antitrust laws, he contended.

"Do We Have A Man
Who Can Fly?"
This is the inevitable question in any
modern corporation.
Then the search begins for a pilot--
but thats not all. The pilot must have
marketing and business skills to be a real
asset on business trips. He will have to
do research, market analysis, or merchan merchandising
dising merchandising while hes on the ground. He will
have to become an integral part of the exe executive
cutive executive team.
With piloting as an added skill, the busi businessman
nessman businessman has a bright future in any modern
corporation.
You can learn that increasingly import
skill now, while youre still in school, at
assels in the Air.
The first lesson is only S 5.
MffrCassek In The Air
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something at the games that he
was unable to furnish.
My wife does not sing, he
smiled.
Im afraid she wont be able
to sing the Star Spangled Ban Banner.
ner. Banner. I have heard Mrs. Sloan in
the past and enjoyed her perfor performance
mance performance very much. I hope that
with the aid of the pep band that
the crowd and players can all sing
our anthem.
Coach Bartlett said that he is
open to suggestions from a r one
concerning ways to generate spirit
for basketball on campus.
We are going to have a morale
problem because of our schedule.
It must be one of the worst I
have ever seen. We play almost
all of our starting games oil the
road. This doesnt help build home
support at all.
Bartlett said this was the fault
of the Southeastern Conference
schedule. He said it was difficult
to work in home games at Flor Florida
ida Florida with the way the schedule was
conceived.
The head of Florida basketball
also lauded the universitys over overall
all overall athletic program. He said that
even though the school had done
well in such popular crowd sports
as football, it had done just as
well in other areas. He pointed to
Floridas winning the SEC cham championship
pionship championship for all sports combined
during the last two years.
Florida is really on the move
in athletics. Ray Graves is de developing
veloping developing 1 a fine, all-around
program.
Bartlett said he hoped the crowds
at basketball games in the future
would warrant a new facility in
which to play the games. He cited
the building programs at other con conference
ference conference schools which had given
them the ability to handle larger
crowds.
But all that is in the future.
Making Florida a better recognized
school in basketball will follow if
we reach our main objective
to win. Were capable of beating
anybody. Its just a matter of
everyone pooling their thoughts and
interests. All we have to do is
win.
VISIT
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