Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Alligator Sport Special
See Section B
I/JO

Accent On The NEW University

Vol. 59, No, 1

Trade With Alabama:
Philpott For Conner

Culminating a year of searching
Dr. Frederick W. has been
chosen Vice President of the UF.
Dr. Conner will leave the Univer University
sity University of Alabama to begin here
Thursday.
Previous to an absence of five
years from the UF campus, Dr.
Conner has spent a total of 26
years on campus from 1935 to
1961. He taught English, humani humanities
ties humanities and philosophy, and served as
assistant dean of the graduate
school before going to the Univer University
sity University of Alabama in 1961.
Dr. Conner is replacing Harry
M. Philpott who left here a year
ago to become President of Auburn
University in Alabama.
But while the UF lost one man
to Alabama, it also gained one.
Conner is presently dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences at
the University of Alabama.
A native of Rochester, N. Y.,
Dr. Conner received his bachelors
degree''from the University of Ro Rochester.
chester. Rochester. He received his masters
and Ph. D. degrees from the Uni University
versity University of Pennsylvania.
He is a member of Omicron Delta
Kappa leadership society,

UF Gets Federal Grant

For New Law Center

UF has been awarded a $962,303
grant from the U. S. Office of Edu Education
cation Education to support construction of an
estimated $3 million, three-story
College of Law center on campus.
Announcement of the grant was
made recently by UF President J.
Wayne Reitz.
Funds for the grant are provided
by the Higher Education Facilities
Act of 1963, which authorizes the
allocation of federal money to sup support
port support construction of both graduate
and undergraduate academic
facilities.
Bid openings for construction of
the law center, originally set for
Nov. 3, have been moved up one

The Florida
Alligator

University of Florida

a
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ir w -f?laS
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CONNER
American Association of Univer University
sity University Professors, Modern Language
Association, College English As Association,
sociation, Association, National Council of
Teachers of English, American
Studies Association, American
Conference of Academic Deans,
Southern Conference of Academic

week to Oct/ 27, according to W.
Ellis Jones, the Universitys
rector of planning.
Jones estimated it will take from
four to six weeks after bids are
opened before the University can
give the successful bidder his
notice to proceed with con construction.
struction. construction.
Target date for completion of the
center is July, 1968.
A separate project, considered
part of the law center complex,
will be the 700-student housing
facility to be constructed at a
later date. The grant announced
today will not support that work.
The federal grant comprises the

Wednesday, August 31, 1966

PHILPOTT
Deans and a council member of
Oak Ridge Associated Univer Universities.
sities. Universities.
Conner is married to the former
Jane Speese Bronson. They are the
parents of two sons, William 8.,
now a law student at UF, and James
F., age 15.

only non-state financing of the
academic plant and a com complementary
plementary complementary one- story utility
structure. The rest of the money
is being provided under the SBB
million bond issue authorized by
the 1965 Legislature for construc construction
tion construction of higher education facilities
in the state, Jones said.
Application for the Federal grant
was made last December and a U.S.
Office of Education site inspection
team visited the campus May 12
this year.
Jones said the University met
\
(SEE GRANT PAGE 2)

18,000 STUDENTS

HERE /MONDAY

The accent is on the NEW on
the 2,000 acre UF campus this
time of year:
A NEW school year, NEW fresh freshmen,
men, freshmen, NEW record-breaking en enrollment,
rollment, enrollment, NEW buildings either
nearing completion or still on the
rise and in another year, a NEW
quarterly system of academic
study.
Classes begin officially on Sept.
5 (Labor Day) for an expected
on-campus enrollment in excess
of 18,000 students.
The University sets new atten attendance
dance attendance records each fall. In 1964,
the total was 15,701 and last year
it soared to 16,874.
New freshmen, limited to 2,800,
are not responsible for the
increase. Rather, Registrar
Richard Whitehead admits, it is the
1,064 junior college transfers and
432 non-junior college transfer
students already approved for re registration.
gistration. registration. The figures may go even
higher.
Freshmen launching college ca careers
reers careers next week will see exciting
new study, research and living
facilities bloom on campus
during the next four years.
Already under construction are
10 projects designed to enhance
the Universitys status in studying
bioenvironmental, aerospace, me mechanical,
chanical, mechanical, chemical and electrical
engineering, life sciences, chem chemistry,

