Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
HELLO CAMPUS! WE'RE BACK

The Florida Alligator

Vol. 59, No. 2

Adams To Speak
Here Wednesday

The first Florida Union Forums
Committee presentation of the tri triin
in triin ester will feature Floridas
M .*/ r? .V V

. 1
jl
SEC. OF STATE
...Tom Adams
RIGHT ON RED
HALTED AT UF
Before you make that right
turn on red, check how much
money is in your wallet. It
may cost you.
The old Gainesville tradi tradition
tion tradition has been abolished by the
City Commission to conform
to a state law that forbids
right on red.

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Nick Arroyo)
TtfE WALLS CAME TUMBLIN' DOWN -- The
last class in the UFS own Alamo -- Benton
Hall -- was held this weekend. For more news
on the construction-happy campus, see page 13.

. University of Florida

Secretary of State Tom Adams,
Wednesday at 8:15 p.m. in Univer University
sity University Auditorium.
Jack Zucker, chairman of the
Forums Committee, announced
Adams will be one of two prominent
Florida politicians to speak during
the trimester. State senator Scott
Kelly will talk on Dec. 1.
Political observers report that
Adams has the best statewide
organizational partisan following
in the state. These pros have
tabbed the 49-year old UF law
graduate as a strong candidate for
the 1970 Democratic gubernatorial
nomination.
Dynamic Federalism will be
the title of Adams address. Zucker
quoted Adams as saying he felt
this was a most timely topic.
Secretary of State since 1960,
Adams publicly announced that in
1970 he would either retire from
public service or run for a position
of greater responsibility and
authority.
A graduate in pre-law from
Michigan University, Adams was
first elected to office in 1956.
A Florida senator from the 29th
district, Adams was named the
Most Outstanding first-term sena senator
tor senator in 1957.
Elected to his present post by
an overwhelming majority, Adams
has collected many honors. In 1963
he was named the states most
outstanding Democrat by the Young
Democrats Club of Florida. In
1965 Adams was selected the Most
Effective Administrator of a State
Agency.

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I* 9 I
(Photo By Arroyo)
AH! THOSE CRAZY, HAZY SUMMER DAYS: GONE
...see additional pictures on page 8
COMPLETES DEMOCRATIC TICKET
Humphrey Slated At Homecoming

By Jo Ann Langworthy
Alligator Staff Writer
Completing the second half of
the current Democratic Presiden Presidential
tial Presidential ticket, Vice President Hubert
H. Humphrey will be the featured
speaker for the annual Florida Blue
Key Homecoming banquet on Oct.
28.
The first half of the ticket, then
Vice President Lyndon Johnson,
was the featured speaker in 1961.
The announcement was made by
Council Wooten, Blue Key chair chairman
man chairman for Homecoming weekend
activities.
Humphrey was chosen as a
speaker who would add to the over overall
all overall flavor of Homecoming and also
raise the UF's image, Wooten
said.
Humphrey will speak to Florida
Blue Key members, alumni and
state officials at the stag dinner
held in the Florida Gym following
the Homecoming parade.
Details of the Vice President's
trip have not yet been completed.
Humphrey, a native of Wallace,
S. D., received his bachelor's
degree from the University of
Minnesota, his masters degree
from Louisiana State University
and his law degree from National
University in Washington, D. C.
He began his political career as
mayor of Minneapolis, Minn. Then
his political affiliations halted for
four years until 1949 when he
served two years as an assistant
instructor of political science at
boty LSU and the University of
Minnesota. During World War H
Humphrey held administrative po positions

r
Monday September 5, 1966

sitions positions with the War Manpower
Commission and WPA.
Humphrey is a member of the
American Political Science Asso Association,
ciation, Association, the Public Administration
Society, Phi Beta Kappa and Delta
Sigma Rho. He received two awards
from the Junior Association of
Todays Alligator
Starts New Series
Todays Alligator opens the big biggest
gest biggest trimester yet at the UF
both in terms of enrollment and
the size of this paper.
The Alligator has planned a new
series of columns, revamped the
editorial pages, created the largest
sports staff among the Southeast Southeastern
ern Southeastern Conference schools and has
added a (POW! ZOOM!) special
shock appearing for the first time
on page two today.
rtf
In addition we will carry noted
Atlanta Journal columnist Furman
Bis her, Our Man Hoppe, By
George! and the New York Herald
Tribune crossword puzzle once a
week.
The Alligator will continue its
state, national and international
coverage through the wires of
United Press International.
Also the Alligator will expand
its coverage of campus and com community
munity community events.
Once again the Alligator invites
its readers to gripe, expound or
compliment on the editorial pages
in letters-to-the-editors.
All-in-all we look for a good
year.

Bigger-
Brighter
Than Ever

Commerce in 1945 for outstanding
service.
Other well known speakers for
this event have included Senator
Burceton Morton and John F.
Kennedy when he was a senator
from Mass.
1 v
Though speakers tend to be poli politically
tically politically oriented, this is not a
requirement. Speakers have also
been chosen in the field of education
and business.
NEWS BRIEFS
Due to a new system that has
been installed in Gainesville, all
seven numbers must be dialed.
Last year students needed to dial
only five numbers.
* *
Late registration will be held
on today only this year. Instead
of the five dollars in past years,
the new cost is $25.
mm
' '. 0
...See Page 2



;, The Florida AlUgator, Monday, September 5,1966

Page 2

VET SCHOOL
ON PLANS
FOR 1970s
If all goes well, the UF will
begin planning the new College of
Veterinary Medicine in 1971,
according to Dr. George T. Edds,
chairman of Veterinary Science
in the College of Agriculture.
Hie Board of Regents was
by the last legislature
to begin planning for a new Col College
lege College of Veterinary Medicine. The
Florida State Veterinary Medical
Association has appointed a col college
lege college liaison committee to advise
the UF in establishing a first firstrate
rate firstrate veterinary college, Edds
said.
Edds expressed hope that the
necessary funds for construction
of the college would be requested
at the next legislative meeting in
1967.
The cost of the new veterinary
complex will be about $6,000,000,
he said. The new school will cover
more than 150,000 square feet of
floor space, Edds added.
Dr. Edds said that the mounting
animal loss due to disease in the
state, the horse industry, and the
increased number of pets have
made it necessary for the expan expansion.
sion. expansion.
At the present time, Florida
students who want to become certi certified
fied certified veterinarians attend Auburn
University under a cooperative
contract between Alabama and
Florida. However, only 20 stu students
dents students a year are permitted to take
part in the program, said Edds,
and the need is much greater.
Dr. Edds has been consulting
with veterinary schools at both
Texas A&M and Michigan which,
he said, have all the modern
teaching and research methods
available.
Tbe proposed curriculum for the
veterinary college will probably
include two years of pre- veter veterinary
inary veterinary training and four years in
the college itself. Some, of the
courses such as bio-chemistry
could be given in conjunction with
the College of Medicine, Dr. Edds
said.
The existing Department of
Veterinary Science, out of which
the new college will presumably
grow, offers only a master's
degree program the necessary
training in the science dealing with
veterinary medicine.
Edds explained that the courses
to be taught in the new college
will have to be approved by the
American Veterinary Medical
Association which supervises the
quality of 18 veterinary colleges
in the United States. This approval
will insure minimum standards of
excellence in training.
Dr. Edds said that the site for
the new college has not been de determTflftd
termTflftd determTflftd as yet.

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NOT JUST A NUMBER

Growing, complex universities
Increase rather than diminish the
role and responsibility of the indi individual
vidual individual student, a UF administra administrator
tor administrator pointed out Tuesday night.
Dean of Student Affairs Lester
Hale challenged the Florida
Gymnasium audience of nearly
3,800 new students taking part in
orientation week activities to help
form a strong partnership with the
University in learning and living
on campus.
This spirit of cooperation be between
tween between students and the University
administration-faculty team is
necessary to prevent the
emergence of a faceless institu institution
tion institution without character or
personality, he said.
Dean Hale emphasized: Every Everyone
one Everyone has a stake In maintaining
the face of the University stu students,
dents, students, teaching faculty and
administrative faculty alike.
Its everybodys job. We all
roust share a concern for one
ROTC Commander
Presents Medal
The widow of a Gainesville sol soldier
dier soldier killed July 26 on combat duty
in South Viet Nam received a
Purple Heart Medal Wednesday
from "the commanding officer of
the UF's Army ROTC unit.
Col. Arlo W. Mitchell, profes professor
sor professor of military science, presented
the medal to Grade D. Maulden,
widow of 24-year-old Lorenzo C.
Maulden.
PFC Maulden, a native of
Apopka, worked in the Physical
Plant Division of the University
from Oct. 5, 1964, to June 25,1965.
He entered the Arm yin September,
1965.
Col. Mitchell made the presen presentation
tation presentation on behalf of the Department
of the Army, Office of the Adjutant
General.

Dean Hale 'Challenges Freshmen

anothers problems, interests and
abilities, he added.
Students can best do" this by
active participation in student
government and other significant
on-campus activities in which they
can exert leadership and assume
responsibility, Dean Hale pointed
out.

He noted that too often students
seem to have difficulty relating
what they learn in the classroom
to their real life experiences. Or,
at least they want to make the
relationship closer and more rele relevant.
vant. relevant.
But to bring this about, the
students out of class life must
involve itself in worthwhile and
significant matters and not just in
a social whirl.
Another point he stressed was
that self-discipline and strenu strenuous
ous strenuous work provides a freedom to
move forward that cannot develop

I Welcome Students
>*
SPECIAL PRICES osf APPROVED & REQUIRED GYM CLOTHES
SHOES, by Converse, Keds, Beacon Falls Y/l
SWEAT SHIRTS, Gator Stencilled
SHOES, by Converse, Keds, Beacon Falls 1m \\
SWEATSHIRTS, Gator Stencilled J* I
s
Fred Perry TENNIS SHORTS for Men TENNIS RACKET RE-STRINGING I
Fred Terry TENNIS-SKIRTS for Ladies FAST SERVICE I
*
We Invite You to Visit North Central Florida's Most Complete Sporting Goods Store!
JIMMIE HUGHES SPORTIHG GOODS |
One Block East of Campus 1113 W. Univ. Ave. f


a TUB VOU A4T AM Uow i rmr

from unrestrained, unbridled, un undirected
directed undirected action.
Hie gap between learning in
classroom and responsible social
action will be closed when there
is a well-coordinated complemen complementa
ta complementa r y relationship designed for
mutual problem solving.
He added, Student affairs is a
bridge to reality and relevance.

Art Exhibition Scheduled
For Art Teaching Gallery

A collection of prints by Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville artist Ann Williams wiU
be on public display in the UFs
Department of Arts Teaching
Gallery from Tuesday through
Sept. 23.
The exhibit is on loan from the
Group Gallery in Jacksonville and
is composed of 30 woodcuts, lith lithographs
ographs lithographs and engravings.
An outstanding Florida artist
and craftsman, Mrs. Williams has
exhibited widely in national and
regional print shows. Her archi-

But this bridge must also extend
between students and administra administration,
tion, administration, bring the two together rather
than keeping them apart.
Again, he emphasized that
despite continuous growth, univer universities
sities universities are not impersonal
institutions as many would like to
believe. And students are not just
numbers.

tectural murals and stain glass
windows have brought her wide
acclaim.
Mrs. Williams recently com completed
pleted completed mural of glazed brick for
the Haydon Burns Library in Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville is a major commission and
shows fully the artist's command
of color for creating exciting visual
effects.
The Teaching Gallery is open
Monday through Friday from 9 a.m.
until noon and from 1:30 to 5 p.m.



