Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
ALAN SETS UP DRAFT CLINIC

Whaddaya Know! Levins Back

Vol. 59, No. 9

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PLAYERS TRYOUTS Bob
Hafley, Carole Nurenberg, and
Arleye Jackson try out for the
play ^Rosterella ,, to be pre presented
sented presented by the Florida Play Players
ers Players on Oct. 19-23.

30 SEATS UP FOR GRABS

Deadline For Fall Elections Comes Friday

By JEAN MAMLIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Candidates to fill the 3u seats
in the Legislative Council must
turn in qualifications by Friday
at 5 p.m.

to See Page 6 I

By JO ANN LANGWORTHY
Alligator Staff Writer
&
Alan Levin was back on campus Tuesday. At a table set iqp
in front of the UF library, Levin and other members of the Student
Democratic Society, discussed the draft issue.
SDS member Tom Sharpless spoke against government policy
affecting peoples lives. Military forces should be on a volun volunteer
teer volunteer basis and no one should be forced into something they dont
believe in, he said.
Sharpless also said, We are providing a service here for UF
students to help them realize their positions as conscientious
objectors. Those students who object to war in Viet Nam but can cannot

The Florida
Alligator

University of Florida

turn in qualifications by Friday
at 5 p.m.
These seats are to be filled
from 20 representatives from the
dorms and 10 representatives
from off-campus housing.
Student elections will be held

Wednesday, September!!, 196 b

A production meeting, open
to persons interested in work working
ing working on the play will be held
Wednesday, Sept. 14 at 7:30
p.m. in Norman Hall Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium.

treasurers office, room 307 in
the Florida Union.
Dorm residents will vote at
their respective areas while
those living off campus will vote
at the Hub. Applications for ab absentee
sentee absentee ballots may be picked up
in room 311 in the Fla. Union.
Jay T. Scheck, head of the
election proceedures, said,
Were hoping for a big turnout
Sept. 29.
Qualifications to run include
having a 2.0 overall grade point
average, having a good conduct
record, living in the area from
which you run, and submitting a
$4 election registration fee to
the Student Government. Can-

not cannot qualify as conscientious objectors because they do not object
to all wars.
The Government has no draft category for such instances,
leaving these students the alternatives of continued draft-dodging
or emigration to Canada, he said.
Levin, whose freedom tactics were widely publicized last year,
added that the draft is undemocratic and that students should be
informed of political tactics to achieve conscientious object objectivism.
ivism. objectivism.
According to Levin, the draft board is not a part of last
years Freedom Party because Freedom Party no longer exists.
The long range goal of the SDS is for a democratic free uni university
versity university free from the State Board of Regents, Levin said.

Student Forum
Program Set
On WGGG Radio

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Government, in co-op co-operation
eration co-operation with WGGG Radio, is spon sponsoring
soring sponsoring a radio program aimed at
student interest on Sunday nights.
The programs, beginning on
Sept. 25, will have an open student
forum as its format. Tentatively
entitled Open Forum, the show
will last one-half hour beginning
at 9 p.m.
Each week a different topic of
current interest will be presented.
Guest panelists will give facts and
issues relating to the topic, after
which individuals may have the op opportunity
portunity opportunity to telephone the station,
ask a question on the topic, and
get an immediate answer.
The first program will feature
Herb Schwartz, chancellor of the
Honor Court, and Fletcher Bald Baldwin,
win, Baldwin, professor of law, discussing
The Role of the Student in Voic Voicing
ing Voicing Opinions: The Right of Student
Dissent.
The producer of the program is
John R. LaCapra, special assistant
to the president of the student
body. Tom Kirby, program direc director
tor director at WGGG, and third year law
student at the UF, will serve as
technical advisor.
There is a definite need for
a public relations program between

South African To Speak
On Supremacy Doctrine
Franz J. T. Lee, a representative of the South African party op opposed
posed opposed to white-supremacist rule, will speak on The Liber Liberation
ation Liberation Struggle in South Africa, on Thursday, at 8 p.m. in Mc-

this fall, since this is an im important
portant important part of student act activities.
ivities. activities.
MARINE OFFICERS
BEING SOUGHT
Those girls interested in poss possible
ible possible placement as commissioned commissionedofficers
officers commissionedofficers in theU.S. Marine Corps
should contact Lt. Betty Hopkins
today and Thursday at the Student
Union.
To be eligible for a Marine
Corps commission, a woman
must be single, between the ages
of 18 and 29 and a college gradu graduate,
ate, graduate, and must meet established
qualification standards.

JOHN LaCAPRA
. . program producer
the city of Gaines ville and the UF,
LaCapra said.
The value, I feel, is going to
be that it will cause the students
and the people of Gainesville to
be aware of and understand all
walks of campus life.
The program hinges on student
interest and student response, said
producer LaCapra. If we dont
have any response, the show will
v e discontinued.

Carty Hall Auditorium.
Lee will discuss the ways in
which the apartheid system, a
policy of racial segregation, af affects
fects affects the African majority and
the role of the Western powers
relative to the Boer Regime.
He will give background informa information
tion information relating to the internal cris crisis
is crisis of the regime and the Ver Verwoerd
woerd Verwoerd assissination.
Lee is currently touring the
United States to raise funds for
victims of the apartheid system.
His appearance on campus is
sponsored by the Student Peace
Union and was arranged by the
newly-forming Forida Socialist
Union.
Working toward his Ph. D.
in political science in West Ger Germany,
many, Germany, Lee has authored a book,
South Africa Before the War.



Page 2

;,The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, September 14, 1966

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C FROM THE
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International
MAJOR CHANGE . Indonesias powerful military leaders think
they have got a time-bomb ticking under the political structure
that so far has kept them from dumping President Sukarno.
The bomb is a major change in the Indonesian electoral system
that would shift Parliament from a single national constituency
to local constituencies.
Its effect would be to downgrade the power of national political
parties in Indonesias legislative bodies, while upgrading the power
of individual legislators and the importance of local issues.
HEAVY BOMBING . The United States hurled its heaviest aerial
punch of the war against Communist North Viet Nam Sunday with a
171-mission attack that ranged close to the Red China border,
U. S. spokesmen reported Monday.
Despite enemy antiaircraft fire and weather, spokesmen said all
planes returned safely to their bases. &
STILL PLOTTING . Ex-President Juan Bosch Monday warned
of revolutionary plotting in his country.
Saying There are persons thinking of overthrowing the govern government,
ment, government, Bosch told the armed forces they had more to lose than
anyone in the event of a coup.
Troops of the Inter-American Peace Force IAPF still in the coun country
try country will wipe out all vestige of Dominican military organization,
he said. We would lose, the little we have left of the republic,
he added.
CALL ANSWERED ... An estimated 25,000 Soviet youths pledged
publicly Sunday to answer North Viet Nams call for volunteers
in a. Red Square rally attended by Kremlin leaders and two foreign
Communist chiefs.
/
National
NEW TRIALS . Communist Chinas Red Guards were reported
Sunday to be launching a wave of kangaroo trials amid official ad admissions
missions admissions of rebeUion in the top echelons of the Communist party.
Travelers arriving here said blacklists of opponents of the regime
had been drawn up for rough justice in the show trials reminis reminiscent
cent reminiscent of those which swept the country more than a decade ago.
CLOTURE FILED . Democratic leader Mike Mansfield set in
motion Monday the Senates ponderous machinery for a vote Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday expected to send President Johnsons civil rights bill into
limbo.
Mansfield filed a cloture petition which, if adopted, would check
the listless filibuster that began last Tuesday against calling up
the Housepassed bill. But Mansfields move was expected to fail,
and the issue to be dropped by the end of this week.
RIGHTS VIOLATED . The Michigan Court of Appeals ruled Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday that a cemetery violated the civil rights law when it refused
burial of a Negro.
WALK CUT . Astronaut Richard F. Gordon cut his planned 155-
minute working walk in half today because he got so hot and
sweaty he couldnt see.
Pilot Conrad ordered Gordon in early from America's fourth
walk in space, which was designed to test how well men can work
in the cold
I just brought Dick back in, Conrad reported. He got so hot
and sweaty he couldnt S6O
It was the third straight spacewalk that failed to accomplish all
planned experiments.
IBM STOPS TRAFFIC . An IBM computer will soon take over
control of stop lights in San Jose.
The computer will reduce the number of stops 17 per cent and
the waiting time at stops 14 per cent.
!* Florida AlUgolnr rwarvoa ttw right to racdaia qm typographical tooo to rorioo or ton away copy which It conaldors ob)octloMblo.
MO POSITION K GUARANTEED, though rtoulroil poaltlon will bo glvofl atuani pouibl*.
no Florida Alligator will not consular ad)uotmota of payment tor aay adrortlsemaat lavolvtf* typo typographical
graphical typographical atrora or orrooooua Inaartloa unloao node* to £van to tho Advortlolag MaMgar within
(1) 000 doy adortloaoaiit appaara.
Tha Florida Alligator wUI not ba raapoaatta for nora than ana income! UMorttoa at aa advorUaanaot
achadriad to ran aavaral timaa. Notlcas tor oorractloo awt ba glraa balm mat laaartVw
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR la tha official atudsat awwopapar at tha Uriooratty of Florida and la
priMOhOd Bwa ttoaa except daring May, Jwaa, and July whoa g to ptgllriiil aaart-wwOkly. Owly
attar at g Udtad Stataa Foot Offlea at GataacoUla.

Georgia
Primary
Significant
ATLANTA (UPI) Georgia
Democrats go to the polls Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday for an historic primary
election.
In the past, victory in the Dem Democratic
ocratic Democratic primary was considered
election. But the Republican
party, led by Congressman
Howard Bo Callaway, has pro produced
duced produced a strange brand of voter
who votes in the Democratic pri primary
mary primary while fully intending to vote
for Callaway in the general elec election.
tion. election. There is no registration
by party in Georgia.
The race is basically a con contest
test contest between two racial mode moderates,
rates, moderates, former Gov. Ellis Arnall
and State Sen. Jimmy Carter,
and four old- line segregationists,
James Gray, Lester Maddox, for former
mer former Lt. Gov. Garland Byrd and
farmer Hoke OKelley.

