Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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( Photos by Nick Arroyo )
SMASHING SUCCESS--Gator center Bill Carr
smashes a car painted the FSU colors
. '* ~ ..
Thursday by Century Tower. Carr really
demolished the car.

MAMMOTH Pep Rally
Set For Tonight
By STEVE HULL
Alligator Executive Editor
A mammoth pep rally will be held tonight at 7 p.m. on the
upper drill field to ignite student spirit for the FSU vs. Flor Florida
ida Florida Game Saturday.
UF cheerleaders will get the festivities started at 6 p.m.
by leading a parade of people down University Avenue. The par parade
ade parade will begin at the Sigma Nu House and proceed to the inter intersection
section intersection of University Ave. and 13th S.t.
The intersection will be blocked off by police to avert any
danger to the parading students.
Students from the Murphree area and adjoining off campus
residents are urged to participate in the parade.
The parade will file past Sorority row, proceed over to Jen Jen**'
**' Jen**' nings Hall and end at the east section of the Drill field.
The rally will be highlighted by a bonfire and the appearance
of the Gator Football team.
Scott Bayman, program director hopes for a very large stu student
dent student turnout.
We know fraternities and sororities will be represented,
however, we do hope independents will partake in the spirit
building activities, said Bayman.

The Florida
Alligator

Vol. 59, No. 27

Regents Take First Steps
To Draw Up Budgets

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI)
The Board of Regents, taking the
first steps towards drawing up bud budgets
gets budgets for operation of Floridas uni universities
versities universities during the 1967-69 school
years, was asked Thursday to
reduce the teaching load of pro professors.
fessors. professors.
The board also unanimously ad adopted
opted adopted a resolution urging the fe federal
deral federal government to establish a
$5 million oceanographic labora laboratory
tory laboratory somewhere along Floridas
eastern coastline.
The regents staff gave the board
members their first look at pro proposed
posed proposed guidelines which the uni universities
versities universities will use to compute their
budgets to be submitted to the
cabinet.
No dollar amounts were consi considered
dered considered by the board, which
sent the problem of salaries for
key personnel to a committee for
further study.
The guidelines included discus discussion
sion discussion of teacher pupil ratios,
number of research positions com compared
pared compared to teaching positions and
and enrollment. The major policy
problems must be worked out by
the board before the individual
schools can draw up their money
requests.
The staff proposed cutting the
number of pupils per teacher. The
effect would be to require more
instructors to handle a given num number
ber number of pupils. Operational costs
would be increased.
REGENTS TO CONSIDER
UF BUDGET, ROTC
Fireworks may be in evidence
today at Tallahassee when the
Board of Regents meets for its
second meeting in as many days.
The Regents will consider the
question of compulsory ROTC at
UF, and the university budget
question.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz
is also presenting the Regents with
a Faculty Senate resolution to abol abolish
ish abolish compulsory ROTC here, effec effective
tive effective next fall.
Reitz spoke at Thursdays Re Regents
gents Regents meeting. He limited himself
to routine agenda matters.

University of Florida

The board took the proposal
under study, planning to give ad additional
ditional additional consideration on this
morning.
Board Chairman Chester Fer Ferguson
guson Ferguson of Tampa urged the staff
to make certain it had proposed
realistic guidelines that would
produce budgets that could be de defended
fended defended to the legislature.
There Is no use building bud budgets
gets budgets with no bricks and mortar
that will fall when the first wind
blows, said Ferguson. Chancel Chancellor
lor Chancellor Broward Culpepper said the

SG SPONSORED

Teacher Evaluation Set

By MAURY OLICKER
Alligator Staff Writer
UF students will soon have the
chance to evaluate their teach teachers
ers teachers and the courses they take.
Student Government, through
Secretary of Academic Affairs Bob
Imholte, will conduct a program
designed to fill the communica communications
tions communications gap between faculty and
students.
Eventually, Imholte hopes to get
student ratings on every teacher
and every course on campus, but
initially the program will involve
between 100 and 150 teachers.
Students of the chosen teachers
will fill out rating forms in De December.
cember. December. They will answer mult multiple
iple multiple choice questions about the
teachers interest attitude, fair fairness,
ness, fairness, presentation of material
and general teaching ability. There
will also be room for personal
comments.
Each form will be processed by
an IBM machine plotted on a pro profile
file profile and given to the teacher. The
teacher ratings will be used for
the sole benefit of the teachers
involved and no other purpose.
Starting next fell, after the quar quarter
ter quarter system has gone into effect,
SG will begin conducting course
ratings. Students will fill out sim similar
ilar similar forms evaluating each

GRRR--These ferocious
fraternity men guard
the cage of UFs mas mascot,
cot, mascot, Albert V.
The watch will
continue until the FSU
game Saturday.

Friday October 7, 1966

proposal would reduce the teach teacher
er teacher load but in the long run pro provide
vide provide better quality education.
Ferguson said he was pledged
to raising the salaries of acade academic
mic academic personnel, but he didn't see
where the money would come from
if the teaching load were re reduced
duced reduced at the same time.
In calling on the U.S. Gover Government
nment Government to establish the proposed
oceanographicliacility in Florida,
the board said the facility would
(SEE REGENTS PAGE 2)

courses text, lab facilities, and
value to the student. These re results
sults results will be compiled and event eventually
ually eventually published. The evaluation
will be financed by Student Gov Government
ernment Government Imholte hopes to use li licensed
censed licensed duplicates of the nation nationwide
wide nationwide form pioneered by Pur Purdue
due Purdue University. Prohibitive cost
makes it necessary to process the
results locally, rather than at
Purdue, but the results will be
just as effective, Imholte added.
Inside Todays
"**4
Alligator
** t
Batman Bonus 2, 5
UPI Wire News 4
Breeze Bill, Piemen ... 6
Letters to Editor 7
Game Cokes Defended ... 13
Tallahassee Map 14
UF-FSU Preview 16
.



Page 2

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 7, 1966-

Wont Support
Segregationists
Says Johnson
WASHINGTON £UPI) President
Johnson said Thursday he had no
plans to support candidates for
governor in the South who are
running as avowed segregationists.
Asked at his news conference if
he would support the Southern
candidates, Johnson said, I think
it is very evident that some of
these candidates...differ with cer certain
tain certain of my policies that deal with
equal rights and equal treatment
for all of our citizens.
These gubernatorial candi candidates
dates candidates that you refer to have
not asked me to support them and
I have no plans to do so, the
President added. I doubt that
the President should get into every
race in every state.
Segregationist candidates Les Lester
ter Lester Maddox of Georgia, James
Johnson of Arkansas, George P.
Mahoney of Maryland and Mrs.
George Wallace of Alabama were
never mentioned by name at the
news conference. All are Dem Democratic
ocratic Democratic nominees for governor of
their states.
FSU HOSPITALITY
Florida States Program Coun Council
cil Council will sponsor a Hospitality Room
at the FSU Student Union today
and Saturday, for all visiting UF
students. Free coffee and donuts
wiU be served.
GATOR GIRL--isTerry
Bain 3ED. Terry is
a member of Alpha Chi
Omega sorority and is
majoring in special ed education,
ucation, education, If youre won wonering
ering wonering why things seem
so lively lately in the
Florida Union base basement,
ment, basement, home of student
publications, its be because
cause because Terry graces the
Seminole offices as
Greek editor.
liSPiKjSff
Gainevi lie's Oldest
.24 S.E. Bth St. 376-7806
1:15 10 5:45 $27.50^,

Tta Florida Alligator laarnaa tta right to riHh too tnuntmi Mm of aU advorttaomanu aad
to rattoo or tara aoay copy watch It ooaatdora obJocltoaaMo.
MO ramOM B GUARANTEED, tooagh daalrad poatttoa wU bo gtraa Miiitif poaaftio.
Tha Florida Alligator toll looaaMar adllMiato of para*at lor m adooMaoMo laroWao typ*.
HMMI WWW or aataaa aottoa la gtvoa la Bo Advorttolag Maaaiar vttkta
(1) oaa day atoar idtrlMloidipiiw.
TWnortda IlMpMi totoaolafiiaotolitoctoorotoaa oaa lanarnM-irllna of aa adoortlaaMoaf
adaddidlanaawmlM*ai. MoMoaaMrMnwlMMMnNi
ydlMlad Ova ttraaa ^ jy Ca^

B
A
T
M
A
N

REGENTS
(FROM PAGE 1)
probably become as important to
oceanography as Cape Kennedy
was to the nations space program.
The regents said Florida had
8,426 miles of shoreline to offer
plus 15 deep water and £5 shal shallow
low shallow water ports. In addition, said
Ferguson, the facility would be
close to research areas in the Gulf
of Mexico.
(Send your problems to George
and face each day with an indeci indecisive
sive indecisive smirk.)
* *
DEAR GEORGE:
I cant seem to hold anybodys
attention in a conversation. No
matter how hard I try to make
my point I am either ignored or
somebody simply changes the sub subject
ject subject in midstream. Sometimes it's
as if I werent talking at all. No Nobody
body Nobody pays any attention to me. What
can I do?
H. H.
DEAR H. H.
You don't have the time, do you?
Im supposed to pick my wife up
at five.
* *
DEAR GEORGE: j
Why, oh, why, does every city
have crews out digging holes in
the main street? This has puz puzzled
zled puzzled me for years. Nobody seems
to know the answer. George, can
you teU me?
PUZZLED
DEAR PUZZLED:
Yes, it is perfectly simple why
so many holes are being so con constantly
stantly constantly dug in so many metropo metropolitan
litan metropolitan thoroughfares.
Obviously, they forgot where
they left it.
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MEETING
Florida State University has had
an oceanographic institute for sev several
eral several years and recently the board
set up a coordinated program of
oceanography throughout the state
university system.
In other action, the board au authorized
thorized authorized FSU to change the name
of its Oceanographic Institute to
the Department of Oceanography.
Also, UF was told it could change
the name of the Coastal Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering Department to the Coastal
and Oceanographic Engineering
Department.
Both moves were made to in incorporate
corporate incorporate the programs into the
general statewide oceanographic
study system.
The board also authorized FSU
to create a separate department
of special education and rehab rehabilitation,
ilitation, rehabilitation, splitting the program
from the Department of Elemen Elementary
tary Elementary Education.
Forum Discusses
Traffic Problems
WGGG radio will present
Open Forum at 9 p.m. Sunday.
Guest BUI Conner, Justice of Traf Traffic
fic Traffic Court; Bill Sullivan, secretary
of traffic and parking; and Campus
Police Chief Augie Shuler will
discuss traffic and parking prob problems.
lems. problems. They wUI also tell how stu students
dents students can challenge the Traffic
Court concerning their parking
violations. Telephone calls after
the discussion are invited.

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First Amendment Policy Issued By UF

By FRANK SHEPHERD
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President J. Wayne Reitz
issued a slightly edited version
of the UFs policy on the first
amendment freedoms last week.

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S 16*-4* IWm ;
Bir fljjll
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Bontgans
1123 W. University Ave.
+< _^__

Originally the policy was issued
last April in answer to the re requests
quests requests of several campus protest
groups.
TTie document explicitly sets
forth university policy toward pe petitions,
titions, petitions, freedom of assembly,

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literature distribution, picketing
and other questions on students
rights.
This is not a new statement,'
said Lester Hale, dean of stu student
dent student affairs. It is a slightly edit edited
ed edited policy developed by the student
affairs committee and approved by
Reitz.
The committee is composed of
five studentsthe presidents of
Florida Blue Key, Student Govern Government,
ment, Government, Mortar Board, WSA
and Mens Interhall Council
According to the policy state statement
ment statement a student has the right
to circulate petitions, give
( Electrical l
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1 for the purpose of discus- I
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speeches or engage in public dis discussion
cussion discussion on campus; distribute free
literature; picket; or act for an
existing and approved student or organization
ganization organization in the recruitment of
membership for that organization.
However, the policy states
there must be no interference with
the normal functioning of class classroom
room classroom insturction or infringing on
the rights of others in the pro process
cess process of exercising the freedoms.
To be sure that there will
be no such interference with
the rights of others when a rally
is planned or a public address
system is to be used, clearance
must be obtained from the Dean
of Student Affairs.
In order to sell literature on
campus a permit must be ob obtained
tained obtained from the Dean of Student
Affairs.
- No literature can be left on
campus in stacks unattended. Lit Literature
erature Literature is to be distributed on
a person-to-person basis. Such
material should identify authorship
and sponsorship.
The student distributing the lit literature

Two Years Wasted?
Volunteers Say No
By BECKY ENNEIS
Alligator Correspondent
Two years of life wasted?
Not according to former Peace members David Le Lemons
mons Lemons and Margie Holloway.
Not at all, emphasized Lemons. Tbe Peace Corps is a
very personal experience. A person can get much more from
the Peace Corps than he gives.
Lemons and Miss Holloway are two of the Peace Corps re representatives
presentatives representatives who are visiting college campuses around the nation.
In trying to recruit the co lege student, they offer free pamph pamphlets
lets pamphlets and occasionally give talks in classes.
Although the minumum acceptance age is 18, we prefer col college
lege college graduates. They are more mature and have a better idea
of the purposes of the Peace Corps, said Lemon.
Many recruits go to a country with the attitude that theyU
change the world. But many times well spend two years in a
country and produce no visible results.
What were working on is the attitude of the people in these
countries and we try to help them realize their potential, Lemon
said.
I think the result of the Peace Corps wont show up for years,
\ until the children, that were, working with grow up. Then we
can see what weve accomplished, Lemon said.
Lemons and Miss Holoway said that many students are wary
over joining the Peace Corps because they dont think they are
qualified to help in any way.
Almost half of our college recruites are liberal arts ma majors,
jors, majors, said Lemonds. There are many jobs, such as teaching
and work in community development, which they can be trained
for.

CUfFS NOTES, INC.
Station Lincoln. Note. 68S0S
INCONOONATIO

Friday, October 7, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

erature literature is subject to all laws
or regulations of the university,
city, state and nation in exercis exercising
ing exercising his rights.
There can be no sale of commer commercial
cial commercial goods on campus except state
newspapers provided in the vending
racks and the traditional Honor ap apples.
ples. apples. Exception may be obtained
only by special permission.
Students are obligated to abide
by the university rules. Violations
of any rules will subject the stu student
dent student to normal disciplinary pro proceedings,
ceedings, proceedings, even though the purpose
of his disobedience is to chal challenge
lenge challenge existing regulation or
authority.
Copies of the full policy state statement
ment statement are being mimeographed and
will be available to all who want
them, Hale said.
And the contents of this policy
will be included in the student
handbook currently being printed.
If there are any questions con concerning
cerning concerning this statement, students
should address themselves to the
dean of student affairs or the com committee,
mittee, committee, Hale said.

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Page 3



Page 4

t, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 7, 1966

... -' *** " ,' ".'*.
v/.v.!^ 'Vv.*\ v.
C FROM THE I
\ WIRES OF /
UPI /
International
BUMPER CROP. .T7ie Soviet government TTiursday announced the
largest grain harvest in the nations history.
The announcement amounted to a tangible vote of confidence in
multi-bill ion-dollar efforts to boost farm output and end the neces necessity
sity necessity for expensive, embarassing wheat purchases from capitalist
nations.
Observers said the bumper crop, while a good sign, did not mean
Russias perennial farm problems were solved. They pointed out that
farmers were blessed by almost perfect weather this year.
But they said the crop will free needed currency that can now be
spent on arms, consumer goods, space or other priority items.
PLEA FOR PEACE. .Pope Paul Vis special envoy to Viet Nam
met with South Vietnamese Premier Nguyen Cao Ky Wednesday and
expressed hope for worldwide peace, it was reported Thursday.
Archbishop Sergio Pignedoli told Ky, I hope that peace will reign
not only in Viet Nam but in the whole world, the semi-official
Viet Nam Press agency reported.
MANILA SUMMIT. .Hie seven-nation summit conference on Viet
Nam will open formally Oct. 24 and then adjourn for closed-door
sessions in Manilas Malcanang Palace.
The conference will be attended by President Johnson and the chiefs
of states of six other anti-Com munlst nations.
Topping the proposed agenda is a review of all peace proposals on
the Viet Nam conflict.
TO ASK U.N... .British Foreign Secretary George Brown said today
he will ask the United Nations General Assembly next week to set up
a Viet Nam peace conference as soon as possible.
Brown said the conference should include the Communist National
Liberation Front, the political arm of the Viet Cong.
ACCUSES WEST.. .Congolese President Joseph Mobutu today accused
Western nations of having woven a network of subversion in the
Congo.
This was the reason he had ordered all consulates outside the
capital closed, Mobuto said in an interview with the official Congo Congolese
lese Congolese press agency.
He said Eastern countries were often accused of subversion,
but it is Western countries, in the name of Christian civilization
and under cover of technical assistance which had woven a network
of subversion, in the Congo.
He blamed consulate officials for fomenting a rebellion in July
at Kisangani which his army put down after bloody fighting two weeks
ago. He said similar rebellions were being organized at Lubumbashi,
Alberville and Bukavu.
National
PASSES BILL. .The House Ways & Means Committee passed a
bill today to limit federal matching funds for state health care pro programs
grams programs to plans which benefit medically needy children and disabled
adults only.
Passage of the measure by the committee plugged a loophole in
the federal Medicare program that had threatened to drain the govern government
ment government of billions of dollars.
A committee spokesman said the limitations were approved to
prevent federal funds going to able-bodied people who could work and
pay for health insurance.
HALTS BOMBING. .The United States has stopped bombing part of
the demilitarized zone in Viet Nam to permit international investiga investigation
tion investigation of charges the Communists are using the zone illegally to infil infiltrate
trate infiltrate troops and supplies into the south.
Announcement of. the halt in bombing was made Wednesday by the
White House. It declined to characterize the move as an effort to
de-escalate the war in the hope the Communists would do the same.
*
NO PREPARATION. .Murderous Hurricane Inez howled toward
Mexico's pool-table-flat Yucatan Peninsula today with 110 m.p.h.
winds and towering storm tides that could spell disaster for ill illprepared
prepared illprepared residents. i
A newspaper editor in Merida, capital of the region, reported no
precautions are being taken.
The New Orleans Weather Bureau, which took over the fore forecasting
casting forecasting duties from the weary experts at Miami, predicted Inez
would move into northern Yucatan late tonight with hurricane-force
winds up to 140 m.p.h. hitting most of the northern coast. Tides of
5 to 10 feet above normal were forecast.
NEW ISSUE. .Gubernatorial candidate Lester Maddox said Thursday
it sounded as if Archbishop Paul J. Hallinan had received instructions
from Mayor Ivan Allen and Dr. Martin Luther King in advising Cath Catholics
olics Catholics to oppose segregationist candidates on moral grounds.
I have Catholics supporting me all over the state, Maddox said,
and I don't call them dishonest. I call them good Georgians.
Maddox labeled himself a segregationist and said I will be one
when I enter the governors mansion and when I leave it.
There are approximately 83,000 Catholics in Georgia, according
to Hallinan.
NEW APPOINTMENTS . .President Johnson announced TTiursday
he was sending Lewellyn E. Thompson, the State Departments chief
authority on Soviet affairs, back to Moscow as the U.S. ambassador.
He told a White House news conference that Ellsworth Bunker, the
U.S. ambassador to the Organization of American States would succeed
Thompson as ambassador at large.