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ACROSS FROM UNIVERSITY CITY BANK V \,7
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Monday, September 5, 1966, The Florida Alligator, J

Page 3



~ The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 5, 1966

Page 4

f FROM THE
\ WIRES OF
UPI /
INTERNATIONAL
V. C. KILLED. U. S. Army helicopters and South Vietnamese
troops teamed up Sunday to kill at least 276 Viet Cong in heavy
fighting in a Communist jungle stronghold south of Saigon.
In Saigon, meantime, U. S. military commanders ordered all
American servicemen to stay off the streets of Saigon except when
on business. The week-long curfew was designed to avoid possible
American involvement in the election campaign.
NEW WEAPONS. .The Soviet army pub publication
lication publication Red Star said Sunday that new
weapons, never before seen by the public,
will be used in Warsaw Pact military maneu maneuvers
vers maneuvers in Czechoslovakia this month*
RELUCTANT TO JOIN. .France and the Soviet Union are re reluctant
luctant reluctant to join attempts to draft Secretary General Thant for an
extended term of office, according to informed sources at the
United Nations.
The sources said that although France and the Soviet Union had
previously endorsed Thant for a second term, they felt his state statement
ment statement Thursday that he would not be available was a flat np
and that further attempts to have him reconsider would serve no
purpose.
NATIONAL
APPEAL TO, LABOR. .Vice President
Hubert H. Humphrey and Labor Secretary
W. Willard Wirtz called on organized labor
Sunday to lend its prestige in the fight
against social inequality.
ON THE MARCH. With a chant of black power, 200 civil
rights demonstrators marched into all-white Cicero under the
protection of 2,000 National Guardsmen Sunday and were met with a
hail of bricks, bottles and cherry bombs.
Crowds estimated at 3,000 ignored police orders to stay away
and taunted the marchers with curses, threats and obscenities.
The marchers, far less disciplined and more militant than the
demonstrators Martin Luther King led into Chicago this summer,
returned curse for curse.

Fugitives Captured
After Wild Chase
GARY, Ind- (UPI) -- Canadian
authorities were reported en route
here Sunday to pick up four Win Winnipeg,
nipeg, Winnipeg, Man., fugitives who were
captured in a wild police chase
that spread from their abandoned
getaway plane to a hotel hide hideaway
away hideaway to rooftops of downtown build buildings.
ings. buildings.
Police, fearful that the desper desperadoes
adoes desperadoes would attempt another jail
break, sought to arrange transfer
to three of the desperadoes to
the federal jail at nearby Crown
Point.
Kenneth Leishman, 34, one of
two fugitives who gave themselves
up without a fight when police
burst into their rooms in the
Hotel Baltimore, was a suspect
in a $383,000 gold bullion robbery
last March at Winnipeg Internat International
ional International Airport.
Leishman, an experienced flier,
apparently piloted the four-seater
plane which they commandeered
*r their excape.
Two-Wheeler Boom
NEW YORK t upj tMotor tMotorcycles
cycles tMotorcycles and scooters became
twice as popular in the United
States in 1965. Approximately
1.350.000 of the two-whee\ers
were registered during the year.
The total is expected to reach
almost 2 million in 1966
T|NyT*T*Yse|iOol
Gaineville's Oldest
24 S.E. Bth St. 376-7806
7:15 to 5:45 $27.50 m J

i\ School t 1
** \ Ties ... I i
\ What I 4
WELCOME/ Are ISTUDENTS \
J j They? \ 4
| Orientation \ I
Gator Growl\ 4
| Homecoming. A X
Traditions arA
great, but thisis\ X
T sixty-six. Things\
I are swinging. WereK X
Y for NOW! Taking the\ f
I, tried and true and \ Z
f making it new-as-you, \
4 j thats what Franklins \ Z
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I / girl we feature sports- \ I
4 j wear, tailored, afternoon \ 4
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I / Stop by, see for yourself the \ I
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X PLENTY OF '\jvear J s JE f
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A BTAKI*e Itu T
£ SHOPPING CENTER 401 W. UNIVERSITY AYE. X

NAVY
PLANS
STUDY
WASHINGTON (UPl)The Navy
has recommended to the Defense
Department a rapid expansion of
ocean research that could mean $1
billion a year for such projects
by 1970.
This would more than triple the
$305 million now being spent an annually
nually annually on experiments designed to
conquer and exploit the vast ocean
depths.
The Navy recommendation was
submitted in budget proposals that
require Defense Department ap approval
proval approval before they are submitted
to the next Congress.
They include a new program lab labeled
eled labeled deep ocean technology
which is expected to be larger than
the present deep submergence
project, which will also expand.
The aim of the new program is
to solve the problems of under underwater
water underwater construction.
Alabama Defies
Federal
Guidelines
MONTGOMERY', Ala. (UPI)
The Alabama House of Represen Representatives
tatives Representatives today stamped its approval
on the administration bill nulli nullifying
fying nullifying federal school desegregation
guidelines and sent it to Gov.
George Wallace for signature into
law.
Rep. Don Collins of Jefferson,
a Republican, asked Rep. Alton
Turner of Crenshaw County, who
directed the measure through the
House, whether the legislature had
the authority to nullify an edict
of a federal bureau.
Id say to you, Mr. Collins,
were damn sure going to try,
Turner replied.

Xv.'.V.V.V'V* *.. .'iv,
;X
LBJ To Woo Labor J
V)
By ALVIN SPIVAK
' 'r ~ g
''' WASHINGTON (UPI)--President Johnson went
to Michigan and Ohio Monday to mend fences
with organized labor and to lend a nelping
hand to Democratic candidates for the House
and Senate. ..
Tie Democratic party will foot the bill for
the Labor Day journey to the Midwest.

While the White House has not
gone to the extreme of calling
it a political trip, it has with withheld
held withheld the non-political label giv given
en given to the Presidents other recent
election-year travels.
The Wayne County AFL-CIO,
sponsor of the ceremony, denied
a place on the program to Re Republican
publican Republican Gov. George A. Romney
and GOP Sen. Robert Griffin, who
was appointed by Romney to suc succeed
ceed succeed McNamara and is running
against Williams. But Romney and
Griffin have been quoted as saying
they plan to be in the hall any anyway.
way. anyway.
Appearing under AFL-CIO aus auspieces
pieces auspieces in Detroitand later in
Dayton and Lancaster, Ohio
Johnson will have a chance to
try soothing the dissatisfaction
voiced by union leaders over the
administrations anti-inflationary
3.2 per cent guidepost for wage wageprice
price wageprice increases.
What's in a Name?
SAN FRANCISCO Theres plenty of life in Death
Valley. Apprbximately 560
species of native plants grow
there.

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fja t 4. 'vfe
&
41 PIECES OF GOLDEN FRIED £
CHICKEN PLUS A LARGE
ORDER OF FRENCH FRIES AND t I
ROLL...
USD
_J_ zz £_ 2037 NW 13 ST.

'Red Guard
Is Opposed
TOKYO (UPI) The extremist
Red Guard movement by Com Communist
munist Communist youths to rid mainland
China of all vestiges of Western
influence is badly split and meeting
stiff opposition from rival groups,
reports from China indicated Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday.
There were reports of distrust
and suspicion between city youths
in Peking and the rural Red
Guards. Factionalism was said to
be appearing in the hierarchy of
the movement.
The city-country dispute was
regarded as an echo of the strug struggle
gle struggle between urban and rural ele elements
ments elements for control of the ruling
Chinese Communist party.
That struggle was believed to
have sparked the current wide widesweeping
sweeping widesweeping purge inside China, which
in turn gave birth to the Red
Guards.



London Press
Greets Bardot
LONDON (UPI) Brigitte Bardot
flew into London, birthplace of the
mini-skirt, Friday wearing a skirt
six inches above her knees.
The result was the biggest news
reception in the history of London
Airport and a room temperature
that soared to 110 degreesfahren degreesfahrenheit.
heit. degreesfahrenheit.
Is there a window somewhere,
the French star gasped under the
glare of television camera spot spotlights.
lights. spotlights.
Brigitte arrived without her new
husband, German industrialist
Gunther Sachs von Opel, to make a
movie.
To be titled Two Weeks in
September, it co-stars English
actor Mike Same and Scottish
actor James Robertson Justice.
It is about a French fashion model
who runs off to Scotland with a
handsome young man.
Football Seating
Applications Due
Groups interested in football
bloc seating should turn in an
application to the Student Govern Government
ment Government office by Wednesday.
No applications will be accepted
after Monday, Sept. 19, for bloc
seating in games following North Northwestern.
western. Northwestern.
The deadline for turning in ID
cards for the Northwestern games
is Friday at
presented at the Athletic Depart Department
ment Department Office,

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MillfSlillliMfc <** a
m lr Vjwl
BRIGITTE BARDOT AND NEW HUSBAND
. . after Las Vegas Wedding
COMES THE REVOLUTION?
Red Office Bombed
NEW YORK (UPI)--Communist party headquarters here was dam damaged
aged damaged extensively early Sunday when a home made bomb exploded.
Police began an immediate investigation.
The explosion rocked the entire neighborhood, in the heart of
New Yorks garment district, shattering windows in a Serbian
Eastern Orthodox church across the street.
Nobody was injured in the explosion which occured in the ground
floor offices of the Communist party of the United States and the
Daily Worker, official organ of the party, both located on West
26th Street.
Henty Winston, the partys national chairman, issued a statement
Sunday afternoon, laying the blame for the bombing to the forces
of jingoism, racism and Fascist reaction.

Monday, September 5, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

TEEN-AGERS QUESTIONED
U. S' tr '~ t
ON WAR/ SEX, NARCOTICS

NEW YORK (UPI) American
teen-agers generally disapprove
of the war in Viet Nam, narcotics,
and parents, are in favor of sex,
indulge in cheating and are very
limited in their hero worship,
according to a poll of more than
550 youngsters in 95 localities,
made by Look Magazine.
Sixty-four per cent of the 13
to 20-year-olds polled felt that
war could not be prevented, but
most of them also felt that
America should seek a lasting
peace, and not support President
Johnsons escalation of the Viet Vietnamese
namese Vietnamese conflict.
Only about 50 per cent felt that
reports of widespread use of mari marijuana
juana marijuana and LSD were accurate, and
85 per cent said they did not in indulge
dulge indulge in drugs.
STUDENTS
PROTEST
45 Some 1,300 leftist workers and
students demonstrated in Yo Yokosuka,
kosuka, Yokosuka, Japan Sunday to protest
the scheduled arrival of the U.S.
nuclear-powered submarine Sea
Dragon. Police prevented them
from storming the gates of the U.
S. Naval base here.
Smooth Rails
WASHINGTON < UPI ) The
familiar clickety-clack is dis disappearing
appearing disappearing from German rail railroads,
roads, railroads, says the National Geo Geographic
graphic Geographic Society, which reports
that by 1970 West Germany ex expects
pects expects to have all of its 19,200
miles of track continuously
welded and noiseless.

Pre-marital sex was accepted
by 66 per cent, and 75 per cent
said their generation was setting
a new sexual morality for America.
Ninety-six per cent of those polled
cheating on high school
and college tests, and placed the
blame on the competitive pres pressures
sures pressures of the system.
The American teen-agers hero
worship, according to the survey,
is generally limited to the late
President John F, Kennedy.
i
Homecoming
Gator Slogan
Is Changed
The Homecoming slogan has
been changed, according to
Chairman Butch Wooten.
The first slogan Gators
Embark On A Disneyland
Lark, was canned in favor
of Gators Embark On A Lark
To Disneyland.
The reason for the change
was the usage of the term
Disneyland.
The Disney attorneys in informed
formed informed us that we can not
use the word as an adjec adjective,
tive, adjective, Wooten said. It can be
used only as a noun.
Wooten made the announce announcement
ment announcement of the slight alteration
in the slogan at the kickoff
breakfast Friday morning at
the Holiday Inn.

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 5, 1966

Page 6

The Florida Alligator
'
'A Mtywty. L Out
EDDIE SEARS 808 MENAKER STEVE HULL
Editor Managing Editor Executive Editor
ANDY MOOR DICK DENNIS
Editorial Editor Sports Editor
Opinions of columnists do not necessarily reflect the
editorial viewpoint of the Alligator. The only official
voice of the Alligator staff is the editorial in the left
column.
Dark At The Door
For 600 years ignorance ruled the
Western World. This era was the Dark
Ages.
For 600 years the classical civilization
which had developed with the growth of
Greece and the Roman Empire slowly
decayed into a shamble of broken thoughts
and lost ideas.
For 600 years historical evidence left
proof of an era of declined intellectual
activity.
The Dark Ages, that vast canyon of
time lacking the normal intellectual
achievments of man, passed almost as
if ignorance had been the philosophy of
the day.
But it wasnt then, and it isnt now.
What each college student faces today
could as easily prove to be an era of
Dark Ages.
v Overspecialization and reliance on cus custo
tom custo two prominent characteristics of the
Dark Ages are also present here. And
they could spell doom for the educational
offerings of this university.
The Dark Ages didnt pass into ob oblivion
livion oblivion with the opening of the Renaissance.
The closed-mindedness and single singlemindedness
mindedness singlemindedness of purpose that strongly char characterized
acterized characterized this era still lurk in mans
mind.
The four years of education being em embarked
barked embarked upon by 18,000 students could be
another Dark Age for each individual;
But only if they make it that way.
Patterns are easily set. Students can
devote all their time to studying, or
they can easily overemphasize the impor importance
tance importance of outside activities such as sports,
social life and entertainment.
There is no lesser of the two evils.
, -o y
The UF doesnt cater to the bright
individual seeking the highest form of
education: the pursuit of knowledge.
The university does cater to the av average
erage average student that elusive description
of mediocrity.
But the average student, like the aver average
age average family of 4.2 persons, doesnt exist.
Returning students and new students
alike should above all keep this in mind,
for the knowledge and achievments of
the college experience wiL be the result
of each students ability to siphon from,
it.
The university gives nothing but the
opportunity.
The education each student will get at
the university is a matter of his own
volition.
It is a balance between the offerings
of the faculty and the inquisitiveness of
the student.
It is a balance between intellectual
pursuits and social activities of college
life.
This is an education. This is what the
.student should seek.
Tis next four years, two years, or
one year could easily be the birth of
your own Dark Age. Or it could be the
renaissance of the pursuit towards a well wellbalanced
balanced wellbalanced education.