Polar Bears And Pandas
Pose Perplexing Problems

MOSCOW (UPI) Chi Chi,
the lady panda from London, has
wound up a summer of peace peaceful
ful peaceful co-existence with An An,
the Russian boy panda.
But love failed to bloom and,
alas, no little pandas are in
sight, a Moscow Zoo spokesman
said today.
Chi Chi has eaten well and

Says Wage Bill Inflationary
GAINESVILLE (UPI) The minimum wage bill now pending in
Congress would be extremely inflationary, the executive vice
president of the Florida Farm Bureau Federation said Tuesday.
T. K. McClane said liberals in Congress are attempting to fed federalize
eralize federalize everything that hasnt already been federalized.
McClane said such a minimum wage bill would be a foot in the
door proposition that would eventually affect even the smallest
farmer.

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FLORIDA BRIEFS

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The Game and Fresh Water Fish Com.
mission said Tuesday two managed wild hog hunts will be held
this year on the Fisheating Creek wildlife management area in
Glades County.
Hie hunts were scheduled for Oct. 28-30 and Nov. 4-6.
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Republican gubernatorial candidate Claude
Kirk made a courtesy call" on Atty. Gen. Earl Faircloth Tues Tuesday.
day. Tuesday. The talk was mostly about fighting organized crime.
During past months Kirk has met briefly with all members of the
state Cabinet, starting with the Governor.
Kirk said he was showing more interest In law enforcement than
Robert King High is.
MIAMI (UPI) A troubled 15- year-old boy who was decorated
for bravery by President Johnson last year, was in Dade County
jail today, after turning himself in as an admitted arsonist. Theres
no room *at a hospital for him to be examined by psychiatrists.
Johnny Daniel Smith saved four Navy airmen last February when
their helicopter crashed into the harbor at Norfolk, Va., and the
citation which came with a medal from the President read For
great personal courage..

grown fat. The two bearlike black
and white animals--the only two
giant pandas in the world out outside
side outside their native Chinahave
sniffed at one another and ex exchanged
changed exchanged curious looks. But that
has been that, and prospects for
a mating are now extremely dim,
the zoo spokesman said.

Chi Chi may be going home
soon, but that is entirely up to
the officials of the London Zoo,
the spokesman added.
Chi Chi flew here March 11
to be An An's bride in what
would have been the Western
worlds first panda mating.
But the only attempt to mate
the pair resulted in a sparring
match March 31 and the two
pandas had to be separated by
attendants with brooms.

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| PATRONIZE ALLIGATOR ADVERTISERS \

Wednesday, September 14, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

British
Empire
Falling
By K. C. THALER
LONDON (UPI) -- Grudgingly
but realistically, Britons have
begun to envisage the possibili possibility
ty possibility of a collapse of the British
Commonwealth.
Those who consider the loose
alignment a substitute for a lost
empire which provides Britain
with world-wide stature and
trembling at the thought of its
possible disintegration and want
it averted, even at high cost.
But others who consider the
commonwealth a wholly inade inadequate
quate inadequate empire- substitute are get getting
ting getting ready to accept its disap disappearance.
pearance. disappearance. The end of the
commonwealth would be a pity,
they argue, but by no means a
disaster: it may even prove sal salutory
utory salutory to Britains problems in
the long run.
The issue was spotlighted by
a commonwealth leaders confer conference
ence conference in London and the rumblings
that preceded it.
The tensions within the com commonwealth,
monwealth, commonwealth, which have been rais raised
ed raised to a dangerous pitch by the
Rhodesia crisis, have pro progressively
gressively progressively weakened the eroding
The links which tied it more
closely at its inception have been
progressively loosened. Experts
predict a further decay because
of the increasing difficulty of sat satisfying
isfying satisfying the conflicting interests
of all its members white, Asian
and African.
Two influential voices have just
offered persuasive arguments
that the collapse of the one onetime
time onetime great institution would, in
effect, not matter all that much:
it might even help Britain.
One of Britains leading maga magazines,
zines, magazines, the Economist, contends
that in the past decade the com commonwealth
monwealth commonwealth probably has done
Britain more harm tl\an good.
It would be a great pity if it
were lost, but it is arguable
that not very much would be lost
now if the commonwealth were
to disintegrate, it said.
A stronger argument still has
come from the conservative
Spectator which is close to some
key members of the Conserva Conservative
tive Conservative shadow cabinet.
In its view Britain has every everything
thing everything to gain by allowing the com commonwealth
monwealth commonwealth to break up. Britain
would no longer be singled out
for Afro-Asian abuse; it would
not feel obliged to bribe recal recalcitrant
citrant recalcitrant members with open-ended
offers of aid, or to break sterl sterlings
ings sterlings back with a crippling sys system
tem system of international financial ar arrangements.
rangements. arrangements.
The left wing New Statesman,
on the other hand, considers the
commonwealth still as an insti institution
tution institution that continues to provide,
potentially at least, a world
role for Britain.
Whatever the final outcome,
British opinion is that the
commonwealth, to survive, will
have to change even considera considerably
bly considerably and adapt itself to a chang changing
ing changing world and its varying needs.
LOAN GUIDE
AVAILABLE
Need a Lift, a new guide for
scholarships, loans, and earnings
from part-time jobs is a new book booklet
let booklet that helps inform the student
where aid totaling over $2 billion
is to be found and how to get it.
The booklet is available for 25
cents from the American Legion,
Department S, P.O. Box 1055, In Indianapolis,
dianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana, 46206.

Page 3



Page 4

Tlie Florida Alligator, Wednesday, September 14, 1966

The Florida Alligator
A -MapvSj. It ChiVk^PklliThS.'
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR DICK DENNIS
- Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not necessarily reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is the editorial in the left
column.

Whose Dead Ball?
What had been a slippery political foot football
ball football for this summers Legislative Coun Council
cil Council turned out to be a dead ball on the
sidelines last week.
A bill was introduced into the Summer
Council to eliminate political considera consideration
tion consideration from bloc seating.
But the bill never received approval
or defeat in the Council. It was being
considered one of the most important
matters for the reconvening Council this
fall.
Summer Council members chose not to
attend meetings rather than vote against
the bill.
But last week Student Body President
Buddy Jacobs appointed an Advisory Com Committee
mittee Committee on Bloc Seating to ensure fair
bloc seating this season.
The first action of the committee --
meeting in secret -- was to provide
preferential seating for Blue Key.
We are only interested in doing what
is fair for the student body, said Scott
Bayman, Council majority leader and
member of Jacobs* committee.
Bayman told The Alligator Sunday it
would be useless for the Council to meet
more than once before the November
elections.
We dont have anything really im important
portant important enough to meet about, he said.
We think the 18,000 students receiving
poorer football seating at Blue Keys
expense ARE important enough.
Bloc seating has been unfair in the
past because it was handled in secret,
used for political favors and offered no
recourse to groups which continually re received
ceived received poor seating.
The Fair Bloc Seating Bill, which
the Council still is refusing to consider,
would eliminate these injustices.
We are only interested in doing what
is fair for the student body, Bayman
said.
Though Jacobs committee is apparent apparently
ly apparently acceptable to many Student Govern Government
ment Government leaders, it does NOT provide fair
bloc seating.
This committee is a poor substitute
for Council consideration of the Fair
Bloc Seating Bill.
We think the students are entitled to
know what their Council members think
about preferential seating.
A Council decision is certainly more
representative than one rendered by a
Student Body President who received lit little
tle little more than one-third of the total
vote 1 t Spring.
Must fair seating remain a dead ball
on the sidelines until the end of each
election?

\ Tl|Elpi%. '~ x l

The Sop with Camel

Due to a fire in my left wing
strut, I was buzzing low over cam campus
pus campus last Friday when I almost
ran into one of Floridas greatest
traditions, the Century Tower.
After having practically impaled
myself on this great tradition,
I thought that I had better re research
search research the subject to keep from
running into any more of them by
mistake.
There is Beta Woods, Sigma
Nu winning water basketball; Won Wonder
der Wonder Warthog; drinking on, around,
and under campus, and dirty rush
to list a few of the near greats.
But since the administration does
not recognize these traditions,
they cant be classified among the
great.
For to be truly great on this
campus, the tradition has to in involve
volve involve either student government
or the administration. Since nei neither
ther neither of these organizations recog recognizes
nizes recognizes the student body, it does doesnt
nt doesnt make any difference if the
students recognize their great
Florida traditions.
Take the Honor System. Most
people do. Without the Honor Sys System
tem System what would they do with the
student government committee
which places Honor Court trial
summary bulletins in those glass glasscovered,
covered, glasscovered, locked, bulletin boards
which are scattered in various
buildings?
Tigert likes the Honor System
because it gives them something
to brag about when they are off
at conventions drinking with other
college administrators. Sure we
have an honor system, just like
West Point or the Air Force Aca Academy.
demy. Academy. Its one of Floridas great greatest
est greatest traditions.
Graduate students wear socks
and ties. I asked a graduate stu student
dent student friend why he wore a tie.
He said because the law students
all wore ties. A junior bar-hoper
said that they all wore ties be because
cause because they thought of themselves
as graduate students, and because
it is one of Floridas greatest
traditions that graduate students
wear ties.
Another tradition which you may
not know about yet is the high highprofit
profit highprofit straw hat with the garish
orange band which student govern government
ment government sells. If they sell enough
of the hats, the university will
win the W.C. Fields Look Alike
Contest award.
Sidewalks bring to mind Plants
and Grounds and its traditional
chain of command. Two men to

By DOUG MOLITOR
Alligator Columnist

turn on the sprinklers, a third
to show his cohorts how to turn
on the sprinkler, another to su supervise,
pervise, supervise, and the most important
fifth man to check his watch so
that the sprinklers are turned on
just before classes are let out.
Keep those sidewalks well watered.
Harassment and low pay of the
faculty and staff is one of this
schools most publicized tra traditions
ditions traditions Currently the best example
is the exit of Dr. Martin from the
College of Engineering. Last
years mass evacuation of the phil philosophy
osophy philosophy department shows just how
far the school will go to preserve
the old educational traditions in
Gainesville.
All sing, where have all the his history
tory history professors gone?
Then there is the traditional bud budget
get budget approval by people whose ed educational
ucational educational background is not that
of the professionals who drew up
the budget.
The best laugh recently has been
heard from Matherly Hall as the
business-wise professors watch
the powers try to recruit a
vice-president. Business profs
seem to feel that a man who has
the responsibility of the vice vicepresident
president vicepresident should be offered a com competitive
petitive competitive salary, not one tradition traditionally
ally traditionally low. Since it took over a
year to find a new VP, the peo people
ple people who were offered the job seem seemed
ed seemed to think so too.
But then, if Florida paid ad administrators
ministrators administrators a salary equal to
that which they could command in
business, we would lose a great
deal of the cobweb of tradition
which surrounds our university.