l||| f||||g

Todays Orientation Special,
published by the staff of The
Florida Alligator, should be of spe special
cial special interest to new and old students
alike. Be sure to check the ad advertising
vertising advertising pages for the best deals
in towfi for returning students.
Mondays full color debut of
the Alligator will feature the
following stories:
Hubert Humphrey to speak
for Homecoming
Construction on the UF cam campus
pus campus
A special visitor to the UF
campus, Secretary of State Tom
Adams
And much more. Watch for
Mondays full color edition.

istry, chemistry, mental health and animal
research at a cost in excess
of s2l million.
Bids soon will be opened for a
new space science building, Col College
lege College of Law Center and other
facilities, costing an estimated $8
million.
Chemistry researchers will see
the first results of ultra-modern
facilities become a reality under
the current s2l million total. The
$1,425,100 chemistry research
unit is already being occupied.
Next scheduled grand opening
will be the $1,786,700 graduate
research library on Oct. 25.
The $217,774 animal research la laboratory
boratory laboratory also is set to open for
use during October.
Late 1966 should be celebrated
with the opening of the Univer Universitys
sitys Universitys $4,286,000 Florida Union,
containing, among other features,
a dramatic theatre and art gal gallery,
lery, gallery, 16 bowling lanes, cafeteria,
ballroom and auditorium.
Before the 1967 fall term, a
nine-building engineering complex
($5,354,000) will open with fa facilities
cilities facilities for electrical, chemical,
aerospace, bioenvironmental and
mechanical engineering research.
Other completions during 1967
include: a $3,256,000 14-story
dormitory for 800 students, the
first unit of a $1,688,749 life
sciences complex, an $898,400
childrens mental health unit, a
new printing building, out-patient
clinic addition at the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center and laundry.
The Florida Field football stad stadium
ium stadium expansion program will pro provide
vide provide 3,200 new seats for the first
game Sept. 17 and 6,000 more for
the Homecoming battle with Auburn
on Oct. 29, giving 57,000 seats
altogether. Dormitory units for
214 students under construction
beneath the stadium will be ready
for the winter trimester in Jan January.
uary. January.
A series of bid openings, start starting
ing starting in September and extending
until March, 1967, will inaugurate
the following construction pro projects:
jects: projects: space science building,
($1,200,000); College of Law cen center
ter center ($2,800,000); a $1,940,000 addi addition
tion addition to McCarty Hall, headquarters
for the Institute of Food and Agri Agri(SEE
(SEE Agri(SEE ACCENT PAGE 2)
ALLIGATOR
STAFF MEETING
There will be an Alligator staff
meeting this Friday, Sep£. 2, at
3:30 p.m. in the Alligator offices in
the basement of the Florida Union.
All interested students are urged
to* attend.