< The Politics Os Florida
3
By MIKE r.APf!TA_
Alligator Staff Writer
(Alligator Columnist Mike Garcia, a journalism junior from
Tampa, is no stranger to the politics of the state or the univer university.
sity. university. Garcia spent two years working in the office of Sen. George
Smathers and, more recently, was Northeast Florida coordinator
for Scott Kelly. He was also campaign manager for Apathy
Party presidential candidate Ernie Litz last spring.)

The political wars have carried
on steadily throughout the summer.
Claude Kirk, the Republican candi candidate
date candidate for governor, has spent the
last three months treking about the
state in search of Democratic
support.
As there are only about 500,000
registered Republicans in the state
and almost 2,000,000 Democrats;
it would appear that Mr. Kirk has
quite a job cut out for him.
appear.
registration
on how the people
vote in a general /-ylr
election. *'-f
ies, Mayor High
rolled up a big GARCIA
majority against incumbent gov-
ernor Haydon Burns. However,
that vote only represented about
one-fourth of the total registered
Democratic vote.
For purposes of round figures,
let us assume that Haydon Burns
received 500,000 votes and Robert
King High, 600,000. If we add the
two we see that about half of the
registered Democrats voted
(1,100,000 of 2,000,000).
Robert King High received bet better
ter better than half the Democratic votes
cast, giving him the nomination.
However, of the total registered
vote, High received little more than
one-fourth (600,000 of 2,000,000).
The question many people are
asking is: How many of those
votes were anti-Burns votes and
how many were pro-High?
The answer to this question will
have a great bearing on the out outcome
come outcome of the General election. If we
assume the obvious, that about one onefourth
fourth onefourth of Highs votes were anti-
Burns then we see that High has a
450,000 voting base after the pri primaries.
maries. primaries.
Os course we must add to that
another 250,000 who will vote for

the Democratic nominee whoever
he may be. So we could give High
about 700,000 strong votes going
into the November election.
If one proceeds on the premise
that about 1,700,000 people will
vote in the general election, High
has, without question, a sizeable
lead over Kirk.
Kirk can probably count on about
300,000 of the registered Republi Republicans.
cans. Republicans. So in effect it appears that
High has 700,000 votes to Kirk's
300,000 at this time. That would
mean that 700,000 votes lay in the
balance.
With this fact in mind let us
return to the present situation.
Robert King High beat Haydon
Burns by less than 100,000 votes.
Also, unlike Burns in 1964, High
does not have the endorsement of
the Democratic governor.
The conservative Burns vote
will probably go with Kirk. This
trend became obvious when Burns
Dade county organization went over
to Kirk. The pattern has been
followed in many of the small
counties of North Florida.
All in all the General election
will probably be a shouting con contest
test contest and the one who shouts the
loudest will get the balance of the
700,000 undecided votes.

Florida Alligator Staff
NICK ARROYO CAROL HEFNER GENE NAIL
Photo Editor Society Editor Editorial Assistant
JO ANN LANGWORTHY TYLER TUCKER
General Assignment Editor Assistant Sports Editor
STAFF WRITERS Marti Cochran, Bob Beck, Barbara Frank,
Sue Froemke, Sharon Bauer, Barbara Gefen, Lin Johnson, Maury
dicker, Harry Moore, Betty Diamond.
S'
ASSISTANT EDITORS Judy Redfern, Dot Bell, Sherrie Bras Braswell,
well, Braswell, Tom Gilibterti, Joe Torchia, Louis Nobo, Kathy Deagan,
Brenda Latt, Justine Hartman, Aggie Fowles.
In order to better cover campus events the Alligator uses
reporters from the School of Journalism and Communications.
Their bylines are followed by Alligator Correspondent.

' jmj
Campus I
Mirror I
.By 808 MENAKER_ I
Alligator Managing Editor I
(Alligator Managing Editor Bob I
Menaker, a journalism senior I
from Miami Beach, has been 1
working for the Alligator for I
three trimesters. He is a for- 1
mer sports editor and executive
editor and spent a good deal
of his spare time this summer
as a desk man for the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Sun.)
Student num hers are now a thing
of the past, and I dont know if
I like the change.
It seems to me as though a
student number was something
personal. When you had a student
number it was yours, all yours,
and nobody else would ever be
able to lay claim to it. I guess
social security numbers are okay
to use instead of student num numbers
bers numbers and just as individual, but
somehow a social security number
seems cold and impersonab-Soc impersonab-Social
ial impersonab-Social security numbers may help the
registrar keep better records but
it appears to me it may be set setting
ting setting a trend.
You have a
number which is
could be identified
than a number.
7C k e S nouT MENAKER
Orwellian visions of 1984 swim
crazily around. This IS the age
of the computer, no doubt about
it. But me, Ill take the person personal
al personal touch of a student number.
Hypothetically, I imagine the
federal government could track
a person down if it j had to with without
out without ever using his name. Numbers
would be enough. I have nothing
against numbers but I want to
be called by name, even if its only
hey you. Maybe its a personal
quirk, but I even resent taking
a number in a barber shop to
wait my turn. The old saying
your counselors tried to debunk
when you were a gullible fresh freshman
man freshman and they would snow you
was youre NOT just a number.'
But Im afraid that its just
not true.
I realize that UF will never
be a small, close-knit school, but
it seems to me as though elim eliminating
inating eliminating student numbers is merely
another step towards a process
of impersonal de- centralization by
Tigert Hall.
Recording students by social se security
curity security number may be easier, but
I for' one will miss my studen
number.
It was something personal.



Food Plan
Can Save
Dollars
'EDITOR:
*
The purpose of the Gator Meal
Plan is twofold. First it was
designed to provide an arrange arrangement
ment arrangement whereby a student would be
assured of three balanced meals a
day. It offers a security to the
student in that once enrolled in the
plan, he no longer needs to worry
about budgeting for meals, regard regardless
less regardless of what unforeseen circum circumstances
stances circumstances arise. Secondly, it offers
the student an opportunity for a
very substantial saving on his meal
appropriations without lowering
his nutritional standards.
The Meal Plan offers a wide
variety of selection, a minimum
of four entrees (more where the
facilities permit).
The meal plan cards are accept acceptable
able acceptable in all cafeterias and break fast
may be had in the cafeterias or
the snack bars (we are unable to
serve lunch or dinner in the snack
bars because of limited facilities).
The price of the Meal Plan is
$206.25 for the 15 week trimester.
This figures out to be $13.75 a
week or an average of 65 cents
per meal. A student on the Thrift
Plan would save approximately
$126.00 a trimester against com comparable
parable comparable meals on an a la carte
basis. A student is not required
to enter into the plan at the be beginning
ginning beginning of the trimester. He is
welcome anytime during the period
on a pro-rated basis. In fact, Food
Services would advise any new stu students
dents students who may be contemplating
joining a fraternity or sorority
to wait until they have made their
decision before considering the
food plan, as most houses would
provide a food service.
a student withdrawing from
school would be reimbursed
for the weeks remaining on
the program, but he may not
withdraw for any reason other
than withdrawal from school.
In short, University Food Ser Services
vices Services feels it has designed a pro program
gram program to fulfill a heed for many
of the students.
For any one interested, further
information may be obtained from
the cafeteria managers or in the
directors office.
ROBERT W. OVERTON,
Food Service Director

Ilf nP JR
JjF* Jf
.. xi^^MHhHwp
'.' -ixxxxaHp^-
Glasgo makes sweaters to _!_,
wear on geology field trips.
v
for STORt NEAR YOU WRITE TOGLAbUOLTD MO7 B WAY. NEW YORK N.V

EDITOR:
- V- 2: : T
There is a standard against
which wo should regularly test
basic issues of foreign policy. That
standard is the historical and con continuous
tinuous continuous struggle of human beings
for freedom and dignity. This must
be our basis in confronting Bresh Breshnev
nev Breshnev and Kosygin. We are right
because the history of man proyes
it.
Domestic issues must also be
measured against mans historic
struggle for liberty. For the his history
tory history of the advance of world Com Communism
munism Communism overwhelmingly provides
the evidence that they will seize
upon any situation approximating
dissent for propaganda purposes.
Woodrow Wilson once said:
A nation which does not

He Questions The Use
Os C-3 Autobiographies

EDITOR:
One of the routine class papers
assigned in C-31 (then freshman
English) in the summer of 1960
was to write a short autobiography.
A few months later while applying
for a loan I accidentally saw my
personal file in the dean of mens
office which contained my C-31
I
autobiography. This was a use of
my paper in a highly unethical way.
I requested its return or per permission
mission permission to revise and recopy it.
I was informed that only the dean
could give that permission.
I made an appointment with the
dean of men and told him my
feelings on this use of my paper.
He would not return my paper but
assured me that he would see to
it that in the future students would
be warned that their papers would
become part of their perament
records. I accepted this and did
not press the issue any further for
several reasons, not the least of
which that I was attempting to gain
financial assistance from the uni university.
versity. university.
Recently I met a U of F student
who took C-31 in the winter of 1965
and she could remember no
warning connected with the writing
lab papers becoming part of her
permanent record. If the university
has continued to follow this un unethical

Dont Tear Down The Structures

remember what it was yester yesterday,
day, yesterday, does not know what it
is today, nor what it is trying
to do. We are trying to do a
futile thing if we do not know
where we came from or what
we have been about.'
In seeking to improve tomorrow,
it is our duty to remember where
we have been anti reflect on where
we are. Our goals are set forth
in the Declaration and buttressed
by a Constitution, a system of
checks and balances which permits
the continuation of western civili civilizations
zations civilizations spirited dialogue. This
unhampered dialogue makes pos possible
sible possible the opportunity to con continuously
tinuously continuously approximate our moral
and spiritual goals.
For we live in that instant of
time when it can be said that never

ethical unethical practice I hope you will
take the necessary steps to inform
the student body.
GENE CARTE,
University of California
IGatOR AOs Sell! I
I CALL UF EX: 2832 I
1 For Specialized Service!