'O
Florida Alligator Staff
MCK ARROYO CAROL HEFNER GENE NAIL
Photo Editor Society Editor Editorial Assistant
JO ANN LANGWORTHY TYLER TUCKER
General Assignment Editor Assistant Sports Editor
STAFF WRITERS -- Marti Cochran, Bob Beck, Barbara Frank,
Sue Froemke, Sharon Bauer, Barbara Gefen, Lin Johnson, Maury
Oiicker Harry Moore, Kathie Keim, Mike Barrel, Jean Mamlin,
Betty Diamond.
ASSISTANT EDITORS Judy Redfern, Dot Bell, Sherrie Bras Braswell,
well, Braswell, Tom Giliberti, Joe Torehia, Louis Nobo, Kathy Deagan,
Brenda Latt, Justine Hartman/ Aggie Fowles.
"V
In order to better cover campus events the Alligator uses
reporters from the School of Journalism and Communications.
Their bylines are followed by "Alligator Correspondent.

S.N.C.C.
Changes
Approach
By AL KUETTNER
United Press International
ATLANTA One morning last
week, Rep. Charles Weltner, a
liberal Georgia congressman who
has avoided saying unkind things
about the many civil rights or organizations
ganizations organizations active in his state, was
talking about a riot that had just
occurred in his home town of
Atlanta.
An organization known as the
Student Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee, a name so long that
people quickly shortened it to
SNICK, had been accused of
fermenting the trouble in a tense
Negro section.
They have that name wrong,
Welter said. Its not the Stu Student
dent Student Nonviolent Coordinating
committee. It's the non-student
violent coordinating committee.
Since its earliest days, SNICK
has been one of the most contro controversial
versial controversial of the civil rights groups.
What was its purpose? Who was
running it? Where did its money
come from? Those questions are
still being raised and more
searchingly than ever now that its
current leader, Stokely Carmich Carmichael,
ael, Carmichael, is in jail awaiting grand jury
action on riot charges in connec connection
tion connection with last Tuesdays trouble
here.
About the only thing many have
known for certain is that SNICK
is completely unorthodox in its
approach to the civil rights pro problem.
blem. problem. In the big civil rights pushes
in the South SNICK stood out froth
all the other participants. Bearded,
fiery-eyed youth clad in blue
jeans and jumpers; its girls as
militant as its men; all of them
ready to march at a moments
notice through the gauntlet of a
white mob or through the doors
of a jail. That was SNICK
and it became a formidable force.
In the swift pace of events,
SNICK at times has run ahead of
its own history so that its be beginnings
ginnings beginnings remain obscure in the
minds of many. Lets go back a
few years.
A little remembered fact about
this organization that has become
the black power wing of the ci civil
vil civil rights movement is that its
founder was Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr.
King met with about 130 Ne Negro
gro Negro and white students from all
over the South on Easter week weekend
end weekend of 1960 on the campus of
Shaw University in Raleigh, N.C.
There and then SNICK was born.
Even in that first meeting, there
was controversy and violent arg argument
ument argument over the course the fledg fledgling
ling fledgling new group should take. King
insisted that it proceed on non nonviolent
violent nonviolent lines and that is like the
way the name developed.
(See Part 2 tomorrow: S.N.C.C.
under Carmichael)



The Pros:
They Rule
Our Lives
By JIM CALLAHAN
Alligator Columnist
EDITOR'S NOTE: Jim Callahan,
lUC, will be a regular columnist
in the Alligator henceforth.
We, the UF students, are being
stepped on. Were being used as
pawns in the cute, little game of
student politics.
Our student offices arent being
used for student benefits, except,
of course, to get Blue Key pre preferential
ferential preferential bloc seating at football
games. Instead, these offices are
the stepping stones of the aspiring
young junior politician.
How much do they care about
what the voters want and need?
Find one on a weekend drunk,
then ask him, if you want the
truth. Youll probably find that
hes really more interested in how
nice it will look on his little list
of brownie points for future
reference.
The mark of the professional
politician abounds on this campus,
barring all those who seek office
on personal merit from success.
But its you and I who suffer
from this idea of immaculately
dressed young men, on their way
up, with their list of status sym symbols
bols symbols clutched in hot, little hands.
While the politico juniors are
climbing that ladder of glory and
achievement, theyre using us as
the rungs.
Do you like to play the goat,
to be taken advantage of and to
see offices used for personal gain?
Is it fun to be a part of some somebodys
bodys somebodys political record? Take a
look at the present Florida gover governors
nors governors cabinet and see if thats
not how it is. All but one mem member
ber member has a record which can be
traced back to the UF campus
where they began their careers as
students, active in games of poli politics.
tics. politics.
The trend to professional poli politicians
ticians politicians is a disturbing one, not
just on the college level, but on
the national scene also. A new
ruling class could easily develop,
once the point of no return is
passed. We would then be faced
with either monarchy or dicta dictatorship.
torship. dictatorship. Even now many elections
are won by the lesser of two
evils. Admittedly, the mores of
society are subject to change, but
only when need dictates. Our de democracy
mocracy democracy is based on the idea of
rule by the people, not by the
politicians.
There is no sound reason why
any of any profession, could not
administer a public office. He
would not be bound or swayed
by the outside associations ties,
influences and deals of the pro professional.
fessional. professional. He would, however, have
the problem of financial support
and outlay to a campaign for
major office.
The cost of winning is high,
especially when many politicians
literally buy votes. The Florida
gubernatorial campaign spending
record shows the emphasis on
spending. The record begins in
1952 and the costs have risen
phenomenally, with the number of
votes received directly propor proportional
tional proportional to the amount of money
spent. In four out of the five elec elections
tions elections since 1952, the winner was
the candidate who spent the most
money.
As UF students, we have a
choice: we can elect capable peo people
ple people who will work for us or we
may fo"ow the course now set,
and continue electing the pros.
And if we choose the latter
course, where will we be?

/nAKE thN fk w AN*
fFIFTH'\ V 9 i £jl
\toa~h6u?) w d
\oue|P
Snug RushW * A

OUR MAN HOPPE

Uncle Sam Needs You, Baby

By ART HdS>PE
Herewith is another unpublished
chapter from that invaluable re reference
ference reference work, A History of, the
World 1950 to 1999. This
chapter is entitled, Meeting the
Unmet Needs.
* *
In the United States, the pre presidential
sidential presidential election of 1976 shaped
up as another traditional battle
between the Democrats and Re Republicans.
publicans. Republicans. >
The Democrats as usual pointed
with pride to such programs as
Medicare, Denticare, Judicare,
Menticare, Pedicare and Opti-
Auri-Nasicare and said they had
met the needs of the people.
The Republicans as usual re retorted
torted retorted angrily that they, too, were
for these programs, were for
meeting the needs of the people
and were also for economy in gov government.
ernment. government.
Many voters saw little to choose
and pollsters, with a yawn, rated
the election a tossup.
It was at this point that Mr.
Rock Hunter, a middle-aged motion
picture star, announced his candi candidacy
dacy candidacy and unveiled a new program
that was to arouse America as
nothing ever had before.
It is true, said Mr. Hunter
at a dramatic press conference,
that the welfare state assures
that each of us gets enough med medicine,
icine, medicine, enough dentistry, enough
legal aid, enough mental health
and enough arch support. But what
of those of us who, through no
fault of our own, havent been
getting enough lately?
Enough what? asked a puz puzzled
zled puzzled reporter.
Mr. Hunter smiled his famous
warm and friendly smile. Love,
he said, simply. And with that
was launched the greatest welfare
program of them all Sexicare!
Do you realize, thundered Mr.
Hunter in speeches from coast to
coast, that two-thirds of our
nation goes to bed each night ill
content, under-loved and alone?
Surely, a government as prosper prosperous
ous prosperous as ours can take care of
those who are romantically dis disadvantaged,
advantaged, disadvantaged, emotionally deprived
Expenses
Rising
WASHINGTON (UPI) The Am American
erican American Council on Education re reports
ports reports that tuition costs at Amer Americas
icas Americas colleges have risen from an
average of about $320 a year in
1936 to about $1,500 this year
a five-fold increase in 30 years.
Room and board has gone up
during the same period from $407
to $941 a year.
lilwTnltySehooT
Gaineville's Oldest
24 S.E. Bth St. 376-7806
7:15 to 5:45 $27.50
mo J

and sexually underprivileged.
Sexicare immediately struck a
chord in Americas heart. With
every citizen inculcated from in infancy
fancy infancy by sexy movies, sexy books
and sexy commercials, it fulfilled
the greatest unmet need of all.
True, there was scattered op opposition.
position. opposition. The concept of more
sex was opposed by a coalition
of Southern Baptists and Play Playgirl
girl Playgirl Bunnies, though perhaps for
different reasons. And the anar anarchist-oriented
chist-oriented anarchist-oriented Sexual Freedom
League split down the middle, some
being for sex and some for free freedom.
dom. freedom.
But Mr. Hunter was elected in
a landslide. At his inauguration
he swore to set a glorious ex example
ample example for every American. Un Unfortunately,
fortunately, Unfortunately, he died three weeks
after taking office-- his last
words being enough is enough.
* *
He was replaced by the Vice
President, a dour New England
parson of 83 who had been selec selected
ted selected to balance the ticket. He promp promptly
tly promptly bolished Sexicare, along with
mini-shirts, mascara and drive drivein
in drivein movies. Sex once again be became
came became illicit.
Oddly enough there was little
protest. As a Young Socialist Lea Lea
Lea 0008 OOOOIGOO
mdecks
ARLINGTON, VERMONT
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KITS now / \
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INCLUDES:
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sorting rods, instructions, file box
Optional notcher $4.50
Refill packs (50 cards) $1.75
A LIFESAVER \ Undergraduates
FOR PEOPLE WHO / Faculty
ARE DROWNING } Students
IN THEIR OWN \ Administration
NOTES I Many Others
Self contained light simplemakes
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Saves 90% of time now spent search searching,
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EACH DECK DESIGNED FOR
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papers, theses and compiling lit literature.
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Study/Review Deck: for class work and
exam review for all course notes.
Research Deck: for research data in
sciences, arts, humanities.
Also ask about MEDICAL/SURGICAL
DECK: for medical students, house
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special coding system, rods, instruc instructions
tions instructions for recording personal clinical
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Campus Shop
And Bookstore
LOCATED IN STU. SERV. CTR.

