Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida Alligator

TO MEET NEXT WEEK

Council Meet Off ;
Seating Bill Delayed

Tuesdays Legislative Council
meeting has been postponed until
next week, the Alligator learned
Sunday.
We called the meeting off main mainly
ly mainly because we just decided to call
it off, Majority Leader Scott
Bay man said. We dont have any anything
thing anything really important enough to
meet about.
The highly controversial Fair
Bloc Seating Bill was scheduled
for its first reading in the meeting.
I think Breeze (Student Govern Government

Court Prints, Keeps
Civil Liberties Card

By JUSTINE HARTMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Herb Schwartz, chancellor of the
Honor Court, has a hand full of
cards and doesnt know which one
to play. The decision is doubly
difficult because all the cards are
the same.
Seventeen thousand wallet size
cards informing students of their
civil liberties and responsibilities
were printed during the summer
WE DONT WANT
ORANGE-BLUE
The Alligator has nothing to
do with the Orange and Blue
Bulletin. It is printed as a pub public
lic public service. Please send all
requests to Informational Ser Services,
vices, Services, Building H, or the Pub Public
lic Public Functions office of the Florida
Union. v

Connor: A Love For Teaching

JHfp' I Wf
PP^Pmjjk
'PffiSm,
IP' t J& pFpM^^^^Wlggg^^p'-
ispi^b
DR. CONNOR
. no stranger to UF

Vol. 59, No. 7

ment Government Vice-President Fred) just
got his dates crossed up, Bayman
said. We only wanted one meet meeting
ing meeting before the fall elections.
The bloc seating bill needed to
be voted on twice to be passed
by the Council.
I know the bill was on the
agenda, Bayman said, but
everybody is pleased with the way
(SG President) Buddy Jacobs com committee
mittee committee is working. We are think thinking
ing thinking about chartering it.
The Advisory Committee on Bloc

and have not yet been distributed
to students.
Schwartz felt some method of
informing students of their rights
was necessary after several vio violations
lations violations of civil liberties by the
university police occurred last
spring. After hearing of the vio violations
lations violations last year, Schwartz con conferred
ferred conferred with Police Chief Shuler,
Dean Hale and President Reitz.
Reitz ordered the university police
not to search rooms without a
warrant or question students with without
out without giving them an opportunity for
council.
In April, 1966, campus police
picked up a girl*on a larceny
charge and held her at the sta station,
tion, station, without counsel, until she
confessed. After this occurence,
Seitzs orders to the police were
reiterated.
Last summer, Schwartz took the
(SEE COURT PAGE 2)

By SUE SCHMIDT
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs new vice-president, Dr. Fred Fredrick
rick Fredrick Connor, is no stranger to Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville or the university.
Connor was an English professor here
for 26 years before leaving for the
University of Alabama in 1961 to be become
come become dean of its College of Arts and
Science. His only break in teaching came
near the end of World War Two, when
he was assigned to duty at Pearl Har Harbor.
bor. Harbor.
Although he is no stranger to admin administrative
istrative administrative work, Connor believes it will
be a while before he is sure exactly
what his job will entail.
I sometimes wonder what my actual
duties will be, Connor said. *l ima imagine
gine imagine my job is to do what the pre president
sident president (J. Wayne Reitz) wants me to
do.
I want students to come and talk
to me/' he commented. 1 what them

University of Florida

Seating has voted preferential
seating for Florida Blue Key. Other
organizations are eligible to apply
for the special exemption.
Bayman said the Alligator was
not contacted of the meeting
change, because thats not my
business. Its Breezes job.
Bayman pointed out that since
35 or 45 seats must be filled in
the November election, it would
be useless to have more than one
meeting.
We are going to try to char charter
ter charter Jacobs committee as fairly
as possible, Bayman said. We
will incorporate a number of the
bills sections into the commit committee.
tee. committee.
We are only interested in doing
what is fair for the student body,
he added.
The bloc seating bill was not
considered this summer because
the Council failed to have a quo quorum
rum quorum on three occasions.
The bill provides for bloc seat seating
ing seating to be divided into four sec sections.
tions. sections. Organizations will draw
numbers to determine what sec section
tion section they will sit, in and will be
rotated during each game. The
presidents committee operates in
the same fashion.
However, the bloc seating bill
states that all disputes in the
seating arrangement will be re referred
ferred referred to the Honor Court. Jacobs
has voiced his opposition to this.
The bloc seating bill also states
that preferential bloc seating will
be awarded to an organization after
it has been recommended by the
president and passed by two-thirds
of the Council. Blue Key received
its exemption by a secret ballot
of the presidents committee.

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs Police Department will
soon have an auxiliary force to
aid in riot control, traffic con control
trol control and other emergencies, Po Police
lice Police Chief A.J. Shuler announced
recently.
The auxiliary, which will be lim limited
ited limited to 40 men, will be a vol volunteer

to know me and I want to learn what
they are like.
Connor eventually would like to go
back to teaching, his first love.
Ive been a teacher all my like and
I don't want to get too far away from
it. When I learn all my duties, then
I want to see if I still can teach.
One thing that is great about being
an English professor is that I get paid
for reading, he said. I am most
attached to philosophers like Huxley and
Emerson.
Dr. Connor received his M.A. and
Ph.D. from the University of Pennsyl Pennsylvania.
vania. Pennsylvania. He and his wife Jane have two
children, Jim, a high school junior and
Bill, a law school senior at UF.
When I was here last, the late J.
Hillis Miller (Then UF president) said
the university was great, Connor com commented.
mented. commented. It wasnt. Now, however, if
we can manage fate, the University of
Florida will not be great in the South
but in the nation.

\
^go *4P* : *' v v * -" '** f fr A- */ *- r
. x'/>s*w v<***.v ><; .. Z^ s ***"-' <,
(Photo by Nick Arroyo)
COME ON ALONG FOR A STROLL
. . see page 10

Police And Students
Togetherness?

Monday Sept. 12, 1966

unteer volunteer group supplementing the re regular
gular regular police force. According to
Suhler it will furnish a trained
pool of qualified men to aid the
regular force.
Shuler said membership would
be limited to married UF male
students over 21. They will be
bonded by the UF Police Depart Department.
ment. Department.
These students will be trained
by members of the regular force
in a program now being formu formulated.
lated. formulated.
At the present time, discussions
are being held with the Veter Veterans
ans Veterans Club because Shuler feels
they will be more likely to meet
age and other requirements.
However, we expect to take in
other eligible members, he said.
This auxiliary force is strictly
to supplement to the present po police
lice police department. We feel it will
help bring the present police de department
partment department and students closer to together.
gether. together.
It also will help provide bet better
ter better law enforcement and will help
us understand students better,
he added.
Students interested in working on
the auxiliary force should contact
Chief Shuler or Dudley Goulden at
the police department, next to Jen Jennings
nings Jennings Hall.
SWEETHEART
CONTEST SET
A Homecoming Sweetheart con contest
test contest now is open to all UF coeds
who have the backing of a campus
club or organization.
Applicants must submit their
entry forms by Sept. 20 at 5 p.m.
in room 315 of the Florida Union.
Hie contest will feature $1,500
in prizes. The final Judging will
be held at Cypress Gardens.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 12. 1966

Fears
Clash On
LBJ Plan
WASHINGTON (UPI) Acting
Democratic leader Hale Boggs
said Sunday he feared a head headon
on headon clash in Congress between
President Johnsons anti antiinflation
inflation antiinflation planned Great Society
spending programs.
Boggs told United Press In International
ternational International that it would be much
more difficult to get Great Socie Society
ty Society appropriation requests ap approved,
proved, approved, despite the Presidents
insistence that the poor should
not be forced to carry the
burden of inflation.
Boggs, from Louisiana, is
serving as House Democratic
leader for the remainder of the
current session because of the
illness of Rep. Carl Albert of
Oklahoma, who suffered a heart
attack last week.
The Presidents plan for
suspension of the 7 per cent
investment tax credit and the ac accelerated
celerated accelerated tax depreciation depreciationcreated
created depreciationcreated during the Kennedy ad administration
ministration administration to spur a lagging
economy-comes before the House
Ways and Means Committee
Tuesday.
The measure, intended to shift
the fleeting economy into a lo lower
wer lower gear, is expected by most
members of Congress to be ap approved,
proved, approved, although many have ex expressed
pressed expressed doubts about its ef effectiveness.
fectiveness. effectiveness.
E* I
GATOR GIRL
. .is Carol Schwartz

8 BARBERS
We Specialize In Razor Cutting
And
Hairstyling
TONYS DEN
Call for Appointment 372-9129 Tony only
CAROLYN PLAZA BARBER SHOP
1620 West University Avenue
Th Florid* Alligator reserves the right to regulate tbo typographical too* of all advertisements and
to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
MO POSITION E GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjuatments at payment for any advertisement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous insertion "Pitst notice is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to ran several times. Notices for correction must be glvw before nest Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper at (fee University at Florida and la
ptddlshad flv* times weakly except during May, June, and July when It la published semi-weekly. Only
editorials repressnt the official opinions of their authors. The AlUfMor Is entered as second dees
aatter at the United States Poet Office at Gainesville.