Data M ate
COLLEGE COMPUTERIZED DATE MATCHING
For Uof F And F.S. u.
*
DATAMATE Offers Florida And Florida State Students:
*
Twice The Results!!!
Each Participant Will Receive Twelve Names, Six From
f
Each School; Twice The Results Os Any Other Computer
Service At No Extra Cost.
n
Much Greater Selection
By Combining The Returns From These Two Major State
Universities The Results Will Be Much More Accurate.
_ i
Special Low Participation Fee For Coeds
- .. v
*
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DATAMATE Offers More To -c*
Pre-Football Season Edition!!!
Results Will Be Mailed Within 10 Days,- In Plenty Os Time
For Football Season And The Fall Term Social Activities Os Both
s
Watch For Data Mate n Wednesdays Gator |

Monday, September 5, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

before have 190 million people en enjoyed
joyed enjoyed so many material benefits--
however imperfect their dis distribution.
tribution. distribution. The multiplication of
consumer wealth, however, is sub subordinate
ordinate subordinate to our greatest
accomplishment -- the fashioning
of the law society. There is an
obligation to that law society. Lin Lincoln
coln Lincoln said:
"Let every American, every
lover of liberty, every well wellwisher
wisher wellwisher to his posterity, swear
by the blood of the Revolution,
never to violate in the least
particular, the laws of the
country. . .Let every man
remember that to violate the
law is to trample on the blood
of his father and to tear the
character of his own and his
childrens liberty....
No society, free or tyrannical,
can give its citizens the "right
to break the law. There can be no
law to which obedience is optional;
no command to which the States
attach an "if you please.
But what has happened to us?
Why is it necessary at this time
to repeat what should be axiomatic
and accepted? What is the respon responsibility
sibility responsibility of a citizen? Unequivocally

I i
* NEW OWNERSHIP PORKY SAYS:
* NEW MANAGEMENT 1
, T A Come out and i
Lets set acquainted . , 1
6 taste the best
I rin ? Th t s JL Bar-B-Cue r\
Receive Off 1 \ i
on any 1 Bar-B-Que Item in TOwn X|J
! MAC'S DRIVE-IN
"1331 East University Avenue BAR-B-CUE j

the continuing social task for the
morally sensitive citizen is' to
impart reality to the yet unachieved
ideal of full and equal participation
by all and in aIT our values and
opportunities. There are no easy
solutions for mans inhumanity to
man.
There is nothing new in violence.
Throughout mankind's history it
has been too. often away of life.
Whole continents have been in involved
volved involved in riot, rebellion and re revolution.
volution. revolution. A large part of the world
lives behind the ugly iron and
bamboo curtains of Communism.
But this cannot justify terror in
the North or in the South. No indi individual
vidual individual or group at any time, for any
reason, has a right to exact self selfdetermined
determined selfdetermined retribution. All too
often retaliation injures the inno innoce
ce innoce n t at random and provokes
counter-retaliation against those
equally innocent.
Our imperfections do not license
tearing down the structures which
have given us our progress. The
only solution is the free and open
law society.
MORRIS I. LEIBMAN,
Member, Illinois Bar

Page 7



Page 8

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 5, 1966

R* Wf V
* w y
K
BmBMBBBmBHB
.M i S 1 HB&k
v JBHIHB b
W:
II I
IllfJif /' > | > 3h I||| < fe
A 4 I I I II I
, m ; j
§ jm
(Photo By Nick Arroyo)
ORIENTATION IS FINALLY OVER
... a hectic week

I ' JrBBB EL a-itfH K 5
1 ''V§§P ' j § | ' JBP 1 $H
&Smy J%& 1 * wOs* V '< t , V P ,-' ffiM
| -> .JMk :
* Jb *f. ;
V *J| Hg^ffr^lfe\^< ;
(Photo By Chuck Broward)
' -'- ,\ ( :
ALWAYS A HECTIC OPERATION FOR UF STUDENTS
.__ J
. .registration in Florida Gym

Traded For School Days

Orientation is a
hectic affair for m ost
UF students--new and
old alike.
Confused freshmen
hurry back and forth
oyer a large-, confus confusing
ing confusing campus, while old older
er older students look on in
w onde r and ask the in
selves, *Was 1 like
THAT?
Yes, its confusing,
and *as classes start
today, m ny freshmen
a n d up p e rcl as sme n
will wander a sound
mattering about sum summers
mers summers transiency. But
to no avail.
Those lazy, hazy
days of summer are
finally over.

THOSE LAZY DAYS OF SUMMER

w 'Whiffy f£?
K' %> i^jj
V; V i Wttm. i -uk
'V ji
Wv : IV
WsM&mFm ~*+
BV 'Mf
jll /
(Photo By Chuck Broward)
s .
FRESHMAN TALENT ENTRY
..oTerry Barnert

'm >:? ,;^BBBBiP
ik jf
:
: .....
' && X:- < sJSjof!§:
I jj '"' B
(Photo By Nick Arroyo)
FIRST CAMPUS CUTIE
H, .;
...is this unidentified
freshman who posed
for our photographer



Orange

Campus Calendar
PLEASE TURN IN ALL ITEMS FOR CAMPUS CALENDAR TO THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS OFFICE, FLA. UNION

Administrative Notices To Students, Faculty & Staff

To Students

I MONTHLY DEPOSITS ARE NO LONGER LIMITED IN YOUR CREDIT UNION I
Building 5 Radio Rood k. i I
I Interest Rate l nc rease I
I 5Vi% Serving Uof F Employees Since 1935 t'I'oTL I
Paid Semiannually Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union Loan...
*******s**+************ ** ********* **********************************************
* 'w 5
| IT S ELEMENTARY ; |
* 5
* The Most Student-Minded Businessmen
tm. i
$ / ADVERTISE IN
(The Florida Alligator|
**.<*********************** *****************************************************^t

Monday
September 5
. -- y
Tuesday
September 6

MENSA: Students with scores above 475 on the
Florida Senior Placement Test please contact Mike
Sipe at 378-4950 or from 12-1 p.m. at the Mensa
table in the Main Cafeteria.
?
TELEPHONE SERVICE: During the next few months,
the University Physical Plant will be conducting a
major utility expansion on the campus. Due to this
project, interruptions to telephone service, as well
as other underground installations, may be expected.
If and when these interruptions occur to your tele telephone
phone telephone service, contact Bill McGee (Ext. 2640) or
M. C. Townsend (Ext. 3116). The earlier a report
is received, the more quickly corrective action can
be taken.
...
FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAMINATION: Friday,
Sept. 9, is the deadline for the Spanish and all fun functional
ctional functional examinations to be given on Sept. 17. Ap Application
plication Application should be made in the Department of Foreign
Languages, 3 Anderson Hall.

Christian Science: Group meeting,
210 FLU, 7 p.m.
Florida Players: Players meeting,
Norman Hall Aud., 7 p.m.
Young Republican Club: Service booth,
10 a.m.
MENSA: Daily luncheonsfrom 1 LOO LOOLOO
LOO LOOLOO for Faculty, students & Staff.
Reserved table in west wing of
Main Cafeteria.
Forums Committee: 118 FLU, 7p.m.
Dollars for Scholars: Service booth,
10 a.m. Campus pacs & Spirit
hats.
U. S. Marines: Recruiting, 118 FLU,
8 a.m.
International Host Committee: FLU
Bryan Lounge, 7 p.m.
Wauburg Committee: Meeting 210
FLU, 4 p.m.

S H ADDRESS notices to orange and blue,
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE, CAMPUS
BLUE BULLETIN

Wednesday
September 7

ORANGE & BLUE DEADLINES: All notices for the
Orange and Blue Bulletin must be received by 9 a.m.
of the day prior to publication. Deadlines are-Friday
for Monday publication, Tuesday for Wednesday pub publication.
lication. publication. Notices should be typed and signed by the
person submitting the notice and sent to the Division
of Informational Services, Building H, Campus. Items
for the Campus Calendar should be sent to the Public
Functions Office, Florida Union.-
IDENTIFICATION CARDS: ID cards may be picked
up at ticket window, west stands of stadium, gate 4,
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on tuesday, Sept. 6, and Thurs Thursday
day Thursday sept. 8. ID cards are official documents of the
University |Lnd are necessary for the procurring of
football tickets, library books and for other campus
activities. ID £ARDS WILL NOT BE MAILED OUT.
PRE-LAW SOCIETY: All freshmen and returning
students interested in the Pre-Law Society may sign
up outside of Room 123, Law Building.

Monday, September 5, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

FLU Forums Lecture: Tom Adams,
Fla. Secretary of State: Dynamic
Federalism. "Univ. Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Florida Players: Open house, Norman
Hall Aud., 7:30 p.m. Everyone
invited; see how Florida Players
operates.
Student Board, FLU Bryan Lounge,
8:45 p.m.
U of F Veterans Club: FLU Aud.,
7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi: Rush Smoker, M-112
MSB, 7 p.m.
AIA Film Series: Walter Gropius,"
105 B AFA, 8 p.m.
Piano Concert:Elder Richard Clinger,
MSB Aud., 7:30 p.m. Sponsored
by Deseret Club & Florida Mission
LDS.

Page 9



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brakes, baskets, lights. One-year
old, excellent condition. See at
1700 SW 16th Court, Apt. D-4
after 5:30. (A-2-lt-c).
2 BRAND NEW RACING Recaps
mounted on slightly damaged
chrome rims. Fits *64 Porsche
and later. S7O, tires alone worth
S4O. One electro-voice 12* tri triaxle
axle triaxle speaker in bass reflex
cabinet SSO. One 8 Frazer
speaker in enclosure S2O. Call
372-6018 after 5:30. (A-2-lt-nc).
BLACK ENGLISH Racing Bike, 5
speeds, Reverse Bars, Good con condition
dition condition $35.00 Call Ed Casker at
372-1451 between 8 and 5 p.m.
J[A 2ItpL^^
1965 BULTACO MATADOR Motor Motorcycle
cycle Motorcycle for sale Scrambler. 1790
miles 200cc. Never dropped. Best
offer, must sell. Call Mike S. at
372-9222. (A-2-2t-c).
1965 HONDA SPORTS 65. Top
Shape $275. Phone 372-4637. (A (A-2-3t-c).
2-3t-c). (A-2-3t-c).
POST OFFICE SCOOTER. Ideal
transportation rain or shine.
Excellent condition. 100 m.p. gal gallon.
lon. gallon. $250 cash. Call 372-7134 after
5:00 P.M. (A-2-3t-c).
MOTORCYCLE 1965 HONDA
SUPER-90. Only 300 miles.
Like new, reasonable price.
Colonial Manor Apt. 87 or call
378-4657. (A-2-3t-p).
1960 AC BRISTOL New Michelin
tires. Many spare parts $1995.
See at 1031 S. Main or call 378-
2136. (A-2-st-c).
1966 MOTORCYCLE. Reasonable.
Call Sherrod,37B-2671.(A-2-st-c).
AIR CONDITIONERS SPECIAL
Cost plus 10%. Most sizes still
available. See Sudden Service Fuel
Oil Co. 907 SW 3rd St. or call
376-4404. (A-2-10t-c).
HARLEY-DAVIDSON Motorcycle,
125 cc, fine condition, $l4O. Bob
Keith, 372-9496, Rm. 2053 Hume
Hall. (A-2-ts-c).
1965 VESPA 150 Motorscooter.
Less than 4000 miles. Extras,
excellent condition. Make offer
378-2193. See at 1216 SW 2nd Ave.,
#lOl. (A-2-ts-c).
3 BEDROOM Trailer, completely
furnished, air conditioned, wall to
wall carpet, appliances, TV, and
stereo, included. Pinehurst Trailer
Park. Call: 372-1356. (A-2-ts-c).
HW Kmmd *. M MWI
Box Office Opens 6:30
Last Two Njtes
PLUS
JACK LEMMON
£4 VIINIALISI
"HOWTO
U MURDER
YOUR WIFE"
artists

for rent
ONE TRAILER SPACE for rent.
Shady and quiet. Coeds only. Call
466-3300. (B-l-2t-c).
1 ROOM FOR RENT for Female.
Room, bath, and carport $45 a
month. Call 376-5673 before 8:00
AM and after 4:00 PM. (B-2-3t-c).
FURNISHED ROOM for Coed Girl
at 1011 NE Ist Ave. S3O a month
linens included. Call 372-7294
after 6:00 PM. (B-2-st-c).
FURNISHED EFFICIENCY APTS.
Private bath $65 a month utilities
included except gas. Off-street
parking. 320 NW 3rd St., Apt. 2.
CaU Mr. Kaplan, 372-0481. (B (B--2-st-c).
-2-st-c). (B--2-st-c).
FURNISHED one bedroom Apts.
$75 a month, Efficiency Apts. S4O
a month, Bedrooms S3O a month.
All utilities supplied, except gas.
320 NW 3rd St. Call Mr. Kaplan,
372-0481. (B-2-st-c).
2 BEDROOM Furnished Apt. 319
NW Ist St. $65 for two people,
s7s.ior three people. Call Mr.
Kaplan 372-0481. (B-3-st-c).
UNFURNISHED HOUSE. 3 Bed Bedrooms,
rooms, Bedrooms, 1 bath. UNFURNISHED
Garage-Apt. 3 blocks from Cam Campus
pus Campus SBS a month. 316 NW 20th St.
372-0481, Mr. Kaplan. (B-2-st-c).
ONE BEDROOM, living room, kit kitchen,
chen, kitchen, FURNISHED. Central Air
conditioning and heating $l2O a
month. 300 feet from Campus,
across from Ramada Inn. Call
from 9:00-5:00 at 376-0031. (B (B--2-st-c).
-2-st-c). (B--2-st-c).
TWO UPSTAIRS 1 Bedroom Apts.
Share bath. Located at 503 S.W.
2nd St. Phone 378-1652. (B-l (B-l-6t-c).
6t-c). (B-l-6t-c).
ROOM IN PRIVATE HOME NE
Section for mature male student.
Linen and maid service, separate
entrance, off-street parking. Call
376-5360. (B-2-ts-c).
wanted
ROOMMATE WANTED, Modern
apartment livingroom, bedroom,
kitchenette. 1 block from library.
Completely furnished. $47.50
monthly. Must see to appreciate.
1530 NW 4th Ave. Apt. 15. (C-2-
I fati.