Wednesday, September 14, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

gue recruiter confessed after being
caught chasing three Vassar girls
through Central Park: The wel welfare
fare welfare state may JjLll mans needs,
but individual initiative is sure
lots more fun.

(jO
3458 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Week WILL BE OPEN SUNDAYS
Days 11 am to 7 pm sat.
10 AM SERVING 11AM
to King Size Sandwiches & Salads to
12 PM Delicatessen Style 1 PM
EVER MET A PILOT?
A Different Breed
Confident, Unusual
Able To Leap Tall Buildings
In A Single Bound
MEET ONE IN YOUR MIRROR
t,
AFTER YOUR $5 INTRODUCTORY LESSON
WE GUARANTEE YOU'LL PASS
YOUR WRITTEN EXAM!
Special ground school class begins
Sept. 14. just 5 weeks youll
be ready to take the test. Enroll
when you take your introductory
flight lesson for $5.
MUNICIPAL AIRPORT WALDO RD.

PLAY
Duplicate Bridge
The University Bridge Club Meets:
Every Wednesday at the University
Inn.
Every Friday at the Hotel Thomas
7:30 p.m.
Everybody Welcome

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, September 14, 1966

ACCENT
Request
On Slate
A request of $5,000 for
ACCENT 67 will go to the Bud Budget
get Budget and Finance Committee of
the Legislative Council this
afternoon to round out its bud budget.
get. budget.
The extimated income through
January 31, including the $5,000
request totals $7,850.
The greatest expense for the
three-day series of lectures will
be $5,000 to bring nationally
known speakers to the UF cam campus,
pus, campus, according to ACCENT
Chairman Charles Shepherd.
Costs for the magazine which
will correspond to the program
of $994 will be supplemented by
the Alumni Association. The
association will devote a com complete
plete complete issue of Florida Alum Alumnus
nus Alumnus to ACCENT.
Facility costs, printing and
distribution, equipmental and in incidental
cidental incidental costs bring the program
expenses to $1,285.
Public relations, printing and
distribution costs, advertising
and office expenses will cost
$340.
Finance and general office ex expenses
penses expenses and incidental costs round
out the budget at S2OO.
Babysitters
In Demand
For Game
Anticipating a big demand for
babysitters for the football game
festivities, the University Baby Babysitting
sitting Babysitting Service needs babysitters
and people who want babysitters.
This is an excellent oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity for students to pick up
some extra money, Secretary
of Labor Lewis Miles said.
Prospective babysitters may
apply room 309 Florida Union
any afternoon, Monday through
Friday.
This service is provided for
members of the student body,
university faculty, and admin administrative
istrative administrative staff. To qualifity as
a babysitter, the applicant must
be a student. member of the uni university
versity university faculty or spouse or child
of a student of faculty member.
Those who wish babysitters
may contact the babysitting office
Monday through Friday, between
1 and 5 p.hn at ext 2547 or
2548.
According to Miles, the baby babysitting
sitting babysitting service is primarily to
assist university personnel in
obtaining babysitters and to help
create employment for students.
The babysitting office of the
Secretary of Labor, operates free
of charge, functioning only as
a clearing house.
The parent hires the babysitter
directly and the rate is set be between
tween between them. No guarantees as
to the actions and capabilities
of the babysitter are made to
the parent.
Donohue: Man
Os Many Ideas
Tim Donohue, 3LW, the new
Sec. of International Affairs
is a man with ideas.
Fresh from the Presidents
Retreat, Donohue is planning an
International Student Magazine
and revisions of the International
Student short loan program.
Born in San Antonio, Texas,
Donohue has traveled extensively
throughout the Far East and, for
-a while, lived in Havana, Cuba
where his father was a member
of the Diplomatic Corps.

A CHANCE,

Only 12 Show Up
At Jennings Coffee
By JANE ROSS
Alligator Staff Writer
Twelve people showed up Monday night at Jennings Hall to meet
and throw questions at Student Body President Buddy Jacobs and
his entire staff. Approximately 200 were expected.
The coffee, one of eight planned, was open to residents of Jennings
and Yulee areas and was to last from 7to 8 p.m. By 7:45 only
12 girls had shown up and puzzled SG officials wandered about,
speeches abandoned, talking to the few present.
According to SG Vice-President Fred Breeze, Students dont
have any questions yet -- its too early in the year.
Jacobs emphasized that his entire cabinet, the treasurer,
vice president, clerk of the Honor Court and presidential and
administrative aides had shown up.
Coffee was plentiful and the only thing absent was students.
Judy Miller, presidential aide, planned the meeting, which was
to explain the services that SG does that students arent aware
of. She cited the increased number of loans available to inter international
national international students and the greater participation of SG officials on
faculty-student committees.
Similar coffees are planned for Rawlings-Broward, Murphree,
Tolbert, Graham, Flavet HI and Diamond Village.
\^E£Corrw)unica-te?^^^Bi4

m '''^^ ## RECORD
E *1 #;,%#.v... # *&,-- j
V' a # E* # # Ep p -wv
# * # # s
T, ***** ***** in* ****** % *
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4 * ****#*** | * # 9
'
Despite
er| dish torture
-*' 'NsESI dynamic BiC Duo
v/^v^pEi writes first time,
vory time!
1 o,
* "V%
BiC V S rugged pair of Stick pens devised for them by sadistic students.
wins in unending war against Get kth BICS at your cam P us store now The bic
bail-point skip, clog and smear! I^2,
Despite horrible punishment by mad research important documents... like writing home for cash,
scientists, BIC still writes first time, every time. And no
wonder, hics Dyamite Hall is the hardest metal v /.tr n
made, encased in a solid brass nose cone. \Vill not skip, m M *yw WATERMAN-BIC PEN CORP.
clog or smear no matter what devilish abuse is jjip MILFORD, CONN.

CORRECTION.' you HAVEN'T V U6H /I [BRACE lSokl'u rW^TT
A CHANCE A6AINST THIS /BIG BALL j THIS > LOOKS HOLY It*S ALL
aauo '-^''.or.i>

niMMPR
UlixiNCn
;: 4 piiciv or a>tt ;!
.; rtiift cmcmn nns :
jyw k LAKCi OtOit Os
miKii ittis io
At_ !j *V VP 1 j
ji m l w| jj
;! SHAKES HAMBURGERS ONION RINGS !
;! 2029 N.W. 13 STREET ;j



SUPER DISCOUNT \ ( £
SAVINGS... YOULL \ SURTS
SUPER FIRST QUALITY S.p. 14
ALWAYS THE BEST FOR LESS 4tVM|k
HUMAN HAIR LOVING SECRET SPRAY HEAD 'N SHOULDERS
GILLETTE STAINLESS EYE LASHES HAIR COLOR DEODORANT SHAMPOO
RAZOR BADES Self-odhesive. f 39 Jmit 1 per cus- 2 per cus- BT L.m.t 1 per cus- B Mk
jm mg% trimmed. Mack M** W omer. Covers #U# tomer Long-last- tomer. 3.3 oz.
tomer 2 Sinless l9 or brown. I the gray. m ing, effective. J % of lotion.
steel. Pock of 15. I
NOXEMA OIIR OWN JJLF. JJLF. SM H SATIN MKRIN
SHAVE CREAM 100's ASPIRIN 1,000 SACCHARM HAND LOTION MOUIMUASN
UnM 2. 11-ex. Relieves keed- BA| Stock up now JJjJ,*
<-*"" f%ft tis.JSL.** |AfC E a4 c 2X JARc /7*
t ' v

Wednesday, September 14, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



love 0
Wvt in 9- e r,c ma,c ,in 9 pattern is e
12.95 Buckeye Aluminum MTyArA^J- osH e ,o X y rt.,7Z3tt
9-PC. TEFLON SET fV£l [ca
1 -qt. covered sauce pan, 2-qf. covered 77 w, heat Bre Vmirr lint Bi
sauce pan, 10 open fry pan, 5-qt. Dutch M UK
lion book. Du Pont's Teflon finish. T" r s*.
i|
yp ~ ""n "'
FIBERGLAS DRAPERIES 11
5 |J
DRAPERIES Swk
tt*win .- u, O*MM umJtmtm f **tiercurtaiii tiers valaece 1 /
far below Satin backing acts C A A A
i# as self fining, reflecting sun's rays, keep- ?<, n 8 fl
in, roc cooW. Ton pinch 28 48 27c A prs. # A , pleats per pair, bKfld stitched side hems. L_ ______J 66' W x 30 L .; 66 'W x 24" L 66" W x 36" L. Kitchen print on fTTEIM^
~. 4 Colors, white, champagne, gold, green. 66" W x 36" l i 94 Fiberglas* glass fiber Red or fM ' I [i L W
\ ng~* valance ji*4k fc ~ **
*:-- - Owens-Corning trademark for glass fiber.