~ The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, August 31, 1966

Page 2-A

The Florida Alligator
.A .MajfuSj. Ia Out

EDDIE SEARS
Editor

ANDY MOOR
Editorial Editor

Homecoming Slogan
Salutes Disneyland

Gators Embark On A Disneyland Lark, was chosen as the
UFs 1966 Homecoming slogan. Submitted by Mrs. J. A. Booher
Jr., who lives in Schuct Married Students Village the winning
entry was selected by the State Cabinet.
A five-day trip for two to Jamaica is Mrs. Boohers prize
for winning. A round-trip flight will be provided by British West
Indies Airlines. She will also receive accommodations at the
Holiday Inn and two tickets to the Homecoming game between the
Gators and Auburn.
The contest runners up were also announced. Miss Nancy
McCreary, St. Petersburg, 'will receive the second prize a
Florida vacation for two with three days at Cape Coral, a
weekend at Miami Beachs Balmoral Hotel, two tickets to the
game and a $50.00 shopping trip compliments of Gainesville
merchants. A**^
A Jacksonville resident, Nancy Garnick, took third place placeprizes
prizes placeprizes a portable stereo phonograph from Couchs of Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, plus a $75.00 shopping trip.
Over 1200 entries were received from as far away as Penn Pennsylvania,
sylvania, Pennsylvania, Washington, D.C., and Hawaii. Ironically, over 23 per
cent of the slogans submitted dealt with a Walt Disney theme.
Other subjects dealt with included state politics, the space race,
education and even Batman. Homecoming 66 is scheduled for
October 28-29.
Last years winning slogan was Gators Cheer Floridas
400th Year. Slogans had to be based on a topic dealing with the
UF and suggesting a current topic.

ACCENT ON NEW UF

cultural Science; medical records
library; hydraulics research
laboratory and renovation of the
existing Florida Union and Univer University
sity University Auditorium.
No new academic changes are
contemplated this year because of
planned program revisions during
1967-68 when the University con converts
verts converts to a quarterly system, with
four equal terms of instruction
starting in September and contin continuing
uing continuing through August.
Study is now under way by a
University committee to design a
recommended calendar.
One big change in administra administration
tion administration policy deals with incoming
freshmen. The 1967 freshman
class limit will remain at 2,800,
but new, tighter selection policies
will be in effect -- based on
scholastic record and prospects
for the students success in col college.
lege. college.
Another important change: the
early calendar control for appli applications
cations applications is being abandoned and
March 1 is now the deadline to
apply for September entry. The
University expects up to 10,000
applications from prospective
freshmen before the March cutoff.
Early estimates indicate ap approximately
proximately approximately 3,000 more applicants
will meet minimum requirements
for admission than the 2,800 who
can be enrolled under the Board
of Regents limit for the freshman
class.
Living space also is a big pro problem
blem problem for UF students. No new
dormitory facilities have been con constructed
structed constructed on campus during the past

Tha Florida Alligator raaarraa the right to rafUlaU tha typographical tooa of all adverttaemanta and
to rartea or tarn away copy which It oonaldar* ohjactlooabla.
NO POSITION B GUARANTEED, though daalred will ba glvan whanavar posslbla.
Tha Florida Alligator wUI not oonaldar adjust manta of payment for any advertlaement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errore or erroneoua Insertion unlee* notice U given to tha Advartlatng Manager within
(1) oaa day after advertisement appear a.
The Florida Alligator will not bo responsible for more than one Incorrect tneertlon of an advertlaement
echednled to run eeveral tlroea. Notice* for correction must be given before next insertion.
v-HE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the official student newspaper of the University at Florida end 1#
ptMlshed Ova times weekly except during May, Juna, and July whan It is published semi-weekly. Only
dltartkU rsprieaM the official opinions of their authors. The AlUfftor ia entered as second class
alter at the (M ed States Poet Offioe at Gainesville.

808 MENAKER
Managing Editor

DICK DENNIS
Sports Editor

year. Dr. H. C. Riker, director of
housing, said dormitory space for
men and women is filled to
capacity.
We have been forced to advise
over 500 students we cannot pro provide
vide provide on-campus housing for them
this September, Riker said.
The University has room for
more than 6,700 students, includ including
ing including dormitory accommodations for
3.550 men and 2,220 women and
955 apartments for married stu students.
dents. students. There are also 450 sorority
and 1,050 fraternity spaces.
Consequently, the University
more and more must rely on off offcampus
campus offcampus housing facilities, which
have steadily increased to meet
the institutions growth needs.
Carl Opp, head of the off-campus
housing office, figures 7,271 stu students
dents students lived in>- the 3,800 private
houses, apartments, trailers and
1.550 rooms within the local
community during the 1965-66
school year.
Since 1962, the following units
have been added to the off-campus
housing supply: 108 efficiencies,
1,180 one-bedroom units, 690 two twobedroom
bedroom twobedroom units and 40 three-bed%
room units.
And another NEW the College
Terrace, a private residence hall
for women -- will greet students
Sept. 1, providing living area for
202 persons. It will be the first
new private housing unit of this
size to open vi Gainesville since
World War 11.