| Telephone 378-2434
PLAST 2 DAYb 1 || "siAKTS WED. I
1 ~ -ginr 1 It T^^oridh' |
1 CHS 1 I 7mmor/^/J^nt un j
fS '*S|

:, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 5, 1966

Page 12

wanted
/ r
WANTED One Plectrum Banjo.
Call 376-2621 after 5:00 P.M. (C (C---2-lt-c).
--2-lt-c). (C---2-lt-c).
GOOD FEMALE Cook with kitchen.
Yours and mines breakfast, din dinners.
ners. dinners. Like bread, meat, potatoes.
Must cook, shop, wash dishes. I
pay bills. CaU MikeS. at 372-9222.
(C-2-2t-c).
WOMAN STUDENT to share 2
bedroom apt. Downtown. $32 a
month, plus 1/2 utiUties. Call
378-2219. (C-2-st-c).
FEMALE TO share large, top floor
A/C apt. Two blocks behind College
Inn. $45 mo. 207 NW 17th St., Apt.
504. (C-2-st-p).
FEMALE ROOMMATES one in
each Apt. Starlight Apts. #B6l
and #859. 2-Bedroom A/C $34 a
month plus utiUties. Immediate
occupancy, call Managers Off.
378-2855, 821 SW sth Ave. (C (C---2-st-c).
--2-st-c). (C---2-st-c). v
help wanted
TEACHERS NEEDED, for High
School Mathematics and Girls
Physical Education. Can use
certified teachers or out-of-field
teachers who have sufficient back background.
ground. background. If interested please contact
us immediately. Gilchrist County
Board of Public Instruction, Box
131, Eli Read, Sutp., Trenton, Fla.
463-2148. (E-2-3t-c).
HELP WANTED, Daytime Hours.
Full or Part time. See Mr. Levine,
Red Barn 2029 NW 13th St.
(E-2- 3t-c).
EXPERIENCED PRINTERS for
part time work on Friday and
Saturday nights. Call George
Doyle. 378-1411. (E-l-2t-c).
WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
WANTED. Full-time or part parttime.
time. parttime. Apply in person, Larrys
Restaurant, 1225 W. Univeristy
Avenue. (E-l-ts-c).
SENIOR HAIRSTYLIST, Excellent
working (conditions. Call: 372-5549
for appointment, Rame Hair Hairstylist.
stylist. Hairstylist.
help wanted
PART-TIME WORK FOR students.
We have an opening in offset paste pasteup
up pasteup for the Florida AlUgator from
8 a.m. until noon. Experience de desired
sired desired but not necessary. Hourly
wage. Contact Ed Barber at Univ.
Ex. 2832, Today. (E-2-tf-nc).
PIZZA HUT, 1723 SW 13th St.
Plan to open Sept. 15th. Male
only. Must be over 21. Duties:
1. Make pizza. 2. Wash dishes.
3. Walt on tables. Minimum $1.25
an hour. Open 11 AM 12 PM.
WUI work your work schedule
around your classes. Need four
men. (E-2-st-c).
WOMEN, Need money for
extras? I may have just the
opportunity your looking for. Call
376-1529. (E-2-st-c).
POSITION OFFERED: Student,
Male or Female, junior standing,
science major, to act as on-campus
representative for established
laboratory supply firm. Send full
resume including grade average to
P O. Box 1202, Cocoa Beach,
Florida. (E-l-2t-c).
ENGLISH RIDING INSTRUCTOR.
Trail & practice riding by appoint appointment.
ment. appointment. Horses boarded & pastured.
Horse Haven Riding School, New Newberry
berry Newberry Road. 376-3494. (E-l-3t-c),
riw.

SSH* citfC, NOW! sth BIG
FUN FROLICKING DAY!
i : L*|3AJui4jA MOVIE ABOUT THOSE WHO
'. APPRECIATE THE FINEST THINGS
il aumtev HePimn
\t am> perea o'TooLe a
IN WILLIAM WYLER'S |L
Ml FEATURE: 1- HOW TO M,
3:10-5:15- ffk
MX 7:25-9:35 amflXlO JX
Jp>' eii| wauscH a}
IL HUGH GRIFFITH fin,
w cHaitLesove UB
t- AllllAM VVYIER FPfO *o*l PKOOUC'iON sC\
J ft PANAVISION* COLOR by DELUXE ztZ-JtJKB
NOW PLAYINGi
; DOWNTOWN : '**!? W mw.
i Dramatic Sensation Os The Year
: JJ THEATRE j FEATURES AT 2:15-4:37-7:00
AND 9:20 P.M.
IMPORTANT NO ONE UNDER 18 WILL BE ADMITTED UNLESS ACCOMPANIED BY HIS PARENT.

EUZHBETH
Ihvlor
Richard
Burton
IN ERNEST LEHMAN S PRODUCTION
OF EDWARD AUBEE S
Whos
I Hfruid Os
Vircinir
Wooif?

AKtiMjftittK MnQl
GEORGE SEGAL-SANDY DENNIS o-mwo, mike nicmols presented by warner bros. Kai

help wanted
~ i
CAMPUS JOB, PART TIME. Per Persons
sons Persons interested in Plant Biology
Research, Lab & Clerical, and
can qualify under Federal Work-
Study Program. 378-2600. (E (E--
-- (E--
situations
wanted
EXPERIENCED Bass Guitarist,
Professional equipment. Needs
work in established band 1530
NW 4th Ave. Apt. 15. (F-2-lt-c).
EXPERIENCED Bass Guitarist
seeking to join established group.
Rock, R&B. Joe Martel, 218 NW
3rd Ave., between 7-10 PM. (F (F--
-- (F--
autos
i
*SB IMPALA CONVERTIBLE,BIue.
Good top, radio. Runs well*. S3OO
or BEST OFFERI Call Tom: 376-
6742. (G-2-3t-p).
1958 PONTIAC. Rebuilt motor.
Good condition, $275. Call 376-
8823. (G-2-st-c).
HHK
V HRrg
the collector
starring
WkM TERENCE STAMP
SAMANTHA EGGAR
||B TECHNICOLOR*
-Plus-"The INTERVIEW 1
Funny Funny

l tC *'' v ' /) 41 1
Km Kmnpf
npf- Kmnpf



H
Americas Most Wanted T.V. I
A AMERICA'S I
LARGEST
T.V. SELLING T.V. I
<&' fRSj Selection of
ISB 1 At ew
,W '~ W
ur From
Model X 1921 3>174.95 9995
No T.V. Is Any Better Than The Dealer's
Service Free Delivery And Free Service
By COUCH'S Own Fine Technicians.
/"Y*\| l/~*LJ>C 608 N Main St
lUUin J PH 376-7171
[OPEN TO 9P.M. FRIDAYS'!
Gainesville's Oldest T.V. Dealer
Your T.V. Dollar Gets More Value
And Service Second To None At COUCH'S
I sell gator ads sell gator ads sell gator ads sell gator d
I THIS CAN BE YOU I
If n
LEARN TO FLY
I- % I
£| v ** ** H
I Complete Course Including
- te. 'I
I All Costs To Acquire A
I PRIVATE LICENSE JUST $595
I Custom Financing To Fit
I Your Budget.
I WE GUARANTEE YOULL PASS
I YOUR WRITTEN EXAM!
I Special ground school class begins
I Sept. 14. In just 5 weeks youll
I 9 be ready to take the test. Enroll
I when you take your introductory
I flight lesson for $5. .
I > CASSELS-IN-THE-AIR
| MUNICIPAL AIRPORT WALDO RD-

CLASSIFIEDS

autos
1965 ALFA-ROMEO Giula Ti
Sedan, 5 forward speeds, 4 wheel
disc brakes, .driving lights, good
condition. $1650, call 372-8818.
(G-2-st-c).
1962 BUICK Skylark, Red with
White Vinyl Top. 4-speed, 4 new
tires, emaculate condition. $975.
Phone 372-5578. (G-2-st-c).
personal
FREE KITTENS, 3 males, 3
females, call 372-6018 after 5:30.
(J-2-lt-nc).

I
Local Carpenter Strike
Slows Stadium Work

By 808 BECK
Staff Writer
Carpenters Local 1278 held a
brief two day strike against Tassi Tassinari
nari Tassinari Construction Co., last week,
stopping all work, on the Florida
Field east stands.
The walkout set the completion
of student seats back two days
for the Sept. 17 game against
Northwestern. Already behind four
days, the Tassinari Construction
Co. will be paying out $5 per seat
per game penalty for as many of
the 10,000 seats not completed for
the Northwestern game.
The union walked off the job on
Thursday of last week and went
back to work Saturday at full
strength. A new agreement was
reached between the union and
Tassinari for a raise of 20 cents
per hour.

-
(ftWTgf
WOULD YOU BELIEVE???H!T^9...
f c*
I that we*re having...as long as they
last.. .a special get-acquainted sale.
ON
basic dacron and cotton skirts that
I a ye regularly $9.00 for only 5.99,
and matching shirts that are regum
larly 5.00 for 3.99
I you better believe it!!!!*
I

Monday, September 5, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

lost-found
FOUND one pair of mens pre prescription
scription prescription sun-glasses. Found in
front of gym, Wed. night. May be
picked up at Classified Ads desk
at Student Publications Florida
Union Room 9. (L-2-st-nc).
services
RUBYS ALTERATIONS 1238
SW 3rd Ave. Call 376-8506. (M (M---2-ts-c).
--2-ts-c). (M---2-ts-c).
IN A HURRY? Passport and appli application
cation application photos. Childrens photos,
commercials, and special
problems. Call Westley-Roosevelt
Studios. 372-0300. (M-2-ts-c).

Raymond Tassinari, owner of the
Tassinari Construction Co., said
the company will work Labor Day
and nine ten hours per day to
catch up. But the new wage agree agreement
ment agreement will not go into effect until
the stadium contract is completed.
Carpenters at the present time
are considered most crucial be because
cause because they do the form work to
pour concrete.
Hoping that he would wrap things
up, D. V. Underwood, business
representative for the union, said,
I certainly would be mighty
pleased to get it settled so we can
put those seats in on time for the
first football game.
When asked why the union was
striking, Underwood said, Its
on the picket signs. The signs
read, TassinariConstruction Co.,
undermining wages, hours and
working conditions as set by Local
1278 Carpenters Union.

Page 13

services
HOUSECLEANING for 8' hours at
SI.OO an hour. Also, ironing in
nty home -- average 15 414 S.E. 12th Terr. 372-6432.
(M-2-3t-c).
TENA WELCOMES YOU students
back and to let you know she is
still at Miladys Beauty Salon,
517 W. Univ. Ave. Her specialty
is FROSTING for average length
hair. $12.50. Limited time, by
appointment s only. 376-3802. (M (M---2-12t-c).
--2-12t-c). (M---2-12t-c).
NURSERY. Complete central
heated and air conditioning. Sep Separate
arate Separate infant department. 3 age
groups.Pre-school training. Phone
376-0917 daytime, 372-4021 night nighttime.
time. nighttime. (M-2- 20t- c).

Gov. Haydon Burns said Thurs Thursday
day Thursday he would intervene in the feud,
and ask the union to withdraw
pickets. I talked to the governor
a couple of times, said Under Underwood.
wood. Underwood. He seemed very interested
in getting this settled as quick as
possible.
Burns also talked with Charlie
Harris, state president of the AFL AFLCIO,
CIO, AFLCIO, and asked him to come to
Gainesville and prevail on Un Underwood
derwood Underwood to stop picketing.
Yes, he is coming here today,
Underwood said of Harris on Fri Friday.
day. Friday. And I hope we can get this
settled, he repeated.
*
Lyceum Council
Is Offering
Season Tickets
University of Floridas Lyceum
Council is offering a limited number
of subscription season tickets to the
nine attractions it has scheduled this
year. These tickets, which include
all but special events, represent n
saving of 10 percent over regular
box office prices and will guarantee
the holder reserved seats to each
attraction.
First in the series is the Gold Goldovsky
ovsky Goldovsky Opera Companys presenta presentation
tion presentation of Verdis * Rigoletto, on Octo October
ber October 11. Others, later in the year,
will be Fiesta Mesicanc, Porgy
And Bess, the National Ballet of
Washington, the Pittsburgh Sym Symphony
phony Symphony Orchestra, the Bach Aria
Group, Nicholas di Virgiliom. Lee
Luvisi and Grainne Yeats.
One hundred tickets are available
to the general public at SIB.OO each
for the series, and one hundred to
University of Florida staff and facul faculty
ty faculty at $9.90 each. They will be sold
by mail order only.
Orders should be mailed to the
Florida Union Box Office, University
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, and
should include a check or money
order for the full price of the series,
plus 25 cents for postage and handl handling.
ing. handling. Individual tickets for each event
will be available later at the Florida
Union Box Office, with university
students having a two-day advance
sale privilege.