y 7 98 Falcon Pattern Stainless Steel
iL wlffll'i FLATWARE
B Wf pa *J*PT I I 24-pc. tel consists of 6 hollow handled
~ 3 I I knives, 6 forks, 6 spoons and 6 tea £96
:p; i !, e ; i h .:r ony *** ffi 14.95 50-pc. set falcon pattern
I lm I STAINLESS STEEL FLATWARE 096
J s *'' l JtL C Mm I Consists of 8 ea.: dinner forks, solad forks, soup spoons, knives;
l *' l YOUR CHOKE sos MM H 1$ teaspoons; 1 sugar shell and butter knife.
i* s ***- *ofw w %0 %0 ll f
m mmJilj&r 8-OZ. MUG for coffee, tea, hot chocolate H^HllHS^iSSSSM&E&^^^^^^^H^'!!!!!!!!!*^!
Wf # SOUP/CEREAL BOWL for use at every meal ^^^^ sa m *S h^
-OZ. DESSERT CUP for jello to banana splits Se,i u m .,,.j
I COMMRAUE FRKES BASED ON CURRENT EQUIVALENT VALUiSg REGUUi Os ORIGINAL tow mttmun ,rcc
A 4M VtdnefnH of the Leom Melatkir Stain-Resistant(Maran teed I Yr.
Wm MELAMINE PINNERWARE
a news Bsasssaf
hsuuidumn' cg^^jjp^g^||^pg.
B ?r*"f *f*T OvPonl Docron* polvt.r pillow 45"PC* MELAMINE SET 9
iVrvT with corded edge. Extra plump. Stain resistant dinnerware in same patterns listed H
"* **' "* Floral print in pink, blue. above. 1-yr. guarantee. Chip and break resistant, H **9* Yjf 9
perfect for any dining occasion. Service for 8. '"
97e SET Os 2 __ ? 79c 5-TIER
si ACK HANGERS SKIRT HANGER SHOE TOTE JIM * Value station * V /
CO mMmp 148 tufted cns.tm* |
£ ASI ~. %A mmC I / V Sanforized? cotton denim
L Tf ?hfi WV pads with kapok fill. Choose
P" o"** 0 "** "ish. Grippers The best and only way Asserted colors and do- f \ Jr 01 ", coJors P fett >'
** clotbe. Irmly. I Bililgj/ to bold 10 skirts secwrelyl signs. With extra pocket. "" f floral P" n *-
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EMSMiin fttt 1409 N.W. 23rd BLVD. AT 13th ST. NEXT TO GANTRY PRIDE O I
h tjfejWPf* rar5 OPEN DAILY 9 TO 9 SUNDAYS 12 TO 7 I



Page 10

l TTie Florida Alligator, Wednesday, September 14, 1966

EH tyraa wzmjs mm zszsiz
|w ms srrKia
\ CO S!S ORLON SHELTEE
\ -£ l CARDIGANS fC
\ \ Long sleeve Orion I
1 4% |Y I sheltee
1 I gans have
1 bIMK 1 button
1 * < J Choose from
colors to go every
- outfit . from casual M/i 1
to dressy. Buy one, two
F66B*BOY
" i.Ti uai
7 ' JSytiEm #;f ,- \2
/s' Cotton Poor Boys have JwX 3 / / yfr
f\ f \ turtle necks, zipper backs. /: ¥/w l-tt' / T
Z Black, white, navy, berry, ml j Jjr
/
f
/ BP never need ironing! 1 4M lljip;
JjM Choose A-line no-waist 1
/ style, or straight-line 11 V W^Z
style with marshmallow | 1 % BBiiH j^HB
belt. Choose navy, l 1 fl
loden, brown, block or \ 1 50% Fortrel polyester, 50% cotton
berry. Sizes Bto 18 in V I slacks come m block, navy, loden, JB
HHMmiP proportioned lengths. I P* um P' nk blue, bone, berry. 8-18.
COMPAKAtU PUCB BASED 0M CURRENT IQUIVAIIHT VALUES, KGULAK Os OAtGtMAL LOW DISCOUNT PRICfS
-TTIBtSrfFIIMOTIBI ITT#! 1409 N.W. 23rd BLVD. AT 13th ST. NEXT TO PANTRY PRIDE |

A



5/ to 3,57 Famous Hit I
I LP. ALBUMS I
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o Strings on tho March Strings
gi iviiSi::
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Wednesday, September 14, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

~
mk ,4 m jf
*s!& vlvlrai^a
:
1 beL
- iinlwMpli
gig > H?
C&feV Jp"
. BWhi if
-HM|Mj|i^^_ ::
#/C£ TREES ' /CWs Wsfcon, a2 UC and Delta
Gamma from Pensacola, is today*s Gator Girl.
Kris enjoys watersports and loves football and
big weekends. After spending two years in Cai Cairo,
ro, Cairo, Egypt, Kris has decided that shed like to
travel.
34 UF Students Get
NASA Scholarships

Thirty-four graduate students
have been awarded National
Aeronautice and Space Adminis Administration
tration Administration training grants for work
in space-related sciences and
technology.
The latest grant for $217,800
was awarded in February. Un Under
der Under the NASA grant program,
students receive stipends of $2,
400 the first year and $3,000
the next two years.
STUDENTS AWARDED
GRANTS WERE: Eugene Ellis
Clark, Donald Arthur Dietrich,
Jay Dewey Doernbach, Allan Ray
Gaither, Tom Harvey Glenn,
David Lee Kingsbury, David Ed Edward
ward Edward Klett, James Judd McEn McEnnan,
nan, McEnnan, Joseph Wesley Philip, Fred Frederick
erick Frederick Eugene Riewe, Augustine

ij
|j Lost youp Contact? % jj
jj Qaton AOs make Contacts! ij

Samec, Robert Louis San Martin,
STUDENTS AWARDED TWO
YEAR GRANTS WERE: Stuart
C. Clough, Leon W Couch, n
Jerome L. Cross, Thomas Ed Edward
ward Edward Evans, William S. Ewing
Jr., Todd Allen Halpern, Bruce
B. Henriksen, Joseph E. Kouba,
Laurence J. Logue, Micheal K.
Rich, James Elza Swander, Ira
Thierer.
STUDENTS AWARDED ONE
YEAR GRANTS WERE: Thomas
W. Ellis, Ronald J. Jaszczak,
John Wayne Koger, Marvin A.
Pokrant, Roger C. Sanwald,
Frank J. Sodetz Jr., John Frank
Springer, Forest Alton Stevens
Jr., Charles Lee Watkins, Jo Joseph
seph Joseph B. Williams.

Page 11



IGATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
66 YAMAHA 50cc, still under
warranty, $210.00, save S4O on
this bike. Phone 378-6418 after
5 p.m. (A-9-3t-p).
i
*65 DUCATI 125 cc, under 2,000
miles, $290.00. Phone 376-3184.
(A-9-3t-p).
FOR SALE: Pure bred seal point
Siamese kittens 6 weeks old. Phone
372-1606. (A-9-3t-c).
"66 BRIDGESTONE 90cc, perfect
condition, low mileage, $395.00.
Now only $295.00. Call 372-5792
or see at 1411 N.W. sth Ave.
(A-9-3t-c).
FOR SALE: 1965 VESPA, excel excellant
lant excellant condition, only $200.00; up upright
right upright piano, best offer; small re refrigerator,
frigerator, refrigerator, 1 1/2 cubic feet, only
weighs 30 pounds. Ideal for room
renter or can be used in car on
trip. 378-4248. (A-9-3t-c).
FOR SALE: 1964 HONDA, 150 cc,
excellent condition with Buco hel helmet
met helmet and bubble sheild, $300.00.
Phone 372-8920. (A-9-2t-c).
1966 TRIUMPH 500 cc, 2 months
old, SBOO.OO, 378-4412 call after
5:30 p.m. (A-9-lt-c).
ELECTRIC GUITAR and amplifier,
$75. Phone 376-9545. (A-9-st-c).
FOR SALE: 55 Chevy, V-8, 2
door hardtop, engine good condi condition,
tion, condition, S3OO. 378-2259, ask for Tom.
(A-9-lt-c).
FOR SALE: Saris from India,
handwoven silk with gold and sil silver
ver silver thread. From S3O. 1724 N.E.
Bth St. (A-9- st-c).
1965 ALLSTATE scooter 125 cc
(Vespa) 2,000 miles, excellent con condition,
dition, condition, reasonable, Call 376-8067.
(A-9-ts-c).
1965 YAMAHA Cycfe, 55cc, $195.
Apt. Size refrigerator $35.00.4161
N.W. 7th St. after 5:30 p.m. (A-8-
3t-c). >
1909 TR3A $695. Top mechanical
condition. Red, wire wheels, R & H,
call: 372-1570. (A-6-ts-c).

ELIZABETH TAYLOR
RICHARD BURTON jHPHg
Who's Afraid OlkhE)
[Virginia Woolf?l^HHL
\ NO ONE UNDER 18 0.1 f. 4.35
\ ADMITTED WITH *!£
his parent 7.00 9:20
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T f HOW TO
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1 1:00 3:10 5:15 a million
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I
award
WINNER 1 i Wi |
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:l[ Best New Director!" H- Myj&s M
I

for sale
1962 WHITE OLDS F-85, Auto Automatic,
matic, Automatic, radio, heater, white walls,
skirts, utility seat covers. $795.
or best offer 378-4950. (A-9-3t-c).
MUST SELL 1965 Voice of Music
portable tape recorder. Hardly
used, call Sandy, 378-3003. (A (A--9-st-c).
-9-st-c). (A--9-st-c).
1965 VESPA motorscooter, less
than 1500 miles. Extra good con condition.
dition. condition. Call Monroe 372-9285, 785
North. (A-9-3t-p).
1961 TRIUMPH TR6 650 cc, good
condition, must sell, $490. Call
372-6793. 1817 S.E. 6th Ave. (A (A-9-3t-c).
9-3t-c). (A-9-3t-c).
200cc 1965 BULTACO Motorcy Motorcycle
cle Motorcycle scrambler. WANTED: Fe Female
male Female cook with kitchen. Yours
and my breakfasts, dinners week weekdays,
days, weekdays, I pay. Mike Schlosse 372-
9222. (A-9-3t-c).
TAPE RECORDER, Westinghouse,
Battery Operated, $25.00. 36
Electric range, $50.00. Phone 376-
4643 after 4 p.m. (A-8-st-c).
DINING ROOM TABLE and five
chairs, two T.V. tables, two
wrought iron end tables, easy
chair, all for $35.00. Phone after
6 p.m. 378-2418 or 378-5664. (A (A-8-3t-c).
8-3t-c). (A-8-3t-c).
APARTMENT SIZE refrigerator,
very good condition $40.00. Four
Burner gas range with oven, S4O,
Fold down divan, SIO.OO. 2 Steel
bedframes without legs including
1 mattress, SIO.OO. Phone 376-
6046. (A-7-st-c).
PRACTICALLY new Moped, 578
miles. Just broken in, perfect
condition, $125.00 Phone 372-
6115. (A-7-3t-c).
HONDA: Cycle, 90cc (1965) $l5O.
& payments. Call: 372-1909 City.
(A-7-3t-p).
Ti i ii iii .i i
3 BEDROOM Trailer, completely
furnished, air conditioned, wall to
wall carpet, appliances, TV, and
stereo, included. Pinehurst Trail Trailer
er Trailer Park. Call 372-1356. (A-2*-
tf-c}.