STEVE HULL
Executive Editor
*

Sears Sets Gator Staff

Fall and winter Alligator Editor
Eddie Sears announced the remain remainder
der remainder of his editorial staff at a
special editors meeting Sunday.
We have more than a dozen
professional newspapers repre represented
sented represented on this staff, Sears said.
Therefore, I am expecting more
from them.
Sears also pointed out that this
years Alligator will be the largest
in the history of the university:
Bob Menaker, former Alligator
sports editor and executive editor
was elected by the Board of Stu Student
dent Student Publications as the managing
editor. Menaker is also a former
Gainesville Sun desk editor.

UF Gets Federal Grant
Oromi-a

the primary criteria established
by the U. S. Office of Education
in order to qualify for the grant:
(1) bachelors degree must be a
prerequisite for admission to the
College of Law; (2) the school
must have a significant research
program; ancl' (3) it must be an
accredited existing college of law.
The new law center will be lo located
cated located south of Newberry Road and
is bounded on the west by Village
Drive (SW 25th St.) in a wooded
area of the northwest portion of
the University campus.
D. Neil Webb, director of
Gainesville building operation for
the Board of Regents, said the law
center will include a large 750-
seat auditorium which can be di divided
vided divided into six classrooms with the
use of special soundproof, movable
partitions.

WELCOME BACK
to the 'seat of learning!
Keep your checking account locally locally.
. v o '
We have a 'special student account
just for you
Only Two Blocks
i*
" e w *
From The Campus!
_'. . f v
_A Full Service Bank
J <
Where Youre Always Welcome!
1116 W. University Ave.
n* *
' V o t
Member Federal Deposit Insurance. Corporation

Steve Hull, former wire editor
of the Alligator has been promoted
to executive editor.
Andy Mcor, former sports editor
and editor of the Alligator and a
staffer for the Cocoa Beach Tri Tribune
bune Tribune will be the editorial editor.
Moor, a Navy veteran, was also
responsible for putting out a base
paper while stationed in Key West.
Dick Dennis, former assistant
sports editor, will be the sports
editor. Dennis was also an editor
on the Army publication, the
Gung-Ho.
Summer Alligator editor and
former wire editor Gene Nail will
serve as assistant managing

It also will include all in instructional
structional instructional facilities, a large law
library, classrooms, offices, two
deans suites, a law review library
and offices, moot court offices and
conference room, a large reading
room, listening areas compatible
with a large audio-visual room,
lecture rooms and other facilities.
Featured in the building wiU be
the auditorium, occupying part of
the first floor and mezzanine. With
the help of partitions, it can be
divided into three lower level and
three mezzanine classrooms for a
total of 150 students the same
capacity of the auditorium.
Jones said design architects,
with the help of acoustical en engineers,
gineers, engineers, achieved a real break breakthrough
through breakthrough in designing the sound soundproof
proof soundproof partitions.

editor. Nail was formerly em employed
ployed employed by the St. Petersburg
Times.
Nick Arroyo, a photographer for
the Alligator for the past three
years has been promoted to photo
editor. held a similar po position
sition position on two other papers.
Former Miami News staffer
Carol Hefner will head up the
society department. Jo Ann Lang Langworthy,
worthy, Langworthy, a former Alligator staffer
will be the general assignment
editor.
Due to Hulls promotion from
wire editor, Sears noted presently
there is no editor to fill that
position.