BEATS THE HORSES, THATS_ALL

Bonds Poor Bargain

By LYLE WILSON
United Press International
None would dare suggest at this
stage of the American currency
inflation madness that a U.S. gov government
ernment government bond is not a safe in investment.
vestment. investment. That may come later.
But here today is the fact
that the new-type savings bonds
about to be offered the common
man do not qualify as a good in investment.
vestment. investment. The return is too lit little.
tle. little. This will be true despite a
Johnson administration plan to of offer
fer offer a substantially higher rate of
return than the 4.15 per cent now
paid on series E and H bonds
that are held to maturity.
The credit of the U.S. govern government
ment government is behind these savings bonds
so that when they come due, they
will be paid. Paif! But paid in
what? Paid, of course, in chea cheaper
per cheaper dollars of depreciating value.
For the common man, the best
standard by which to measure the
rotting of dollars in pocket, in
bonds, in banks or accumulating
as insurance, is to examine what
is happening to consumer prices.
The common man and his wife
consume just about what they earn.
Consumer prices have been in increased
creased increased in this year of you younever-had
never-had- younever-had it-so-good at a rate of
about 4 per cent annually. Assume
that the Johnson administration in increases
creases increases the savings bond inter interest
est interest rate to 5 per cent, to obtain
the maximum return, the saver
must hold the bond several years
until maturity.
As their savings bond increa increases
ses increases in value at the rate of 5
per cent a year, the common man
and his wife would discover the
purchasing power of their dollars
shrinking in terms of consumer
Bhutan Seeks
UN Protection
CALCUTTA, India (UPI) The
Buddhist kingdom of Bhutan, nest nestling
ling nestling in the high Himalayas bet between
ween between India and Tibet, may soon
seek United Nations protection
against Com munist China.
Sources close to the Bhutanese
palace report that the kingdom
may apply for U.N. membership
in the hope of having U.N. troops
stationed in the country to stop
Chinese intrusions into its terr territory.
itory. territory.
India, at the request of Bhu Bhutanese
tanese Bhutanese King Druk Gyalpo Jigme
Dori Wangchuk, recently protest protested
ed protested to Peking about a number of
intrustions across the borders.
The king, who visited India ear earlier
lier earlier this year, secured Indias
written guarantee that it will sup support
port support Bhutans application for U.N.
membership whenever the move
is made.
I
Bhutan has only a small, ill illarmed
armed illarmed army. Officials fear that
any attack on it would be timed
to coincide with a similar attack
on India so that that giant coun country
try country would be too preoccupied with
its own affairs to rush in assis assistance.
tance. assistance. India, under the terms of
the 1949 treaty, has promised mil military
itary military support to Bhutan in the event
of attack.

goods by about 4 per cent each
year.
That means roughly that the
common man and his wife are
receiving in real dollars as a re return
turn return on their bond $1 per year
on each SIOO invested instead of
$5. Four of the interest dollars
went down the high cost of living
drain. The original dollar invest investment
ment investment also has been shinking in

TV GROWS UP?I
A NEW OUTLOOK

HOLLYWOOD (UPI) Would
you believe that stuffy old tele television
vision television is on the air with a ser series
ies series wherein a man and women,
unmarried, live together?
Its true.
Either television hasnt noticed
this little design for living or it
is finally maturing.
The series is The Man Who
Never Was. Its definitely not
a situation comedy. The ABC-TV
series deals with a spy who moves
in on a widow. He just happens
to be a dead ringer for her very
dead husband.
They share the same house and
have subtly fallen in love. The
viewer is left to his own ima imagination
gination imagination as to the exact relation relationship
ship relationship between the two.
Beautiful Dana Wynter plays the
lady. The man she lives with
on screen is Robert Lansing,

'
FLORIDA BRIEFS
TALLAHASSEE -- Atty. Gen. Earl Falrcloth appointed a cit citizens
izens citizens committee Thursday to recommend ways to combat crime,
but said no measure can take the place of a good, honest police policeman.
man. policeman.
Faircloth, chairman of the Florida Committee on Law Enforce Enforcement
ment Enforcement and the Administration of Justice, chose two law enforcement
men and a noted ex-prosecutor among the members.
TAMPA (UPI) -a Tampa firm filed suit here today to have the
state law which prohibits it from donating to the campaign of Repub*
lican gubernatorial candidate Claude Kirk declared unconstitutional.
The suit by L. and J. Corp. challenges the law which bars political
contributions by any corporation.
The suit contends the firm wants to contribute SIOO to Kirks
campaign, but that the law is an unreasonable and arbitrary exer exercise
cise exercise of state police powers, in denying equality of law, and depriving
e plaintiff of life, liberty and property without due process of law.
The suit alleged that labor organization officials have made numerous
contributions to Robert King High, and contended that essen ial difference between corporations and a labor organization.
dpJit LLAHAS^ EE (UPI) ~~ stat Supreme Court will make a
ordinJnr II wf ther a nep dy person accused of violating a municipal
Th P h e as 6 right t 0 a c art- appointed attorney,
writ nf US J k Urt accepted the challenge Wednesdav when it granted a
tL tt c o aS C rpus t 0 Jesse Lee Taylor, 18, of Melbourne.
DrovidPri* *.,f Uprenie Court has ruled that accused felons must be
that a dpf F Urt ~ appointed attorneys if they do not have them and
Lt tZ Z T St bG told f his ri ht to counsel.
offenses deral court ha s not gotten into the area of municipa
Florida J mn A f SEE
* must pay property taxes too.
lnB CteClslon 0f the Stlte SUpren,e C0 rl
The statp pn f* 1 lts vote 4 3 on the niatter. h(
property did Urt threw out contentions by the home that although
through a ' exCep onS **

purchasing power.
Moreover, when the savin*
bonds are cashed at maturity th
common man and his wife must pa!
income tax on the shrunken tl
turn on their investment. On
long-haul basis, these new sav savings
ings savings bonds are superior to crap
shooting, horseracing or pok er
But they scarcely qualify as a
good investment.

late of Twelve Oclock High,
There are a couple of adults,
who obviously dont play it lor
cutes. But so far the scripts have
been delicately written and the
results have been true adult vi video
deo video fare.
To add further zest to the story,
the entire series is being filmed
in Europe at locales from Berlin
to Barcelona.
Because The Man Who Never
Was is drawing more viewers
than most spy stories, the pro
ducers decided it was the love
story between the principals that
triggered interest in the series.
There will be more emphasis
on the love story than the spy
business in future segments,
Dana siad. And I cant remember
when television last had a real
love story on the air.



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1 I
Bfe- / since you choose hot to bbubve li yau'Re ]f for what?!? you u § 'i Quote section 8, paragraph ms, | %
1 I
;X X;

Hub Closed Due
To Lack Os Business

By 808 BECK
Alligator Staff Writer
Lack of student business caused
the Hub to be closed down per permanently.
manently. permanently.
Under the new food contract
given to Servomation this fall the
Hub was not included. For several
years the Hub had been in the
loss bracket financially.
During the last fiscal year the
Food Services Division grossed
$1,490,000 and lost SII,OOO there.
The book store grossed $1,513,000
and made a net profit of $115,000.
The Hub Cafeteria was just
not popular enough with the stu students
dents students to produce the necessary
volume of sales to cover the loss,
said William Elmore, UFs as-

IFC Leadership Retreat Held

UF's Interfraternity Council
held its fifth annual leadership
retreat last weekend at Crystal
River. Over 100 representatives
from different fraternities, faculty
and the administration spend Fri Friday
day Friday and Saturday discussing Greek
problems in relation to their own
internal structure, the campus, ad administration
ministration administration and community as a
whole.
Guest speakers and participants
included Mel Sharpe, assistant to
President J. Wayne Reitz; Frank
Adams, dean of men; and Harvey

QUICK!
Think of BLANCHS
For the Best
In Good Styling
l)\ N.W. ISrti ST.
THI FASHION CINTIR JUST OFF CAMFUS
BEAUTY SHOP I SPECIALTY SHOP
WTIST WOMH'S STYIIS
376-5997 | 372-1581
r GATOR ADS SELL!'

Friday, October 7, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

sistant business director.
Each individual service must
stand on its own financially and
cannot be supported by other pro profit
fit profit producing services within the
university, said Elmore.
The cafeteria area will be used
only for the expansion of the book bookstore.
store. bookstore. The bookstore will not
increase the number of goods to
be sold, but increase the area for
its already cramped bookshelves.
The banquet facilities above the
cafeteria will be closed as soon
as the new Florida Union opens.
Personnel Services will move into
the vacated banquet space.
It is necessary for the cafe cafeteria
teria cafeteria area to be studied by an
architect for the bookstore expan expansion
sion expansion to obtain maximum benefits,
said Elmore.

Sharron, assistant dean of men and
fraternity advisor.
The retreat also served for the
announcement of the five annual
William Fleming Service Scholar Scholarships
ships Scholarships to Jeffrey Klink, Beta Theta
Pi; James Dickenson, Chi Phi;
Frank Snell, Sigma Alpha Epsilon;
Stephen Bronis, Tau Epsilon Phi
and Ernest Haslam, Tau Kappa
Epsilon.
The scholarships are received
on the basis of competitive appli application
cation application and are chosen by service
to the fraternity system, scholar scholarship
ship scholarship and need.

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 7, 1966

The Florida Alligator
A L Ou^HPUlkT^k'
EDDIE SEARS 808 MEW AKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR DICK DENNIS
Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not uecessaniy reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is die editorial in the left
column.
Breezes Bill
It was deplorable.
Thats about all we can think of to
say about the obvious political nature of
the seven Legislative Council replace replacements
ments replacements of Sept. 27.
Two of the seven replacements named
by party whips Terry Moore and Tom
Cushman were clearly unqualified to hold
the seats to which they were appointed.
And two of the remaining five have re records
cords records t)f an average less than 2.0 --
although both these gentlemen claim other otherwise.
wise. otherwise.
Mark Armstrong, a lUC, was appointed
to fill a vacancy from the School of For Forestry.
estry. Forestry. And Dan Peterson was appointed
to a Murphree area seat even though
he lives off-campus.
The strangest thing about all seven
rush-rush appointees was that they voted
for the Blue Key Preferential Seating
Amendment to the man.
This suspicious conincidence goes along
with the fact that few on the Council --
save Moore, Cushman and a handful of
others knew that replacements were
coming up until the very day of the meet meeting.
ing. meeting.
However, Student Body Vice-President
Fred Breeze has proposed a bill which
will combat this. And he plans to intro introduce
duce introduce it at the next Council meeting.
Breezes bill would require that names
be brought to the vice-presidents office
within a reasonable time before the meet meeting.
ing. meeting.
Breezes bill also would take the ap appointments
pointments appointments of new members out of the
hands of politicians. Replacements would
be made by local area councils under
the bill.
In the past, a couple of politicians
have made all the decisions, Breeze
said. Such a state of affairs certainly
doesnt help the student body get fair
representation.
We support Breezes ideas and will
support wholeheartedly such a bill when
it reaches the floor.
It is our belief that this would drive
just one more nail in the coffin of the
spoils system in Student Government.
Help For Piemen
Students looking for something to do
in Tallahassee Saturday morning would
probably find it enjoyable to make the
scene at the FSU golf course, next to
the stadium, at 10 a.m.
There, before the very eyes of all to
see, the Purple Piemen of Charlatan ma magazine
gazine magazine will tackle FSUs Smoke Signals
Staff for the Intergalactic Cup sym symbolic
bolic symbolic of state croquet supremacy.
It should be an interesting morning for
all and the Piemen admittedly need all
the moral support they can get.
With the aid of a partisan crowd Char Charlatan
latan Charlatan could make it two victories in one
day for a Gainesville team.

retrospectively yours

Childish Tripe From FSU

Our Man Hoppe
By ART HOPPE ~
Alligator Columnist

Our ever-vigilant Right Wing
warns us that secret Communist
infiltrators are about to make a
concerted effort to take over the
American labor movement. Again.
This certainly is alarming news.
Most alarmed is my friend, Mr.
Rasputin G. Pettibone, the well wellknown
known wellknown secret Communist
infiltrator.
Oh, no! cried Mr. Pettibone,
on hearing the news. I cant go
through that again.
And with a shudder of pain Mr.
Pettibone recounted his heroic at attempt
tempt attempt to take over and subvert
the International Brotherhood of
Smelters, Puddlers & Coupon
Clippers.
* *
It was at the Brotherhoods re recent
cent recent convention in that heart of
trade union activity, Miami Beach.
On orders from the Party, Mr.
Pettibone cleverly disguised him himself
self himself as a typical labor leader --
Louis Roth suit, countess Mara
tie and alligator shoes.
On taking his seat on the plat platform,
form, platform, Mr. Pettibone found the con convention
vention convention engaged in a vigorous floor
fight over a resolution con condemning
demning condemning management for self selfishly
ishly selfishly disregarding the welfare of
the American working man by cal callously
lously callously refusing to provide adequate
plant facilities to meet his on-the on-thejob
job on-thejob needs.
Sweat shop conditions, eh?
Mr. Pettibone whispered happily to
his neighbor. What is it, speci specifically?
fically? specifically? Dangerous machinery?
Back-breaking loads? Obsolete
tools?
No, inadequate facilities to
chill white wine, his neighbor ex explained.
plained. explained. You can imagine how a
man feels, having to wash down his
pressed duck sandwich with a dry
Bordeaux.
Mr. Pettibone, not being able to
think of a dialectic covering the
situation, wisely took no side in
the debate. But as soon as it ended
he grabbed the microphone and,
pointing heavenward, cried: Arise
ye prisoners of starvation!
For a moment, it appeared he
might sway the throng, many
brothers not having had a hot
hors doeuvre since lunch. But

one delegate rose to a point of
order, noting that the banquet in
the Louis XTV A-Go-Go room
wasnt scheduled until 8 p.m. and
we must adhere to the agenda.
Changing tacks, Mr. Pettibone
warned that Wall Street was
milking the blood of the Brother Brotherhood
hood Brotherhood and. .
But the Secretary-Treasurer
angrily arose to point out the
unions $87.3 million in assets
were cautiously invested in mutual
funds, municipal securities and
first deeds of trust. His report
consumed three hours.
As a last resort, Mr. Pettibone
launched a tirade against those
who would exploit your labors,
those who would seize the fruits
of your honest toil, those idle men
who live off the sweat of your
brow!
At last his ringing words hit
home. And after minimum debate
the Brotherhood passed a
unanimous resolution condemning
the confiscatory income tax.
* *
Since then, Mr. Pettibone has
been recovering slowly. To revive
his crushed spirit, the Party has
assigned him an area more fertile
for subversion, more ripe for the
message, than trade unions. Nat Naturally,
urally, Naturally, he prefers it.
Maybe they havent got the
class or the money, he savs
"but 1 like working with the Na Na(acturers.
(acturers. Na(acturers. ASS Clatlon ' M u

Florida Alligator Staff
NICK ARROYO CAROL HEFNER GENE NAIL
oto Editor Society Editor Editorial Assistant
JO ANN LANGWORTHY NEWT SIMMONS
General Assignment Editor Wire Editor
Maurv F rm^ TEl !? M Beck Sue Froemke, Barbara Gefen,
Fowles jwf r Kathie Keim Jean Mamlin, Frank Shepherd, Agg*
rowies, Justine Hartman.
D i T I ? Judy Redfern, Sherrie Braswell, Toni
Ken
i^.. '

By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Editorial Editor
Things have gotten complete,,
out of hand. e y
Hie FSU Flambeau -a su
posedly responsible college n
paper has stooped to printing
some of the most unbelievabu
tripe ever seen by man.
Some UF stu students
dents students might
argue with Dick
Dennis or Tyler
Tucker about the
Gators, but they
ought to be glad
they aren't stuck
with a Howard
Figler.
Figler, who
alleges to be
sports editor of
the Flambeau, will have to share
some responsibility for a riot or
brawl after Saturdays game. His
writings and news judgment have
been unbelievably abortive in the
past two weeks.
On Sept. 28, he began his column
with Rebuilding year be damned.
This 66 football squad has quelled
Miami and war drums are thun thundering
dering thundering toward Gator ears from the
Tallahassee tepee. One rival down
UF is next."
This kind of ultra- chauvinistic
attitude undoubtedly led to the
Screw the Gators pins, which,
in turn, have led some Florida
1 students to retaliate by putting up
Screw the Seminoles signs and
burning the old jalopy that was
to be wrecked in the spirit of clean
fun.
Figlers latest com ments with an
accompanying article entitled
Facts Revealed about Alli Alligators,"
gators," Alligators," are even worse.
Hie UF is an overrated team,
quoth he. Our down-state rep reptile
tile reptile rivals are not the supermen
some scribes would have us be believe."
lieve." believe."
He goes on to explain why Florida
shouldht win Saturday, because
the flightinSeminoles are tough.
By the time one gets to the end
of his short piece, he could do
with some anti-emetic potion.
But the article on alligators
wins the award of the week.
In order to expedite the sight sighting
ing sighting of the creepy, crawly, slimy
reptiles from downstate, it says,
when they presume to slither
onto the compus (sic), an FSU
fan has kindly provided this factual
guide for the benefit of loyal
Seminoles:"
On it goes to give nine facts
about alligators which include that
it is impossible to distinguish
a male from a female, "that Gator
skin is yellow when preserved
and a child can walk faster than
an alligator can run.
As I said, its gotten completely
out of hand in Tallahassee.
Even worse, however, would be a
retaliation in such a childish-man childish-manner
ner childish-manner by UF students. For all i
will take to ignite a full-scale riot
Saturday would be onefoolis
Florida student.
And no one in his right min
wants to see that.