B
A
T-
M
A
N

RUSSIANS
CRITICIZE
BATMAN
MOSCOW (UPl)Holy Batfad:
The masked marvel has been
unmasked. '*
Snapped the Soviet satire
magazine Krokodil Sunday,
Batman ... is deepening the
spiritual vacuum of the United
States.
His adventures have hardened
American schoolchildren to vio violence
lence violence to the point they no lon longer
ger longer flinch at cruelty and take
the death of relatives in their
stride, Krokodil lamented.
The magazine said Batman and
Robin looked like idealized re representatives
presentatives representatives of the FBI.
Theyre tools of capitalism too,
according to the Communists.
Korkodil claimed businessmen
have made $75 to SBO million
from the children, teen-agers
and under-developed adults who
follow Batmans adventures.
SG Holds
Coffee Hours
A Student Government coffee
hour will be held Monday evening
from 7 to 8 p.m. in Jennings
Hall.
The reception is open to re residents
sidents residents of Jennings and Yulee
area.
The coffee hour will introduce
Student Government officers to
the coeds.
Another reception will be
held in Hume Hall, Tuesday even evening
ing evening from 7 to 8 p.m.
Similar receptions will beheld
throughout the term for Raw Rawlings-Broward,
lings-Broward, Rawlings-Broward, Murphree, Tol Tolbert,
bert, Tolbert, Graham, Fla Vet in and
Diamond Villare.
Riding Americans
NEW YORK (UPI* Four
out of every five US. house households
holds households own automobiles and one
out of every five owns two or
more cars, according to Tyrex.
Inc., the association of rayon
tire cord producers.

M BETTER GET 1 M BM e R6 £, UeT HARROW and THOSE two A^n-
, W OUT OF HERE \ E ROLLTHIS 4AT END, SO GET SQUASHED
THE EFFECTS) BUT T WO-TON CHROME) BIG BALL UKE FUES'/Y^T*

(FROM COURT PAGE 1)
information on the American Civil
Liberties Union card and adapted
it to the UF campus to ensure
students knowledge of their rights.
However, Schwartz now feels that
the police have made improve improvements
ments improvements and distribution of the
cards would only disrupt relations
with them.
The police have made such vast
improvements in their methods
and procedure that it is neces necessary
sary necessary to give them a chance with without
out without overt pressure, as a matter
of good relations, Schwartz said.
The police are now more aware
of their social responsibility not
only to enforce the law but to
do it by standards set by the
legislature, he continued.
Schwartz also fears students
would regard the campus police
as their adversaries if the cards
were distributed now.
The university police are now
attending a training school for
the first time. Fletcher Baldwin,
professor of law and president
of the American Association of
University Professors, is giving
the police a course in constitu constitutional
tional constitutional law, in which he emphasizes
legislature concerning search,
seizure, and arrest.
The police have an increase in
pay and attended an 18 hour sym symposium
posium symposium on investigation over the
summer. Attending this sym symposium
posium symposium were a criminologist from
FSU, a member of the U.S. Jus Justice
tice Justice Department and other law en enforcement
forcement enforcement officials.
The financing of the cards, which

$5 Puts You In The I
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FOR AN INTRODUCTORY FLIGHT LESSON I
H gPl||
>CASSELS-IN-THE-AIR I
MUNICIPAL AIRPORT WALDO RD. I

Court Keeps Cards ******

cost SSO, came from the Honor
Court, a portion of Student Govern Government
ment Government funds. Schwartz is holding
the cards and will distribute them
in the future if similar violations
occur.

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aBMRMOPPEa EXPIRES Sept. 30,66 .memM

Schwartz will begin a progran
of dorm lectures Thursday nigh
at Reid Hall. He will discus:
students rights on a state suj
ported campus as opposed to i
private university.



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Monday, September 12, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Stores Disagree
On Bad Checks

A poll of merchants near
campus reveals a diversity of
opinion on the honesty of student
check writers and also on the
effectiveness of the Honor Court
as a deterrent against bad check
passers.
Os nine merchants polled who
accept student checks, only two
admitted ever having reported of offences
fences offences to the Honor Court for
action. Two merchants stated that
they report cases directly to the
Alachua County Sheriff when legal
action is necessary.
The other five stores reported
that they have never had to take
legal action against a student.
Os these, three said they would
go to the Honor Court, while the
others did not know what they
would do.
The general consensus of store
owners is that student check
writers are almost all honest.
All owners admitted that a num number
ber number of checks are returned each
month, but most bounce because
of an honest error.
If the check doesnt clear the
second time it is put through,
most store owners contact the
student personally and advise him
of the problem. The merchants
say that most students correct
the error immediately.
The trouble arises with
students who dont make their
returned checks good. In this case
a logical place for a merchant
to turn is the Honor Court. At
least two store owners, both of
whom preferred not to be identi identified,
fied, identified, disagree with this. One,
who does almost exclusive stu student
dent student business, said that when an
offense is reported to the Honor
Booster Club
To Organize
To provide a cheering core
at home football games, a Gator
booster club is being formed.
The club will have 50-yard 50-yardline
line 50-yardline seats and will cheer with
the cheerleaders.
Membership will be limited to
200, on a first-come-first-serve
basis. Other applications will be
placed on an alternate list.
Application must be made by
Wednesday, Sept. 14, in Room
310, Florida Union.
Members will be supplied with
shakers and will learn the new
Gator cheers. The only expense
will be the purchase of spirit
hats.
A tentative organizational
meeting is scheduled for
Thursday evening at the Univer University
sity University Auditorium. At that time,
William Cross, assistant dean
of men and Leslie Mananet, com commissioner
missioner commissioner of school spirit will
explain the purpose and pro procedures
cedures procedures of the new organization.
Club membership is open to
all students, but since only 200
seats will be provided, members
cannot bring dates.
FOUR WINDS
IS O MI NG

Court, the result is slow and in indefinite.
definite. indefinite.
The other store manager said
the Sheriffs Department works
very effectively and he would not
know how to get in touch with
the Honor Court if he wanted
to.
A factor that may influence bad
check passing is whether or not
the store in question gives cash
for a check or will only take
a check for the amount of a
purchase. In general, those
stores giving cash for checks
receive more bad checks.
New Opera
On WRUF
Friday Night
j
The world premier of a new
opera and the opening per performance
formance performance at the new Metropoli Metropolitan
tan Metropolitan Opera House, will be heard
on WRUF Friday night at
6:30.
The inaugural ceremonies and
the opera commissioned espec especially
ially especially for the event, Samuel Bar Barbers
bers Barbers Antony and Cleopatra.
will be broadcast by the Texaco-
Metropolitan Opera Radio Net Network.
work. Network.
This special program will be
in addition to the regular 20-
week season of Saturday
afternoon Metropolitan Opera
broadcasts beginning Dec. 3 on
WRUF.
Title roles of the new opera
will be sung by Justino Kiaz
and Leontyne Price, and Antony
and Cleopatra will be perform performed
ed performed in English.
Radio listeners will be taken on
a tour of the new opera house,
which is 14 stories high and cost
$45,700,000. A backstage visit
with Rudolf Bing, General Man Manager
ager Manager of the Met will follow.
Administrative
Intern Named
Dr. Ralph B. Kimbrough, newly newlyappointed
appointed newlyappointed chairman of the Depart Department
ment Department of Educational Administra Administration
tion Administration Supervision and Field Ser Services
vices Services at the UFs College of
Education, announced recently that
John Bennett of West Palm Beach
has been selected as administra administrative
tive administrative intern for the 1966-67 school
year,
Bennett will intern at Palm
Beach High School.
Through this program, the in intern
tern intern is placed in a school which
is conducting some innovative
practice. It is hoped, said Dr.
Kimbrough, that the intern will
learn how to provide the same
leadership for change in the school
to which he later may be ap appointed.
pointed. appointed.
Dr. Kimbroughs appointment to
chairman of his department came
in July. He succeeds Dr. R. L.
Johns who retired as department
chairman, but will continue on the
teaching faculty of the College
of Education.
a*
Cost Is Instrumental
SAN FRANCISCO
The San Francisco Symphony
Orchestra reports that it costs
plenty to make music.
The total cost of the orches orchestras
tras orchestras instruments is more than
$2.10 million