Page 14

[, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 5, 1966

f J
Bv HARRY MOORE
Staff Writer
The Interfraternity Council (IFC)
has set up new rush rules to aid
rushees in selecting a fraternity.
Don Slesnick, Chairman of the
IFC rush committee sai|i the new
rules give rushees" more time to
consider the different houses and
Guitarist Wins
Frosh Talent
Contest
By MARTI COCHRAN
Staff Writer
A tall, dark guitarist from Miami
won the Annual Freshman Talent
Night held here Friday.
If applause could be used as a
measure of approval, Alan Victor,
a student of guitar since he was
nine, was the favorite of the audi audience
ence audience as well as the judges in
playing the flamenco-style
Maleguena.
Pert Judy Hill captured second
place with her interpretive dance
to Whitmans poem I Sit and Look
Up.
In winning the first two places,
Victory and Miss Hill were auto automatically
matically automatically signed into Gator Growl,
the worlds largest student talent
show.
A folk-singing group, The
Three Corners, placed third in
the competition. Fourth place was
won by Agnes Tibor, who gave a
gymnastics demonstration.
Other participants in the show
were dancers, pianists, a magi magician,
cian, magician, a storyteller, and various
singing acts including aperfor aperformance
mance aperformance by The Renjees,
professional folk-singers from
Miami and recording artists.
Freshmen Ronny Chassner and
Jerry Cohn, Renjee members,
eliminated themselves from the
competition, however.
Planned and organized by Bruce
Flower, chairman of the Special
Events Committee of the Florida
Union, the show was emceed by
Bud Blackwood, WDVH disc jockey.
Talent Night sponsors were
Donigans, which awarded a $25
gift certificate to the winner; the
University Shop, which donated sls
for second place; Freeway
National, with a $lO certificate
to the third place winner, and Jim Jimmy
my Jimmy Hughes Sporting Goods, with a
$5 certificate to fourth place.
Gville Puts
Jacobs On
Race Board
UF has made another chip in
the Old Guard of Gainesville with
the inclusion of the UF student
body president on its Human Re Relations
lations Relations Board.
This advisory board supercedes
the Bi-Racial Committee and deals
with problems in human relations
in addition to racial conflicts.
The July 1966 ordinance which
recognizes the position of the UF
students in the city of Gainesville,
will allow these students to have
a representative to the city.
***
Foreigners Score
NEW YORK Trabert's victory in 1955 was
the last posted by an American
in the U.S. Tennis Champion Championships.
ships. Championships. Five Australians. a
Mexican and a Spaniard have
captured the titles since then.

IFC Changes Rush Rules

help avoid the panic of haphazard
bidding.
1 f
Fraternities held open house last
Thursday, and all functions follow following
ing following this open house were by invi invitation
tation invitation only. Fraternity men were
allowed to visit rushees in their
dorm areas.
The most important change was

sfifi Students:
B 1 1 iM gjg£TBEST NEWS OF THE DAY
TP ,rrurn food for less"
jSji suit j^feEjK
pipp\ GOOD EATING CROWD
lane Cafeteria!
bU tvidv \
0 p ort' es {
I 0000 f Y#V, f S \
: Sr J FULL course l
7 Complete
Luncheon Specials
R7f
1 U# V complete "VfeSBBBn
- rflM \ ( LESS DISCOUNT) \ !jj
l\ t\ .< \ Dinner Specials Every Evening 1 \HSU
!$X nXrfVttVft \ NO CHARGE FOR TAKE-OUT jjt
\ CONTAINERS J_ f
\
JBr\ J lunch
JJ Y \ ?e j£011:30 A.M. 2:05 P.M.
. JcjA DINNER
- 9:05 P.M.
fsKW. mmmm 2 Hot Entrees To Select
HImI tiLVwrS From Daily.
fFREE PARKING J
T^T^^^L,g I^^c A F ETER i A
4 Minutes from Campus 1212 North Main Street, in the Gainesville Shopping Center

that no rushee could officially ac accept
cept accept a bid to joih a fraternity
until Sunday at 1:00 p.m. The
IFC defines the official acceptence
of a bid as when a rushee signs
a pledge card, accepts a pledge
pin or participates in rush for
the fraternity.
The move from a system of open

rush to an extended time for of official
ficial official bidding has laid much of the
groundwork for rush on the quartex
system. According to Slesnick,
these rules have also helped the
smaller fraternities complete bet better
ter better with the larger fraternities.
Under the new rules fraternity
rush has been made somewhat

similar to sorority rush. Bids l'rom
fraternities dont gt*.through the
dean's office but a set time of
bidding has now been enforced by
both fraternities and sororities.
The change to more regulation
in fraternity rush has been done
to help strengthen the rush system,
Slesnick said and has been approv approved
ed approved by all UF fraternities.



Z TELLS FROSH

Be Aware Os Responsibilities

president J. Wayne Reitz
3,800 new students Wednes Wednes
Wednes ;ht to be aware of their
e ty during their college car-
Knd to prepare themselves
lee to new
I FACULTY
members
I Compliments of
I Gainesville Kirby
I Company
Kug Shampoo (9x12)
Dr Kitchen Wax
111 Mike at 372-5000 or
| 378-4950

Call Low Financing
Ickey Richardson Imm(1 I# through
378-4640 1% Ford Motor Credit Co.
I Special Prices For U of F Students
I V-6 BUICK SPECIAL 4 dr. 1965 V.W. Sedan, White. Very
In. Radio & Heater, Power Sharpe Car.
ting, Air Condition. Cool white 1395.00
fcr. Local owner reference.
I 2095.00 1965 Falcon 4 dr. Sedan, white.
I Less than 13,000 Mile Factory
I FIAT. 1100 D 4 dr. Sedan Warranty.
le R&H, X-Clean 1495.00
[ 1095.00
I 1963 FALCON 4 dr. Sedan, White
I FIAT 110 D 4 dr. Sedan. 27,000 Miles. Very nice car.
Ltiful Red 4 Speed Heater. 945.00
895.00
| Low Financing thru
FORD MOTOR CREDIT CO.
V* CRANE
LINCOLN-MERCURY -
IMPORTS & USED CARS

*
Balijl
LARRY DUPREE And I
. \ I
SALES MADE THESE TWO DAYS HAVE A GUAR- I
ANTEED DELIVERY DATE BEFORE CHRISTMAS. I
<& I

to cope with principal issues of
the future.
In terms of intellectual ability,
this is probably the best class we
have admitted to the university,
Dr. Reitz said. He stressed need
for students to maintain a bal balanced
anced balanced way of life.
Keep abreast of your studies,
seek help if you are having trou trouble
ble trouble in one of your courses and
set aside some time for phys physical
ical physical and other recreation,;; the
president asserted. But be cer certain
tain certain to keep these in proper bal balance.
ance. balance.
You come to college when the
world cries out for highly educa educated
ted educated men and women. It also cries
out for men and women of solid

moral standards, integrity and a
high sense of social responsibil responsibility.
ity. responsibility. Man does not live by intel intellect
lect intellect alone.
The audience at Florida Gym
included 2,800 freshmen and 1,000
transfer students who will begin
fall trimester classes today.
Dr. Reitz noted, Let me make
one point eminently clear. Con Contrary
trary Contrary to some comments I have
heard, we are not here to see
how many freshmen we can flunk.
It is our hope that every one of
you will succeed at the univer university.
sity. university.
We have admitted each of you.
because, in our judgment, you are
capable of earning a degree from
the university. I trust that you will
not disappoint us.
Our first task is to assist
you in developing an informed and
disciplined mind so that you can
turn your energies to construc constructive
tive constructive programs of action for the
betterment of mankind. Be active
and interested in great causes, but
know why you take the position
you do, rather than be led on
emotional or unreasoned im impulse,
pulse, impulse, Dr. Reitz continued.
He pointed out keen and noble
thinking, courtesy, decency and
neatness as the hallmarks of ed educated
ucated educated men and women.
In the conflict and sifting of
ideas, and in all human relations,
the one whose appearance is neat
and who deports himself well is
more apt to win respect for his
ideas and actions than those who
figuratively or literally go about
with their shirt tails out, with
shaggy beards, or otherwise un unkept
kept unkept appearances, Reitz conclu concluded.
ded. concluded.

Monday, September 5, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

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PERSUASIVE POWER . Two-year-old
Rachel Candace Bradley isnt sure what its
all about, but shes using her persuasive
powers to help mommy (Mrs, Bonnie Brad Bradley)
ley) Bradley) get a National Defense Act loan at
UF, Mrs, Bradley of Jacksonville, a junior
majoring in education, discussed the pro program
gram program with Mrs Joan Hinson last Monday
as college registration and orientation ac activities
tivities activities got underway at UF, A

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 5, 1966

Momentum Kev To 66 Season

Go like sixty, go like sixty.
This catchy phrase should be the byword for the
1966 Fightin Gators. Like the 1960 gridders, this
years squad is young, talented, eager, but inexper inexperienced.
ienced. inexperienced. In 1960, led by sophomores such as Bob
Hoover, Larry Libertore, Lindy Infante, and Larry
Travis, Graves first UF squad rolled to a 9-2 mark.
Many state sportswriters predicted the lack of
battle-proven veterans would prove a thorn in the
side of the Orange and Blue. However, Saturdays
scrimmage indicated sophmores will be the ones
that spark the team. Newcomers like Larry Smith,
Larry Rentz, Guy Dennis and Bill Dorsey must plug
the holes left by graduation.
The first seven varsity scores were all contributed
by Gators who did not see much, if any action with
the varsity last season. Smith, (2), Graham McKeel,
Bobby Downs, Tommy Glenn, Jim Yarbrough, and
Tom Christian. Downs and McKeel, juniors, did not
letter last season.
A young team, traditionally, is anxious, determined
and quick to learn. The 1966 Gators will need to
reach a high plateau and stay there. Momentum, or
lack of it, could spell the difference toward a strong
seasons record.

Graves Still Unsure Wholl Start

Ray Graves claims he has never been in involved
volved involved in a situation in his career like the
one facing him now.
With Northwestern only 12 days away Graves
has no idea of his probable starters at nine
positions and in each instance there are three
or four boys solidly in the picture.
I have never encountered anything like this
before, Graves says. We simply have so
many people of near equal ability that making
the decision as to starters is going to be
difficult. This would be a wonderful spot to
be in if all these boys were all-star can candidates
didates candidates or something.
Unsettled positions on the first unit are
defensive left end, one tackle, both guards,
one linebacker and one halfback, along with

piHiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiniuHiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiuniiiniiiiiiiM
| "May We Serve You" JfiS) |
it? imTio service H I
SAVE APPROX. OVER A LA CARTE PRICES I
GATOR THRIFT MEAL PLAN
[ / \ !GREAT SELECTIONS! N
I / CONSULT fio* At 4 £tktu EukMid/ Y#u Cqn \
If Ckrnt Turn 8 Sddi l9ia *' I
i MANAGER J Ctaoji Tio At djui.A 5 'Uuj.itiiMii |
| Cllo ohi Titow (0 Ut & tilth |
or the Food Service I -r~ J) _i_ O' T> 15 Weeks @ $206.25
s Director's Office OIItOOAC/ T /LOI/11/ vvl cixjKLAl O Ljtilbl KLfiJlA ($13.75 per week) j§
| BY POPULAR DEMAND: BREAKFAST WILL BE SERVED IN GRAHAM AND TOLBERT |
j| SNAK BARS! (Lacl< of Facilities Prevent Lunch or Dinner being served in these areas) s
If You Are Contemplating Joining A Fraternity or Sorority, We Would Suggest That
f§ You Do Not Consider The Food Plan Until You Have Reached A Decision.