Against
The Vets
EDITOR:
My heart bleeds for the Veterans
Club. The poor guys can't get an
office, a secretary, and an open
telephone line to St. Petersburg.
Poor old vets requested only $3300
from Legislative Council and were
granted only $394. All the
Veterans' Club has is a loaned
drawer in the Florida Union.
My heart really bleeds.
If the Veterans have problems,
the Veterans Club ought to follow
the example of Gainesville Students
for a Democratic Society. We have
problems sometimes too we
solve them without Legislative
Council money. We manage without
Florida Union offices. We pay our
own phone bills and do our own
secretarial work.
If the Legislative Council wont
help liberal and left-wing groups
(SDS, Student Group for Equal
Rights, Student Peace Union, Stu Student
dent Student Committee for Academic
Freedom), why should it be obliged
to help right-wing groups like
the UF Veterans' Club?
I might add, in closing, that ac according
cording according to the powers that be in
Tigert Hall, an organization with
University of Florida in its title
(as UF Veterans Club) cannot
be officially recognized on this
campus. A bit ol discrimination
going on in Tigert Hall, wouldnt
you say?
BONNI GREENSPAN

Prof Offers
EDITOR:
Being a sometime admirer of
the late Senator Huey Long (Share
the Wealth Every Man a King),
I will be glad to share my office
(10 x 15) with the Veterans Club
and its president, Bart Kimball.
If this is acceptable to Bart, Ill
first clear my offer through the
proper channels. Remember fel fellows
lows fellows its really not the gift that
counts, but the sentiment!
DR. J. E. DOVELL,
Professor Social Science,
Retired Navy Commander
Differs With
Hale Adams
EDITOR:
My opinion is that Dean Adams
opinion about other left-wing
campus organizations serving the
purposes of the Florida Socialist
Union is just a rather obvious way
of keeping a truly left-wing group
off campus.
SGER (Student Group for Equal
Rights) is not of the same type
as the Socialist Union, it is con concerned
cerned concerned with equal rights and un unless
less unless the Deans Adams and Hale
consider this concern left-wing
(which from past experience on this
campus seems very likely), then I
dont see any feasibility to their
position.
As for Dean Hale not wanting to
prejudice the committee with his
opinions Baloney! Why was he
interviewed for the statement
appearing in the Alligator article?
Obviously because his opinion is
influential!
Come on now, stick to reality
and quit hiding the manipulations
that Tigert Hall imposes on any
politically-oriented group which
doesnt have a consensus on
campus.
HOLLIS HALL, 7AS

A.
D.

LBJ: A Letdown After Kennedy

r 5 By CAROL SANGER
# Alligator Columnist
We arent unreasonable.
We dont demand impossible feats from any man. .well, at
least we dont expect them.
We understand that each person must do things in his own way,
and we dont condemn a man for methods strange to us.
As a nation we are reasonable, patient, calm and basically
very agreeable. Most of the time.
We do possess a funny trait though. We re spoiled very easily.
Once we become acquainted with a unique, compelling style we
find it difficult to adapt ourselves to any other.
It wasnt easy to accept any replacement for John Kennedy.
He was more than a man, he was a spirit, an idea, a state of mind.
He was the voice of the youth of America. He was one of us,
and when he died he claimed a part of our youth.
The spirit remained, and we called it idealism.
From behind this shield we took our first look at Lyndon
Johnson. He was everything that John Kennedy was not. .well,

EDITOR:
All loyal Gator fans arise and
cry for our noble sports editors
head! With fans like him, I wonder
why the Gators even try. Mr. Den Dennis,
nis, Dennis, no team loses on purpose.
No team, (yes, no team) can be
physically and mentally up for
every game. This is the reason

Garretts Views All Wet

EDITOR:
Jan Garretts letter to editor, Will it be So Socialism
cialism Socialism or Barbarism, published in Alligator,
September 29, induced us to write this open letter.
It was extremely regretful that Mr. Garrett lacked
of proper knowledge and understanding of the events
happening currently in Indonesia, although it was
widely published in this country; then bewildered
as he saw the figure that 300,000 people (definite
figure is unknown) have been butchered in the anti anticommunist
communist anticommunist purge throughout this archipelago. In Indeed
deed Indeed any murder is barbarian. However, we
definitely disagree that the current government,
which Mr. Garrett claimed neo-Fascist ruler of
Indonesia, has something to do with this mass
murder. We are strongly against this uncivilized
term to designate the new government, which
reminds us to totalitarism.
Let us straighten up the point, hopefully to fill
the gap of misunderstanding of the current event
in Indonesia. Under mismanaged and dictatorial
Sukarno regime, our countrymen had been hand handcuffed
cuffed handcuffed by fear, lack of freedom, monotonous in indoctrination,
doctrination, indoctrination, frustration of the unfulfilled pros prosperity
perity prosperity promises and topped by economic depression
and uncontrolled inflation. Although we are about
two years in this country, it is still fresh in mind
that an instructor could be fired if he gave a lec lecture
ture lecture which did not go along with lndocrination
program; a large number of magazines and news newspapers
papers newspapers were banned for being accused to function
as anti-revolutionary media if they refused to
support indoctrination instead of criticizing it.
A man could be jailed if he got caught tuning to
beautiful music broadcasted by radio Malaysia,
indeed he was. lucky when he only lost his radio
set. It is still fresh in our mind how our families
struggling to keep the stove burning and to make
both ends meet from day to day, which we never
experienced before. Meanwhile hundreds of
thousands of empty bellied countrymen witnessed
a handful of marhaen (Indonesian slang for pro progressive
gressive progressive and revolutionary proletar group) swirling
up and down from Djakarta to luxury mountain
retreat resort, Puntjak, in brand new cars. Only
God knows why that nation that occupies the land of
enormous abundance in natural resources and ex extremely
tremely extremely fertile should senseless suffer.

1 1
NO NO
* ," 1
jar*
. 1..

He Wants DennisScalp

for upsets and near upsets like
Georgia Tech winning over an
inferior Clem son team by only 13-
12 and North Carolina beating a
superior Michigan team. Our cry
is not that you maligned a great
team by calling them the sorry
Saurians,' (although no team de deserves
serves deserves such an epithet, especially
when they have won every game

The October 1 communist coup was the climax,
the spontaneous outburst of the people who want to
free themselves from the handcuffs who eliminate
them as free men, led to mass murder. This was
all done by gentle, social and cooperative people
who never committed violence. Thanks and praise
for General Suharto and his associates who suc succeeded
ceeded succeeded to rescue the nation from the mouth of the
mighty dragon.
Whos all behind this scene; we should admit
it was PKI, Indonesian Communist Party. It was
PKI that insisted Sukarno in taking West Irian
by force, and Sukarno blessed it; it was Aidit
(PKls boss) who put pressure upon Sukarno to
crush Malaysia, and Sukarno was considering
this. The motive hidden behind all these cam campaigns
paigns campaigns was to weaken the army and depleted the
government treasury which eventually led to eco economic
nomic economic chaos, ultimately this would open the road
for communist take over. It was also Aidit who
drive for arming the so-called revolutionary pea peasants
sants peasants and labor organizations to contend against
the army. The non- and anti-communist majority
have confidence in the army as a sole power
capable of buffering the communist activity. The
last effort of PKI was to persuade Sukarno to
put the army under control of NASAKOM (Na (National,
tional, (National, Religious, and Communist leadership).
Now let us be simple in showing what should
have happened if Aidit played his cards right.
We certainly know what would be the faith of the
majority of anti-communist civil servants, stu students,
dents, students, intellectuals and others. Perhaps, Mr.
Garrett will thunder us that this is extremely
exaggerated if we said that our beloved families,
left at home, would be insecured when PKI suc succeeded
ceeded succeeded in the coup, for it just happened were
pursuing some knowledge in this capitalist coun country.
try. country. It is not a matter of Socialism or Barbarism
should mankind faces, as quoted from Engels'
statement. It is history has taught us that any
effort to bring up injustice and fulfillment of
personal pride, ambition and dignity, and totali totalitarism
tarism totalitarism end up in chaos, catastrophe and finally
self-destruction.
FAISAL A MAN, 7 AG
ZOEFRI HAMZAH, 7 AG
Indonesian Students

we still carried the shield.
We were satisfied then. We are reasonable people. We watched
this new figure in the White House as he twisted arms and
played politics with Congress. Our generation had never seen
this before. He accomplished many good things. Were reason reasonable.
able. reasonable.
Then the change came. We watched this leader of the so socalled
called socalled Great Society as he skirted the policitaUy dangerous
practice of taking a stand. We watched the arm twisting of the
press compete with the arm twisting of Congress. We watched
this tall Texan grow steadily smaller in his vain attempts to
appear even taller.
We wanted a president not a politician. Now he was taking
something of ours. .he took the spirit of idealism left us and
submerged it in the mire of old-fashioned political maneuvering.
We arent THAT reasonable! We shouldnt be. This spirit is
ours. .a legacy from one who cared enough to show us the
better side of life, even political life. We must keep it, for it
is a part of our youth. Hard, cold realism comes with age.
We can wait.

and are within one of what was
predicted by some experts to be
their total victories) but with your
woeful lack of football knowledge.
NAMELY:
1. A disturbing factor of this
sequence was that the only line lineman
man lineman to make a tackle was George
Dean. The other three stops were
perpetrated by the linebackers and

Friday, October 7. 1966. TTie Florida Alligator,

the secondary. In a goal line
stand, the linebackers are a part
of the line. Second it is the line linemans
mans linemans responsibility to take out
the blockers so that the linebackers
(if you insist) can prevent the vital
one year (sic) gain. Thus it was
not a disturbing factor but a re rewarding
warding rewarding one: a team does not make
five goal-line stands in one game
with linemen NOT doing their duty,
Mr. Dennis.
2. Our fourth quarter offense
played cautiously having to punt
once on third down, choosing to
fumble on first down,. . Ahead
13-0, 3rd down and 8 inside the
20, you punt on the third down.
If you watched the UCLA-Missouri
game Saturday, you would have
seen the same play performed by
UCLA, the nations No. 2 team.
Also, a player does not choose to
fumble; a fumble may happen acci accidently
dently accidently or be forced, but a player
does not choose to fumble.
3. More and more, it appears
Floridas claim to greatness lies
with its unexpectedly staunch de defense
fense defense not its on-again off-again
offense. Yes, our defense is great
but so is our offense. It leads the
SEC in total and pass offense. It
takes a great offense to go 60 yards
in four plays with less than 1:30
left. No, our team will not score
every time it gets the ball; no
team does. Our offense did not get
the ball outside the 20 yard line
(where they had less than a 10
per cent chance of scoring) with
the exception of the touchdown
drive in the second half.
4 A team enroute to a Bowl
berth against Alabama must not let
up. Wheres your crystal ball that
says well play Alabama in a bowl?
Its writers like you, Mr. Dennis,
who cause our players to look
ahead and not at this weeks weak
opponent, or quit and say Whats
the use? I hope the whole school
is behind us when we say GO TO
HELL, MR. DENNIS and say to
our Super Gators, GIVE THEM
HELL, GATORS!
MAX F. MORRIS, ILW
JOHN F. HEALY, 4PE
(EDITORS NOTE: Dick Dennis
was in Nashville last week and
SAW the action he reported. What
about you? And since when is it
his function to be a fan?)

Page 7



IGATOR CLASSIFIEDS!

for sale
MAHOGANY drop leaf dining room
table. Make offer, 378-4085. (A (A---26-3t-c).
--26-3t-c). (A---26-3t-c).
1965 HONDA 150. 3,500 mUes,
brand new condition, S4OO. Call
378-6187. (A-26-2t-c),
NEW REGAL classical guitar
Beautiful tone and workmanship,
private owner, SIOO includes all
accessories. Call Marvin Kays
Music Center. 372-7681. (A-26-
2t-c).
1956 NASHUA Trailer, good con condition,
dition, condition, 37x8 with 12x15 enclosed
cabana, air conditioned. Call 378-
4752 after 6 p.m. (A-25-3t-p).
MUST SELL LEAVING TOWN
1961 32 foot trailer, air condi conditioned,
tioned, conditioned, carpeted and complete completely
ly completely furnished, excellent condition.
$1,500 or best offer. 372-0450.
(A-27-2t-c).
1962 CUSHMAN Eagle, good con condition,
dition, condition, 100 miles on overhauled
engine, good tires, $125. Call Univ.
extension 2848 days and 372-80-
50. (A-27-st-c).
MOVING AWAY HAVE TO SELL
Electric Remington typewriter,
S4O. Bed, small couch, kitchen
table, reclining chair. 1235 SW
sth Ave. Friday only. (A-27-11-
cX
10x55 TRAILER, two bedroom
Marlette. Small equity and take
over payments.. 378-2405. (A-25-
3t-c).
1965 BULOVA Portable stereo,
2 speakers, 4 speeds, wooden case,
excellent condition, Cash, SBO, call
378-2330. (A-25-3t-p).
1965 STEREO deck, Muntz
Manual, includes four speakers,
tape and installation. Like New,
S7O. Call 372-9438 (Lester). (A (A---26-st-c).
--26-st-c). (A---26-st-c).
1956 NASHUA TRAILER, good con condition,
dition, condition, 37x8 with 12x15 enclosed
cabana, air conditioned. Call
378-4257 after 6 p.m. (A-25-3t-p).
for rent
MOTEL STYLE two rooms
furnished, ground floor, refriger refrigerator,
ator, refrigerator, near Gator Groomer. One
block to campus, reduced rates.
Phone 376-6494. (B-26-3t-c).
AIR CONDITIONED trailer and
cabana, 2 bedroom, in nice park
on busline. S6O monthly, avail available
able available October 1. Rent or sell.
372-2914. (B-22-lOt-c).
r%||l p]pj klpllaV SHOW
every
JfMDA** I.
ABIB
|^XRewman|

for rent
FURNISHED apartment, 3 blocks
from campus, air conditioned, S9O
a mo. all utilities except cooking
gas. Men only,.call 372-8840 aft after
er after 5 and on weekends. (B-21-10t (B-21-10tc).
c). (B-21-10tc).
wanted
MALE roommate wanted to share
two bedroom air conditioned Sum Summit
mit Summit House apartment. S4O month monthly,
ly, monthly, plus 1/4 utilities. 376-8133.
(C-27-3t-c).
WANTED: Ride to North Caro Carolina
lina Carolina State Game, October 14th
call Joyce 372-3913. (C-27-2t-c).
RIDE wanted to Athens, Georgia.
Weekend of Oct. 22. Contact Her Herbert
bert Herbert Bronwell, 1062 Hume Hall.
Phone 372-9460. (C-27-st-p).
FEMALE roommate wanted for
three bedroom house. $29 mon monthly
thly monthly call 378-5279, 1103 SW 4th
Ave. (C-27-3t-c).
MALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share large apartment. No lease,
no deposit. See after 5 p.m. at
405 NE sth Ave. Apt. 5 (C-25-
st-p).
FEMALE roommate wanted to
move in immediately. Upstairs,
poolside apartment in Village
Park. s4l monthly plus utilities,
call 378-5654. (C-26-2t-c).
MALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share new one bedroom apartment,
air conditioned. Summit House,
behind new VA Hospital- 378-6848.
(C-25- 3t-c).
MALE roommate wanted to share"
two bedroom apartment at Uni University
versity University Gardens. Call Paul 378-
1113. (C-23-st-c).
GIRLS NEEDED to share upstairs
room. Private bath; air con conditioned;
ditioned; conditioned; $30.00 monthly. Between
downtown and University. Call 378-
4018. (C-24-10t-c).