Page 3



Page 4

l, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 12, 1966

I FROM THE
\ WIRES OF
TJII
International
ELECTION VICTORY. . South Viet Nam scored a crushing
political victory over the Communist Viet Cong in Sundays elec election.
tion. election. Final official figures announced at midnight said 83.2 per
cent of the eligible voters cast ballots despite Viet Cong terror
attacks and threats of death. The voting was for 117-man con constituent
stituent constituent assembly, which will draft a legal constitution for the
country and set up the framework for a civilian form of govern government
ment government to replace the military near-dictatorship that now rules
South Viet Nam.
PLAN TESTS. . The Czechoslovakian
Embassy in Paris said Thursday the most
important war games ever undertaken by the
Warsaw Pact nations would take place in
Czechoslovakia in mid-September.
BEGIN PURGE. . The Syrian government Thursday night
began a purge of certain elements it said were trying to seize
power. Tanks rumbled through the capital and took up positions
around the defense ministry.
A broadcast over Radio Demascus identified the anti-government
elements as in the service of the imperialists but gave no
other details.
CRASH WALL. . Five persons including
a pregnant woman crashed their way to free freedom
dom freedom through the Berlin wall and hail of Com Communist
munist Communist bullets Sunday in a bulldozer with
do-it-yourself armor plating.
SEEK TIES. . President Chung-Hee Park told the National
Assembly Thursday South Korea would seek closer military ties
with the United States and would increase its military and tech technical
nical technical assistance to South Viet Nam in the coming year.
National
ISSUES STATEMENT . Black Power leader Stokely Carmichael
issued a statement from his jail cell Sunday asking Mayor Ivan
Allen to say who is to blame for a new outbreak of rioting in a Negro
ghetto.
Carmichael is being held in lieu of SIO,OOO bond on a charge of
inciting a riot last Tuesday. He has refused to post bond saying he
is a political prisoner.
Carmichael said he will conduct religious meditations for the
next 96 hours and will not be in contact with persons outside the
jail.
AVIATION PIONEER DIES . Collett Ever Everman
man Everman Woolman, 76, who built Delta Air Lines
from a rickety crop dustiug outfit with a
handful of biplanes into the worlds seventh
largest air carrier, died Sunday in Atlanta.
r* ,
SIGNS TRANSIT BILL . President Johnson signed a two-year,
S3OO million mass transit bill designed, he said, to do something
about that daily horror known as the rush hour.
And he appointed Leo J. Cusick, former assistant general super superintendent
intendent superintendent of the New York City Transit Authority, as Washingtons
expert adviser to cities struggling to unsnarl traffic jams.
LONGEST STRIKE ENDS . New York
stereoiypers Sunday ratified their contract
with the World Journal Tribune, ending the
longest strike in American newspaper history.
Florida

HIJACK PLANS ... An unnamed jet engine firm was charged in
West Palm Beach Friday with attempted bribery in an alleged plot
to obtain blueprints from employees of Pratt & Whitney, a division
of United Aircraft, which is currently engaged in developing a ver version
sion version of the highly competitive supersonic jet transport engine.
.....
INCOME RISES . The State Chamber of Commerce reported
Saturday in its weekly business review that Florida had maintained
its position of first in the South with a per capita income of $2,423
last year. The national per capita income was $2,746 with a gain
over 1964 of six per cent, slightly higher than Floridas advance.

ban booze,
SAYS TOpZE
PORTLAND, Ore. (UPI) -- The
president of the National Woman s
Christian Temperance Union
(WCTU), charged that the U.S.
armed forces have become a
school for alcoholism and ships
huge amounts of liquor to the
fighting men in Viet Nam.
Mrs. Fred J. Tooze of Evans Evanston,
ton, Evanston, 111 told the WCTUs Ex Executive
ecutive Executive Committee prior to the
opening of the unions convention
Friday that 270,000 fifths of whis whiskey,
key, whiskey, gin, vodka and rum were
shipped to Viet Nam by the mil military
itary military last September alone and
there have been subsequent ship shipments.
ments. shipments.
The charges that the Ameri American
can American military has become a 'school
for alcoholics in veterans hos hospitals
pitals hospitals are increasing, she said.
The practice assumes a new
aspect in these critical times
when our armies overseas have
such a large stake in sobriety,
she said.
Second In Auto Output
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OLD TIME RELIGION

Poland Bans Graham

ATLANTA (UPI) Evangelist
Billy Graham announced that the
Polish government has denied his
request for a visa to visit Uiat
country this month to partici participate
pate participate in Protestant ceremonies
marking 1,000 years of Chris Christianity
tianity Christianity in Poland.
Graham said he was postponing
his planned trip. But he added
that the Polish embassy in
Washington had encouraged him
to apply later.
The Baptist evanglist said the
embassy had told him the govern government
ment government did not feel this was an
appropriate time for his visit.
Naturally, I am disappointed
because I have great affection

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a thousand years of Christianil
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' ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUfc,
| 1 INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE, CAMPUS
urange and blue bulletin
Campus Calendar

Administrative Notices To Students, Faculty Sc Staff

Campus Calendar
PLEASE TURN IN ALL ITEMS FOR CAMPUS CALENDAR TO THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS OFFICE, FLA. UNION

I MONTHLY DEPOSITS ARE NO LONGER LIMITED IN YOUR CREDIT UNIOI^^^I
Building J Radio Road K i I
Dividend Rate Increase
I 5%% Serving Uof F Employees Since 1935 LTSTi., I
I Paid Semiannually Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union Loans! !! j|

QUALIFICATIONS FOR FOLDING OFFICE: To
participate or hold office in an extracurricular
activity, a student must be in satisfactoryacadem satisfactoryacademid
id satisfactoryacademid standing and free of disciplinary or scholas scholastic
tic scholastic probation.He or she must also be classifi classified
ed classified as a fulltime student enrolled in a minimum
of 12 hours. Included in this classification are
all athletic teams, debate and forensic groups,
dramatics and musical groups, and representa representatives
tives representatives of the student body and chartered organ organizations.
izations. organizations.
-3
PRE-MED & PRE-DENT STUDENTS: Register
with the Pre-professional Counseling Office, 111
Anderson, Sept. 12-23, so your instructors can
evaluate you. Please know your instructors name
and your section number.
LYCEUM COUNCIL SUBSCRIPTION SERIES:
All subscriptions for UF faculty and staff have
been sold.

Monday
September 12

*>
Panhellenic Rush: 324 FLU,
Noon-6p.m.
Florida Players: Tryouts, 239
TIG, 4 & 7 p.m.
Block & Bridle Club: Smoker
and Initiation, 324 FLU, 4:30
p.m.
Real Estate Club, Johnson
Lounge, 7 p.m.
International Committee: Group
Meeting, 123 FLU, 4:30 p.m.
Alpha Delta Sigma, mens pro professional
fessional professional advertising frat fraternity
ernity fraternity will meet in Room 225
in the Stadium at 7:30 p.m.
All current members are urged
to attend to plan the program
for the coming year.
Swim Fins & Agua Gators: Meet Meeting,
ing, Meeting, 201 Fla. Gym, 7 p.m.
Anyone who can swim at all
and is interested in joining
v is invited to attend.
Student Government Coffee Hour:
Jennings Hall, 7-8 p.m. Yulee,
Mallory, Reid, Off-campus
students invited. All student
Government officers and cab cabinet
inet cabinet will be present to answer
questions.
Christian Science Organization:
Board Meeting, 123 FLU, 7:30
p.m.
Florida Blue Key, Gator Growl
Committee, 212FLU, 6:00p.m.

ADMISSION TO CANDIDANCE: Monday, Sept.
19 is the deadline for admission to candidacy
for graduation in December for the fall trimester.
i
FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAM: Spanish reading
knowledge examination and all functional ex examinations
aminations examinations will be given on Saturday, Sept. 17,
18 Anderson Hall, 10-12 noon.
STATE TEACHING SCHOLARSHIP EXAMIN EXAMINATION:
ATION: EXAMINATION: Applications for State Teaching Scholarship
examinations are available from Sept. 5 through
Sept 15, in the Undergraduate Office of the Col College
lege College of Education, Room 124 Norman Hall. Ex Examinations
aminations Examinations will be given Oct. 11, 1966, between
9-11 a.m. You should report by 8:30 a.m. Place
of the examination will be announced later.
ORCHESIS: Anyone interested in modern dance?
Attend a film showing at the Women's Gym Mon-
DAY, Sept. 12, 2:50-4:45 p.m. Wear leotards.

Tuesday
September 13

-V
Wednesday
September 14

Monday, September 12, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Print Sale and Exhibit:FLU Social
Room, 10 a m. 9 p.m. Maxi Maximum
mum Maximum price for prints is $2.98.
Open to public. Admission free.
Florida Players: Tryouts, 239
TIG, 4 & 7 p.m.
Student Government Coffee Hour:
Hume Hall, 7-8 p.m. Off Offcampus
campus Offcampus students,fraternities
and sororities are invited.
All Student Government of officers
ficers officers and cabinet will be pre present
sent present to answer questions.
Union Board: Bridge Lessons,
215 FLU, 7 p.m.
Pi Sigma Epsilon: Group Meet Meeting
ing Meeting 220 FLU, 7 p.m.
Print Sale & Exhibit: FLU
Social Room, 1-9 p.m.
High Holiday Services, MSB Aud.,
7 p.m.
AIA Film Series: Frank Llloyd
Wright, 105-B AFA, 8 p.m.
Florida Players Production
Meeting, Norman Hall Aud.,
7:30 p.m.
WRUF FM auditions for an anouncers,
ouncers, anouncers, 4th Floor Stadium,
7:30 p.m. No previous exper experience
ience experience necessary.