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, September 14, 1966

Page 12

for sale
NATIONAL 300 Receiver, $l5O.
Knight Kit T-60 transmitter, 60
watts, 6-80 meters, $35. Phone
372-2023. (A-6-st-c).
TRAILER with beautiful finished
cabana, air conditioned, wall to
wall carpeting, completely fur furnished.
nished. furnished. Glynnwood Trailer Park,
Phone 372-5540. (A-8-ts-c).
AIR CONDITIONERS SPECIAL
Cost plus 10%. Most sizes still
available. See Sudden Service Fuel
Oil Co. 907 SW 3rd St. or call
376-4404. (A-2-10t-c).
TWO BEDROOM house, completely
furnished, A/C. Outside city lim limits,
its, limits, perfect for student family.
$64.60 a month plm, down-pay down-payment.
ment. down-payment. Call 372-5511. (A-3-ts-c).
COMPLETE Public Address Sys System:
tem: System: Harmon-Carmen P.A. Amp.,
Shure microphone, stands included
S2OO. Utility Trailer completely
covered, 4x $75. Call: 454-1577.
(A-4-st-c).
for rent
MALES TO SHARE large house
Doubles $l3O. Trimester, util utilities
ities utilities furnished. One block from
campus. 1125 1/2 S.W. 4th Ave.
Call 378-3314. (B-8-3t-c).
WILLIS TON MOTEL: Rooms by
week or month. Single or double.
Students rates. Television and
daily maid service. Rooms avail available
able available for all University events. Sor Sorry
ry Sorry no phone calls. (B-3-10t-p).
FOR RENT: Room, S3O a month
all utilities furnished, maid ser service
vice service 5 days a week, 2 blocks from
campus. Phone 376-6983, 1128 N.
W. 4 Ave. (B-9-3t-c).
*
ROOMMATES Olympia Apts.
Central heat and air -two bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, living room, kitchenette,
$50.00, utilities included. Call 372-
8173 apt. 401. (B-8-2t-p).
SINGLE ROOMS for male students.
Cheap. See any afternoon between
5:30 8 p.m. JimHodgesl6o2 N.W.
Ist Ave., 376-9345. (B-6-10t-c).
1 MOO *
I
7:22 JwC l,:l7
PLUS
o FRANK SINATRA AT
L in M1
o "marriage on 9:23

for rent
FEMALE roommate to share two
bedroom, air conditioned apart apartment,
ment, apartment, 2 blocks from campus, $35.
month plus 1/3 of utilities. Own
room call 378-5445 or see at
1123 N.W. Ist PI. Apt. 10. (B (B--9-ts-c).
-9-ts-c). (B--9-ts-c).
WANTED: Male roommate to share
apartment. $35 a month plus 1/2
utilities. 912 S.W. 7th Ave. Apt. 4,
376-3442. (B-9-2t-p).
ONE GIRL to share two bedroom
apartment with three girls, Uni University
versity University Gardens. Call after 2 p.m.
378-5730. (B-9-3t-c).
A/C Furnished Apt., 3 blocks from
Campus $62.50. A/C Private Room
with Refrigerator $40.00. Call
372-8840 or 378-3166. (B-4-ts-c),
MALE Roommate wanted to share
large one room apartment. Private
entrance, private bath, $35 a
month. 376-6651 or see at 1740
N.W. 7th Ave. (B-9-2t-p).
WANTED female roommate, art or
interior design major preferred
to share studio-apartment, S4O
plus 1/2 utilities. Paula 376-2361,
ext. 2601 or 376-1231. (B-9-st-c).
-.- - --
VACANCY for male student in
double room, A/C, 3 blocks from
campus, 327 N.W. 15th Terr. Call
372-8929 after 3 p.m. (B-9-2t-p).
OFFICE SPACE 1/2 block from
central portion of campus on W.
Univ. Ave. For more information,
apply 1702 W. Univ. (B-5-st-c).
COMMUTING STUDENT. Students
with noisey children or others
who might need a private 1-room
cabin near campus to study in,
call 376-3012. (B-5-st-c).
NEW FURNISHED Apt. Studio BR
with living room, kitchen 10 miles
S. of Univ. Preference to advanced
art or architecture student. $75
mo. Act. Center 466-3459 or 372-
4979. (B-5-st-c).
1 BEDROOM, apartment, twinbeds,
Air conditioned Downstairs, wall
to wall carpeting, 3 years old,
private patio. Phone 376-3179 or
372-0565. (B-7-3t-c).

| TeHpliii 378-2434 ) a t 1:00-2:40-4:25
*. ,J _:
m hidfonda!

help wanted
STUDENT who is handy with tools
to work part-time in exchange for
room rent. Call 376-3012. (E-5-
st-c).
PART-TIME secretary for Jew Jewish
ish Jewish Center office Monday-'Hiurs Monday-'Hiursday
day Monday-'Hiursday afternoons and Sunday morn.
Call Mrs. Alvin Bobroff, 372-
4070. (E-8-st-c).
FEMALE HELP WANTED:Student
with art or music training to work
part-time in Nursery school. Call
Dorothy Browning, 372-2981 for
interview. (E-9-st-c).
LIFEGUARDS for Wauberg: Life Lifeguard
guard Lifeguard to work Tuesday, Wednes Wednesday,
day, Wednesday, and Friday from noon to
6:30 p.m. Must have Sr. Life Lifesaving
saving Lifesaving certificate and have aver average
age average grades of 2.0. Call Mr. Scott,
466-3171. (E-9-3t-c).
HELP WANTED: Reliable sitter,
male or female for two children
of graduate student on Tuesday
and Thurdays, 3-6 p.m. Some even evenings
ings evenings need own transportation. 376-
0203. (E-9-3t-c).
FEMALE: Full and Part-time
opening for young ladies. No
experience necessary. Good hourly
pay. Ideal for student wife. Apply:
Kings Food Hosts, 1430 SW 13th
St. (E-4-ts-c).
PROCTORS: Male and female
graduate students or mature
upperclassmen for private prep
school in Ocala. Room and board
plus monthly remuneration. At Attractive
tractive Attractive opportunity. Call 372-7012
Friday, after 7 p.m., all day
Saturday. (E-6-tf-nc).
PJFmW show
WTilTj4lM A EVERY
h.w. ilit st.
DOUBLE COT.OR SHOW
JERRY LEWK^^n
Russell



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

help wanted
MALE: Have various full ahd
part-time jobs. Good hourly pay.
Work arranged to fit class sche sche
sche dule. Apply Kings Food Hosts,
11430 SW 13th St. (E-4-ts-c).
PART-TIME help to put up hay
land fencing. Horses for rent. Horse
I Haven Riding School, Newberry
I Road. 376-3494. (E-7-3t-c).
I jr jrlost-found
lost-found jrlost-found
LOST: One pair of womens pre prescription
scription prescription sunglasses. The inscrip inscription
tion inscription John R. Keene, O.D. is print printed
ed printed on the case. Phone: 378-6492.
(L-7-3t-c).
LOST: Miami Norland Senior High
Class ring 1966. Lost in Walker
area Tuesday. If found, call Ei Eileen,
leen, Eileen, Jennings Hall, 1409. Re Reward.
ward. Reward. (L-8-2t-c).
LOST Brown plastic case with
Student Publications papers in it.
Please return to Florida Union,
room 9 or call 376-3261 ext.
2832. (L-9-3t-nc).
LOST: Mans watch, silver band,
Joel 1961 engraved on back, re reward,
ward, reward, call 378-1181 or 372-9260.
(L-9-3t-c).
personal
VISIT GATOR GROOMER where
romance blooms. Next door to
University P.O. Self-service and
professional laundry and dry
cleaning. (J-3-ts-c).

IYOUR U HEEIS i|
Momjmm
NO MORE WAITINGir
Still Some One Bedroom Apartments Left I
HH --- ?- ? H
I MOVE IN IMMEDIATELY! I
g|| r \
I CALL 376-6720 700 SW 16th AVE. I
- \ -. ; \

I wanted j
HOME FOR 4 month white kitten
with pink nose, ears and feet. Pre Preferably
ferably Preferably girls, scratch post, nail
clipper included, call for Frog
376-4482 or 376-4483. (C-9-2t-c).
MALE ROOMMATE to share ex expenses.
penses. expenses. S4O per month. A/C, pool,
near campus. Phone: 378-5146.
(C-7-3t-c).
MALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share new A/C apt. in Summit
House, 1700 SW 16th Court. Sorry,
no phone yet. Please come by
apt., D-25. (C-6-st-c).
WANTED MALE ROOMATE FOR
COLONIAL MANOR APT. FOR
.INFORMATION CALL 378-6265.
(C-8-3t-p).
/
*'
FEMALE Roommate to share one
bedroom apartment at Lakeshore
Towers, Kitchen, Large Living-
Air Conditioned, pool. SBO
per month. Call 378-3875. (C-7-
3t-c).
LPN needed to care for elderly
lady in the home. 11 p.m. -7
a.m. shift. Near campus. Call
376-1330 after 5:30 p.m. (C (C---5-ts-c).
--5-ts-c). (C---5-ts-c).
GIRL TO SHARE one BR Apt.
beside pool of Univ. Garden, $l3O/
by two plus 1/2 food, 1/2 elec electricity.
tricity. electricity. 706 SW 16th Ave. Apt.
111. No phone yet. (C-5-ts-c).

Wednesday, September 14, 1966, The Florida Alligator.

i
services
NURSERY. Complete central heat heating
ing heating and air conditioning. Separate
infant dept. 3 age groups. Pre Preschool
school Preschool training. Phone 376-0917
daytime, 372-4021 nighttime. (M (M---f2-20t-c).
--f2-20t-c). (M---f2-20t-c).
HOLIDAY MAGIC Cosmetics, Inc.
A dynamic new firm is seeking
campus representatives eager to
earn S3O to S2OO per month. Call
Jerry Walker, Sunday through
Thursday evenings after 6:30 at
378-4257. (M-7-3t-c).
_ r
TENA WELCOMES YOU Students
back and to let you know she is
still at Miladys Beauty Salon,
517 W. Univ. Ave. Her specialty
is FROSTING for average length
hair. $12.50. Limited time, by
appointment only. 376-3802. (M-2-
12t- c).
TAILORING 35 years experi experience
ence experience in alterations of all kinds
of mens and womens clothing.
Prices reasonable, contact Mrs.
Dora Manookian. Phone 376-1794.
(M-8-st-c).
IN A HURRY? Passport and appli application
cation application photos. Childrens photos,
commercials, and special pro problems.
blems. problems. Call Westley-Roosevelt
Studios, 372-0300. (M-2-ts-c).
TEDDY BEAR Nursery open for
game Sat., call for reservations.
Phone 376-0917 day or 372-4021.
(M-9-3t-c).