GOD BLESS THE STUDENTS
7 . . &
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JUST 1/2 BLOCK FROM THE CAMPUS
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n 1 A § M ZIV
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COME IN AND SEE THE ALL NEW LITTLE LARRYS
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TRY LARRYS WONDER HOUSE FOR ITS FAMOUS
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OPEN -6 AM TILL 3AM >*< OPEN 10:30 AM TILL 8:00 PM
7 DAYS A WEEK .7 DAYS A WEEK
372-6666 j \\ 372-2405 1

Wednesday, August 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3-A



Page 4-A

L, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, August 31, 1966

New Look Seen In Florida Frosh

A new look is seen in Florida
freshmen and the look is good,
according to L. Vernon Voyles,
director of records and registra registration
tion registration at UF.
The student type at the univer university
sity university is definitely changing with the
changing of Florida from a rural
to an urban state, Voyles said.
In a study of the 1965 freshman
class, Voyles collected data which
he says may cause some of the
stereotyped ideas of the past to be
subjected to re-evaluation.
Voyles cited the fact that most
of the freshmen come from cities
with populations over 100,000 and
were graduated with moje than 500
students in their high sehool
classes. This is partially due to

THE PASSION
IN FASHION

Mod Designers
Needle London
Haute Couture
LONDON (UPI) The couture
houses of London are fighting a
battle for survival against the tax taxman
man taxman and the new young British
designers whose ready-to-wear
clothes are selling around the
world.
The couture houses have finan financial
cial financial troubles because the number of
women who can afford to pay their
prices is limited.
The new wave of young designers
also has brought a big problem.
Whereas the ready-to-wear in industry
dustry industry used to look to the couture
houses for the fashion lead, the
industry now employs designers of
its own who produced the swinging
London image.
They put the hemline up way
beyond the level that the London
couturiers would consider suit suitable.
able. suitable. They made cut-outs in
dresses that never could be shown
by a dressmaker to the royal court.
They designed essentially for youth
and made it pay.
Some of the couturiers are
branching out to strengthen their
positions.
John Cavanagh has opened a
ready-to-wear boutique to operate
alongside his couture business.
Amies is busy designing clothes
for men as well as women and
also has a ready-to-wear boutique.
Clive, newest of the ISLFD mem members,
bers, members, is working on his first de designs
signs designs for a movie Maroc 7,
a thriller set against a fashion
background starring Cyd Charisse
as a magazine editor.
Uncle Sam, Prospector
NEW YORK (UPI) The
U.S. Government is planning
an intensive search for native
sources of gold, silver, platinum
and other metals now almost
entirely supplied by other
countries l^
Beaches along the Pacific
coast from Alaska to Oregon,
the Appalachian backbone
from Maine to Georgia, and
the upper Great Lakes are like likely
ly likely to be argas searched by the
Geological Survey and the
Bureau of Mines, according to
Chemical and Engineering
News.

New Colors Reflected In Footwear

NEW YORK (UPI) The new
color in mens suits and over overcoats
coats overcoats this fall is a very dark
black-green, and the black-bur black-burgundy
gundy black-burgundy combination of last year is
back more popular than ever. Both
colors are reflected in the fall
mens shoe lines.
In many cases manufacturers
have coordinated their offerings
with those of the clothes manu manufacturers,
facturers, manufacturers, not only in colors but
in new shapes to carry out the
ever trimmer and slimmer lines
of clothing and the slight shaped
look that has become universal.
Another major factor has been
the Mod look in teen-age fashions
with its knee-length boots and
semi-boots which used to be called
flight boots or chukkhaboots. Since
men and boys alike seem to be
wearing slimmer pants some shoes
and boots have taken on an almost
Edwardian look.
Europe, and especially Italy,
also has had a major influence
and most lines this fall show a
rounded-off square toe, often in
a very lightweight leather and of offering
fering offering a new silhouette which calls
for a nearly straight line from toe
to top of vamp for almost a wedge
shape.
Color is the newest development
in all ranges, whether it is a
business shoe or a leisure slipon,
and the newest colors are the black
forest shadings and the wines and
black cherry shades. There are
also black olives, brown olives,
blues, browns with a greenish
cast and deep gold shades including
a black-brass.
The trend this year is for hand handrubbed
rubbed handrubbed finishes which give an anti antiqued
qued antiqued or shaded effect where the
center part of the shoe might be a
definite olive shading to almost
black near the soles. In some
shoes the green is hand-rubbed
onto the basic color for the antiqued
look.
The classic brogue is back with
its thick soles, pinking and big
perforations. The tasseled mocca moccasin
sin moccasin is shown more than ever
even in patent leather for evening.
Monk straps with brass buckles,
usually very dark, are seen more
than ever.
BIGGEST CHANGE
Perhaps the most amazing
change has been the teen-ager or
young mans switch to Mod
fashions. Renegades got into the
picture early with its 17-inch Mus Muskeeter
keeter Muskeeter boot which is turned down
at the top and is worn under the
pants. This fall they have added a
jockey boot (10 inches) and a gear
boot (12 1/2 inches) in such new
colors as mahogany, hunter green