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 12, 1966

The Florida Alligator
A Mtgyuty Ii OufbttuPllwlkTiuilii'
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR DICK DENNIS
Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not necessarily reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is the editorial in the left
column.
i "I I I I I ' I I
The Finest Retreat
For the past eight years campus 1 lead leaders,
ers, leaders, administrators and faculty members
have taken off one weekend and
disappeared into the wilderness to talk
turkey about the UFs problems.
This years Presidents Retreat was
the finest in the eight year history of
the event. It was well-planned and well wellexecuted
executed wellexecuted and the were top topnotch.
notch. topnotch.
Some of the problems that were kick kicked
ed kicked around included the infirmary, park parking,
ing, parking, student demonstrations, ACCENT,
off-campus publications and a variety
of others.
We feel that the retreat is the time
that student leaders can toss some
hot potatoes at the administration and
faculty and see the reaction. This is
exactly what did happen and the admin administration
istration administration and faculty both responded
amazingly well.
We feel that UF President J. Wayne
Reitz and Student Body President Buddy
Jacobs did an excellent job of planning
the two day retreat. We feel that it
is a worthwhile meeting and possibly
should be expanded to once a trimester
instead of once a year.
By doing this it would be easier to
keep a progress chart of the various
problems and to see if something is
being done. Twice a year might help
accomplish this.
Poor Drainage
You dont notice it until it actually
happens, but there is a definite drain drainage
age drainage problem on campus.
And last Wednesdays duluge proved it.
Four inches of rain fell in late after afternoon
noon afternoon and, immediately, there were prob problems.
lems. problems.
Diamond Village, home for hundreds of
married students and their families, was
cut off from the main part of campus
when two trenches flooded out. Students
couldnt drive in or, for that matter,
drive out.
Jennings Brown, mayor of the village,
was distressed over the incident.
We are tired of complaining about
problems such as this, he said. We
feel that these things should be taken
care of without our complaints.
We agree.
And After November ...
The draft call for October has been
raised from 46,200 to 49,200.
But the fine folks in Washington are
still trying to tell us that the War in
Viet Nam isnt going to be escalated
further. Some military experts, however,
are offering long-range predictions that
it will last another temyears.
You can understand why the Dem Democratic
ocratic Democratic Administration is trying to keep
the hawk talk down. After all, elec election
tion election time is only two months away.
But whats going to happen after that.

''-.ay J V
lT*>y W m' f

It was in the 47th year of our
lightning campaign to wipe the
dread Viet-Narian guerrillas out
of West Vhtnnng. And, frankly,
the peasants were getting a lit little
tle little tired of the whole thing.
We must instill in these sim simple
ple simple peasants a love for freedom
and democracy so they will know
what they are fighting for, said
our Ambassador to the Vhtnnngian
Premier of the Week, General
Hoo Dat Don Dar.
There is nothing more worth
dying for, said the General, nod nodding
ding nodding gravely, than freedom and
democracy.
Therefore, said our Ambas Ambassador,
sador, Ambassador, we must hold free and
democratic elections.
Sure, said the General. What
are they?
* *
The Ambassador patiently ex explained
plained explained how free and democratic
elections were held in America
and the General said, Oh, that
sounds like lots of fun.
So 647 candidates were chosen.
To guarantee the elections would
be free and democratic, each can candidate
didate candidate was carefully screened in
order to make sure he was de definitely
finitely definitely for freedom and demo democracy.
cracy. democracy. And definitely against Com Communism,
munism, Communism, neutralism, negotiations
or otherwise being unkind to gen generals
erals generals in general.
It was a lovely campaign, waged
in the finest American traditions
of free and democratic elections.
In the American way, each can candidate
didate candidate first shook down as many
wealthy merchants as possible for
campaign contributions. He then
purchased billboards and bumper
strips to plaster his name on any anything
thing anything that held still for more
than 12 seconds. And lastly he
went on television to denounce his
opponents as dirty, low-down, rat ratfink
fink ratfink mud slingers.
There were, of course, drama dramatic
tic dramatic high points in the campaign,
as when a leading candidate, Mr.
Ngo Mahn Ngo, was caught in a
love nest with a curvaceous (48-
23-36) beauty identified as Miss
How Bot Dat.
But, generally, the campaign was
orderly and reasonably quiet, if
a little dull by American stand standards.
ards. standards. And at last election day

Our Man Hoppe

By ART HOPPE

dawned bright and clear.
Unfortunately, the peasants, not
having television sets and being
unable to read, didnt know it
was election day. But the Loyal
Royal Army rounded them up and
herded them to the polls. There
each was shown pictures of the
distinguished candidates. But
every time the peasant would shake
his head and say the same thing
to the tally takers.
And so it was that the notor notorious
ious notorious Hoo Hee won in a landslide.
* *
Unhappily, Hoo Hee happened to
be the famous leader of the Viet-
Narian guerrillas. And as General
Hoo Dat Don Dar said, He cer certainly
tainly certainly doesnt believe in freedom
and democracy as we know it.
So the election was declared in invalid.
valid. invalid.
But as the General added polite politely
ly politely in thanking the Ambassador,
It sure was a lot of fun and
I do hope well be able to do
it again some time.
And as the Ambassador pointed
out in a cable to the State Depart Department:
ment: Department: Our Vhtnnngian allies nov|
have a clearer idea of what they
are fighting for.
This proved true. But, fortun fortunately,
ately, fortunately, by quickly doubling the num number
ber number of American troops, we man managed
aged managed to keep the war going.

Florida Alligator Staff
NICK ARROYO CAROL HEFNER GENE NAIL
Photo Editor Society Editor Editorial Assistant
I)--
JO ANN LANGWORTHY TYLER TUCKER
General Assignment Editor Assistant Sports Editor
3
STAFF WRITERS -- Marti Cochran, Bob Beck, Barbara Frank,
Sue Froemke, Sharon Bauer, Barbara Gefen, Lin Johnson, Maury
dicker, Harry Moore, Kathie Keim, Mike Barrel, Jean Mamlin,
Betty Diamond.
ASSISTANT EDI TO Its Judy Redfern, Dot Bell, Sherrie Bras Braswell,
well, Braswell, Tom Giliberti, Joe Torchia, Louis Nobo, Kathy Deagan,
Brenda Latt, Justine Hartman, Aggie Fowles.
In order to better cover campus events the Alligator uses
reporters from the School of Journalism and Communications.
Their bylines are followed by Alligator Correspondent. -mm t.

C ampus
Mirror
By 808 MENAKER
Alligator Managing Editor
Well, it looks as though the
Legislative Council is putting off
one of the most controversial bills
to come before it in many years.
What Im taking about, of
course, is the Fair Bloc Seating
Bill. Putting off the meeting an another
other another week from Tuesday night is
merely prolonging the agony of
indecision. Sooner or later, some something
thing something will have to be done.

In away, Im
glad. This mere merely
ly merely puts petty stu- i
dent politicians in
the spotlight for
another week,
giving students |
food for thought.
Thoughts, for
instance, like who |
to vote for in the
fall elections. Im
not an indepen independent,
dent, independent, but even

from the point of view of a jaded
fraternity man, this monkey bus business
iness business over the bloc seating bill
will stick in my mind when I
step into the booth and pull the
lever.
Like other fraternity men, I like
being on the winning side in cam campus
pus campus elections. It means a lot for
a house to have men working
on campus in important positions.
But I dont like the pettiness
of campus politics, like putting
the losing side in poor seats for
home football games. You know
the old phrase about sitting on
top of the engineering building.
Well, I dont like it, and I
dont likesthe pettiness of the peo people
ple people who are trying to defeat the
bloc seating bill. Buddy Jacobs
little committee may have elim eliminated
inated eliminated some of the dishonesty of
bloc seating but it still gives
Blue Key preferential seating.
This dislike for preferential
seating came about this summer
during a Leg Council meeting. Ma Majority
jority Majority Leader Eric Smith, (a Blue
Key) was ready to present a bill
entitled the Fair Seating Bill,
to do away with bloc seating en entirely
tirely entirely if the bloc bill had passed.
It didnt, so Smiths childish rea reasoning
soning reasoning If I cant get my way,
Ill ruin it for everybody else,
was for naught.
I dont know if Smiths rea reasoning
soning reasoning is typical of Blue Key
members. I hope not. If Blue
Key gets preferential seating, so
should countless other organi organizations
zations organizations on campus that work just
as hard.
Preferential seating is bad, any
way you look at it, and should
be abolished. Maybe then, campus
politics would come out of the
back room into the open.