Page 13

f
services
GET ACQUAINTED Special Miss
Kathy, hair stylist from Richmond,
Va. will give free hair cuts with
regular price shampoos and sets.
$35 factory price permanent and
wave for sls. Call 372-5549. Rame
Hair Stylist, 319 W. Univ. Ave. (M (M---5-3t-c).
--5-3t-c). (M---5-3t-c).
FOUND CAR CERTIFICATE OF
TITLE upon payment of ad in
Alligator, owner will be given
title. (M-9-tf-nc).
CHILD CARE Expert care in
private home for toddlers and
pre-school children. Large fenced
yard and lots of inside play area.
376-6512. (M-9-3t-c).
BEGINNERS KNITTING class, 6
week course begins Sept. 15, 7:30
to 9:30 p.m. Ann Knitting Corner,
378-3000, $6 includes materials,
registration limited. (M-9-2t-c).
GET ACQUAINTED Special --
Miss Kathy, hair stylist from Rich Richmond,
mond, Richmond, Va. will give free hair
cuts with regular price shampoos
and sets. $35 factory price per permanent
manent permanent and wave for sls. Call
372-5549. Rame Hair Stylist, 319
W. Univ. Ave. (M-9-st-c).
CLASSICAL and Flamenco Guitar
Lessons, Afternoon and Evenings,
Call 378-6024. (M-9-10t-p).

services
ARE YOU one of the formaly mar married
ried married with children? We are having
a get together this Thursday, for
details call 376-4010, 372-6682,
378-3575 or 376-3851. (M-9-2t-c).
DO IRONING in my home, $.lO
per shirt, $.13 long sleeve. Health
Center, ext. 5745. (M-9-3t-c).
situations
wanted
WHITE housewife would like 1/2
or full days work, will cook, iron,
sew and clean. Phone. 372-5269
after 4:30 p.m. (F-9-st-c).
autos
1960 CORVAIR, R&H, WSW. 1960
Johnson outboard with cruise tank.
Both excellent condition. Best
offer. Evenings 372-3975. Days
376-3261, ext. 2446, ask for Joan.
(G-5-st-c).
l&flfM*
B ads \ S 1
g REACH li
SI PEOPLE If T
BB\z k>Hii
fi! UNIV. EX- 2832 I W



Page 14

t, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, September 14, 1966

Orange

Campus Calendar

Administrative Notices To Students, Faculty Sc Staff

I D PHOTOS: Students who have not had photo photographs
graphs photographs taken for identification cards may do so
Thursday, Sept. 15, 8 a.m. 5 p.m. in the base basement
ment basement of Florida Gymnasium. I D cards may be
picked up at this time. NO I D CARDS WILL BE
MAILED TO STUDENTS.
PRE-MED AND PRE-DENT STUDENTS: Register
with the Pre-Professional Counseling Office, 111
Anderson, Sept. 14-23 so your instructors can eval evaluate
uate evaluate you. Please know your instructors name and
your section number.

r MONTHLY DEPOSITS ARE NO LONGER LIMITED IN YOUR CREDITUNION^^I
I- Dividend Rate Building j Radioed No Increase I
I SVa% Serving Uof F Employees Since 1935 I
I Paid Semiannually Gainesville Florida Campus Fede|al Credit Union Loans!!!

Wednesday,
September 14

Benton Engineering Council: Meet Meeting,
ing, Meeting, 319 ENG, 7 p.m.
Lutheran Student Association:
Have brown I.D.s into Dons
box today for bloc seating.
Arts & Science Dames: Get ac acquainted
quainted acquainted meeting, home of Mrs.
Ernest Barteley, 1050 S.W. 11
Stree, 8 p.rii.
Florida Players: Production Meet Meeting,
ing, Meeting, Norman Aud., 7:30 p.m.
High Holiday Services: MSB Aud.,
7 p.m.
Print Sale & Exhibit: FLU Social
Room, 1 p.m. 9 p.m. Max Maximum
imum Maximum prices for prints is $.2-
98. Open to public. Admission
free. ?*
WRUF-FM: Auditions for an announcer,
nouncer, announcer, 4th Floor Stadium, 7:-
30 p.m. No previous experience
necessary.
Agricultural Science Dames:
Meeting, University Womens
Club, 8 p.m.
Young Democrats Club: Organi Organizational
zational Organizational meeting, 121 FLU, 7:-
15 p.m. Everyone is invited.
Student Agricultural Council:
Meeting, 130 McC, 5 p.m.
AIA Film Series: Frank Lloyd
Wright, 105-B AFA, 8 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House: Talent
auditions, 1826 West University
Ave. 8:30 p.m. Anyone inter interested
ested interested in helping out in some
way or other than * talent (wait (waitress,
ress, (waitress, emcee, etc.) is invited.
Free coffee.

STATE TEACHING SCHOLARSHIP EXAM: Applica Applications
tions Applications for State Teaching Scholarship examinations
are available through Sept. 15, in the undergraduate
office of the College of Education, Room 124, Nor Norman
man Norman Hall. Examinations will be given Oct. 11,
1966, 9-11 a.m. You should report by 8:30 a.m.
Place of the examination will be announced later.
Qenexal Notices
CAMP WAUBURG OPEN: Camp Wauburg is now
open 12 noon to 6:30 p.m. daily, except Mondays
when it is closed all day. Students will be admitted
by identification cards. Faculty and staff may pur purchase
chase purchase tickets at 108 Florida Union or at Camp
Wauburg.

ani BLUE BULLETIN

' ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE,
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE, CAMPUS

Thursday,
September 15

Judo Club: Meeting, South end of
the Gym floor, 4:30-6:30 p.m.
U of F Handball Club: Initial
Meeting, Handball Courts, 7:30
p.m. Open to students & facul faculty,
ty, faculty, beginners and experienced.
High Holiday Services, MSB Aud.,
9 a.m. 2 p.m.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellow Fellowship:
ship: Fellowship: Open house, Johnson
Lounge, 7:30 p.m.
Student Peace Union: Lecture,
Franz J. T. Lee, McC Aud.,
8 p.m.
AIA Film Series: Frank Lloyd
Wright," j 105-B AFA, 3:40 p.m.
Wrestling Club, South end of the
Gym floor, 4 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi: Rush Smoker,
M-112 MSB, 7 p.m.
Painting for Fun: Oils," 215
FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Print Sale & Exhibit: FLU Social
Room, 1-9 p.m.
Young Republican Club: Group
Meeting, 218 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club: 121 FLU, 7:-
30 p.m. Everyone welcome, no
experience necessary.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellow Fellowship:
ship: Fellowship: Prayer Meetings, 4th floor
of the library every Monday
and Thursday, 5 p.m.

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY: Monday, Sept. 19
is the deadline for admission candidacy for
December graduation.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAM: Spanish reading
knowledge examination and all functional examinations
will be given on Saturday, Sept. 17, 18 Anderson Hall,
10 a.m. to 12 noon.
RESEARCH ASSISTANT: Senior chemistry student
or equivalent wanted to assist in research. Contact
Student Employment Office, 124 Tigert.



t HOMECOMING FOE

Auburn Adopts Pro Style

By DAVID MOFFITT
UPI Sports Writer
AUBURN, Ala. Theyre
rowing out the three yards
d a cloud of dust offense at
ubum this year and coming out
rowing.
I We will use a pro-type of-
Inse more than we ever have at
uburn, said coach Shug Jordan.
IWe want to spread out more and
pen out our opponents defenses
I little bit. We feel we have to
row the football
I Jordan has good reasons: He
loesnt feel he has the horses to
I)lay a running game and, more
Important, he fears that the
Tigers inexperienced defense may
ie vulnerable.
We have a fine, extablished
offensive line, said Jordan, but
were untried amateurs on defense
from end to end.
This new offensive policy at
Auburn places a lot of respon responsibility
sibility responsibility on a pair of sophomore
halfbacks-probable starter Larry
Blakeney and Loran Carter.
Were naturally concerned
about the fact that our quarterbacks
are sophomores, Jordan said.
But Blakeney doesnt worry about
his mistakes and bounces right
back. He has the flair for what
we want to do this year. We are
confident about our receivers.
Blakeney, who weighs 190 but
stands only 5-foot-11, said he pre prefers
fers prefers to sprint out on pass pat patterns
terns patterns rather than drop back be because
cause because I lack the height and can
see my receivers better.
Auburn has two experienced
quarterbacks in camp. One, Tom
Bryan, was switched to fullback
late last season and is the lead leading
ing leading returning rusher in the South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference.
The other is Joe Campbell whom
Jordan describes as a steady
senior who lacks the flair of our
two sophomores.
Bryan explained he had to switch
to fullback because I wasnt as
good a quarterback as graduated
Alex Bowden. If I wanted to be
on the first team, I had to find
another position.

KARATE .
The UF Karate did) has begun
its fall instruction. The deadline
for any new students interested in
karate is Sept 20.
No experience is necessary for
new members and there is no
charge for instruction. Those in interested
terested interested should meet on the gym
floor (east) on Tuesday or Thurs Thursday
day Thursday from 5-7 p.m., on Saturday
from 10-12 a.m., or contact the
intramural athletic department
* *
SAILING .
The UF Sailing club invites all
interested students to Its weekly
meeting Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in
Florida Union room 121.
This week the club is partici participating
pating participating in the Florida Champs Re Regatta
gatta Regatta at FSU.
'V L-
* *
handball...
The first meeting of the UF
Handball club will be Thursday
at 7:30 p.m. on the handball courts
idelity
376-1208

Bryan, who almost quit foot football
ball football his freshman year but was
talked into continuing by Vince
Dooley, now Georgia head coach
but then Auburn freshman coach,
was the third leading rusher in
the SEC last fall with 561 yards.
The two men who gained more,
Steve Bowman of Alabama and Rod Rodger
ger Rodger Bird of Kentucky, are gone.
Mike Perillard and Richard
Plagge, the No. 1 and No. 3
Auburn runners last year, also re return.
turn. return. While Perillard will start
at wingback, Plagge has lost his
job to Dwight Hurston, a 180-
pound sophomore from Bremen,
Ga.
Jordan feels the Tigers have a
pair of outstanding ends in sen senior
ior senior Scotty Long and junior Fred Freddie
die Freddie Hyatt. Both are 6-3 and well
over 200 pounds. But the best
athletes in that offensive line are
probably center Forrest Blue and
big tackle Bill Braswell who mis missed
sed missed eight games last season be because
cause because of a knee injury.
y
-TOM BRYAN
. . was quarterback
Jordan does not believe that Au Auburn
burn Auburn is as good this year as
last when the Tigers had a 6-4
record and finished second in the
conference.