the tremendous growth rate of the
state, he said.
This past freshman class is the
best academically prepared and
most able the UF has ever had,
Voyles said.
Only about three per cent of the
1965 freshman class will not make
it through the freshman year be-
of academic failure.
Each year the new freshman
class is better prepared than the
last their high school back background
ground background is more comprehensive
and their attitude towards college
is more sophisticated, he said.
Over 70 per cent of the 1965
freshman class were in the top
one-fifth of their graduating high
school class, according to Voyles.

and butternut in both leather and
suede.
Johnston & Murphy hits the new
wedge silhouette hard in its dress
shoes. The shoe is an .almost
unbroken straight line from the
flattened, rounded square toe to the
top of the vamp where it ties.
Also new there is a leisure slipon
with a suede toe and a calfskin
heel in new colors including olive
green and a lighter-than-navy blue.
Tassel mocs show up in every
line. Crosby Square does one in
pale chocolate with a pebble finish.
Thom Me An shows a very low,
very squared toe with decorative
stitching. British Walkers has one
in a pale coffee tone. Freeman
combines a gillie and tassel in a

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The average freshman made
about 415 on his senior placement
test and maintained an approximate
3.0 grade average in high school,
he said.
The UF accepted no freshman
applications for the Fall Trimester
of 1966 after the first 6,500 were
received.
Experience has taught us that
it takes about that number to get
the approximate 2,800 limit set for
the freshman class, Voyles said.
It also seems that good poten potential
tial potential students tend to get their
applications in early, Voyles
added.
Most UF freshmen come from
families with an average income
of SIO,OOO per year or more.

dark blue. Bostonian has one in
patent leather for evening.
In the monks strap field Stetson
shows one in patent leather for
evening. Calumet shows a flight
boot in medium walnut with a dark
brass buckle. A Nettleton wingtip
has a folded leather effect under a
silver buckle. Portage shows a
medium high plain toe boot with
heavy perforations around the heel.
One by Thom McAn is really for
the Mods a square toe like a
cowboy boot and turned up the same
way, in an olive cast, Paisley
lined, and boldly buckled.
Color? Pedwin shows a dark
blue loafer. Freeman has a bur burgundy
gundy burgundy suede one-tie moc. Free Freeman
man Freeman has an olive cast tan in a

Hie families are small, usually
with not more than two children
he said.
Some 80 per cent of the 1965
class came into the UF without
any type of scholarship aid and
only 11 per cent of the freshmen
gave lower costs as a reason for
attending the UF, according to
Voyles.
Most of the freshmen have one
parent who either attended or grad graduated
uated graduated from a college and about
42 per cent of the freshmen have
parents who both attended col college,
lege, college, he stated.
High school background of UF
freshmen is extremely good, ac according
cording according to Voyles.

three-tie plan toe and a two-tie
in blue. Hush Puppy shows an ash
green (grayish) loafer with white
stitching. Stetson has an evening
shoe with dark red-blue-green silk
toe and a plain back. French
Shriner uses black forest, black
cherry and cactuswood in half a
dozen shapes. Renegade added bur burgundy
gundy burgundy and blue to its plain-toed
slipon already offered in nine
shades.
The same colors and shapes have
carried over into boys lines,
according to the National Shoe
Institute, which showed dark fall
colorings ranging from bottle
green to durango brown which i;
as dark as a dark wine. And, like
the mens shoes, the newest one
have a hand rubbed antiqued finish



ALBERT
SS(/S
Get off yoc/zk^f*^
pedestal &/7d *£3M
prepare for $
l/pfc. w-is^J l PADS I W&m
mmrli/jf |HI
< B '*
/ < £i/ery X+em Discounted
moOTHPASTS
4 PEMsj |
K. Si cai /b RE*
1 grgfsffi (I <* I> r (
. SB A A(V.
(V. A(V.
7023 W UNIVERSITY AV£.