MENAKER



By LOUIS CASS ELS
United Press International
In much of the South, the school day still opens
with Bible reading or a prayer.
But throughout the rest of the nation, schools
are complying with the Supreme Courts ban on
daily devotional exercises.
As a substitute, some schools in New England
have initiated a minute of silence for 51 meditation.
In Pittsburgh, classroom opening exercises feature
readings from a specially prepared collection of quo quotations
tations quotations from Aristotle, Plato, Shakespeare, Daniel
Webster and other savants.
The ways in which public schools are adjusting
to the 1963 Supreme Court ruling that held School Schoolroom
room Schoolroom prayers unconstitutional was disclosed by a
nationwide UPI survey.
Before the courts ruling, nearly half the schools
in the country began the day with a brief religious
service. Most exercises included Bible reading and
a recitation of the Lords Prayer.
This practice was declared unconstitutional in the
now-famous of Abingdon School District vs. Schempp.
The Supreme Court said the First Amendment, which
guarantees religious liberty, precludes a public school
from sponsoring an act of worship.
However, the court did say that the public schools
can and should teach objectively about the role re religion
ligion religion has played in history and in shaping Ameri Americas
cas Americas heritage. It commended literary study of the

a
I G-A-T-O-R A-D-S I
I A G-R-E-A-T W-A-Y I
I T-O C-O-M-M-U-N-l-C-A-T-E I
I S T "" P I

| *y ft I .iiioiit B

How The School Day Starts Ojf Now

Bible as an essential aspect of a well-rounded ed education.
ucation. education.
UPI reporters assigned to investigate the impact
of the school prayer ruling in 50 cities came up
with these principal findings:
In the predominantly Protestant South, schools are
still beginning the day with prayer and Bible reading.
Opening exercises in most schools outside the South
do not now include prayer or Bible reading. However,
there is a growing practice of a minute or so of
silent meditation. Its up to the students to pray,
or just stare out the window.
Not many schools have adopted objective courses
in religion which the court suggested.
In the South, the policy question of school prayer
has largely been left to the individual teachers.
Jesse T. Anderson, state superintendent of education
for South Carolina, said there are no state regu regulations
lations regulations on school prayer. Its up to each teacher,
he added.
And the teachers are continuing to do what they
have always done conduct daily devotional exer exercises,
cises, exercises, an official of the South Carolina Educational
Association told a UPI reporter.
Correspondent Randolph T. Pendleton found that in
Duval County, Jacksonville, Florida the school
board leaves it up to the principals, and the princi principals
pals principals leave it up to the teachers, and most of the
teachers are continuing with the Lords Prayer and
Bible reading just as theyve always done.
Memphis, Term., school Supt. E. C. Stimbert can candidly
didly candidly acknowledged that prayers and Bible readings

Monday, September 12, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

will continue until somebody objects. We are very
flexible, he said.
The Hampton, Va., schools also will continue daily
classroom devotionals unless we receive a legi legitimate
timate legitimate complaint from one of our citizens, accord according
ing according to Supt. C. A. Lindsay.
The Supreme Court ruling had the least impact
in the Midwest and Far West where most schools
did not hold devotional exercises anyway.
Dr. Normal Drachler, acting superintendent of th£
Detroit schools said the question of school prayer
hasnt been an issue in his city for many years.
In Seattle, Wash., schools were very careful
about daily devotional exercises long before the
Supreme Court ruling, Deputy Supt. Fred Breit said.
There never have been any religious exercises in
St. Louis schools. Supt. William Kottemeyer said his
city has always adhered to the principle of separa separation
tion separation of church and state.
In Massachusetts, however, the Supreme Court ruling
set off a long and heated debate which finally was
resolved when the state legislature enacted a law
requiring a minute of meditation in place of de devotional
votional devotional exercises.
Many schools in New Hampshire and Rhode Island
also have adopted the silent meditation substitute. One
teacher in Pawtucket, R.1., said that from visual
observation, about 80 per cent appear to be saying
a prayer during the silence.
In New York City, the school day opens with the
Pledgfc of Allegiance and the singing of any patriotic
songs.

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
MOTORCYCLE for sale. 1962 Tri Triumph
umph Triumph Bonneville. New engine, new
paint, new chrome. Call MikeVol MikeVollroer,
lroer, MikeVollroer, 376-1271 or 372-6208. (A (A--5-st-c).
-5-st-c). (A--5-st-c).
1965 HONDA SCRAMBLER, 305 cc.
Metallic grey and black with cus custom
tom custom striping. This bike is v in
excellent condition with only 3,000
miles". Ph. 376-3569. (A-5-3t-p).
AIR CONDITIONERS SPECIAL
Cost plus 10%. Most sizes still
available. See Sudden Service Fuel
Oil Co. 907 SW 3rd St. or call
376-4404. (A-2-10t-c).
TWO BEDROOM house, completely
furnished, A/C. Outside oity lim limits,
its, limits, perfect for student family.
$64.60 a month plus down-pay down-payment.
ment. down-payment. Call 372-5511. (A-3-ts-c).
COMPLETE Public Address Sys System;
tem; System; Harmon-Carmen P.A. Amp. %
Shure microphone, stands included
S2OO. Utility Trailer completely
covered, 4x $75. Call: 454-1577.
(A-4-st-c).
1961 VESPA Motorscooter newly
painted, good condition, best
offer Engineering kit, excellent
condition, best offer, Call Esther
Kaplain 376-9547. (A-4-st-c).
1965 VESPA 150 Motorscooter.
Less than 4000 miles. Extras,
excellent condition. Make offer
378-2193. See at 1216 SW 2nd
Ave., #lOl. (A-2-ts-c).
'l' I
3 BEDROOM Trailer, completely
furnished, air conditioned, wall to
wall carpet, appliances, TV, and
stereo, included. Pinehurst Trail Trailer
er Trailer Park. Call 372-1356. (A-2-
ts-c),
1959 TR3A $695. Top mechanical
condition. Red, wire wheels, R & H,
call: 372-1570. (A-6-ts-c).
NATIONAL 300 Receiver, $l5O.
Knight Kit T-60 transmitter, 60
watts, 6-80 meters, $35. Phone
372-2023. (A-6-st-c).
BUNK BEDS complete with ma matresses
tresses matresses and bed spreads. Could be
used as twin beds. S4O. Call after
5 p.m., 376-6244. (A-6-4t-c).
1964 VESPA 125 cc. 400 campus
miles. Very good condition. $225.
Call: 378-6551. (A-6-3t-p).
MOTOROLA PORTABLE STEREO,
Diamond Needle, Excellent condi condition,
tion, condition, SSO. 35rom ARGOS, 50mm
lens with light meter and case
S4O. Call: 372-9708. (A-6-3t-c).
YEAR OLD PHILCO 19 portable
TV with stand. A steal at S9O.
Call Plaza Theatre after 1 p.m.
378-2434. (A-6-2t-c).

I fMBffiftBHIHF BQX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
EXPLOSIVE ACTION AT
I THE BATTLE FRONT
I BwnSap
I THE BULGE
J plus w-mmmmmm?
I 'MEYER TOO UTE I
*i i ** T I.T %"T 1 -TAA.JI-1. _l * V * 1 r r pyJyJ, i B

for sale
1964, 250 cc MOTORCYCLE. Must
sacrifice. S3OO or best offer.
Actual miles 6,000. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Original price $534. 372-
7366. (A-6-lt-c).
FENDER DASSMAN Amp with Fra Framus
mus Framus Bass, S4OO. Also Lafayette
60 watt PA Amp with 8,8"
speakers. Call 378-6032 after 7.
(A-6-lt-p).
1966 BRIDGESTONE SPORT 90
Motorcycle 90cc. 4 months old
excellent condition. Owner grad graduated.
uated. graduated. $285. Darrel Hartman. Call
378-6615. (A-6-lt-c).
1965 HONDA 50cc. Less than 1,-
000 miles. Call 378-2284. (A-7-
st-c),
1958 PONTIAC, Rebuilt motor,
good condition, $275.00. Phone
376-8823. (A-7-st-c).
APARTMENT SIZE refrigerator,
very good condition $40.00. Four
Burner gas range with oven, S4O.
Fold down divan, SIO.OO. 2 Steel
bedframes without legs including
1 mattress, SIO.OO. Phone 376-
6046. i i ' -*
PRACTICALLY new Moped, 578
miles. Just broken in, perfect
condition, $125.00 Phone 372-
6115. (A-7-3t-c).
HONDA: Cycle, 90cc (1965) $l5O.
& payments. Call: 372-1909 City.
(A-7- 3t-p).
1957 MO-PED, good transporta transportation.
tion. transportation. Make offer. 3/4 width bed
like new, $45. Call after five.
378-4654. (A-7-2t-p).
" ' ~ '
f
for rent
/*
OFFICE SPACE 1/2 block from
central portion of campus on W.
Univ. Ave. For more information,
apply 1702 W. Univ. (B-5-st-c).
COMMUTING STUDENT. Students
with noisey children or others
who might need a private 1-room
cabin near campus to study in,
caU 376-3012. (B-5-st-c).
NEW FURNISHED Apt. Studio BR
with living room, kitchen 10 miles
S. of Univ. Preference to advanced
art or architecture student. $75
mo. Act. Center 466-3459 or 372-
4979. (B-5-st-c).
GIRLS SHARE Large House 1 1/2
blocks from Campus. $l6O Tri Trimester
mester Trimester Single, $l3O Trimester
Double. Utilities and phone furn furnished.
ished. furnished. 1119 SW 4th Ave. Call 376-
3184. (B-4-st-c).