W sWiIHuiH
I N 1 a 17:07
I THE FEAR
I FLASHER AND THE HORROR HORN.
CHAMBER
HORRORS
I A SUZY PARKER
IE OF JACKSONVILLE
I TFrM^mn^PATWYMURE
I No. 3 at 10:53
/SIMHUMO \V
WENrpwa
I EOUAIMN|>a&
ll -COIgVCOPE
VIRGINIA WOOLF

Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 7, 1966

trade
WANTED Austin 850 or Mini-
Cooper. Can trade American se sedan
dan sedan or English Sports Car. Call
Tom, 378-2750. (D-26-2t-c).
help wanted
YOU can work a m inumum of 4
hours per week in your dorm apart apartment
ment apartment or sorority and earn S2O
to S3OO per month. How? Holiday
Magic Cosmetics is seeking re representatives
presentatives representatives to introduce to coeds
their fine line of cosmetics. In Interested?
terested? Interested? Call 378-4257, Sunday
Thursday. Evenings after 7 p.m.
(E-23-6t-c).
WANTED BEAUTICIAN: Fulltime,
busy shop, phone 378-1050. (E (E---24-st-p).
--24-st-p). (E---24-st-p).
MODELS needed for Glamor as assignments.
signments. assignments. Should be 21 years of
age and possess the qualities of
good figure and personality. Please
contact Bill Horne Photographer,
Roy Green Studios, Inc. 372-4656.
(E-25-st-c).
MAKE EXTRA MONEY IN YOUR
SPARE TIME. Sell Beauty by
Mary Kay Something new and
different, call Doris Moore, 372-
8354 between 12 A.M. and 5-6
P.M. (E-24-4t-c).
DEANS OFFICE Needs Secretary-
Receptionist. Must be good typist,
60 words a min. minimum. No.
shorthand, attractive pleasant
personality. Call or apply Deans
office 140 Norman Hall. (E-24-
st-c).
NEED SALESLADY for ladies
department full time employ employment
ment employment experience preferable but
not necessary. Apply in person at
Silvermans, 225 West University
Ave. (E-25-3t-c).
WANTED, engineers, technicians,
technical writers, draftsman, pro programmers,
grammers, programmers, and others on a part
time contract basis. Call Schultz
Instrument Inc. 378-1750, (E-27-
3t-c).
PARTTIME INCOME Free Man Manuel
uel Manuel Box 5477 Athens, Georgia.
(E-27-lt-c).
DELIVERY help wanted. $1.05 per
hour plus mileage. Phone 378-
1486 after 4 p.m. (E-27-lt-c).

HORROR TONIGHT HORROR
3 BIG HORROR SHOWS I
- WITH A BIG CAST
. No. 2 at 9:04 1
y
H Donahue H
Hand H
H Joey H
HHeathertonH
BRg. y
in
My Blood I
Runs
CoM" I

help wanted]
TWO needy male students repre representing
senting representing terrific new line of cos cosmetics.
metics. cosmetics. Must have needy female
students to demonstrate and sell
for them part time. Profits de depend
pend depend on initiative. Call 378-5432
after 7 p.m. (E-27-st-p).
autos
1956 YELLOW AND WHITE
Plymouth, V-8, automatic trans transmission
mission transmission electric gas pump, $225
or make offer. David Self. 372-9319
(G-25-3t-c).
1964 TR4 ROADSTER, immaculate
condition, fully equipped, call
372-9427. (G-25-st-c).
1965 Tempest, automatic trans transmission,
mission, transmission, power steering and pow power
er power brakes, radio, air- conditioner,
back-up lights, padded dash, tint tinted
ed tinted glass, under warranty or 1965
Austin Healy 3,000, call ext 2881
days and 372-6289 evenings. (G (G---19-10t-c).
--19-10t-c). (G---19-10t-c).
1963 VW EXCELLENT condition,
$995. Call 376-0077 (G-25-st-c).
1963 BUICK LeSabre, four door,
hard top, power steering, power
brakes, factory air, heater, S3OO
below NADA retail, 372-5190. (G (G---22-6t-c).
--22-6t-c). (G---22-6t-c).

"i truly arilllt lIIVC Stflfvl
finely made!"
/
WEAR IQIM IQIMPASSES
PASSES IQIMPASSES **.
PLEASE (M /)|,\ / / I INO ONt UNDER 18 WILL Bf
A\ /JJ\J '**/ 1 I ADMITTfO UNLESS
I ACCOMPANIfQ BY
DOWNTOWN 1
yPI Norman Mailer's
Mmui test-SejjjjwNnri
This is Mrs. Rojack. img
Be glad youre (B
not Mr. Rojack. 4i

C K H G C H A I FLORIDA STATE THEATRES
BIS? ~E 3 Z SHOOT THE |
ySIo Buddm
iiziSkS
Angela Laiskiry
-I we SHIAH PREVUE r t h h

l "" 1 "" 1 1
autos
1940 FORD all original body, per perfect
fect perfect mechanical condition. Second
owner. $450. 376-6046. (G-22-1 Ot Otc).
c). Otc).
1965 MUSTANG Convertible, V V-8,
-8, V-8, Stick Shift. $250. and take over
payments. Call' 376-9545. after 5
p.m. (G-21-10t-c).
1958 TR3 red and white conver convertable,
table, convertable, new motor and new paint
job. $450. Call University Inn Mo Motel
tel Motel and ask for Arthur Annison.
(G-26-4t-c).
SUITE
1-3-5-7-9:10
Bp-%. WBwkEwSKbK
MERCOURI PERKira^
RAF Last
Y£H5 NE ift Ti mes
JULES Set
dassins pw rl T nR
pfiooucnoNCf rnAtiUnA
QISWUUTfO T -3TQIT nCTjKS Co*yQ*TloK y



CLASSIFIEDS

| autos
1960 ALFA ROMEO VELOCE: 2
webers, DOHC, 2 spare wheels,
2 tires, roll bar. Getting married,
must sell. Best offer over S7OO.
376-4271 (G-25-3t-p).
1966 CHEVY fl NOVA 350 H.P.
327, four soeed, chrome Mag"
wheels, Huiot shifter $2,400.
Frank Metzger 372-4075 (G-25-
Bt-c).
personal
FREE kittens waiting for new
home. See after 2:30 p.m. 372-
8325. (J-27-3t-c).
lost-found
LOST: a pair of black rimmed
prescription sunglasses, in vic vicinity
inity vicinity of handball courts. If found
return to Rick Stratton Theta Chi
House, 372-7627. (L-26-2t-c).

LOS ANGELES COUNTY ANNOUNCES:
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Representatives of Los Angeles County will be on campus Oct. 26
to interview graduating Seniors for entry-level positions in the
following career fields:
+ CIVIL ENGINEERING ASSISTANT $735 mo. to start
with 8.5., $776 with M. S. Gaine experience that
will qualify you for registration. Selection interview
with no further examination required.
Visit your Placement Office now
County of Los Angeles Civil Service Commission
Office of Campus and Field Recruitment
222 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles, California 90012

I SENIORS IN I
I ARTS S SCIENCES ENGINEERING I
I NURSING JOURNAUSM I
I THIS IS YOUR WEEK
H I
' I
I to get your Seminole pictures I
jj| % 1
I ROOM 200 FLA. UNION I
|||||| '* |il||
-. k 1 H
-S 1-
B ;

Friday, October 7, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

I lost-found |
LOST: Wallet, black with ID's.
Lost in mens room, Anderson
HaU REWARD, call 372-9145. (L (L---27-lt-c).
--27-lt-c). (L---27-lt-c).
real estate
Have: Duplex, three blocks from
University. Live in one unit and
receive rent from the other.
Have: 20 acres between Gainesville
and Newberry, mostly cleared.
$350 per acre with terms. Will
sell all or part.
Have: New 4 unit apartment build
lng central air conditioning, fur furnished.
nished. furnished. All leased for 1 year.
Monthly gross income $540. Call
for an appointment:
Wayne D. Mason, Realtor
Ernest Tew Realty
376-6461.
(I-21-7t-c).
services
10? PER SHIRT FOR IRONING
Call Cam, 378-6556. (M-24-4t-c).

Page 9

services
SINGLES PARTY Friday Oct October
ober October 14. Ramada Inn Ballroom with
Travis Warn mack and the Myster Mysteries.
ies. Mysteries. (M-25-st-c)
FLY for pleasure at worlds low lowest
est lowest cost. Join Trangle Flying Club,
372-0634. (M-27-4t-c).
SPECIAL by Gertrude -Hair -Haircut,
cut, -Haircut, $1.50 with shampoo and set;
frostings $14.50 average Length,
hair, limited time. Mi Ladies
Beauty Salon, 376-3802. (M-27-
lt-c).
TEDDY BEAR NURSERY Child
care Will be open for all ball ballgames
games ballgames and also entire Homecom Homecoming
ing Homecoming weekend. Call for reservations:
376-0917 or after 6 p.m. 372-
4021. (M-16-6t-c).
VISIT GATOR Groomer where ro romance
mance romance blooms. Next door to Uni University
versity University Post Office. Self Service
and professional laundry, dry
cleaning. (M-10t-19-c).

Km .*
9
19 yS W\ jS j
a Jmmm f A
# V J|
9MP^ IPBP |IIIM inffliETlir^Ffl
jpifl .y|>
DANGEROUS JOB -- Workmen hurry back
and forth on the roof of the new graduate
research library in the Plaza of the
Americas. High above the ground,
they scamper back and forth as if they
were a mere few feet above the ground.

Brighter Tune
NEW YORK (UPI) The
Four Tops song group, wholl
earn six-figures this year, got
vocal training in an Army
chorus at S2B a month.

Reitz Really
On Move
UF President J. Wayne Reitz
qualified for the Man about the
Country* award given by the
Florida Alligator this week. Reitz
schedule will allow him to be in
his office for a half a day out of
the current two week period.
He left Gainesville Thursday,
Sept. 29, to go to 'Washington,
D.C. for a water resources com committee
mittee committee meeting. From there he
went to Nashville on business and
to see the Vanderbilt game last
Saturday. Sunday he flew to Lex Lexington,
ington, Lexington, Ky. to make a speech the
following day at the meeting of
the Southern Association of Land Landgrant
grant Landgrant Colleges and State Uni Universities.
versities. Universities.
He flew back to Gainesville
Tuesday night where he went di directly
rectly directly to his office for an evening
of catching-up. In his office
Wednesday morning, he left for
Tallahassee Wednesday after afternoon
noon afternoon for the Board of Regents
meeting and FSU weekend.
He will leave Tallahassee im immediately
mediately immediately following the game
Saturday so that he can be in
Gainesville for three receptions
Sunday. Monday he will spend the
day in his office and Tuesday he
goes to New Orleans for a con conference
ference conference of the American Council
on Education.



Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 7, 1966

Do UF Greeks Meet The Need?
.. -X

By STEFANIE JARIUS
Alligator Society Writer
i
And so the lure of the Greeks
quiets for another term. Hie two twoway
way twoway appraisal period has ended
and formal rush is over. As new
fraternity and sorority pledges
ready themselves for the running
of the hurdles, lets not forget
the group still standing at the
starting line.
What about those who didnt make
it, who wanted in, but found no
door open? Perhaps a door was
open, but the path to it an inade inadequate
quate inadequate one. Perhaps we need a
bigger Greek system.
Does UF need more fraternities
and sororities? Does the present
System reach all the students?
There are many points of view,
of course.
Fraternities
/
According to Harvey Sharron,
assistant dean of men and advisor
to fraternities, nearly 2,000 men
rushed l,OOO were pledged by
the 27 fraternities.
However Sharron said, At this
time we do not need additional
national fraternities on this cam campus.
pus. campus. But, we do need to expand
in some of the smaller houses.
Sharron favored internal ex expansion
pansion expansion for two reasons. First,
because there are two relatively


Ma\ority Os Students
Not Reached By Rush
Rush is the access route to the Greeks. Although handled differently
by sororities and fraternities, the idea is the same.
Fraternity rush is a more casual affair than its female counterpart,
but no less intense. Whereas fraternities may pledge all during the
term and have no quotas, sororities have quotas and are limited to a
formal and informal rush period for pledging.

But, does rush reach everyone?
Harvey Sharron, assistant dean
of men and advisor to fraternities
commented, In theory everyone
can rush, but in practice, just
freshmen and about 50 per cent
of the junior college transfers
rush.
Sharron said there is no con concerted
certed concerted effort, except on an Indi Individual
vidual Individual basis, to reach sophomore
and senior men. Freshmen and
juniors are appealed to on a na national
tional national basis.
Male freshmen receive copies of
Gator Greek, an introductory
booklet on UF fraternities. During
registration men may sign cards
indicating fraternity interest. A
list of these names is compiled
and distributed to the fraternities.
During orientation fraternities
set up small rush booths in the
Plaza of the Americas and hand
out material about their individual
fraternities. Open rush parties are
held, usually announced only by
word of mouth.
Sorority rush begins withaPan withaPanhellenic
hellenic withaPanhellenic forum during registration
week. Key to the Greeks, Pan Panhellenic

new, small fraternities Phi
Epsilon Pi, here seven years, and
Phi Kappa Psi, a colony in its
third year. Until all the fratef fratefnities
nities fratefnities are strong and on a sound
financial basis they can fulfill the
need, Sharron said.
The quality of fraternities here
can always use improvement,
Sharron stated as his second rea reason.
son. reason. There is a shifting image,
he said from hell-raisers to
a more responsible, mature group,
and no new groups are needed
till this shift is completed.
Commenting about the 50 per
cent of the rushees pledges, Shar Sharron
ron Sharron said many go through rush just
to see what its like. Others dont
pledge because they want to see
how their first term grades turn
out or because their parents wont
let them.
Fraternities do have the pero perogative
gative perogative of being selective, he said,
but there is a place in the fra fraternity
ternity fraternity system for every man.
He said he believes that the num number
ber number of persons who want to pledge
but do not get bids is minor.
Sororities
Os the 954 rushees at ice water
teas, 297 were pledged by the 13
sororities.
Yes, there is a need for ex expansion
pansion expansion in the sorority system,
said Dr. Betty Cosby, dean of
women and Panhellenic advisor.
The present system doesnt lend
itself to internal expansion.

hellenic Panhellenic handbook for rushees,
is given out, and girls then sign
up for rush.
They attend ice water teas at
all 13 sorority houses; go to in informal,
formal, informal, skit and, finally, prefer preferential
ential preferential parties. The elimination
process permits sororities to
choose girls they would like to
return, and ushers to choose sor sororities
orities sororities they would like to return
to.
The sorority rush effort is aim aimed
ed aimed mainly at freshmen. Others are
invited to sign up for rush, but
by a set system,
Its necessary to do something
about (reaching) the juniors and
transfer students, says Dr. Betty
Cosby, dean of women and Pan Panhellenic
hellenic Panhellenic adviser.
Both fraternities and sororities
like to have alumni recommenda recommendations
tions recommendations for their pledges. Sharron
estimated that more than 50 per
cent of fraternity pledges received
recommendations, and Dean Cos Cosby
by Cosby said she suspects each soror sorority
ity sorority receives in excess of 200.

Sororities have quotas set by
the Panhellenic Council said Dean
Cosby, with a limit of 70 members
for an average size house.
In addition sororities expect
their upper division sisters to
live in the house. Most of the
houses here are built to handle
only 40 people.
Dean Cosby said demand is lar larger
ger larger than supply and feels quotas
should be increased. The
sororities dont need to be that
exclusive.
Dean Cosby said she felt there
is enough desire to warrant trying
to attract another sorority to UF.
Perhaps by next fall, a com competitive
petitive competitive group with enough local
alumni and a sound colonization
program can be found.
We want to provide an oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity for sorority life for as
diverse a group as is interested.
As for between number of girls
who rushed and pledged, Dean
Cosby gave much the same reasons
as did Sharron. Many go through
rush just to take a look and drop
out after the ice water teas, she
said.
Dean Cosby did say that 72 girls
signed preference cards, listing up
to four sororities did not receive
bids.
All The Good
Files Need Not
Be Greek
By LORI STEELE
Alligator Society Writer
Fraternity files. Sorority files.
Independent files? Yes, there could
be thorough study files for inde independents
pendents independents if dorm residents would
donate used class notes to their
area libraries. Independent stu students
dents students can have as good, if not
equal quality study aids as the
Greeks.
Greek scholarship files general generally
ly generally contain back progress exams,
used notes and term papers. The
main library (which gives dorm li libraries
braries libraries most of its progs), branch
libraries and dorm libraries only
carry back progs in its files.
These progs can be checked out
by any student.
If the halls would take com complete
plete complete responsibility for accepting
and organizing the notes, I would
have no objection to student li librarians
brarians librarians checking them in and
out, said Stanley L. West, direct director
or director of university libraries.
According to Bob Imholt, chair chairman
man chairman of mens interhall council,
the project would have to go through
the dorms educational forums
committee.
Presently, dorm libraries are
limited to Help sessions sponsor sponsored
ed sponsored by student government on Amer American
ican American institutions and biology, a few
other dorm projects, and the progs
supplied by the main library. The
majority of fraternities and soror sororities
ities sororities said they felt that outside of
progs classmen, notes
held equal importance.
Boiled down its a question of how
badly dorm residents want expand expanded
ed expanded files with additional study aids,
and how much support will be given
if dorm committees decide to in initiate
itiate initiate such a project. Notes could
be accepted from students by dorm
libraries whether local com committees
mittees committees were formed or not, but
if students support organized com committees,
mittees, committees, even better result could
be achieved.
Independent flies? It is up to
the independents.