DICK DENNIS
SPOR TS EDITOR

ITS WHATS UP FRONT
This meansi Its whats up front that counts on the
Gator schedule. Preseason predictions run from 4-C
to 7-2-1 for the orange and blue. (One former Alli Alligator
gator Alligator editor picks 10-0, and hes been right before.
No name will be mentioned, but he finished first
in last seasons "Alligator Staffers Pick The Winners
poll.) #
Two years ago the Gators had the toughest string
of foes in the Southeastern Conference, and still
finished 7-3. This season, UF has a comparatively
easy slate. However, the Gators will have a tough
time compiling their third straight 7-3 regular sea season
son season mark.

offensively one guard, one end and possible full fullback.
back. fullback.
If Graham McKeel is healthy at fullback
he will be there when we play Northwestern,
says Graves. If he is not its a wide-open
contest with Tom Christian, Wayne Barfield,
Don Knapp and Marquis Baeszler involved.
We have very few certain starters at this
point, says Graves. Probably no more than
four on offense and five on defense. We will
juggle the starting lineup in practice based
on film grades primarily and whatever we
come up with after the final adjustments will
start on Sept. 17.
Graves also added he would rather get set
with a starting lineup but at this point didnt
know when, or if this is possible this year.

1- v : T

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2C Discount per gal
On Gasoline Fillups (with I.D. card)
(No Stamps on Discount Purchases)
Terrys Bay Station
703 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
< V t 'V < 9 HOURS A s
V o* Mon. Sat. 7 A.M. -12 P.M.
Sundays 10 A.M.-9 P.M.
&

The Orange and Blues schedule can be divided
into three sections: (1) two games at home, against
Northwestern and Mississippi State: (2) four on the
roadNashville (Vanderbilt), Tallahassee (Florida
State), Raleigh (North Carolina State), and Baton
Rouge (Louisiana State) and (3) four games in
Florida Auburn, Georgia (Jacksonville), Tulane,
and Miami.
The four-game road stint in the middle should
help the sophomores grow up in a hurry. The pro probable
bable probable season record, according to Ray Graves, stands
at 6-4. Depending on the teams ability to gather
momentum, the actual mark could be better, or a
lot worse.
GATOR BRIEFS
Those who purchased an infamous 25-cent game
coke Saturday may have wondered who was the tall,
black-haired gentleman in the coke booth. It was
Perry Moore, administrative assistant to Athletic
Director Graves and concessions manager at all
athletic events, who seems to know the business
from top to bottom.
One of the happiest men at Florida Field Saturday
was Defensive Coach Gene Ellenson. Ellenson grinned
openly at the news that speedy sophomore Larry
Rentz was switched to defense.



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(Photos by Jim Moffit)
EWALDSEN AWAITS PASS
. In Gator scrimmage Saturday

Graves Happy After Scrimmage

By MIKE WILLARD
Alligator Sports Writer
Gator Ray appeared to be humming
a different tune after scrimmage
Saturdayit might be called opti optimistic.
mistic. optimistic.
Yes, Im very pleased with the
teams progress. said head coach

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Graves after the Gators hit the
locker room following two hours
of scrimmage with the freshman
team.
Relaxing on the sidelines, Graves
pointed out three players he thought
were particularly strong in their
positions.
Fullbac.Y Graham McKeel did a

Rentz-Led Secondary
Sparks Varsity Rout

By TYLER TUCKER
Ass.stant Sports Editor
A tentative Gator team took form
in the Saturday scrimmage as the
varsity romped 71-14 over the B-
Squad on the strength of the defen defensive
sive defensive secondary.
The secondary pilfered three
passes, two by safetyman Larry
Rentz and one by halfback Bobby
Downs. The loss of three gradu graduated
ated graduated defensive backs, Bruce Ben Bennett,
nett, Bennett, Alan Tram mell, and Dick Kirk
gave coaches reason to worry in
practice.
Downs, who returned an inter interception
ception interception 50 yards, has recovered
from a knee injury and taken over
the halfback position. Tom Hunger Hungerbuhler
buhler Hungerbuhler rounds out the secondary.
Graham McKeel, hampered his
entire career by a leg injury, gained
3G yards in seven carries and Larry
Smith open with a strong inside
block. Coach Ray Graves said earl earlier
ier earlier in the spring that fullback will
be a question mark, but McKeel
has the job if he is healthy.
Richard Trapp, who has two re receptions
ceptions receptions for 117 yards, gathered
in an aerial from Kay Stephenson,
raced inside and flashed down the
sideline 82 yards for a score. SPLIT
END Paul Ewaldean, successor to
Charles Casey, caught three passes
for 38 yards. >
Safety George Grandy, playing on
an uncertain knee, saw limited action

good job blocking, sophomore back
Larry Rentz cane up with several
big defensive plays and tailback
Larry Smith is proving to be a
powerful runner, said the head
coach as he wiped sweat from his
forehead.
Graves continued with praise for
Rentz who in his 160 pound frame
only resembles a football player
through action and deeds.
Larry is sure not going to be
on the bench with me. He isdefinal isdefinally
ly isdefinally a football player and will be on
that field when season comes.
Last week the head mentor had
woes about his defensive secondary ;
this week Graves admits, Things
are looking up.
Both defensive halfbacks Bobby
Downs and George Grandy ran the
distance on punt returns during Sat Saturdays
urdays Saturdays scrimmage. Downs also

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Alligator

9 "'1

f r d *' *& £**i"u^jt
SPURRIER PLACEKIdK
. 0 New role for Steve

in the defensive backfield. Late
in the scrimmage, he fielded a
punt at the 32 yard line, broke
loose and raced 68 yards behind
a wall of blue uniforms to the end
zone.
At tight end, non-letter man Jack

picked off one frosh pass and Rentz
playing safety grabbed two.
On the Gators first foe, North Northwestern
western Northwestern University, Coach Graves
had this to say:
They just started practicing last
Thursday. Its really too early to
tell although they did look good
in spring training.
As Graves was walking off the field
he was asked, who will be handl handling
ing handling the place kicking chores?
He commented, At this point it
looks like it will be quarterback
Steve Spurrier. The coach with a
faint smile, then quipped, This
year we will kick for one point
instead of passing for two.
The Gators lost by two points
in the Sugar Bowl last year as
they tried unsuccessfully to pass
for extra points three times.

Monday, September 5, 1966,

SPORTS

Coons caught one pass for 14 yards.
Coons substitute, 6-6, 236 pound
sophomore Jim Yarborough had two
receptions for 68 yards one recep reception
tion reception was a 48 yard touchdown play.
The varsity interior line of tackles
John Preston and Wally Colson,
guards Bob Young and J. Pasteris,
and center Bill Carr opened several
holes for backs McKoel, Smith,
Baeszler, and Knapp.
Steve Spurrier handled the place
kicking chores, making all sevenof
his extra-point attempts. One place placement
ment placement split the uprights from 35
yards.
The Gator squad will return to the
practice field Monday afternoon,
twelve days prior to the opener with
Northwestern at Florida Field.
Clay Faces
Southpaw
For Crown
Cassius Clay puts his world
, heavyweight title on the line for
the third time in four months
Saturday night.
He faces southpaw Karl Milden Mildenberger
berger Mildenberger in Frankfurt, Germany, in
the feature event on this weeks
boxing schedule.
The bout between the undefeated
Clay and the tough German, the
first of his nation to fight for the
crown since Max Schmeling, will
mark the first time the heavy heavyweight
weight heavyweight championship will be held
in Germany and is expected to at attract
tract attract a crowd of more than 60,000
to Forest Stadium.
Mildenberger, who has not lost a
fight since 1962, carries a record
of 50 wins, two losses and three
draws into the 15-round bout.
Clay, who has won all 23 of his
professional fights, never has
fought a southpaw as a pro although
hisonly two amateurlosses were to
lefthanders.
Aids Alma Mater
3_' ' 1
ATLANTA I'l-T Woody
Woodward ol the Atlanta
Braves donated $3,000 of bis
bonus toward installing Held
lights at Florida State I'niver I'niver>ity.
>ity. I'niver>ity. when he starred in college
baseball

Page 17



, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 5, 1966

Page 18

Two Different Stories On Cut Os Charles Casey

Martin, Halberstein
Ambushed Him

By JIMMY MANN
St. Petersburg Times
Dorothy Parker, celebrated writer,
put it this way Men seldom make
passes at girls who wear glasses.
Lets rephrase it. Guys who wear
glasses knock men who catch passes.
Twice this week, columns have
passed across this desk, one by Joe
Halberstein of the Gainesville Sun and
another by Buddy Martin of Cocoa
Todayaccusing former UF All-
America Charles Casey of dogging
it in his bid for a place on the
Atlanta Falcon football team.
It could be suggested that the two
purchase stronger glasses and take
a closer look at the Casey situa situation.
tion. situation.
First, Casey was accused of night
clubbing five straight nights before
practice opened in Atlanta for the
Coaches All America game which was
the beginning of Charlies trouble.
Night clubbing? mused Casey.
One night 30 of us went to a night
club in Atlanta. Most of the guys who
went played in the football game and
played well.
One night in a night club and youre
no longer Charles Casey, the boule boulevardier^
vardier^ boulevardier^
Both men wrote that Casey failed
to show up for practice at the All-
America game and was dropped from
the first team by Duffy Daugherty.
I missed one time, said Casey.
I asked the main desk (8 a.m. for
9:30 practice) and never got the call.
I awoke at 11 and they were through
at 11:30.
From the beginning, wrote Mar Martin,
tin, Martin, Casey started his pro career on

Unknowns Key Gator Hopes

Although their names are un unfamiliar
familiar unfamiliar to Florida fans it now
appears a host of relative un unknowns
knowns unknowns will be a key to Gator
football hopes this year.
Both non-lettermen juniors and
sophomores have taken the spot spotlight
light spotlight in early practice sessions.
Foremost are tight end Jack Coons
of Lake Worth, defensive half halfback
back halfback Bobby Downs of Winter Ha Haven
ven Haven and safety man Tom
Hungerbuhler of North Miami. All
are currently starters and there
is no inclination on their part to
be beaten out.
Split end Mike McCann of Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville Beach, a boy whose
travels with the Gators include
stops at quarterback and defen defensive
sive defensive halfback, is having a good fall
and stands a chance of battling
senior Paul Ewaldsen for the start starting
ing starting job.
Defensive end Rex Rittgers of
Jacksonville came from a fifth fifthteam
team fifthteam berth in the spring to the
top of the pack by the end of
the first weeks practice. Whether
Rittgers can fight off the experi experienced
enced experienced Brian Jetter is still a ques question
tion question but he now appears certain of
much playing time.
J. D. Pasteris of Miami is hob hobbled
bled hobbled by a knee injury but fits
strongly into the offensive tackle
or guard picture if he fully re recovers.
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shaky ground. Apparently, even the
hard-driving Hecker (Norb, Atlanta
head coach) couldnt wake him up.
Maybe the bleakness of unemploy unemployment
ment unemployment will.
Halberstein says Casey is apparently
a rookie too well-fed, too complacent,
too rich and out of the NFL picture
before he gets into it.
Casey says, Ill be back there.
They have to give me another chance
next year and Ill be there to take
it. I love football. Its firstnot sec second.
ond. second.
The double attack on Casey was
from ambush. Neither Halberstein nor
Martin quoted the talented receiver.
In fact, though references were made
in the pieces to Daugherty, Hecker and
John Sauer, College All-Star coach,
neither was quoted.
Had either man called Casey and
asked him why he bad been dropped
by the Falcons, he would have told
them quickly. Four good reasons: Alex
Hawkins, a seven-year veteran end
from Baltimore; Angie Coia, a seven sevenyear
year sevenyear vet from Green Bay and Chicago
Bears and Neil Petties, a two year
flanker from Baltimore. Thats
too much experience for most rookies
to buck.
And, Casey wants that last scholastic
year at the university. He needs 15
hours of class work and then a 15
hour intern sesson. The degree follows.
Ultimately, says a wise Casey,
the degree is the most important.
You know, he said, I played
my heart out up there at Gainesville.
We had a good team most of the way.
I helped them win a couple of games.
Everything was all right with those
writers then.

Thats a lot of non-lettermen
juniors to have ranking so high,
says Gator head coach Ray Graves.
They have all worked hard, have
improved and certainly this is the
year for people to attempt to earn
playing time. We have a lot of
places open on this football team.
One other non-letterman is ex expected
pected expected to give the Gator defense
a helping hand. Hes Charlie Pip Pippin

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(Editors Note: Many sports
fans have expressed opinions about
recent Gator great Charles
Casey being cut from the roster
of his hometown Atlanta Falcons.
A sixth round draft pick, Casey
signed for an estimated $175,000.
Many slurs and dispersions have
been cast on Caseys conduct, but
proof abounds on both sides of the
issues. Here are the stories by
two acknowledged sports experts.)
f
. 7$ Mm m
Bp n
mm '
CHARLIE CASEY

pin Pippin of Moultrie, Georgia, who is a
senior. s
Pippin was originally listed as
a junior on the Gator roster. This
information hit the newspapers, the
local draft board became
interested in Pippins status and
Charlie beat a hasty path to the
sports publicity office to inform
all that he indeed was a senior.