Page 8

t, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 12, 1966

for rent
BEDROOMS for females S3O a
month. 2-rooms with twin beds, 1
large room to accomadate 3 or
4 girls. Bath and large closets,
A/C. 105 NW 7th Terr. Call 378-
4018. (B-3-st-c).
WILLIS TON MOTEL: Rooms by
week or month. Single or double.
Students rates. Television and
daily maid service. Rooms avail available
able available for University events. Sor Sorry
ry Sorry no phone calls. (B-3-10t-p).
1 BEDROOM, apartment, twinbeds,
Air conditioned Downstairs, wall
to wall carpeting, 3 years old,
private patio. Phone 376-3179 or
372-0565. (B-7-3t-c).
A/C Furnished Apt., 3blocks from
Campus $62.50. A/C Private Room
with Refrigerator $40.00. Call
372-8840 or 378-3166. (B-4-ts-c),
SINGLE ROOMS for male students.
Cheap. See any afternoon between
5:30 8 p.m. Jim Hode, 1602 N.W.
Ist Ave., 376-9345. (B-6-10t-c).
wanted
MALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share new A/C apt. in Summit
House, 1700 SW 16th Court. Sorry,
no phone yet. Please come by
apt., D-25. (C-6-st-c).
WANT TO RENT car or motor motorcycle
cycle motorcycle to take to Ft. Lauderdale
Thursday. Owner can use my car
for trans. in GainesviUe. Call
Dusty Schneider, 378-5457. (C-6-
2t-c).
GIRL TO SHARE one BR Apt.
beside pool of Univ. Garden, $l3O/
by two plus 1/2 food, 1/2 elec electricity.
tricity. electricity. 706 SW 16th Ave. Apt.
111. No phone yet. (C-5-ts-c).
LPN needed to care for elderly
lady in the home. 11 p.m. -7
a.ro. shift. Near campus. Call
376-1330 after 5:30 p.m. (C (C---5-ts-c).
--5-ts-c). (C---5-ts-c).
MALE ROOMMATE to share ex expenses.
penses. expenses. S4O per month. A/C, pool,
near campus. Phone: 378-5146.
(C-7-3t-c).
FEMALE Roommate to share one
bedroom apartment at Lakeshore
Towers, Kitchen, Large Living Livingroom,
room, Livingroom, Air Conditioned, pool. SBO
per month. Call 376-0150. (C-7-
3t-c). i
MALE Roommate to share house.
1105 N.E. 9th St. 376-3261, Ext.
2545 before 5:00. 372-0854 after
5:00. (C-7-lt-p).

You are cordially
/ invited to George and
Martha's for an evening
of fun and games.
ELIZABETH TAYLOR
RICHARD BURTON iLjfflS
Who's Afraid Ofarifl
[Virginia Woolf?lHKy
\ ADMITTED WITH- **.}£ nVJfTfJYi
his parent .00 9:20 |£MJJIuJ
tejotniMO ("Ai&ai auDitei nePuan
fJjJLJJrj anDPCTmtfrooLf
mail n HWpi
1 1:00 3:10 5:15 y mllllnn 1
7:25 9:35 V__ mW

wanted
WANTED . Two roommates
to share apt. A/C, S4O/mo. .
Inquire apt. 74, Frederick Apts.
1130 SW 16th Ave. (C-5-3t-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE. 2 BR,
A/C Summit House Apt. SSO/mo.
plus 1/3 utilities. Call Manager,
376-9668. 1605 SW 16th St. Apt.
F-. 21, Micki Ross. (C-5-3t-p).
KINDERGARTEN CHILD needs
ride to J. J. Finley from Dia Diamond
mond Diamond Village, daily at 12:30. Call
378-3430 after 5 p.m. (C-5-3t-c).
WANTED Immediately". Carrier
for moring delivery of the Flor Florida
ida Florida Alligator. Must have car and
Ist and 2nd periods free Monday
Friday. Contact Bernard Mackey
378-4052 or 376-3261 Ex. 2832.
(C-3-tf-nc).
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED 2
bedrooms. S3O per month plus 1/2
utilities. See at 718 NE 4th Ave.
(C-4-st-c).
help wanted
1
PART-TIME help to put up hay
and fencing. Horses for rent. Horse
Haven Riding School, Newberry
Road. 376-3494. (E-7-3t-c).
NEED MALE Student, preferably
in engineering who has experience
repairing electronic equipment.
About $1.25 an hour. Call: 372-
8273. (E-7-lt-c).
MALE LAB ASST. 1 needed im immediately.
mediately. immediately. Plant Pathology Ext.
2371. No Experience necessary.
(E-5-ts-c).
STUDENT who is handy with tools
to work part-time in exchange for.
room rent. Call 376-3012. (E-5-
st-c).
PIZZA HUT, 1723 SW 13th St.
Plan to open Sept. 15th. Male
only. Must be over 21. Duties: 1.
Make pizza 2. Wash dishes 3.
Wait on tables. Minimum $1.25 a
hr. Open 11 AM-12 PM. Will work
your work schedule around your
classes. Need four men. (E-2-
st-c).
PART-TIME CASHIERS wanted in
the A.M. Inquire at Pantry Pride,
NW 13th St., in Fields Plaza.
(E-6-3t-c).
mU
COED Part-time work. Choose
your own hours. $1.25 per hour
to start. Call Mr. Bowen at 378-
6368, between 9-5. (E-6-2t-c).

help wanted
MALE: Have various full and
part-time jobs. Good hourly pay.
Work arranged to fit class sche schedule.
dule. schedule. Apply Kings Food Hosts,
1430 SW 13th St. (E-4-ts-c).
FEMALE: Full and Part-time
opening for young ladies. No
experience necessary. Good hourly
pay. Ideal for student wife. Apply:
Kings Food Hosts, 1430 SW 13th
St. (E-4-tf-cL
PROCTORS: Male and female
graduate students or mature
upperclassmen for private prep
school in Ocala. Room and board
plus monthly remuneration. At Attractive
tractive Attractive opportunity. Call 372-7012
Friday, after 7 p.m., all day
Saturday. (E-6-tf-nc).
IGATQS^
ADS nT
REACH I Jl
(PEOPLE WT
Rene A THRILLER
i Clement s I
PLUS THE VIOLINIST
nivliivjalbjiaW mow
Ih.w. mfc ST,
I 3 BIG HII3 i
I SmtulST
Fmww
I in BELLBOY
*
BEBSRPBH Last 2
Days 1
I ImmortaJyldventure!
TECHNICOLOR
At 1, 3:05, 5:20, 7:30, 9:40

Rene
Clement's



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I GATOR
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THE
BEST BUYS!

I FRONTIER EDEN : The L iterary Career of \\ arjori e K inn an Rawl ings^k
h Y Gordon Bigelow
f I FRONTIER EDEN, an engaging account of a fascinating personality and I
I i an important literary career, is the first full-length study of Marjorie I
! 'C|&S 4 'Wj Kinnan Rawlings. A faithful portrait of the colorful person behind The H
Yearling and Cross Creek, it presents a warm and lively story of her 9
' n j pastoral adventure in Floridaher love of the countryside and the cracker H
r people who were her chief subjects. It discusses Mrs. Rawlings as liter- I
ary artist, describes her acquaintance with other great writers of her H
A?A, y '* era Hemingway, Wolfe, Fitzgerald-and relates her writings to their I
1 time to stream of literary history. Beautifully illustrated with I
Jflpen-and-ink sketches by Robert C. ( arson, noted Florida landscape art- H
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I' wWSfrlflr' acters and countryside, FRONTIER EDEN is a charming, absorbing I
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autos
1958 PONTIAC. Rebuilt motor.
Good condition, $275. Call 376-
8823. (G-2-st-c).
62 MONZA in good condition,lst
reasonable offer takes it. Call 378-
4630 after 5:00 PM. (G-3-st-c).
1965 KARMANN GHIA, air, tinted
glass, radio, seat belts. Local,
one-owner. Phone 378-1391, 9 to
5 or 376-0129 after 6. (G-6-2tf (G-6-2tfc).
c). (G-6-2tfc).
1962 VW. Sunroof, faithfully main maintained,
tained, maintained, exceptional condition, fully
equipped, a handsome, dependable
car. Call to see, 372-7019. (G (G---6-2t-p).
--6-2t-p). (G---6-2t-p).
MUST SELL either 1959 Chevy
6 cyl., 2 dr. coupe or 1962 Ram Rambler
bler Rambler 6 cyl. station wagon. Excel Excellent
lent Excellent condition. Sacrifice. Call 376-
8312. (G-6-lt-c).