So, heres how the records stand
according to the officials: no more
fraternities for now, and yes, we

FROM ~
HAIRPIN
By RICK FROMME
Alligator Columnist
As I recall we left Nuvolari and Clark blasting around some
ancient track. But what of Nuvolaris friends? Who else was
Immortal?
In 1934 the Mercedes Team gave an unexcitable, order ordertaking
taking ordertaking Italian a try out with the team. In his first season, Luigi
Fagioli won at Pescera, the Spanish, and Italian Grand Prix
and nosed out Louis Chiron for the non-existent title.
In 1935, after winning at Monaco and second at the Swiss,
Spanish, and Belgian Grand Prix, Fagioli bolted the team.
Fagioli faded from the scene during the war, only to reappear
after it in an Alfa Romeo. After several unsuccesful second
string years with Alfa, Luigi switched to Lancia. In 1952 he
was killed when he slammed his Lancia into the tunnel at the
Monacan GP.
THE HARBINGER
tp
They say Rudolf Caracciola was to much like todays GP
drivers to be considered with the Immortals. He was too
precise a driver. He had too few flaws, flaws that are supposed
to make greatness. To Caracciola you could say, Today you
must win -- and he would.
Before Caraccio a took to the tracks, he was a highly un unsuccessful
successful unsuccessful car salesman. His first car race was a minor sports
car race in Berlin. He won and he lived. Like Chiron, he entered
the sport to escape poverty. Because of this victory and several
otherg, he landed a job test driving for Daimler-Benz.
Then along cam Louis Chiron and off Caracciola went to race
him in a private Alfa. He crashed shortly there after, and did
enough damage to his leg to finish a mortal man, but not Rudi
Caracciola.
In 1935, he chose the hot, sand blasted Gran Prix of Tri Tripoli
poli Tripoli to test his leg and driving ability. Mid-way through the race
he was trailing the entire pack. By the end of the race he had
wrested the lead from Varzi to win the race. The rest of the
season was down hill and Caracciola would have taken the title,
had there been one. His closest competitor was Fagioli, 20
points back.
Caracciola won the crown in 1937 and 1938 for Mercedes-
Benz, and then like racing he faded into obscurity during WW
n.
He reappeared in 1953 in Mercedes exotic new 300 SL gull
wing racing machine. His form was gone though, and after
a fourth at Mille Miglia (a defunct marathon road race in Italy)
and a crash at Bren that injured his other leg, Caracciola re retired.
tired. retired. He died in bed, peacefully in 1959.
f
THE ARYAN SUPERMAN
When Fagioli retired from the Mercedes team in the late
30s there was a promising superstar on the rise -- He was
the Auto Unions Bernd Rosemeyer.
Few men mastered the treacherous Auto Union, 20 years
ahead of its time, it was a rear engine supercharged V-12
that handeled like a truck and went about a million miles an
hour.
At the end of his first Auto Union season, Rosemeyer had
taken The Czechoslovakian GP, and finished second at Pecara.
A fairly good showing for a guy who almost didnt get a chance
for a try out.
In 1936 Rosemeyer took firsts at Swiss, German, and Ita Italiam
liam Italiam Grans Prix to take the title by 11 points.
In late 1937 Auto Union was intent on shattering the world
land speed record. Since Germany has no Bonneville Salt Flat,
they had to make do with what they had. Besides, were not the
Furhers autobahns the best roads in the world? Good enough
maybe, but they werent quite wide enough. Rosemeyer was
hitting about 180 mph when a strong gust of wind blew his Auto
Union right off the autobahn. Need I go into detail?
FSCW BLEAH!
Allow me to disgress. Spurrier & Co. against the girls from
Florida State College for Women? Are you kidding me? That
is like asking Sterling Moss if he thought a race between a
four-wheel Jeep and a Ford GT Mark II would be interesting
and woujd he care to place a bet on the outcome. Are you
kidding! GO GATORS.

need more sororities. Soon the
players will have their say, and
then the spectators.



ff
AS HOMECOMING PLANS BEGIN
Gator Groups Announce Events

By CAROL HEFNER
Alligator Society Editor
I OMICRON
I DELTA EPSILON
Charter members of the UF Del Delta
ta Delta Chapter of Omicron Delta Ep Epsilon,
silon, Epsilon, National Economics Scho Scholastic
lastic Scholastic Honorary, were initiated last
Friday.
The honorary is open by invita invitation
tion invitation to undergraduate and graduate
students in economics who have
achieved scholastic rating. Dr.
lrving J. Goffmon is faculty ad advisor.
visor. advisor.
Officers are Charles Guy,presi Guy,presi
Guy,presi dent; Dennis Mohar, vice-pres vice-pres
vice-pres ident; J. B. Floyd, secretary, and
William Latham, treasurer.
Members include John A.
I Anderson, Marsha Ann Bent, Allen
I W. Berres, L. D. Berkowitz, Dav Davlid
lid Davlid N. Brodsky, James S. Fogdall,
I Hugh R. Granade, Robert L.
Greene, Franeiseo J. Hernandez,
I Jane Mucke Johnson, Paul E. Koe-
I sod, John W. Leppelmeier, David
I E. Lycan, Kenneth E. McConnell,
I William R. McDill, T. P. McEl-
I hattan, Iris Ann Megahee, Charles
IM. Neufeld, David L. Roberts,
I Martin I. Veiner and Stanley E.
1 Warner.
I Showing an iifterest in inter-
I sorority, fraternity and campus
K activities, the Sigma Kappas have
I gotten themselves in positions
where they can help.
Susan Bartley, Panhellenic pre president,
sident, president, has been working with pre presidents
sidents presidents of all the sororities on
a huge social for all sorority
women. Linda Bennett has been
elected vice president of thfe Lamb Lambda
da Lambda Chi Alpha Little Sisters. Les Leslie
lie Leslie Magnant, Commissioner of Sch School
ool School Spirit, has undertaken the dif difficult
ficult difficult project of organizing a UF
Pep Club.
Making sure their new house housemother
mother housemother was introduced to other
housemothers on the campus, the

UF Men Are Conservative
By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Correspondent
Young men today are very conscious of their appearance. They
are stabilized, conservative dressers, said J. Silverman, owner
of Silvermans clothing store, 225 West University Ave.

Bud Garland of Fremacs, 112
W. University Ave., and Joe Tay Taylor
lor Taylor of the Young American Shop,
208 w. University Ave., agree
that more radical styles and fads,
like popular Mod-look sweeping
Europe and America, are shun shunned
ned shunned by college students.
High school students appear to
b e the Mod admirers in Amer America,
ica, America, they believe.
According to Gainesville mer merchants,
chants, merchants, college attire for men this
fall has changed very little from
last year. The predominant style
Is still traditional. But some new
patterns and colors are appear appearing.
ing. appearing.
High on the popularity list of
new colors are whiskey, wheat,
chili, coffee and light burgundy.
Patterns that are increasing in
Popularity are bold checks, plaid,
wide stripes, multi-stripes and
Paisleys.
All the clotheirs questioned
agreed the two most popular fa fabrics
brics fabrics this fall are corduroy and

SKs held a reception for Mom
Roberson this Sunday.
Pledges pledged informally are
Jan Halker, Vicki Kingdon,
Agatha Lyons, Kathy Murphy, Pat
Sidney and Pat Sousa. Officers
of the growing SK pledge class
are Margie McCown, president;
Lauren Silberberg, vice-presi vice-president;
dent; vice-president; Jan Halker, secretary, and
Ann Clark, treasurer.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
The Lambda Chis annual
pledge-brother football game this
Sunday ended up as usual a vic victory
tory victory for the brothers.
Preparations began for this week
for Parents Weekend. For many
years the weekend has been an

ALLIGATOR
SOCIETY

annual event to acquaint parents
of pledges and brothers with the
fraternity and campus. While the
event hasnt been held the past
few years, with the completion of
Lambda Chis new house it is
now part of the calendar of ac activities
tivities activities again.
The weekend will be on Octo October
ber October 15. Included in the numerous
planned activities are talks by
Harvey Sharron, faculty advisor
to fraternities, and Prof. William
T. Tiffin, faculty advisor of Lam Lambda
bda Lambda Chi Alpha.
Lambda Chi representatives at
the IFC retreat at Crystal Riv River
er River were Tom Thomas, Norm Bled Bledsoe,
soe, Bledsoe, Jerry Abascle, John Shrote
and John OShea and faculty ad advisor
visor advisor Tiffin.

dacron. They are most popular
in pants, but dacron shirts and
corduroy blazers are also popu popular.
lar. popular.
Shirts with button-down collars
are in again this fall. But the
narrow stripes have been replaced
by wide and multi-colored stripes.
Also new to the scene are Glen
plaids and Houndstooth checks. The
traditional solid colored shirts are
still top sellers.
One innovation in shirts is the
pull-over with flaps over the poc pockets.
kets. pockets. There is also a trend to towards
wards towards shirts with a collar bar
instead of button down in dress
wear. Henleys, Madras and tab
collars are virtually dead.
Pants on the college campus
this fall will be almost exclus exclusively
ively exclusively Sta-pressed Dacrons, cor corduroy
duroy corduroy Levis and hopsack jeans.
Popular colors for pants, besides
the traditional dark colors, are
wheat, light blue, whiskey and
burgundy. In a renewal of 19th
Century tastes, plaids and checks
are highly popular.

ZETA TAUALPHA
The Zetas who not too long
ago went caving at a social
went to an LSD social last week.
Well, not exactly but the Zeta-
Theta Chi social theme was car carried
ried carried out by bright, wildly colored
attire. It appears that the Zetas
have found some good ways to in inject
ject inject new life into socials.
In the rapidly growing popula population
tion population of little sisters, Zetas Sue
Morgan and Karen Zinkovich have
become little sisters of Pi Kap Kappa
pa Kappa Phi. And, the Lambda Chi
Little Sisters have elected Judy
Rosenberger treasurer.
First aid wont be any problem
around the Zeta house this trimes-

Friday, October 7, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

ter, they have 12 pinstripers and
two of them are co-chairmen of
the organization Judy Rosen Rosenberger
berger Rosenberger and Kathryn Lamb.
As part of the Zetas new sch scholarship
olarship scholarship program, Dr. Glenn Hoff Hoffman
man Hoffman of the University College
conducted a discussion on Am American
erican American Institutions Monday night.
ARCHITECTS
INSTITUTE
A 22-minute color film of Tou Toulouse-Lautrec
louse-Lautrec Toulouse-Lautrec will be shown at
8 p.m. Wednesday in the archi architecture
tecture architecture and fine arts building,
room 105 b.

College men still prefer dark
or narrowly-pinstriped suits. But
in sportswear they are a little
less conservative. The most pop popular
ular popular sports coats are hopsack bla blazers,
zers, blazers, colored navy and light blue,
burgundy, whiskey, light green and
olive. Corduroy blazers are ris rising
ing rising rapidly on the scene.
The consensus of the merchants
interviewed was that cardi cardigan
gan cardigan sweaters are once again num number
ber number one favorites. Also in conten contention
tion contention are double-brested, mohair
pullovers and mock turtlenecks.
There is some indication that v vnecks
necks vnecks will regain some of their
former popularity.
Ties are a little wider this year
than last up to four inches.
According to Joe Frank, this is
probably an influence of the Mod Modlook
look Modlook with Western adaptations.
Wide stripes are again the most
popular pattern, but there is a
large trend to paisley prints.
Wool ties are gaining acceptance.

The movie is part of the Stu Student
dent Student Chapter of American Insti Institute
tute Institute of Architects meeting but Is
open to non-member for 25£.
At the meeting of the chapter
following the movie, Dean Robert
Bolles will be speaker.
KAPPA DELTA
Getting an early start on home homecoming
coming homecoming activities the KDs have
taken time this week to help the
DTD and KA pledges paint home homecoming
coming homecoming banners for the campus.
KDs interest in Homecoming
was sparked even more with the
naming of two KDs to the Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming Sweetheart Court Sha Sharon
ron Sharon Lynn and Judy Silver.
Last night, KD took time out

Page 11

to make sure a newcomer to the
campus was properly welcomed
and held a reception for Dean Bet Betty
ty Betty Cosby.
To the KDs new pledge class
has been added: Debbie Mochelle,
Carolyn Mancl and Karen Klein Kleinhelter.
helter. Kleinhelter. Debbie and Cheryl Weihl
were named Pi Kappa Phi lit little
tle little sisters this week.
ALPHA TAU OMEGA
Newly elected chapter officers
are Rich Lossen, vice-president;
Don Middlebrooks, treasurer; John
Flowers, secretary; Bill Bridges,
usher; Gary Patchen, sentinel, and
Bill Mcride remains president.
The new pledge class officers
are Tom Blackmon, president; Jim
Currington, secretary, and Paul
Dee, treasurer.
CHI PHI
Fall elections at the Chi Phi
house put Andy Berky in the pre presidents
sidents presidents position, Bill Blizzard,
vice-president; Mike Smodish,
treasurer; Steve Kaufman, sec secretary;
retary; secretary; Don Roberts, parliamen parliamentarian,
tarian, parliamentarian, Steve Bernstein, historian.
Officers of the pledge class
are Bob Parsons, president; Bob
Caudel, vice-president, and A1
Rice, secretary-treasurer.
Let Him In First,
Safer That Way
NEW YORK (UPI) -- If you love
that man of yours, dont let him
be so gallant at the car door.
Unless the car is in a driveway
or on an exceptionally quiet street,
a man should go ahead and enter
the car first from the curbside,
letting the woman enter next,
closing the door herself.
The safety tip comes from the
makers of Johnsons car polish.
It is based on reports from safety
experts. They maintain it is fool foolhardy
hardy foolhardy for a person to enter or
get out of a car on the street
side, in todays traffic.

ALPHA EPSILON PI
ITie brothers of Alpha Epsilon
Pi are proud to announce the
coming of their new housemother,
Mrs. Helen Sherman, who pre prefers
fers prefers to be called Aunt Helen.
ALPHA OMICRON PI
The AOPIs have pledged five
new girls: Barbara Barett, Meg
Leith, Judy Matthews, Sheri No Noland
land Noland and Kay Murray.
ALPHA DELTA PI
With rush barely behind them the
ADPIs turned to initiation last
Friday. Eight girls gladly exchan exchanged
ged exchanged their pledge and neophyte pins
for the ADPI diamond.
At a banquet Sunday Donna Walk Walker
er Walker was presented with the Best
Pledge trophy, Christy Kimball
the efficiency trophy and Judi Lee
the scholarship trophy.
Newly gained positions in the
house are Gae Walters, Sorority
Coordinator for Homecoming, and
Linda Webb, Sorority Coordina Coordinator
tor Coordinator for Dollars for Scholars.
Officers of the fall pledge class
are Ann Dore, president; Jamie
Sennit, vice-president; Anne Gil Gilbert,
bert, Gilbert, secretary and Susan Stewart,
treasurer.
ZETA PHI ETA
Zeta Phi Eta, National Speech
Arts Fraternity, initiated seven
members Sunday night and pre presented
sented presented an appreciation plague to
Dr. Micki Newbilf, retiring fa faculty
culty faculty advisor.
The groups new advisor is Mrs.
Norma D. Einbecker.
The Zetas plan to continue their
program of reading to child pa patients
tients patients at J. Hillis Miller Health
Center and later in the year to
extend its entertainment program
to children throughout the state
in cooperation with the State Men Mental
tal Mental Retardation Program.
DELTA PHI EPSILON
The D Phi Es are having a
patio party featuring the Cam Cambridge
bridge Cambridge Knights Band in honor of
their new pledges tonight at 8:30
to 11:30 p.m., everyone is Invited.
Eunice Tall has been tapped for
membership in Theta Sigma Phi,
professional journalism frater fraternity.
nity. fraternity.
BETA THETA PI
Michael F. Gable has been sel selected
ected selected among 45 men in the na nation
tion nation to receive Beta Theta Pi
Founder Fund Scholarships.
The scholarships have been pre presented
sented presented annually for the past 16
years to undergraduate Betas who
are judged on the basis of sch scholarship,
olarship, scholarship, need, college activities
and fraternity service.



Page 12

:, Ibe Florida Alligator, Friday, October 7, 1966

BULLETIN

Campus Calendar

Friday, October 7
Bent Card Coffee House: 1826 W. Univ. Ave.,
another big weekend of music, folksinging, and
. . who knows? 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday
nights.
Mensa Lecture: Dr. Darrel J. Mase, Mind Pow Power
er Power Utilization/ 103-B AFA, 7:30 p.m.
Florida Players: Silent Film Festival, FLU Aud.,
8 p.m.
Painting for Fun: 215 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Peace Corps Language Aptitude Test: 118 FLU, 10
a.m., 2 p.m., 5 p.m.
Pep Rally: Upper Drill Field, 7 p.m.
Yulee Area and Graham Area Dance: Yulee Hall,
8:30 p.m. Everyone invited, refreshments.
Movie: Psycho, MSB Aud., 7 & 9:25 p.m.
Chess Club: Chess Games, 215 FLU, 7 p.m.
Peace Corps Recruiting: Hub, Library and FLU
Bryan Lounge, 9-6 p.m.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL NOTICES TO OFFICE OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES
General Notices Administrative Notices

t INFIRMARY HOURS: EXCEPT FOR EMER EMERGENCIES,
GENCIES, EMERGENCIES, the Infirmary will close at 4:30 p.m. on
weekdays, at 12 noon on Saturday and will be closed
all day Sunday. Scheduled hours for weekdays are
from 8:30 11:30 a.m. and from 1- 4:30 p.m.
EMERGENCIES will be admitted through the emer emergency
gency emergency entrance at the rear of the building, ground
floor. It is only necessary to ring the buzzer.
VISITORS ONLY will be admitted at the front door
between 7-8 p.m. at night and between 2-4 p.m.
on Saturday and Sunday and will sign in at the re reception
ception reception desk. Residence hall assistants and fraternity
and sorority house-mothers are requested to call
the Infirmary, except in the case of a serious
emergency.
STATE TEACHING SCHOLARSHIP EXAM: Exams
will be given Oct. 11, 9-11 a.m. in the State Armory.
Students should report for the test at 8:30 a.m.
v
SPEECH SCREENING TESTS: All teacher educa education
tion education majors, regardless of college enrollment are
required to satisfy the speech screening require requirement
ment requirement before being admitted into the Advanced Pro Professional
fessional Professional Sequence or enrolling in EDS 400, EDE
400 and the elementary block (EDE 300, 301, and
302). Appointments are now being made in room 124,
Norman Hall.
RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS: Students interested in
applying for a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford Uni University
versity University contact Prof. A. A. Murphree, 202 Anderson
Hall before Oct. 22. Limited to male citizens of
at least junior standing who will reach the ages of
18-24 by Oct. 1, 1966. The scholarship is for $2,-
800 per year, running 2-3 years.
ORANGE & BLUE DEADLINES: All notices for the
Orange & Blue Bulletin must be received by 9 a.m.
of the day prior to publication. Deadlines are Fri Friday
day Friday for Monday publication, Tuesday for Wednesday
publication and Thursday for Friday publication. No Notices
tices Notices should be typed and signed and sent to the
Division of Informational Services, Building H, cam campus.
pus. campus. Items for ttil Campus Calendar should be sent
to the Public Functions Office, Florida Union.
E.T.S. GRADUATE RECORD EXAM: October 14,
is the deadline for applying for the Graduate Re Record
cord Record Examination to be given October 29. Applica Application
tion Application must be received by the Educational Testing
Service, Princeton, New Jersey on or before Oct October
ober October 14 for the applicant to take the exam.
DENTAL APTITUDE TEST will be given at 8 a.m.,
Sat. Oct. 8 in the Seagle Building.

r^^^^WONTHLYDEPOSIT^AR^N^^ONGE^LIMITE^I^YOUf^^^^^^^^^^ 1 1111 *!
I Dividend Rate # Boilding J Radio Road No Increase I
i 5Vi% Serving Uof F Employees Since 1935 t'eoTLr I
Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union % £ Loans!!! I

Saturday, October 8
First Lutheran Church: Fla. vs. FSU listening party,
Rainbow Springs, 10 a.m. Transportation.
Peace Corps Language Aptitude Test: 118 FLU,
10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Florida Players: Silent Film Festival, FLU Aud.,
8 p.m.
football: Fla. vs. FSU at Tallahassee.
Chinese Club: FLU Social Room, 7 p.m.
Flavet in Annual Picnic: Beta Field, 11 a.m.
India Club: Dr. N. E. Bingham, Some Comparisons
of Secondary Science Teaching in India & the
U.S.A., and Dr. Kenneth A. Christiansen, Ed Educational
ucational Educational Television in India, 324 FLU, 8 p.m.
Childrens Ceramic Class; FLU Craft Shop, 9 a.m.
Movie: Donovans Reef, MSB Aud., 7 & 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, October 9
Music Dept.: Chamber Concert, Brask-Schieber Duo,
p. k. yonge Aud., 4 p.m.