He Did Not
Pay The Price
By BUDDY MARTIN
TODAY Sports Editor
<1
Maybe its a trite phrase, but the best way I know
to sum up Charles Caseys failure as a pro football
player is that he didnt want to pay the price.
It no doubt was a great disappointment to Florida
football fans when Casey was cut Thursday by the
Atlanta Falcons.
As a football player at Florida, Casey had few
peers. He was beautiful to watch running pass cuts,
faking the defender, then springing off the ground to
pull down a pass that sometimes looked impossible.
Casey was slow afoot, but his nimble fingers and
strong grip, plus a knack for getting in the open,
more than compensated for his deficiency in speed.
He had the ability, but apparently not the desire.
Sure, he got the $125,000 or $175,000, or however
much it was. But that wont buy back what could have
been a rewarding future. Neither will it erase the
disappointment of those who followed him and stood
behind him.
Im not condemning Charles Casey. It was, and is,
his life to live the way he wants. But the trouble with
Casey is that he wanted to dance, but didnt wan|,to
pay the fiddler.
Even in college, Casey never gave 100 per cent
in practice.
Saturday afternoons were different. No. 89 was
always there when he was needed and always came
through in the clutch with some super effort.
Suspicion that Casey was slipping came to us a
few weeks ago. First I heard Casey had been out
night-clubbing five straight evenings before the All-
America game in Atlanta. Then it was announced that
East coach Duffy Daughtery had dropped Casey from
the first team for failure to show for practice.
In Chicago, Casey reported injured and out of shape.
All-Star coach Johnny Sauer told me on the phone he
released Casey because of the injury. I later learned
different.
From the beginning, Casey parted his pro career
on shaky ground. Apparently, even the hard-driving
Hecker couldnt wake him up.
Perhaps the bleakness of unemployment will.

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ns. WHATEVER HAPPENED TO BEAR BRYANT

The Problems Os A College Football Coach

By Furman Bisher
Atlanta Journal Sports Editor
fa i remember football. Its
hat game they play with the silly
htng that has two ends and a big
a t middle. The American jumping
jean.
W hen it starts, you know sum sumner
ner sumner is over. The temperature
,utside doesnt change. Just the
xjdy temperature. Everybody gets
he 50- yard-line, the tweedsie,the
task and the alumni fever, all at

jnce.
Sight unseen,
jack in July when
he average sen sensible
sible sensible man and
amily are lol lolingonthe
ingonthe lolingonthe beach,
he Football Fan
s willing to rent
ibout 18 inches
if board (with no
jack) from an

ithletic depart departrrent
rrent departrrent for two and one-half hours of

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BISHER

a given autumn Saturday afternoon
for the fee of $6.
It all begins with the ever-pop ever-popular
ular ever-popular Picture Day. Cameramen
from everywhere gather and shoot
films of the athletes as they pose,
eluding make-believe tacklers,
stiff-arming make-believe tack-,
lers, grimacing at make-believe
tacklers, and float daintly through
the air catching make believe
passes.
The next day the coaches begin
their little game. They begin mak making
ing making believe that none of the
clumsy, slew-footed, knock kneed,
myopic campus urchins who had
posed so prettily the day before
can do anything but clean the tops
of training tables and fall flat in
their tracks.
They truly feel they should be
spared the awful ordeal of having
to try to coach such toads, but
they are stuck with a 10-year
contract, and you know how upright,
honest, true blue football coaches
are about contracts.

Some love their Mamas too
much, and they dont want to go
back to the wagon, and theyve got
to prove that you can make a
football player, out of a paraplegic,
even if it means kicking him in
the teeth.
Gathering from what one reads
in Sports Illustrated lately, foot football
ball football was played by the knights of
medieval days. The knights wore
armor, like our scholarshipped
lads, and ate at a training table
known as King Arthurs Round.
The only difference was, the
knights played their game on
horseback, and instead of using
their heads, they used real actual
spears.
I quote a line printed in Sports
Illustrated (Aug. 29):
People ask me if I ever kicked
a guy and I say, yes, I have. And
If a boy lets me kick him and
slam him around and he doesnt
kick back Ive said I didnt want
him.
You try to bring your kids up

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right, to have respect for their
elders and never sass them, and
of all things, never kick elderly,
weather-beaten, ill-tempered
football coaches, especially one
thats liable to keep kicking back.
And heres a man in a sporting
magazine saying kick back.
Heres .another little seedling
that helps beautify footballs own
little garbage heap:
I dont know whether wed have
won or not without paying players,
but Ill say this, most of the kids
didnt play like they got some something.
thing. something.
There are more, like this one:
Well, we ran off a few and
worked some of them extra hard
and they quit, too, and I probably
made more mistakes and mishand mishandled
led mishandled more people than anyone ever
has.
Then there is a reference to
Bobby Dodd of Georgia Tech. He
tole me two or three times before
that if we didnt stop beating him

DORM FURNISHINGS:
11 Draperies I
( ) Rugs
I 1 Bedspreads I
Sheets & cases j
( 1 Towels
11 Clocks I
CD Radios
0 Clock-radios J
11 Phonographs 1
11 Phonograph stands
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A I

* Monday, September 5, 1966, The Florida Alligator, :

he was going to quit playing us,
and I can understand that.
I can hear him now, Dodd saying,
Awright, Beah, you just quit
beating us, yheah now?
Then there is a reference to an
incident that took place after
Georgia Tech beat Alabama, 7-6,
in 1962. It was widely reported
in the newspapers.
I walked through that crowd
thinking I'd probably get my throat
cut and went in there and called
their captains out of the showers
and shook hands with them. I con congratulated
gratulated congratulated Dodd again, and when I
was going back through the crowd
a woman who had a boy on Tech's
team told me how proud she was.
I said she had a reason to be.
I did all that and I didnt mean a
darn thing I said, either, but mama
and papa would have been proud
of me.*'
The author of the article is
listed as Paul Bryant with John
Underwood. This has got to be one
of the gassers of the year, Paul
Bryant a magazine-writer.
(I assume that Bryant is the
magazine-writer, even though Bear
is using the pen name of Paul.
I just never heard of a Coach
Underwood at Alabama.)
It really cant be assumed that
after reading this article Ameri Americas
cas Americas mothers are going to rush
to the nearest sporting goods
house, suit up their kids and point
them for a career in football.
By the time one finishes reading
this, with its gut-sucking and gut
checking, whatever the blazes that
is, he feels like his brain has a
bloody nose.
This is a GAME? People are
going to read this in Viet Nam and
coin a phrase. Games is hell.
In fact, Bryant says the boys
he had at Kentucky called one of
the practice fields Hell Hollow.
It may be the way they want it.
It may be Im the one that's all
wrong and the Bryants are right.
But I dont have to buy that kind.
Besides, he leaves you away
out. He leaves you to believe (I
didnt mean a darn thing I said)
that a good deal of the time he
really doesnt mean what hes
saying anyway.
Anderson
Cops First
Fleming
John Anderson, captain of the
1966 UF track team, was presented
the annual Don Fleming Memorial
Award late this summer in a
campus ceremony.
The award, given in memory of
the late Fleming, a Gator football
and baseball star and captain who
also starred in professional
football with the Cleveland Browns,
was presented to Anderson by
Florida Director of Alumni Affairs
Bumper Watson.
It is given each year by the
alumni association of the Univer University
sity University to the Gator athletic captain
who best exemplifies the character
and leadership qualities of
Fleming.
Anderson was the Southeastern
Conferences leading dash man
until severely pulling a leg muscle
in the Florida Relays.
He continued to workout, lead
the team and twice attempted to run
in later meets, but was unable to
record placing times due to the
handicap of his bad leg.
Johns determination and hard
work under such a handicap was
an inspiration to the entire squad,
said head track coach Jimmy
Carnes. The encouragement he
lent the young boys on our squad
was a big factor in the success
our sophomores had last year.
Anderson is a senior from
Tampa.

Page 19



i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 5, 1966

Page 20

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MYSELF MY DATE
2. AGE: (1) 17.18 (2) 19-20 (3) 21-22 (4) 23-24
(5) 25-26 (6) 27-28 1234 5 6 123456
3. HEIGHT: (1) under 5 (2) s*-5T (3) 5*4 M .s*B
(4) SVJ,' (5) over 6* 12345 12345
4. RELIGION: (1) Protestant (2) Catholic
(3) Jewish (4) other (5) unaffiliated 1
5. RACE: (1) Caucasian (2) Negro (3) Oriental 12 3 12 3
6. CLASS: (1) freshman (2) sophomore (3) junior
(4) senior (5) graduate 12345 12345
7. DRINKING ON DATES: (1) often (2) seldom
(3) never 12 3 12 3
8. RELIGIOUS CONVICTIONS: (1) strong (2) so-so
(3) doubtful 12 3 12 3
9. ATTITUDES ABOUT SEX: (1) conservative
(2) fairly conservative but willing to con consider
sider consider others* philosophy (3) dont care one
way or the other (4) very liberal 1234 1234
10. POLITICAL ATTITUDE: (1) conservative
(2) moderate (3) liberal 12 3 12 3
11. FAMILY INCOME: (1) less than $5,000 (2) 5,000-
10,000 (3) 10,000-20,000 (4) over 20,000 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4
12. GRADE AVERAGE: (1) A (2) B (3) C (4) Do* F 12 3 4 12 3 4
13. COLLEGE BOARD SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST
MATH SCORE: (1) above 700 (2) 601-700 (3) 501-
600 (4) 401-500 (5) 301-400 (6) 300 or
below (7) did not take this test 1 234567 1 234567
14. COLLEGE BOARD SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST
VERBAL SCORE: (1) above 700 (2) 601-700
(3) 501-600 (4) 401-500 (5) 301-400 (6) 300
or below (7) did not take this test 1 234567 1 234567
15. COLLEGE MAJOR: (1) humanities (2) natural
sciences and moth (3) social sciences 1-2 3 12 3
16. EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITY PARTICIPATION:
(1) active (2) moderately active (3) not
active 12 3 12 3
17. FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES: (1) interested
(2) not interested 12 12
18. ATHLETIC ABILITY: (1) good (2) obout overage
(3) below average 12 3 12 3

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MYSELF MY DATE
19. TALKATIVENESS: (1) dominate conversation
(2) give others equal time (3) let others
do most of the talking 12 3 12 3
20. FAMILY TIES: (1) close-knit family (2) aver average
age average (3) independent 12 3 12 3
21. ATTRACTIVENESS: (1) very attract!ve (2) nice
face, build average (3) nice build, face
average (4) average (5) probably below 12345 12345
22. EYES: (1) blue (2) brown (3) green or hazel 12 3 12 3
23. HAIR: (1) blond (2) brown (3) black (4) red 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4
24. DANCING: (1) interested (2) not interested 12 12
25. POPULAR MUSIC: (D interested (2) not
interested 12 12
26. CLASSICAL MUSIC: (1) interested (2) not
interested 1 2 12
27. JAZZ: (1) interested (2) not interested 12 12
28. FOLK MUSIC: (1) interested (2) not interested 12 12
29. ART: (1) interested (2) not interested 12 12
30. LITERATURE: (1) interested (2) not interested 12 12
31. DRAMA: (1) interested (2) not interested 12 12
32. POLITICS: (1) interested (2) not interested 12 12
33. SCIENCE AND MATH: (1) interested (2) not
interested 12 12
34. SOCIAL SCIENCE: (1) interested (2) not
interested 12 12 1
35. FOREIGN LANGUAGE: (1) interested (2) not
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36. TRAVEL: (1) interested (2) not interested 12 12
37. TELEVISION: (1) interested (2) not interested 12 12
38. MOVIES: (1) interested (2) not interested 12 12
39. SKIING: (1) interested (2) not interested w 12 12
40. TENNIS: (1) interested (2) not interested 12 12
41. CONTACT SPORTS: (1) interested (2) not
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42. BOWLING: (1) interested (2) not interested 12 12
43. SWIMMING AND WATER SPORTS: (1) interested
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44. GOLF: (1) interested (2) not interested 12 12
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* .... J