Monday, September 12, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

autos
1960 CORVAIR, R&H, WSW. 1960
Johnson outboard with cruise tank.
Both excellent condition. Best
offer. Evenings 372-3975. Days
376-3261, ext. 2446, ask for Joan.
(G-5-st-c).
*SB TR-3 Red Convertible $550.
Rebuilt motor, new paint job. 601
NW 4th. Call 372-1122. (G-4-st-c).
1954 FORD Reconditioned 55
V-8 engine. New tires, Good con condition.
dition. condition. $175 or best offer. Call Jim,
372-3002 after 5 P.M. (G-4-st-p).
1965 ALFA-ROMEO Giula Ti
Sedan, 5 forward speeds, 4 wheel
disc brakes, driving lights, good
condition. $1650. Call 372-Bdl£.
(G-2- st-c).
1961 FALCON, 4-dr., Standard,
A/C, Rebuilt Motor, excellent,
$450, Masap Box 8765 Murphree
Area. (G-4-3t-p).

Page 9

autos
AUSTIN HEALY Sprite, $625. Call:
376-9700. (G-7-lt-c).
f mmmmmm
lost-found
LOST: Black Wallet vicinity
of C.S.C. Social Security No.
029-38-2335. Call Randy, South
H. Rm. 937 Reward! (L-3-st-p).
LOST One pair of Mens pre prescription
scription prescription glasses, brown frames
and black case. Contact Jim Al Alin
in Alin and, Delta Chi House, 6 Fra Fraternity
ternity Fraternity Row. Reward. (L-8-lt-p).
LOST: One pair of womens pre prescription
scription prescription sunglasses. The inscrip inscription
tion inscription John R. Keene, O.D. is print printed
ed printed on the case. Phone: 378-6492.
(L-7-3t-c).
RUBIES ALTERATIONS 1238 SW
3rd Ave. Call 376-8506. (M (M---2-ts-c).
--2-ts-c). (M---2-ts-c).

services v
GET ACQUAINTED Spedlal Miss
Kathy, hair stylist from Richmond,
Va. will give free hair cuts with
regular price shampoos and sets.
$35 factory price permanent and
wave for sls. Call 372-5549. Rame
Hair Stylist, 319 W. Univ. Ave. (M (M---5-3t-c).
--5-3t-c). (M---5-3t-c).
HOLIDAY MAGIC Cosmetics, Inc.
A dynamic new firm is seeking
campus representatives eager to
earn S3O to S2OO per month. Call
Jerry Walker, Sunday through
Thursday evenings after 6:30 at
378-4257. (M-7-3t-c).
TENA WELCOMES YOU Students
back and to let you know she 1s
still at Miladys Beauty Salon,
517 W. Univ. Ave. Her specialty
is FROSTING for average length
hair. $12.50. Limited time, by
appointment only. 376-3802. (M-2-
12t-c).
IN A HURRY? Passport and appli application
cation application photos. Childrens photos,
commercials, and special pro problems.
blems. problems. Call Westley-Roosevelt
Studios, 372-0300. (M-2-ts-c).
NURSERY. Complete central heat heating
ing heating and air conditioning. Separate
infant dept. 3 age groups. Pre Preschool
school Preschool training. Phone 376-0917
daytime, 372-4021 nighttime. (M (M---2-20t-c).
--2-20t-c). (M---2-20t-c). ~
personal
> M4HM '
VISIT GATOR GROOMER where
romance blooms. Next door to
University P.O. Self-service and
professional laundry and dry
cleaning. (J-3-ts-c).
DIG IT. You will eat free. Coe*
for self plus three seniors* Trans Transportation
portation Transportation furnished. Coed only.
378-5638. (J-5-3t-c).
rifflsrni!
FOUNDATION j
High Holy Days-
ROSH HOSHANA
Sept. 14 16
SERVICES: §
Sept. 14 7:30 p.m. :j:
Health Center Aud.
Sept. 15 9:30 a.m. x
Health Center Aud.
Sept. 15 7:30 p.m.
Hillel Foundation $
Sept 16 9:30 a.m.
Hillel Foundation $



Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 12, 1966

mik On The Wild Side
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fe,

On some fall days it's just re relaxing
laxing relaxing to take a walk. Our photo
editor Nick Arroyo followed this
unidentified girl in a late after afternoon
noon afternoon stroll through the millhopper
and photographed what she saw.



How To Watch Pro Football

By FURMAN BISHER*
Atlanta Journal Sports Editor
Well, I see that professional football
is making some progress. Frank Leahy
resigned as chairman of that new league,
the U.S.F.L, and I havent seen anything
about Harry Wismer coming up with a
franchise lately, and this is progress.
Its negative, like when youre in the
middle of a bad case of poison ivy
youre thankful you havent got chiggers
to scratch, too. Pro football has man managed
aged managed to survive Wismer, but it never
had a double attack of the plague before.
You may not realize this, but Wismer
had his eye on an Atlanta franchise
once. It was mainly in the days when
he was mad at George Preston Mar Marshall,
shall, Marshall, and he wanted to get even with
him, and the best way he knew to get
even with him was take the South away
from the Redskins.
In those times this was G. P. Mar Marshalls
shalls Marshalls whole private preserve. More
Southerners knew Gene Brito and Eddie
Learon by name and number than could
recite the first verse of Dixie. You
ask a kid who the greatest running back
in the world was and hed say, Scooter
Scudero, without any coaching at all.
Nobody knew who the coach was from
day to day. Marshall changed them every
time he changed shirts, until Joe Ku Kuharich
harich Kuharich got the job. Maybe he got stuck
on Joe, or maybe Joe wasnt an easy
to take off and put on as a shirt. Any Anyway,
way, Anyway, Kuharich stayed around so long that
some elderly women, not being intel intellectual
lectual intellectual on pro football and all those
Redskins in Washington, thought he was
Secretary of the Interior.
Those were the horse and buggy days
of TV. Wismer owned a piece of the
Redskins, but had to sell out. People

eoounc ijjk
ImW.your heels yjjU
7 MOTEL ROOM?
NO MORE WAITINGIr
r
Still Some One Bedroom Apartments Left
rr- MOVE IN IMMEDIATELY!
- ... Jtf-, ; *' 1 ;*
*. ; ..* ; \ " .. . -- ... ; . ' ...
, A '. CALL 376-6720 700 SW 16th AVE.

ALLIGATOR
S
P
0
R
T
S
0.
Monday, September 12, 1966

Page 11

watched pro football by television in the
South, or else they didnt watch pro
football, unless they caught one of those
excursions to Washington to watch the
Redshins live.
Frankly, it wasnt half as much fun
as watching at home on Sunday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. Say, youre wedged in a seat 18
inches wide with 20 people on one side
and 20 people on the other and its

colder than 40 hells. How do you get
up and go to the refrigerator for a
beer during the commercial?
All of our watching habits will be chan changed
ged changed this fall. Sunday afternoon used to
be the old mans refuge from family
and outside world. Hed hole up like a
hermit in front of TV and hed watch
professional football from the time it
was noon in New York until somebody
turned out the lights at Balboa Stadium
in San Diego.
By sundown, he was so bleary-eyed
he wasnt sure if Billy Cannon was a
real gun or a service station operator,
and if Roger Zatkoff and Boris Diman Dimancheff
cheff Dimancheff were Russian delegates to the UN
or football players.
And since the NFL had an official
named Bill Downs, why didnt the AFL
fire back and hire Rix Yard?
Those balmy autumn matinees are gone
now. Its up and out to the stadium on
Sunday afternoon like everybody else,
or forget it.
Oh, therell still be football on TV,
but you dont know how far out can
really be unless youre not there where
the in crowd is. Seen Stadium-Club Stadium-Clubbing,
bing, Stadium-Clubbing, the country club brunch and pro prominent
minent prominent in your 60-yard line seat.
A few little hints about conversion from
TV- side in the den to a seat in the Sta Stadium
dium Stadium are in order, I feel:
First, always remember to wear a
shirt. The sight of a hairy chest peek peeking
ing peeking over the top of a BVD vest just
wont pass inspection where the game is.
Second, also pants. It isnt a bad idea
to remember that pants AND shirt should
be worn to your seat in the Stadium.
Ill admit its more comfortable to sprawl
around the family den in your unmen unmentionables,
tionables, unmentionables, but every fellow ought to think
of his neighbor at the Stadium.