Wednesday, August 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5-A



Page 6-A

~ The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, August 31, 1966

VJL
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HIT TREE IN PLAZA OF AMERICAS
. mad artist at work?

Management
Workshop
To Be Held
Principles and practices of
sound management will be dis discussed
cussed discussed during a workship for con construction
struction construction supervisors Sept. 12 at
the International Inn in Tampa.
The workshop is being sponsored
by UFs; Department of Civil
Engineering and the Florida Road
Builders Association.
The course will concentrate on
how to plan, organize and control
a construction job with less effort
and better results.
Workshop speakers and topics
include Professor James Deuel,
University jf South Florida, Ef Effective
fective Effective Management of Construc Construction
tion Construction Operations;* Frank M. Hub Hubbard,
bard, Hubbard, chairman of the board,
Hubbard Construction Company,
The Construction Managers
First Task Planring the Work,
and J. L. Cone Jr., president of
Cone Brothers Contracting Com Company,
pany, Company, Controlling the Work-Lines
of Communication, Feedback and
Corrective Measures.
Tuition for the course, which
will be limited to 40 persons, is
$lO. For information on regis registration,
tration, registration, individuals should contact
C, A. Collier, teaching associate
in civil engineering, Room 204,
College of Engineering, UF,
G> inesville.

jKamlH
PROUDLY ANNOUNCES
/' THE OPENING OF ITS NEW STORE
JUST AROUND THE CORNER FROM THE UNIVERSITY J j
Representing The Finest In Banjos
Classical & Electrical Guitars And Amps^^^^
I I/'mARTIN GOYA GUILD FENDER AMPEG VEGA EPIPHONE MOSRITE GRETSCH I J Featuring The Best In Band Instruments
I SELMER KING LABLANC VITO BUESCHER LUDWIG -SLINGERLAND OLDS BACH
I WE ALSO CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF
I ACCESSORIES FOR ALL INSTRUMENTS
I Stop In And Browse Around ^k,a K^?p CHMAL
I MANAGER

Gainesville Growing...
But Not THAT Fast

Gainesville IS a growing town.
New theaters, new apartment
buildings, new classrooms
springing up like weeds all around
us.
Yes, Gainesville IS growing, but
not quite as fast as these pictures
might hint. The person or persons
who painted these Playboy bunnies
around campus last year were per perhaps
haps perhaps a little ahead of their time.
Gainesville isnt ready for a
Playboy Club -- not yet, anyway.

mL* ds^MBB^B^BeTBi^BB
BbhbbJTbb bb UP
MB ma&a fIiMIBIIBII
H IB f* ~ ~ -v. BMP ' UMB I

J1

THOMAS HALL SHOWS THE STRAINS OF OVERWORKED STUDENTS
o o gotta release that pressure somehow

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PAINTED STATUE GREETS STUDENTS
. . Dr. Murphree his victim



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Wednesday, August 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7-A



Page 8-A

~ The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, August 31, 1966

JH

According to UF President J.
Wayne Reitz, Florida faces five
major problems concerning higher
education.
One problem has grown out of
adjusting to a year-round oper operation
ation operation particularly the trimester
system.
Because some authorities and
responsibilities of the Board of
Regents, chancellor, administra administration
tion administration and faculty of the universities
are not clearly defined, uncertain uncertainties
ties uncertainties and frustrations often result.
Also, he pointed out that finan financial
cial financial support of higher education is
still inadequate.
Another problem concerns the
structure of the universities. It
is necessary to avoid duplication
of certain professional schools,
which are so necessary, yet costly.
These, including graduate schools,
must be concentrated rather than
widely dispersed, Reitz said.
Lastly he discussed overall fi financial
nancial financial support and the ability to
detain and hire quality professors.
While he realizes that there is
considerable unawareness of these
problems in the state, he also
added, There is by far greater
awareness now than at any other
in history.
In discussing the year-round
university operation President
Reitz said, The problems
evolving from the trimester sys-