PROGRESS TESTS:
(Students in the following courses are expected
to take the following tests. Each student must brng
a No. 2 lead pencil and will be required to use his
SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER.)
CSS 111 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Oct. 11,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Peabody
1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) report to Leigh 207;
(D) report to GCB 121, 125 or 127; (E) report to
GCB 113; (F) report to Matherly 213, 216 or 219;
(G) report to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; (H)
report to Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208, or 209;
(I-J) report to Flint 110 or 112; (K) report to Walk Walker
er Walker 301, 303, 307 or 308; (L) report to GCB 201,
203, 205 or 207; (M) report to BCB 213, 215, 217,
219, 221, 223, 225 or 227; (N) report to GCB 233
or 235; (O) report to GCB 237 or 239; (P-Q) re report
port report to Flint 101 or 102; (R) report to Floyd 108;
(S) report to Walker Auditorium; (T-V) report to
GCB 101 or 109; (W-Z) report to Walker Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium.
CSS 112 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Oct. 11,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A-
L) report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10,

(Students must be registered with the University
Placement Service to interview. Sign-up sheets are
posted two weeks in advance of the interview date
at Building H. All companies will be recruiting for
December, April and August grads unless otherwise
indicated. Indicates hiring juniors for summer em employment.)
ployment.) employment.)
OCT. 7: THE BOEING CO. AE, CE, EE, IE,
ME, Eng. Sci, MetE, Eng.Mech, Math, Ps. RADIA RADIATION
TION RADIATION INC. EE, ME, CE, IE, Acctg. FLORIDA
POWER & UGHT CO. EE, ME, ChE, IE, Math.
UNION BAG-CAMP PAPER CORP. IE, ChE, ME,
Foresters, Bus. Ad. AMERICAN OIL CO. ChE,
CE, ME. GENERAL TELEPHONE CO. OF FLA.
Math, Bus, Acctg, EE, IE, ME, CE.* ERNST &
ERNST Acctg. FMC CORP. ChE, ME, IE, EE.
OCT. 10; NAVAL LABORATORIES DAY AE,
ME, EE, Ps, Chem, ChE., Math, MetE, Naval Arch,
IE, Eng. Mech, CE, Geol, Biol.
OCT 10, 11: WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORP.
Math, Ps. TAMPA ELECTRIC CO. EE, IE, ME,
ChE.
OCT. 11: COTTON PRODUCERS ASSOC. Agri,
Gen. Bus, Ed. WILLIAM CARTER CO. IE, ME,
CE. NEWPORT NEWS SHIPBUILDING & DRY DOCK
CO. CE, EE, IE, ME, MetE, Eng. Mech. SIMMONS
CO. Bus, Lib. Arts, Ed.
OCT. 11, 12: MCDONNELL AIRCRQAFT CORP.
AE, CE, EE, IE, ME, Eng. Sci, Met, ChE, Ps,
Math.

Placement Notices

Lutheran Student Association: Horseback riding, meet
at Center, 1:30 p.m.
Union Bridge: Duplicate Bridge, 215 FLU, 1:30 p.m.
Unitarian Fellowship: Church Services, FLU Aud.,
11 a.m.
Monday, October 10
Mensa: Daily luncheons from 11-1 for faculty, stu students
dents students and staff members. Reserved table in west
wing of Main Cafeteria.
Real Estate Club: 218 FLU, 7 p.m.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship: Prayer meetings,
4th floor of the Library every Monday & Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, 5 p.m.
Seminole Pictures: For graduating Seniors and Greeks,
200 FLU, every week day 12-5 & 6-9, Saturdays
10-1.
FLA. UNION BOX OFFICE: Tickets now on sale
for RIGOLETTO, THE TEMPEST and the Chad
Mitchell Trios appearance at FSU this Friday night.
Tickets for the Forums Committee Program featur featuring
ing featuring A1 Capp will go on sale Monday, October 11.

11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118 |
or 119. ?
CET 141 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Oct. 13, 1
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 106 or 109; (B) report to Pea Peabody
body Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) report to Leigh
207; CD) report to GCB 121. 125 or 127: re report
port report to GCB 113; (F) report to Matherly 213, 216
or 219; (G) report to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114;
(H) report to Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209;
(I -J) report to Flint 110 or 112; (K) report to
Walker 301, 303, 307 or 308; (L) report to GCB
201, 203, 205, or 207; (M) report to GCB 213,
215, 217, 219, 221, 223, 225 or 227; (N) report
to GCB 233 or 235; (O) report to GCB 237 or 239;
(P-Q) report to Flint 101 or 102; (R) report to
Floyd 108; (S) report to Walker Auditorium; (T-
V) report to GCB 101 or 109; (W-Z) report to Walk Walker
er Walker Auditorium.
CET 142 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Oct. 13,
7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with: (A-
L) report to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11,
12, 13, 14, or 16; (M-Z) report to Matherly 102,
105, 108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, or
119.

OCT. 11, 12, 13: PROCTER & GAMBLE CO. &
BUCKEYE CELLULOSE CORP. -- All engineers.
OCT. 12: PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS CO.
Chem, ChE.
OCT. 12, 13: ALLIED CHEMICAL CORP. Chem,
ChE, ME, CE, IE, EE, MBA. LOCKHEED-GEORGIA
AE, EE, ME, Math, Ps, Acctg, Bus. Stat, Ind.
Rela, Mktg.
OCT. 12, 13, 14: ARMSTRONG CORK CO. Acctg,
Gen. Bus, Ind.Mgmt, Econ, Mktg, Lib. Arts, Chem, ChE,
CE, EE, IE, ME.
OCT. 13: SYSKA & HENNESSY, INC. ME, EE.
WEST VIRGINIA PULB & PAPER CO. ChE,
ME, Chem. GEORGIA KRAFT CO. ChE, ME,
CE, EE.
OCT. 14: SCHLUMBERGER WELL SERVICES
EE, ME, IE, Ps. AIRESEARCH MFG. CO. OF AR ARIZONA
IZONA ARIZONA AE, ME, Eng. Sci. MUTUAL OF NEW
YORK All majors. FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS
COMMISSION EE. JEFFERSON CHEMICAL CO.,
INC. ChE, ME, IE, Org. Chem.* CHARLESTON
NAVAL SHIPYARD EE, ME, MetE, CE, ChE,
NE, IE, Ps, Chem. CONTAINER CORP. OF AM AMERICA
ERICA AMERICA Acctg, Eng, Forestry.* SINCLAIR
RESEARCH INC. Chem, ChE. PAN AMERICAN
PETROLEUM CORP. Geol, Eng. Sci, Chem, Ps,
EE, ChE. VETERANS ADMINISTRATION CE, EE,
ME, Arch.



,y
Players Schedule Announced'

Florida Players will open their
eater season Oct. 19-23 with
e farce Mostellaria.
-Hie second offering on their
aybill will be John Browns
ody a chamber theater piece
be* presented Nov. 30 and Dec.
4.
The Players plan a contem contemorary
orary contemorary drama by Robert Bolt,
Man for All Seasons,* for open opening

TO ALL STUDENTS
AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL J
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Youll look greatfeel great too,
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it has to do with that V-taper fit.
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And dont overlook the softest collar roll going.
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417 shirts are made in broadcloth or oxford
in whites, stripes, solids and endless patterns.
VA N HEUSEN
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The shirt collection that has all the action
this farll is Van Heusen "417"
Its special V-taper fit accents a man s build
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Choose from our wiae selection of
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Many in permanently pressed Vanopress.
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ing opening night in the new Florida Un Union
ion Union theater. The play is schedul scheduled
ed scheduled for Feb. 23-25 and March 1-4.
This production, based on the
life of Sir Thomas More, will
require elaborate technical stag staging
ing staging made possible by the new
facilities, according to Dr. L. L.
Zimmerman, director of the Flor Florida
ida Florida Players.

Perry Moore Defends
Florida Game Cokes

By BILL BURNS
Alligator Correspondent
Soft drink prices at UF football games
have long been a sore spot with students,
but assistant to the athletic director Perry
Moore staunchly defends his part in the
sale of the drinks.
I fail to see the point of controversy
concerning the cokes we sell at football
games, erupted Moore in defense of the
now famous 25 cent coke.
Through our method of distribution there
is no way for anybody to get a rakeoff
and it is impossible to intentionally cheat
students by watering down the drinks, he
added.
There are two types of cold drink con concessions
cessions concessions at the game stand sales and
stringer sales. The former covers any drinks
purchased at booths underneath the stands,
while the latter refers to the boys running
through the stands peddling drinks. Both
divisions are tightly controlled financially.
Most of our operations dont directly in involve
volve involve cash, Moore said. Where cash is
handled we employ bank tellers for max maximum
imum maximum safety. When a stringer picks up
a case of cokes (12) .he goes to the cen central
tral central office and purchases a ticket for $2.40.
He then takes the ticket to our wholesaler
and picks up a case of cold drinks. He
makes five cents on each 25 cent drink
he sells.
At the end of the day Moore balances
the amount of cash on hand with the num number
ber number of cups used. So far no discrepencies
have arisen, and profits have averaged out
at seven cents per drink.
We lose five cents right off the top,
Moore emphasized. From the remaining 20
cents it costs us about 13 cents in taxes
and costs cups, lids, ice and syrup.
In the stand sales that first five cents pays
for the workers salaries.
What are the chances of someone water watering
ing watering down the drinks?

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Friday, October 7, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

+ 4 */
None. In preparing the drinks for string stringers
ers stringers everything is done automatically, said
Moore.
The cups are automatically loaded into
the trays, filled with ice and drink and
capped. The drink is dispensed from govern government
ment government inspected tanks which Moore claims
contains the same drink you get in a bottle.
Each 25 cent drink comes in a 12 oz.
cup, of which 9 oz. is fluid.
Moore purchases the cups directly from
the drink companies to keep anybody from
slipping cups in on him and stealing drinks.
The drink companies keep a record to
to whom they sell these cups, Moore
said. This way there arent any extra cups
floating around.
He estimates that on a good day his staff
will sell around 80,000 cold drinks. The
profit from these sales are deposited in
the general athletic department to help defray
all athletic expenses.
Drink concessions are the major part of
the athletic department income, but we still
try to sell them as cheaply as possible,
Moore declared. I defy anyone to find
a stadium anywhere which sells the same
size drink for any less.

Alligator
Correction
The Alligator would like
to apologize for a mistake
which appeared in Hiurs Hiursdays
days Hiursdays paper.
The mistake occured in an
article which stated that a
former UF student, Danny
Hondul, was arrested at the
Pub, 921 W. University Ave_.
He was not arrested in the
Pub but had left the estab establlshment
llshment establlshment when he was arrest arrested.
ed. arrested. We regret any embar embarrassment
rassment embarrassment or invoncenience it
may have caused.
S* | the influential toiletry
WjjmM collection.lt's not just a
ppjjjf? scent, its a sense of
AVAILABLE AT
WISES DRUG STORE
U V.-#A £ V 4 5
239 W. Univ. Ave
&
WISE S PHARMACY
708 SW 4th Ave.
r-

Page 13



Wmkmgmm liaif.i y m :
fZMkmJhJLI 9
a K* ife' J
i ~... .^paps,*
11 I t v 4 J^**%? H A*
AJM 1 mBB" 1
Wm 1 -
t *** * i grfii (k*
iMr x*
( Photo By Gerald Jones >
BABY DONT GO The words written on
the side of a truck may reflect the views
of some student who decided he didnt want
to see Benton Hall torn down. This truck
happened to be parked next to the site
where Benton Hall was. The building in
the background is the maintenance shop,
which is also being torn down.
Study Lounge Life:
Grin And Share It

By ANN BARDSLEY
Alligator Correspondent
The university residence
halls/* says the UF catalog, have
been designed and organiz&i to em emphasize
phasize emphasize the importance of the in individual
dividual individual student in small-size liv living
ing living groups. What the catalog
had in mind are the rows of
double rooms in each dormitory,
but for 66 OF women, a small smallsize
size smallsize living group is four to seven
roommates.
These women, mostly transfer
students, live in the floor study
lounges of Jennings, Rawlings and
Graham Halls. From five to eight
women share each room, sleep sleeping
ing sleeping on bunk beds and sharing
clothes racks, two dresser draw drawers
ers drawers and a few tables and chairs.
Most lounges have only one mirror.
Some have none.
The floor lounge situation
results from severe over overcrowding
crowding overcrowding of the womens dormitor dormitories.
ies. dormitories. Frederick E. King, assistant
director of housing, said there is
no overpopulation problem in the
mens dorms because of the large
number of men students who live
off campus. The women, King said,
and particularly their parents,
seem to prefer on-campus re residence.
sidence. residence. The number of women at
UF has increased so much that
very inch of available space has
to be used.
King explained the lounge dwel dwellers
lers dwellers will all be relocated to per permanent
manent permanent rooms as other girls drop
out of school or move into soror sorority
ity sorority houses and apartments. Some
women have already been moved
from lounges to standard rooms,
but King said he had no way of
knowing how long the 66 re remaining
maining remaining women would be in their
20 by 30 foot lounges.
The girls, meanwhile, are bear bearing
ing bearing up patiently, if somewhat fret fretfully.
fully. fretfully. As transfer students,
fiiey applied for housing later than
freshmen and students already en enrolled
rolled enrolled at the university, and wei%
low on the priority list. Almost
all the lounge dwellers were ad advlsed
vlsed advlsed in advance that they had been
assigned to a floor lounge and
warned not to bring anything they
didnt absolutely need.
Even though they were forewarn forewarned,
ed, forewarned, adjusting to life in the tiny,
crowded rooms hasnt been easy.
Most of the girls said patience,
ingenuity and a sense of humor
were essential for lounge living.
Lack of storage space is the big biggest
gest biggest problem in the lounges, where

two dressers and a few shelves
have to accomodate everyones in indespensibles.
despensibles. indespensibles. The girls also com complained
plained complained of cuts and bruises caus caused
ed caused by getting up in the bunk too
quickly, lint and dust gathering on
their clothes, which hang on tem temporary
porary temporary racks along the walls, lack
of an intercom buzzer to tell them
of phone calls and visitors, and
the antipathy of other girls on
their floor. They want us out
of their study area. You cant
blame them, one lounge dwelling
coed said, but we have to Uve
someplace.
The adjustment, if difficult, has
been made. Women double and
triple up on clothes racks and
dressers. They comb their hair
and put on makeup in shifts at
the rooms single mirror and study
in bed when there arent enough
tables and chairs to go around.
Most lounges have agreed on a
lights out hour, so that those who
have to study use small lamps,
and avoid disturbing roommates
who want to sleep.
It sounds awful, said one
coed, But once you get used to
it, it really isnt, so bath I feel
as though I have five sisters.
Their biggest gripe now, the
girls say, is that they dont want
to leave. They are moved to avail available
able available space according to the date
they first applied for housing, with
those who applied earliest being
moved earliest. This often means
they are moved into another dorm dormitory,
itory, dormitory, even though they have made
friends and joined clubs and ac activities
tivities activities in the hall to which they
were first assigned.
Im sorry King sighed But
if we let them wait for an open opening
ing opening in a hall they wanted we could couldnt
nt couldnt be sure it would ever come
up. They could be in the lounge
forever.
Little Theater
Tryouts Set
Tryouts for the Gainesville Lit Little
tle Little Theaters production of Our
Town will be held Sunday at 2
p.m. at the theater. They are
open to students and faculty.
Production dates for the play
are Nov. 10, 11, 12, 17, 18 and
19.
Kyle Stirling, instructor in the
School of Journalism and Com Communications
munications Communications and producer-director
of WUFT will direct the Pulit Pulitzer
zer Pulitzer Prize winning play by Thorn Thornton
ton Thornton Wilder.