Third, be sure to shave. It's bad
enough to look at a man lurking behind
a growth of beard at 3 p.m. in his own
home, much less in a public open air
place.
Fourth, be sure to go to the bathroom
before reaching the Stadium. You mis missed
sed missed nothing but the commercials at home,
but youll miss dancing girls, watching
that blonde in the box seat section through
your binoculars and seeing the injured
get carried off at the game.
Fifth, stay sober< All your wife had
to do at home was cover your body
with a sheet and tell the kids she was
expecting the painter the next morning.
Its embarrassing as all sin to have to
be carried home from the Stadium.
Sixth, dont try to trim your toenails.
Perfectly permissible in the family den
between halves but never has been cleared
with Amy Vanderbilt as acceptable Sta Stadium
dium Stadium behavior.
NO NAPPING
Seventh, napping is frowned upon. Tlie
game may get dull at times, but the
neighboring seat-holders didnt come to
the Stadium to be your pillow.
Eighth, remember, if youre going to
invite the guy next door, youve got to
have a place for him to sit. Its not
like the times when you used to holler
over the fence, Hey, Brick, whyowncha
cmovern watch zuh progame? I got de
beeuh on ice.
Ninth, dont mind the peanut shells.
You can drop them on the floor here
and your wife wont care. But watch
the cigar. The guy next to you may be
wearing a raccoon coat.
Tenth, dont wear your raccoon coat.
The guy next to you may be smoking
a cigar.



Page 12

The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 12, 1966

'Sports For All-
Programs Goal
By DREW STRAEHLEY
Alligator Sports Writer
Sports for all and all for sports is the goal of the Department
of Intramural Athletics and Recreation.
As stated in the Managers Guide, the purpose of the intra intramural
mural intramural program is to provide for the student at the UF the oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to participate in competitive and non-competitive sports and
activities.
This department, under the College of Physical Education and
Health, provides to each individual student at UF the means of
developing physically as well as socially.
Under the guidance of Spurgeon Cherry, Chairman of the De Department
partment Department of Intramural Athletics and Recreation, and his assistants,
the program attempts to fulfill the diverse desires of the student.
Intramurals at the University of Florida for years have been
considered among the best in the country, and should be. This
tradition is largely due to student leadership. Cherry said. Cherry,
who is also Assistant Dean of the College of Physical Education
and Health, heads two major sections in the intramural program --
leagues and clubs.
Supervised under the combined direction of Paul Varnes, As Assistant
sistant Assistant Program Director for intramurals, and Ruby Pye, Assist Assistant
ant Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Women, 13 leagues are
sponsored by the Department of Intramurals. The leagues comprise
165 teams and compete in over a dozen sports.
The basic types of leagues fraternity, sorority and independent,
provide a wide spectrum of groups in which to participate. Sports
range from track for men to archery for women, which has separate
teams for men and women. Each team has a manager who is se selected
lected selected by the me ibncs of the team and who ;s responsible for no-
'.he Intramural Office, fou.il ? .n room 229 of the Florida Gvm,
of his teams entrance in a particular league.
A hough a program of league competition has not been designated
yet, the first sport for each of the various league groups has been
assigned. The dormitories will play flag foot ball, fraternities, water
bas oeiball; sororities an i independent leagues, volley ball. AM teams
which intend to compete must sign in at the intramural office on
m before Sept. 13. The first game will start Monday, Sept. 19

Clay Floors Mildenberger;
Wins Sixth Title Defense

FRANKFURT, Germany(UPl)
World heavyweight champion
Cassius Clay left for Chicago
Sunday to enjoy a short rest
before completing preparations
for his next fight against Cleve Cleveland
land Cleveland "Big Cat Williams.
Clay made his fourth title de defense
fense defense of the year and sixth since
winning the title when he scor scored
ed scored a 12th-round technical knock knockout
out knockout over German Karl Milden Mildenberger
berger Mildenberger Saturday night.
Clay indicated interest in
another bout with Mildenberger
here.
If Mildenberger wants it and
the promoters can build it up,
we will back them, the champion
said before boarding his plane.
Everything was nice and clean
here and I would like to come
back.
Clay looking back to his old oldtime
time oldtime style, first praised Milden Mildenberger
berger Mildenberger for presenting a stern

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challenge and then bragged about
the licking he handed the German.
This was a tough fight and
I would say that only the first
Sonny Liston fight and the one
against George Chuvalo were
harder, Clay said. I knew from
the start that Mildenberger would
last a few rounds because he was
fast. I would say he is the se second
cond second fastest heavyweight in the
world.
Asked if he had trouble with
the Germans lefthanded style,
Clay replied: Did it look as
though I had trouble?
Referee Teddy Waltham of
England stopped the cout at 1:32
of the 12th round when the chal challenger
lenger challenger seemed helpless under a
constant barrage from Clay. Mil Mildenberger
denberger Mildenberger later admitted that he
could hardly see anything after
the eight round because of blood
and swelling around his eyes.

BBb&v
WAGES
. o Looking sharp

Graves Disappointed
At Gators 1 Practice

By MIKE WILLARD
Alligator Sports Writer
If the Florida Gators dress
rehearsal scrim mage Saturday
is a preview of coming attrac attractions,
tions, attractions, it could be a very long
season.
This is the sloppiest prac practice
tice practice weve had, a disappointed
Ray Graves said Saturday. He
continued, mumbling, . mis mistakes,
takes, mistakes, penalties, fumbles--
enough for at least two games.
The Gator first team had just
finished straining past an aggres aggressive
sive aggressive freshman team 27-0 a nar narrow
row narrow margin in most any varsity
vs. B team battle.
Well, Graves said resign resignedly,
edly, resignedly, if were going to look
bad, I would rather it be against
those boys. In a year or two
they will be wearing blue team
jerseys.
During the day of disappoint disappointment
ment disappointment two key injuries were re registered
gistered registered in the defensive secon secondary.
dary. secondary.
Halfback Dan Manry sprained
an ankle and safety Tom Hun Hungerbuhler
gerbuhler Hungerbuhler received head injuries.
I dont know how long they will
be out yet, Graves said.
Adding some bright spots to the

CHICKEN m ni
Ali* DINNER
Includes four pieces of golden brown, crisp HjH
and hot fried chicken ana a heaping order of
tasty french fried potatoes, all in a cute toy
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0
Q a BIG BARNEY I HAMBURGER....IS<
S-f ( v t Includes two grilled patties _ .__ _
7 XV " beef, a slice of GR LLED CHEESE 19C
( melted, creamy cheese, pickle V
J j and a special tangy sauce
PL/ a toasted double deck FISH .....29b
a/tj6 MM I ONION RINGS 25b
UU(t I FRENCH FRIES 15b
RED' BARN
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$ 4iH 11 ' H
dSSSS
.y
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1
MANRY
. . Sprained ankle

practice, Graves pointed to the
quarterbacking of second string stringer
er stringer Harmon Wages, and the con continuously
tinuously continuously improving defense as
highlights of the full game scrim scrimmage.
mage. scrimmage.
We will have a hard workout
Monday but continue through the
rest of the week with limited
action, the Gator coach said as
he looked to the Northwestern
game next Saturday.
Yes, Graves announced,
the first team, both offensive
and defensive, will be named
Monday.
Graves is hoping that it will
be blisteringly hot for next Sat Saturdays
urdays Saturdays game. Its been pretty
cool in the midwestthis will
be to our advantage when the
Wildcats meet us in the Florida
field sweatbox, he said.
Last year Florida trounced the
Big Ten team 24-14 in Evanston,
111.
TimTnfUySehool
Gaineviile's Oldest
24 S.F. Bth St. 376-7806
7:15 to 5:45 $27.50 m0-

Pep Rally
To Kick-Off
Gator Season
By JIMMEY BAILEY
Alligator Sports Writer
The kick-off rally for the
1966 edition of the Florida Ga Gator
tor Gator grid season will be ignited
by a bonfire Friday at 7 p.m.
The UF band, led by torch torchcarrying
carrying torchcarrying cheerleaders and fol followed
lowed followed by a procession of students,
will march from the Music build building
ing building to the University auditorium.
Jack Zucker, coordinator of the
rally, will introduce speakers at
the auditorium- Larry Tyree will
share the podium, thanking the
Florida Union Board for the or organization
ganization organization of the rally activities.
Tyree will also introduce
special guest speaker Larry
Libertore. Libertore is remem remembered
bered remembered by Gator followers for his
instrumentalfootball leadership in
1960, a season in which the Ga Gators
tors Gators under coach Ray Graves
compiled a 9-2 record.
The pint-sized quarterback
was chosen SEC Sophomore of
the year in 1960, outstanding
player in the Gator Bowl, (also
in 1960) and an honorable men mention
tion mention All-America.
Libertores address will be
followed by program of band
selections, cheers by the UF
cheerleading squad and major majorette
ette majorette routines.
Coach Ray Graves will
then show slides of the Gator
football squad. He will comment
on the teams play and on several
individual players. Graves will
then introduce the team.
After more cheers and the
singing of the UF alma mater
Graves will set the bonfire
ablaze officially inaugerating the
1966 grid campaign.
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