The Huddle

adjacent to Murphree area. Those
interested should wear athletic
dress to the meeting.
The club is open to students
and faculty, beginners and experi experienced
enced experienced players. Those unable to
attend should contact club advisor,
Bill Benz, Room 134 Florida Gym.
a
* *
FENCING .
Fencing eld) president Joe Se Sesak
sak Sesak invites all interested students
to an organizational meeting Fri Friday
day Friday at 5 p.m. in Norman Ball
Gym. ah past members and ex experienced
perienced experienced fencers are Invited.
Registration for beginners and
advanced students will begin next
week. The time and dates of the
lessons will be announced following
the Friday meeting.

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There were times last year
when Auburn might have won from
most teams, he said. Weshould
be more consistant in 1966 but
I doubt well reach some of last
years Wights
ALLIGATOR
S
P
O
R
T
S

Wednesday, September 14, 1966

Page 15

i i
Bear Optimistic
TUSCALOOSA, Als. (UPI)
Alabama coach Paul Bear Bry Bryant
ant Bryant agrees with his devoted fol followers
lowers followers that the Crimson Tide
should definitely be a contender
for the national college football
crown this fall but he urges
caution.
Someone falls on their face
every year, warns the Bear.
We are optimistic around
here andl just hope it doesnt hap happen
pen happen to us.
Ttiere are no crying towels
here. Winning national titles is
becoming a tradition at Alabama
and just about every poll picks
the Crimson Tide this year.
I'd rather be picked last and
wind up No. 1, said Bama
split end Ray Perkins. But it
wont bother us, we've been un under
der under pressure before.
Defensively, we should be
quite a bit deeper than a year
ago and I will be disappointed
if we are not sounder, Bryant
said. We are sure as heck go going
ing going to try to win it the national
title, but like I said, someone
always falls on their face.
We still have not cleared up
all of our problems on offense,
Bryant said. We've got back backfield
field backfield depth and a good interior
line. But the center and full fullback
back fullback situation are not cleared
up. Stabler should be outstand outstanding
ing outstanding but hes untested.
Our kids know something a about
bout about winning and they have a win winning
ning winning attitude. We are trigger and
deeper than last year. It remains
to be seen whether we will have
the leadership we had last year.

Dietzel Returns

By BUDDY MARTIN
TODAY Sports Editor
BATON ROUGE ~ Paul Diet Dietzels
zels Dietzels homecoming to Baton Rouge
Sept. 17 is being paralleled, in
biblical terms to the return of
the prodigal son.
It may be more like Daniels
trip into the lions den t though,
when the former LSU coach
brings his South Carolina team
here to face his exassistants
club.
i v - iiii nr
I ''ijK
mMmSjfc: ' W&m
&
PAUL DIETZEL
. . now Gamecock
Only make that Tigers.
Conceivably, Saturdays LSU-
South Caroline game could be the
most important of Charley Mc-
Clendons coaching career.
Louisiana folks make it ob obvious
vious obvious on the billboards and the
newspapers with reminders like:
**lts only seven days until 15-
Day.
Waiting For Revenge
It is entirely possible that
Dietzels unpopularity in Baton

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Rouge has reached the magni magnitude
tude magnitude of the esteem LSU suppor supporters
ters supporters held for him when the Ti Tigers
gers Tigers won the national champion championship
ship championship in 1961.
Loulsianans felt they were
cheated when Dietzel broke his
contract and departed for Army.
They aim to get even.
Though McClendon has tried to
minimize the LSU vs. Dietzel
aspect and point out that the Ti Tigers
gers Tigers are playing South Carolina,
not one man, he obviously has
failed.
1 have a great regard for coach
Dietzel, McClendon said. I
just hope I dont change my
tactics. We expect him to do
something like bringing his team
out on the field at the same time
we do.
If I were Dietzel, I'd try to
build things up as much as I
could.
If thats Dietzels theory,
hes succeeding. Already a con controversial
troversial controversial figure, he has been
known to pull such unorthodox
stunts as having his Army team
wear white shoes.
One-Man Opponent
LSU players arent sure what
to expect. Most of them never
knew Dietzel. Guard Mike Duhon
is an exception. He was recruit recruited
ed recruited by Dietzel.
I have a high regard for coach
Dietzel, Duhon said. Yes, Ive
followed his career. Then he
smiled
LSU players say theyre play playing
ing playing South Carolina, not Dietzel.
But they say it with all the sin sincerity
cerity sincerity of a young kid going into
a cookie jar and repeating,
Moromie says Im not supposed
to do this.
Rest assured that Dietzel, the
psychologist, will come up with
something. Hed better.



Page 16

;, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, September 14, 1966

OR, WHAT HAPPENED TO ALABAMA

Alachua Big Time

In any college football town
where the team has any chance
for a reasonably good season, the
more ardent fans are sure to be
screaming something like:
Were No. 1.
Gainesville is, of course, no ex exception.
ception. exception. But the Gators have ne ....
really come close to the top, and
the townspeople have not had much
to shout aboutuntil last Sunday.
Through a misprint in the
Gainesville Sun, the people had
something to shout, or least laugh
about.
The local newspaper ran an
Associated Press pre-season foot football
ball football pool which ranked the top
teams in the nation. At the top
of the box, for all to see, it
read: No. 1 ALACHUA.
This may be the last time a
Gainesville college makes the top
spot for many years, or at least
until Jackie Eckdahl and Larry
Smith play on the same team.
Naturally, the No. 1 rating should
have gone to Alabama. Not sur surprisingly,
prisingly, surprisingly, when the final poll was
taken at the end of the 1965 sea season
son season in January, it was Alabama
who ruled the roost. Alabama Head
Coach Paul Bear Bryant is gun gunning
ning gunning for his third straight national
championship.
The success story of the Bear
is not a pretty, pleasant, or whole wholesome
some wholesome one. His questionable tactics
have served him well in Alabama,
but only because the southern uni university
versity university had little to offer else elsewhere
where elsewhere in the sports field.
Bryant left the University of
Kentucky in 1953, partially, if not
primarily, because he was not the

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most important man on campus.
The Baron, Adolph Rupp, was
the King, and is still in resi residence
dence residence in the Bluegrass State.
Bryants Tide is an over overwhelming
whelming overwhelming choice to roll over all
Southeastern Conference opposi opposition,
tion, opposition, since it returns 34 of 44
lettermen. The two main depart departees,
ees, departees, Steve Sloan and Steve Bow Bowman,
man, Bowman, have not carried the Bryant
stamp of greatness into the pro
ranks. Sloan is second-string
signal caller on the first-year
Falcons, and Bowman has already
been cut.
If ones conscience wont let
you root for Bear Bryant, where
can you turn? Perhaps to a team
that is also driven with emotienj emotienjbut
but emotienjbut this time with a feeling of
love and understanding, not fear
and hatred. Bryants players learn
to hate his guts, and only later
do they see how hes turned them
into hardened, unfeeling Southern
gentlemen.
On the other hand, the Univer University
sity University of Tennessee has a lot to
remember. Last years team
caught the fancy of the Southland,
even those who werent sports
fans, and took the measure of
teams all over the nation.
Bouncing back from the loss of
three assistant grid coaches in

DICK DENNIS

SPORTS EDITOR

two freak accidents (one of them
at the Gainesville airport), the
Vols tied Alabama, beat Rose Bowl
champion UCLA, and whipped Tul Tulsa
sa Tulsa to win the Bluebonnet Bowl
by a wide margin.
The Vols seemed to grow strong stronger
er stronger week by week, and wound up
with a mark of 8-2-1. This was
a team that rose above its sor sorrow,
row, sorrow, a team driven with a mis mission
sion mission of faithfulness.
Like Alabama, Coach Doug Dic Dickey,
key, Dickey, former Gator grid great, has
a quarterback problem. But Dic Dickey
key Dickey has a problem many other
coaches would love to have. Both
Dewey Warren and Charley Fulton
have proven to be leaders.
Tragedy struck at Tennessee
again this summer when lineback linebacker
er linebacker Tom Fisher, an All-America
hopeful, died. However, who can
say that Tennessee wont bounce
up off the floor and have an another
other another great season.
Tennessee and Alabama play
each other, and Florida plays nei neither.
ther. neither. This could give the Gators
the needed break. If Florida does
win the SEC crown, I know who
Id root for to finish second.


j; 'yEJ
I
WOODY CAMPBELL

Three To Beat Cats
Head Coach Ray Graves listed speed, hot weather and homefield
Tuesday as Floridas advantages, but then added, it will take
three touchdowns to beat Northwestern Saturday.
It seems the Gator team lacks two other ingredients experi experience
ence experience and weight.
Were still a young team and the Wildcats out-weigh us almost
30 pounds a man, said Graves. The mentor added, Were defin definitely
itely definitely going to have to have more pursuit, and desire to win.
Before meeting Northwestern in last years battle, Coach Graves
had commented it would take three touchdowns to win it did!
The Gators vwhs 24-14.
This is a much improved Northwestern team, said Graves
during a break in practice. Theyve sharpened both their run running
ning running and passing attacks.
The coach continued, Im well aware the end sweep weve been
practicing against wont look like the one we face Saturday.
Northwestern has bulldozer Bob McKelvey, a 222-pound full fullback.
back. fullback. He scored twice against Florida last year. Fleet Floridian
Woody Campbell complements him at halfback.
Lack of injuries is another attribute of the Florida team.
The team is in good physical condition, said Graves. We
have the fewest injuries for a starting game since I ve been here.
The head coach reported that Tom Hungerbuler and Dan Manry,
both defensive secondary men, will be ready for Saturdays game.
Tuesday marked the Gators last hard practice day before
meeting Northwestern. They worked on pass protection, goal line
offense and all phases of their kicking game.

1 pfe&ig v i- -.' &*''- ?>
TOM HUNGERBUHLER