Nothing Like A Dame;
A UF Married One, That Is

Mrs. Bart Kimball, a member of
the journalism and communica communications
tions communications Dames outlined the organ organization
ization organization and objectives of Dames
organizations in a recent inter interview.
view. interview.
Mrs. Kimball explained that hun hundreds
dreds hundreds of wives join Dames groups
each year to learn more about their
husbands chosen profession, his
classwork and his college. A
wife can contribute a great deal
toward motivation, diligence and

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golden opportunity to learn the worlds most practical sport. First lesson is only $5.
Cassells In The Air
Gainesville Municipal Airport Waldo Road
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ujith no (
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About SIO.OO in brilliant paisley combinations. *Du Fonts registered trade- ySTI I
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. v s p# o
Holler Things for Hotter Hiving . through Chemistry
Get Your Creighton Shirt With "Dacron" At
St
Page 14

extra efforts if she is well inform informed,
ed, informed, Mrs. Kimball said.
Dames are divided into 10 groups
each representing one of the uni university
versity university colleges. A girl usually be belongs
longs belongs to the group representing the
college in which her husband is
enrolled, but it isnt necessary.
Each Dames college group
holds monthly meetings with a
planned program ranging from in information
formation information to entertaining pro programs
grams programs and the regular amount

The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 7, 1966

of socializing, business and
refreshments.
Their next project is the Mrs.
UF contest followed by a doll con contest
test contest in November.
The Fall P.H.T. (Pushing Hubby
Through) presentation will be held
in December.
Mrs. Kimball stated that wives
who are interested in becoming a
member of a Dames group can
contact Mrs. Leonard E. Ireland,
Jr.



FSU Police Dept.
b Hers Traffic Tips

HAn estimated 42,500 fans are ex exited
ited exited to converge on Campbell
Kidium Saturday in Tallahassee
Hr the Florida State-Florida foot-
K game and FSU police have
Bfered these tips for motorists:
Hi. Fans planning to arrive ear-
H and have a picnic lunch should
Hter the stadium area byway of
Hall street or Pensacola and they
Hill be parked in the picnic area
ear Tully Gymnasium.
H 2. Those planning to attend the
Hint FSU-UF Alumni barbecue at
H e gym should use the same route.

Relief From
hunger Pangs
For Students
By LIBBY JARVINEN
Alligator Correspondent
A relief for late-night hunger
pangs soon may be a reality
for dorm students.
Richard E. Gentry, a sopho sophomore,
more, sophomore, plans to organize a system
where sandwiches will be bought
from Food Service by students,
in volume, at a discount. Then
they will be sold in the dorms
for the same price as in the cafe cafeterias.
terias. cafeterias.
The big difference is that the
sandwiches will be available late
at night after the cafeterias close.
Unlike the sandwich machines in
several dorms, these will be fresh
daily and not kept for long per periods
iods periods under refrigeration. t
Approved by Robert Over Overton,
ton, Overton, manager of Food Service,
the plan will become effective when
approved by UF housing authori authorities.
ties. authorities. A similiar idea has worked
successfully at the University of
Kentucky.
Gentry said he hit upon the idea
because, It seemed like an in interesting
teresting interesting way to make money.
Something like this has been need needed
ed needed for a long time. The residents
of womens dorms cant get out
after curfew to get something to
eat, and if they could they would
have too Car to go."
Conferences
To Improve
JC Physics
Physics specialists at UF will
assist Florida junior colleges in
improving and expanding their phy physics
sics physics programs under a $6,800 grant
from the National Science Founda Foundation.
tion. Foundation.
The grant supports a series of
six conferences for junior college
physics teachers at various junior
colleges and at the University un under
der under sponsorship of the University
of Florida.
Dr. S. S. Ballard, professor and
chairman of the Universitys De- t
>artment of Physics as well as
conference chairman, said the gen genial
ial genial purpose of the conferences are
to achieve better communication
tmong junior college physics
eachers and those of other in institutions
stitutions institutions of higher learning.
The first conference is schedul scheduld
d scheduld at 9:30 a.m. Oct. 15 in Bless
Auditorium.
Included on the program will be
)r R. E. Garrett, associate pro proper
per proper of physics; Marvin Young,
raduate assistant and former phy phyics
ics phyics teacher at Miami-Dade Jun Junr
r Junr College, and other facul faculmembers
members faculmembers of the Department of
lysics.

3. Out-of-town fans from the
south will probably .come into town
on UjS. 27. They should use Pen Pensacola
sacola Pensacola street, which runs right
by the Capitol building.
4. Fans arriving on U.S. 90,
either east or west, should turn
south on Woodward street to Call
Street until they come to the traf traffic
fic traffic control officer. They will be
directed into the parking area via
Chieftian Way.
5. Fans arriving from the north,
either U.S. 27 or 319, should turn
right on Tennessee Street (US 90)
and then turn into Woodward Street.
6. Local fans should use the route
nearest their home.
7. Seminole Boosters with tags
affixed to the front of their cars
will be the only ones allowed
through Stadium Drive or West
Pensacola street.
8. Fans are being encouraged
to form car pools and students
have been asked to walk to the
stadium.
There will be an information
booth located on Woodward Street
to help out of town visitors but
motorists are drged not to stop
in the lane of traffic for infor information.
mation. information.
The stadium will open at 11a.m.
for early arrivals. More than 150
traffic officers will be on hand to
keep the flow of cars and buses
moving.
Several special trains are due
to arrive early and will be parked
on the railroad siding just south
of the stadium. Its just a short
walk from any point of the sta stadium
dium stadium to the picnic area and gym gymnasium
nasium gymnasium where the barbecue will
be held.

stadium.

Collar goes-up or down,
depending on the temperature
in your torture chamber. V
Raglan shoulders Secret inside pocket
let your arms move freely, for confidential memos
H for karate or cockfrom the White House,
Brawny back k / I
H for concealing your M / g
shoulder fgt f
j jjj Rugged poplin
jf JR holds up through
m JP thick and sin.
m 7 colors
( M i let you pick the best way
{ j m I 1 to blend
I with the background.
Adjustable cuffs loosenl a
when you loosen up
the master friend.
I watching you every minute
when you wear the if A
T&s i
Wea therall Jacket.
Just $lO 00 (m unmarked bills) Slightly higher m the West Talon sipper At

, i!U A
ij r n
ri,i *** i, > . i.
) Cg-
- -ilAfilfigy fi LULL Ho i
HUW TO GET AROUND IN TALLAHASS.E
... Campbell Stadium in lower left

For $200,000

Humanities Council Gets Grant

A four-year grant of $200,000
to support faculty research has
been made to the Humanities Coun Council
cil Council of UF.
In announcing the grant, Robert
B. Mautz, UF vice president and
chairman of the board of directors
of the Division of Sponsored Re Research,
search, Research, said the award is design designed
ed designed to support and stimulate re research
search research in the Humanities.
Dr. V. R. Learned, director

of research, said, This is anoth another
er another major step in strengthening the
overall research program of the
university.
Dr. Learned and members of
his staff are currently working
with other disciplines here to ana analyze
lyze analyze what must be done in order
to create a strong, balanced
research program for the total
university research community.
Terms of the humanities grant

Friday, October 7, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

ITS TRAD, DAD! 1
This traditionally styled suit solves your B
dress-up problems all year round! Tailored
by famed h.i.s with authentic university
detailing like lapped seams, hooked vent, cut-
in flapped pockets and, of course, natural
shoulders. Trousers are slim, tapered Post-
Grads traditional to the last stitch.
Smartly tailored in sturdy fabrics, favorite
colors ... $38.00 to SBB.OO I
THE STORE I
. 1302 NORTH MAIN §

provided by the Division of Spon Sponsored
sored Sponsored Research allocate $35,000
for use during the 1966-67 aca academic
demic academic year and the following sums
for succeeding years: 1967-68
$45,000; 1968-69 $55,000; and
1969-70 $65,000.
Most of the funds allotted will
be used to provide salaries for
faculty actively engaged in re research
search research during the summer months.

Page 15



Veteran Spurrier
Faces FSU Sophs

By JAMES GILLESPY
United Press International
TALLAHASSEE Ninth ranked
Florida goes against cross state
rival Florida State Saturday after afternoon
noon afternoon in a contest that will pit
veteran Steve Spurrier against two
young FSU quarterbacks.
Kickoff will be in Doak Camp Campbell
bell Campbell Statium at 2 p.m. EST.
Florida is unbeaten, dealing out
a 43-7 victory over Northwestern,
beating Mississippi State 28-7
and blanking Vanderbilt last week
13-0.
Florida State is one and one for
the season, losing the opener 21-13
to Houston then coming back two
weeks ago to edge Miami 23-20
on the Hurricanes home field.
The Gators have Spurrier Spurriera
a Spurriera quarterback who currently leads
the Southeastern Conference in
passing and combined offense.
He's completed 38 of 56 pas passes
ses passes for seven scores and 525 yards.
His total offense comes out to
544 yards.
On the receiving end of Spur Spurrier's
rier's Spurrier's throws will be Richard
Trapp, who has grabbed 11 pas passes
ses passes for 213 yards and two scores,
and Paul Ewaldsen, who has
held on to nine throws for 109
yards and two touchdowns.
Opposing Spurrier will be ESU
junior quarterback Kim Ham Hammond
mond Hammond and sophomore Gary Paj Pajcic.
cic. Pajcic. Both had little or no var varsity
sity varsity experience prior to this year.
As of now Pajcic, who will
start against Florida, has con connected
nected connected with 11 of 26 passes for 153
yards and two scores, and Ham-
Elite
DETROIT (UPI) The De Detroit
troit Detroit Lions of the National
Football League number 100
Big Ten Conference players on
its team rosters over a 32-year
period.
How Fast
Can You
Read ?
A noted publisher in Chicago
reports there is a simple tech technique
nique technique of rapid reading which
should enable you to double your
reading speed and yet retain much
more. Most people do not rea realize
lize realize how much they could in increase
crease increase their pleasure, success
and income by reading faster and
more accurately.
According to this publisher,
anyone, regardless of his pres present
ent present reading skill, can use this
simple technique to improve his
reading ability to a remark remarkable
able remarkable degree. Whether reading
stories, books, technical matter,
it becomes possible to read sen sentences
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To acquaint the readers of
this newspaper with the easy easyto-follow
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rapid reading skill, the company
has printed full details of its
interesting self-training method
in a new booklet, How to Read
Faster and Retain More mail mailed
ed mailed free. No obligation. Send your
name, address and zip code to:
Reading, 835 Diversey, Dept.
3707, Chicago, 111. 60614. A post postcard
card postcard will do.

mond has hit on 21 of 49 for 244
yards and one touchdown.
They will be throwing to
flankers Bill Cox, Ron Sellers
and T. K. Wetherell, and tight
end Thurston Taylor.
Florida State's running game,
which hasnt jeUed so far this
season will be in the hands of
halfbacks Bill Moreman and full fullback
back fullback Jim Mankins.
In addition to the youth versus
experience battle among the
quarterbacks, the two defen defensive
sive defensive units will get a major test.
So far Floridas defense has held
opponents to 192 yards in three
games.
Florida States opponents in two
games have pushed up 571 yards,
against a defense that was .green
when the season opened.

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Make your next step Convair. where you can open the doors to a lifetime of job-satisfaction.
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Alligator
s
p
o
R
T
S
Friday, October 7, 1966
Page 16

Peterson Calls
Spurrier 'Superstar'

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Flor Florida
ida Florida State University Coach Bill
Peterson said Thursday if he could
pick one defense against Florida
it would be to intercept the ball
when the center hands it to quar quarterback
terback quarterback Steve Spurrier.
Peterson said Spurrier, who
leads the Southeastern Conference
in passing and combined offense,
was a super star.
The FSU head coach said his
Semlnoles had worked up the best
defense they knew how to stop
Spurrier, but he added, a su super
per super star can beat you on any
day.
Wed like to intercept the ball
from the center so he cant get
it, Peterson said.
The Seminoles had an off date
last weekend, so Peterson had two
weeks to put the squad in shape

for the clash with Florida.
Weve had two weeks of good
practice and improved our run running
ning running game considerably, he said.
Were going to throw a lot
but I wouldnt say its going to
be predominately passing.
He said the team that would win
Saturday would be. the one that
made the fewest mistakes and got
the breaks.
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Friday, October 7, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Travis Says Freshmen
'Ragged' But Ready

By EVAN LANGBEIN
Alligator Sports Writer
The University of Florida's
freshmen football players will be
officially initiated into the ranks
of college football Saturday at 2
p.m. at Florida Field when they
take on the Auburn Tigers.
For the Baby Gators, it will
be their first really authentic op opportunity
portunity opportunity to discover what they can
really do. Up to now theyve been
busy aiding the varsity squad?
Right now I would say that
our team is pretty ragged, states
Freshmen Head Coach Larry Tra Travis.
vis. Travis. We havent had much time
to work together. Ibis entire week
weve been busy helping the var varsity
sity varsity get ready for the FSU game.
Despite preparatory defects, the
freshmen Gators are expected to
field an exciting football team. It
is a team which will pass a lot
and play a wide open brand of
football.
The offense will be guided by
two quarterbacks concurrently.
Jackie Eckdahl, a six feet, two
inch blondie from Gainesville
whose father is a physical educa education
tion education instructor at UF, will start
at quarterback. But operating at
starting halfback will be Guy Mc-
Theny, also six feet, two inches
from Sarasota, who is likewise
a quarterback and will switch with'
Eckdahl.
Both Eckdahl and McTheny are
fast and shifty and throw the ball
very well. With both in there at
the same time the Baby Gators
passing attack is a threat.
We will throw the football,"
exclaims Coach Travis. Pass Passing
ing Passing is our definite strong point.
We will try to run a balanced
attack, but weve worked harder
on the passing game."
Catching Eckdahls and Mc-
Thenys aerial strikes will be the

Florida Oranges, I
Texas Cactus, I
We Play F.S.U.
Just for Practice! I
(Our Thanks To Charlie Edwards) 1
,^ Annl A
pr r WONDERHOUSEI
Open 24 Hrs. 14 S. W. Ist St. I
1225 W. Univ. Downtown
1 ; 2 Block en 10:30-8 I

highly-touted six feet, two inch,
175 pound end from Miami, Steve
Tannen. Tannen, a track sprinter
in high school, is fast and he
has a great pair of hands. Some
already compare him to Charlie
Casey.
Wingback Paul Maliska from
Winter Park and tight end Skip
Amelung from Ft. Lauderdale will
share the pass receiving chores
with Tannen.
The defense will be essentially
the same which the varsity Ga Gators
tors Gators employ. It is called a split splitsix
six splitsix defensive alignment.
Key defensive players are ex expected
pected expected to be end David Ghesqui Ghesquiere
ere Ghesquiere from Pensacola, linebacker-
Tom Abdelnour from Miami, half halfback
back halfback Skip Albury from Coral Ga Gables
bles Gables and safety Larry Williamson
from Ft. Walton Beach.
Coach Travis emphasizes, how however,
ever, however, that it is difficult to say
who at this juncture is truly out outstanding.
standing. outstanding. The boys havent been
tested yet. You cat say for cer certain
tain certain who is good until they prove
themselves on the field.
Travis continues, I dont real really
ly really know anything about the Auburn
team well be facing. They have havent
nt havent played either. But I do hope
the students come out and sup support
port support these boys. This is a re regular
gular regular game and we like to have
people cheering for us like any anybody
body anybody else."
At the same time the Baby Ga Gators
tors Gators are battling Auburn, the var varsity
sity varsity Gators will be playing their
big one in Tallahassee against the
Florida State Seminoles. Coach
Travis encourages anyone staying
in Gainesville to enjoy both games
simultaneously.
If people have transistor
radios, they should come on out
and root for two Gator teams
at once."

Page 17



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 7, 1966

Page 18

Staffers And Guests Pick The Winners
wttf'w Dick Judy Bob Nick Ed Steve Andy Mike Frank Betty D. K. Norm
Dennis Redfem Menaker Arroyo Sears Hull Moor Willard Adams Cosby Stanley Carlson Conser
TOUGHEST _____ ____ ______ ________ ______ _____ ___ ___ ___
TWENTY 47-13 47-13 46-14 46-14 45-15 45-15 45-15 45-15 Dean a ? e<^ E pubhFist 4 789
.783 .783 .767 .767 .750 .750 .750 .750 of Men of Women of P.E. Publicist
_ F F F F F F F F F F F F F
Florida at Florida State F r r F r
Duke at Maryland D D D D D D M D
r r T r TTGTTTTTT
Tennessee at Georgia Tech 1 1 u
Mississippi at Georgia M M MM G MM M
Ohio State at Hlinois I 0 10 O O I O
r r r r r C C C C C C C C
Charlatan at Smoke Signals c c c c
Michigan at Michigan State MS MS MS MS MS MS MS MS MS MS MS MS Mi
c e Qc o c c s S s SS-S
Navy at Syracuse b b s b
c/"' it \jr' r' NT' NC SC NC SC NC SC NC NC
S. Carolina at N.C. State SC NC NC NC NC
t T O t T T T T 0 T T T T
Oklahoma at Texas T U T ~ J
c n n n n S S O O S O S O
Oregon at Stanford S O O 0 O
x i i p w P x P W P P w p W P W p
West Virginia at Pittsburgh P w r y p w
Texas Tech at TCU TCU TT TT TCU TCU TT TCU TCU TCV TCU TCU TCU TC
Wake Forest at Auburn A A A A A A A .A W A A A
Tulane at Virginia T V T V V V V T T T V T
Northwestern at Oregon St. 0 N N N O O O O o O N O
Colorado at Oklahoma St. G C C G c C C C C C C C
Baylor at Arkansas A A A A AAA A A A A A
Minnesota at Indiana I I I M M M M M M I M I M
Washington at USC V U V V V U V U W u W U U

IN SHUTOUT PERFORMANCE

By LEO H. PETERSON
UPI Sports Editor
LOS ANGELES Jim Palmer,
a 20-year-old righthander, shut
out Los Angeles on four hits and
the Baltimore Orioles took full
advantage of a record-tying six
errors by the Dodgers Thursday
in sweeping the second game of
the World Series, 6-0.
Palmer, making his first World
JIM PALMER
. goes distance
Series appearance after compil compiling
ing compiling a 15-10 mark during the re regular
gular regular season, gave the Orioles a
2-0 lead in games by stifling the
meager Dodgers* attack. He struck
out six, walked three and was in
trouble in only one inning.
Victim of Los Angeles* shoddy
SMASH THE
SEMINOLES

Palmer Outauels Koufax

defensive play was Sandy Koufax,
the premier pitcher in baseball.
He pitched the first six innings,
allowing four runs-only one of
them earned.
Koufax was followed to the mound
by Ron Perranoski, Phil Regan and
Jim Brewer. Perranoski also was
sabotaged by his fielders in the
eighth when the Orioles scored
their final two runs.
Baltimore collected eight hits
and in the process scored the
first runs off Koufax after 22 con consecutive
secutive consecutive scoreless innings in
World Series competition. He had

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blanked Minnesota in the fifth and
seventh games last year.
Claude Osteen will try to get
Los Angeles back on the winning
track when the series resumes
Saturday in Baltimore. He will
be opposed by righthander Wally
Bunker of Baltimore. The teams
have an open date for traveling
Friday.
r World Series, 2nd game.
Balt A 000 031 020-6-9-0
L.A. N 000 000 000-0-4-6
Palmer and Etchebarren; Kou Koufax,
fax, Koufax, Perranoski 7, Regan 8, Bre Brewer
wer Brewer 9 and Roseboro. Lp-Koufax.

* --- ' '
Please don't
zlupf Sprite.
It makes
plenty of noise
all by itself.
w i

Sprite, you recall, is
the soft drink that's
so tart and tingling,
we just couldn't keep i
it quiet. I
Flip its lid and it 1
really flips. \
Bubbling, fizzing,
gurgling, hissing and
carrying on all over
the place.
An almost exces excessively
sively excessively lively drink.
Hence, to zlupf is
to err.
What is zlupfing?

w
uv
|mWV|
swmic is A nrciSTfnco twadc mark
l

VISIT
)t Eeli Uton
Where Everyone
Meets

Zlupfing is to drinking what
smacking one's lips is to
eating.
It's the staccato buzz you
make when draining the last few
deliciously tangy drops of
Sprite from the bottle with a
straw.
Zzzzzlllupf!
It's completely uncalled for.
Frowned upon in polite society.
And not appreciated on campus
either.
But. If zlupfing Sprite
is absolutely essential to your
enjoyment; if a good healthy
zlupf is your idea of heaven, 1
we11...a1l right.
But have a heart. With a
drink as noisy as Sprite, a
zlupf goes a long, long
way.
I SPRITE. SO TART AND
I TINGLING. WE JUST COULDN'T
IT QUIET. j



Lineman Work
Into Toughness
By TYLER TUCKER
Assistant Sports Editor
A football lineman is mobile guts.
He is a guy who can take a goalpost out of a play if the effort
will advance a runner. He is a unique combination of courage
and recklessness unleashed on the enemy. He is a square squareshouldered
shouldered squareshouldered man who is afraid of nothing. He fears the defensive
coach slightly but he doesnt let it be known.
The lineman is a player that suits-up every afternoon to push
100-pound sleds around a muddy field. He spends the evening
hours being yelled at, coerced and knocked down. He is a guy
who gets up from the ground twice as fast as he was put there.
This player is the steel beam of football he is there to
stay. He digs his cleats in his small foxhole and dares backs
across the battle line. He takes great pride in splitting backs
at the waist, pushing them back, and taping them against the goal
line.
He does his job thats all --he does his job.
He doesnt read about himself in the newspaper unless he
weighs more than 250 pounds. He doesnt actually like to be mea measured
sured measured in pounds -- he prefers measurement in tackles, assists
and block grading. He doesnt care much for numbers at all
the only figure he worries about is the opponent's score.
He comes to a university a little green behind the ears and
a little soft in the seat. He leaves a little callous, battered and
kicked into toughness. He isnt particularly conscious of smooth
skin or straight bones possibly because he can maintain
neither.
From high school he meets the collegiates head-on. He
learns slowly and painfully but he learns nevertheless.
He finds out how to use his elbows, head, shoulders, and just
plain strength, to the utmost advantage.
He is the klnda guy that shatters a wall to find a flower in
its cranny.
But he is also a student leaning over a book in a pale light.
He goes to movies and he subscribes to Time magazine. He
also wants to know the ballot results in the Democratic pri primary.
mary. primary.
He is a guy who says good morning as he passes. He is a
well-dressed gentleman in a gray-flannel suit who talks shop
and goes to church twice a week.
At Florida he is Bill Carr and Don Giordano. He is John
Preston and Jim Benson. He is Red Anderson and J. D. Pasteris.
He is Guy Dennis and George Dean. He is Don Barrett and Rex
Rittgers. He is Ed Warner, Bob Young, Bill Dorsey and Doug
Splane.
He is a big man with a big job.
He seldom gets credit for his accomplishments.
He does his job thats all he does his job.
>v.Xv.
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I 13 E. tHnibersitp aue. I

Ramblin Tech Hosts Vols;
Lenny Snow Hits Defense

By DAVID MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA The Southeastern
Conference race takes a back seat
Saturday as seventh-ranked,
defensive-minded Tennessee bat battles
tles battles 10th-ranked, independent
Georgia Tech here in a nation nationally
ally nationally televised contest.
It sould be quite a ball game.
Both teams are undefeated. Ten Tenessee,
essee, Tenessee, which has yielded only
one lone field goal while sweeping
past Auburn and Rice, leads the
nation in scoring defense.
Georgia Tech, which over overwhelmed
whelmed overwhelmed Texas A & M and Van Vanderbilt
derbilt Vanderbilt before last weeks squeak squeaker
er squeaker over Clemson, is averaging
31 points per game.
Tennessee is a slim P-point
favorite.
Theres only one conference
game this week-and it shapes up
as a defensive masterpiece. Geor Georgia,
gia, Georgia, unbeaten and ranked No.
16, is host to Mississippi, loser
only to 4th-ranked Alabama, and
the odds makers say the game is
a tossup.
Steve Spurrier of Florida leads
the South in total offense with 544
yeards. The Gator senior now has
3,765 career yards and with seven
games to go appears set to
break Zeke Bratkowskis all-time
SEC career record of 4,824.
In the other southeastern ac action,
tion, action, Alabama is heavily favored
over Clemson, Auburn is a two twotouchdown
touchdown twotouchdown pick over Wake For Forest,
est, Forest, and 9th- ranked Florida is fav favored
ored favored by a touchdown over cross crossstate
state crossstate rival Florida State.
Kentucky is picked over Virgin Virginia
ia Virginia Tech; Louisiana State over
Texas A & M: Mississippi State
over Southern Mississippi; and Tu Tulane
lane Tulane is a slight underdog to Virgin Virginia.
ia. Virginia. Memphis State, Miami Fla.
and Vanderbilt are all idle this
week.
Plenty of fireworks are pro promised
mised promised for the Georgia Tech-
Scoring Record
GREEN BAY, Wis. (UPI)
Paul Homung of the Green Bay
Packers holds the National
Football League season scoring
record of 176 points, which he
chalked up in 1960. He scored
15 touchdowns and kicked 41
conversions and 15 field goals.

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Tennessee clash. Tech tailback
Lenny Snow leads the nation In
scoring with seven touchdowns
and he leads the South in rush rushing.
ing. rushing. Tech quarterback Kim King,
who set a school record last year,
is averaging 146 yards per game
in total offense.
Tennessees top offensive gun is
quarterback Dewey Warren who
has passed for 418 yards and five

by Albert the Alligator as told to Bob Larec
Albert wants to apologize to all of his fans for his disast disastrous
rous disastrous forecast last week. He explains that he was feeling wild
and took it out on his predictions. Lets hope he calms down
a little this week. Alberts record last week was 17-9, which
gives him an overall 54-17 slate. His .761 percentage is still
pretty good.
Place your bets. Here are Uncle Alberts Upsets of the Week.
Oklahoma over Texas-Texans (even the big chief) are destin destined
ed destined to lose sooner or later Ibis time it will be SOONER.
Illinois over Ohio St.-I told you last week that the Buckeyes
were overrated.
And now for the rest of the games. 61
Florida over Florida St.-Im going to catch that grubby
Seminole in my powerful jaws, rip off his dress, and expose
him for what he really is. 31-14.
Arkansas over Baylor-1 was tempted to pick another upset
here.
Notre Dame over Army-Total victory!
Auburn over Wake Forest-I cant picture the Trees winning.
Alabama over Clemson-If Mississippi cant do it, Clemson
cant.
Duke over Maryland-I'm not going to say something stupid like,
Put up your Dukes, Mary, or you know where youll Land.
Tennessee over Georgia Tech-Tennessee melts Snow and crowns
King.
Mississippi over Georgia- The Battle of the Bigots. Theyd
like Martin Luther King for the half-time show.
Minnesota over Indiana-The winner of this is bound to hit
the Top 10.
Purdue over lowa-Griese didnt even throw a T.D. pass last
week.
Kentucky over Virginia Tech-Could be a surprise.
L.S.U. over Texas A & M-Wait until they meet the Super Ga Gators.
tors. Gators.
Michigan St. over Michigan-Too bad we cant play them.
Missouri over Kansas St.-Missouri stinks this year.
Syracuse over Navy-Holy Torpedoes!
Nebraska over Wisconsin-Nebraska is a pretty husky bunch.
(All you true football fans should catch the humor there. If
you dont ask you neighbor.) Wasnt worth it, "was it?
North Carolina St. over South Carolina-Poor Paul.
Southern Cal over Washington-Possible upset. /
Texas Christian over Texas Tech-Get em Christians.
U.C.L.A, over Rice-Did you see Better than Spurrier
Beban get four passes intercepted last week. Enough said.

Friday, October 7, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

touchdowns in two games. His main
target is split end John Mills who
already has 17 catches and appears
enroute to a conference record.
Georgia quarterback Kirby
Moore is the No. 2 runner in the
air Saturday against Ole Miss
which has allowed an average of
only 75 yards per game on the
ground and leads the conference
in total defense.

Page 19



1, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 7, 1966

Page 20

HONDA SCRAMBLER 160
* Perfect For The I The Harmon Football Forecast | | vt
TOP 20 TEAMS (Forecasting Average: 427 right, 146 wrong 745) \ * Ve)^ : l
1 MICH. STATE 6 TENNESSEE 11-PURDUE 16-NEBRASKA \U U \ \UIjA HfU M. :
2- NOTRE DAME 7- SOUTHERN CAL 12-MISSOURI 17 GEORGIA lI\UU \ \mK%\ \ U MKfc VfcLUIV
3 U.C.LA. 8 FLORIDA 13 MISSISSIPPI 18 DUKE \ \ \ \
Cn AP A Dial am 4-ALABAMA 9 GEORGIA TECH 14-HOUSTON 19-WYOMING Hl' i i f T JFVz
jpOlT maUI 5-ARKANSAS 10-TEXAS 15-S.M.U. 20 KENTUCKY VPMIPMk\
Saturday, Oct. 8, Major Colleges highlights PIJJPv'-'' -'V
- Air Force 42 Hawaii 0 L 4
Arkansas 17 Baylor 0 0 Last week was reall y the week that was! \ V f
____ _ Auburn ...ZZZZ 20 Wake Forest 8 If the underdogs didnt clobber the upperdogs,
Who Likes To SSSSS ?SS4 n 8 they at least managed to scare the living
ata. ZZZ-% tsr&s-mnz 1 daylights out of them. So. Me top 2 ' %
Citadel 14 George Washington 13 underwent a fast and friendly shuffle. ?
cSSJdo ":zzzz 15 ck'ahomTstate Z. it still ln the #1 s Pt this week, Michigan
Cornell 20 Pennsylvania 7 State entertains a real rowdy, but deflated, Stni3d Oxford
_ I 8^S OUth ...Z:ZZ 20 w?wta n 13 guest -- arch-rival Michigan. However, the
Go Aovwhoro. FkJfda 21 Fioridr d state lo Spartans will be poor hosts as they are favored
"Wiw Furman 20 Wofford ...... 15 to clip the Wolverines by fifteen points.
!2/hJ rd ZZZZ:: 26 fdaho'stateZ.Z..Z o Notre L>ame, in the runner-up position, If youre a fancier of
JjNnois 20 Ohio
Kentucky ZZZZ! 14 vp.t. 8 The Irish will win by 27points. AndU.C.L.A., Choice luxuriant Cotton
Stx*eit 9 s iS&m~zr= 8 S A i::: S <"* .V 3 . 7 bury Mce iust a blt oxford worth adding to
Min Swota 5tate ...::.... II KSiai5 n ..:zzz: S 4th-ranked Alabama is three touchdowns your collection. In
Mississippi 14 Georgia 7 tougher than Clemson, and Number 8 boy, distinctive Color Stri Strim!ssour
m!ssouri Strim!ssour 18 0 ............... 40 Kansas r state S o Florida, will win a backyard scrap with pings.
N bra ka 22 Wisconsin 6 Florida State by 11 points.
qiq U/ I Iniuorcih/ A a New Mexico state 27 Pacific 6 Baylor will be sticky for sth-rated Ar ArI8
I8 ArI8 W. umvanity Ave. Ijogj Tg- ............ a rung. kaosas, and Washington wUI throw a scare
Ohio u. 15 Toledo 14 into Southern Cal #7. However, the Razor Razorfl
fl Razorfl A /i || I# p2nn n state te ....::::z:. l! *6 backs wiU stay undefeated, winning by seven-
IR6 voll6flo Lit 6 Rugere "zzzz; U & ? teen and toe Tr j ans w lll tQ p Huskies
_ . South Carolina 15 North Carolina St. .14 by eleven points.
Football Forecast 031 Io Ks! *? 6th-ranked Tennessee runs into tnde-
Syracuse 17 Navy 13 pendent powerhouse Georgia Tech, ranked
Texas 21 Oklahoma 6 9th. WeU pick the Vols to slip by the Ram- ms \ \
#4j&jfar Texas western 1:...*.. 20 IStS : J bling Wreck by just 3 points. Wl \ \ \
Tulsa 27 Colorado state 7 Texas, in the #lO spot, will beat Okla- If fj j
Virginia is Tu'ifne is homa by 15 points, and Purdue, rated 11th, II 11/ I \ \
-.HMh **v.m.i 19 Richmond 7 should roar over lowa by 28. il V M / \ m.
west Virginia 14 Pittsburgh io We remind our readers each year that the WL / / \ Is
Z\ 1 wyom?ng & Mary 21 utah Va 9 top 20 is anything but a haven for unde- \ \
Xavier 20 Cincinnati 19 seated teams. It is meant to reflect what we \ I
ale 16 Brown 6 think are the twenty strongest football teams U \ \
Other Games South in the country. .in that order. This week, A \ T
Arkansas A& M 25 Ouachita 7 Ulere e alread y flve leams tllat a - 1 \ A
THF PAMF<; Defta .. Peay ...z:z 24 Troy tem KentUCky o 12th-ranked Missouri and 16-rated Ne- \
East Carolina 17 Davidson 8 braska, the Big Eight powers, will roll over J!\ (
Eastern Kentucky 22 Middle Tennessee 14 their opposition. The Columbia Tigers will be Wf )| I
Alabama vs. LSU Florence 1 Henry 12 Mfss. V College 7 big 40 ~Pt n t winners over Kansas State, and fit II I
Auburn vs. Mississippi State Gienvilie 15 west va. state 12 the Cornhuskers from Lincoln will whip -V f II f
Florida vs. Georgia Hardrng Sydney 18 Co'nway ater ...... ... 15 Wisconsin by sixteen. il j J l
Georgia Tech vs. Tennessee Henderson 14 Southern state 13 In Athens, Georgia, the 17th-rated Bull- If / / M
Rice vs. Arkansas Lamar Tech 21 sw Louisiana 7 dogs of Georgia take on the once-beaten y J M
Duke vs. North Carolina State M^Neese^ 6 17 ArMn^on' 3 14 Rebels of Mississippi, #l3. The winner: Jr
Miami vs. Boston College Morehead 27 Murray 12 Ole Miss by seven points. \
Stanford vs. Tulane n| W Louisiana"4....Z 33 Louisiana College 7 Three newcomers complete our top 20. . j )
Michigan vs. Illinois ^ by Hnrn 9 Howard PaynA X r This week: Duke, Wyoming, and Kentucky. (
FSU vs. Wake Forest s f. Austin ....Z !" 20 Texas ai 1 15 Duke is a two-touchdown favorite over Mary-
Iw T&Si ana § Angelo o land. .Wyoming will win by the same mar- / \)
Tennessee Tech 21 East Tennessee 20 gin over Utah. .and Kentucky will handle s J
\ Washington & Lee .. 18 Centre 13 VDT
**West Va. Wesleyan 20 Salem 6 V.F.I. Dy SIX. C Z
!||§ggmk Western Carolina .... 25 Catawba 0 LZ)
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TJL as Company Os America | *Wotch For The Opening Wood Hosts
Ark. Baylor Ark Vic McKenzie and Assoc. Os New King's Across From Jb' fITW' S
Ala Ala *s* 4115 N. w. 13th st. is Men's Dorns.
Neb. Neb Neb.
S. Carollan North Carolina St. NC State