" i w
;^_
' U/ttjurtt t Ulf J^ f r*Ui H

Reitz Views Florida Education

tern are being resolved now by
the adoption of the quarter plan.
The important thing now is that
various institutions, working with
faculty groups, must develop a
satsifactory quarter program and
bring about an effective transition
from the trimester system.
We didnt approve of the tri trimester
mester trimester plan. Nevertheless, we
worked diligently to make it effect effective,
ive, effective, he said. Admitting that it
had some advantages, Reitz said
the disadvantages offset the
advantages.
He believes the major overall
problem the trimester created was
that it threw us out of phase with
the national academic community
and brought about pressures of
time for students and faculty.
One of the crucial points here
is that faculty salary contracts
were never quite meaningful in the
national salary structure for col colleges
leges colleges and universities, he con continued.
tinued. continued.
It did not give faculty flexi flexibility,
bility, flexibility, in terms of contract, or
time to plan a years program
with the best professional advan advantage.
tage. advantage.
He continued to mention the
quarter system will satisfy the pri primary
mary primary advantage students saw in
the trimester system: exams will
be over before the Christmas holi holidays
days holidays and a student will have an


opportunity to accelerate his edu education.
cation. education.
Dr. Reitz noted another problem.
The state is still operating under
statutes affecting higher education
which are outmoded and hinder
needed flexibility by not permitting
needed authority to be vested in
the Board of Regents and at uni university
versity university levels.
There is reason here to have
great hope for the future, he said,
because the Board of Regents,
all gubernatorial candidates, the
State Chamber of Commerce,
Council of 100, leading citizens
and numerous members of the
legislature have announced their
intentions to correct this
situation. . t
Since World War 11, Reitz
pointed out, higher education has
made tremendous progress, but
has done this without adequate
financial support. Time has come
for Florida (9th nationally in pop population)
ulation) population) to take its proper place.,
among leading states, he said v
Citizens in general have come
to realize that the quality of higher
education is absolutely vital to a
progressive society and advance advancement
ment advancement of a state socially, economi economically,
cally, economically, culturally and politically.
The solution is to call for
special recognition by the legis legislature
lature legislature in allocation of increasing
general revenue, he said. The

past several years the percentage
of general revenue going to higher
education has remained practically
constant, he reported.
The great importance of higher
education and trained people will
require a reassessment of our
scale of values in general revenue
allocations. This calls for allo allocating
cating allocating increased revenues to edu education
cation education rather than spreading such
increases over all government
activities, Reitz said.
The structure of universities
poses other problems, he con continued.
tinued. continued. It is essential that grad-

Sex On The Air

MIAM3 (UPI) An educational
television program on sex?
Miamis educational television
station, WTHS-TV, is ever so
cautiously attempting to put toget together
her together a program series on sex for
prime time viewing this fall.
The series, believed to be the
first of its kind in the nation,
plans to give teen-ager and parent
alike a sophisticated, up-to-date,
challenging view of moral and
sexual standards and how they do
and should apply.
Included in the proposed 13-

uate education and certain Dro
fessional schools, which are so
necessary, yet costly, be concen.
trated rather than
dispersed." y
To disperse such functions is
to spread our available resources
so thinly that quality in graduate
education, and the cost of pro
fessional schools could lead to
mediocrity. Therefore, the poll pollcies
cies pollcies established by the Board of
Regents with respect to role and
scope of institutions under its
jurisdiction must be carefully stu studied
died studied and enunciated.

week, half-hour programs, are
telecasts on abortion, unwed
parenthood, veneral disease, male
and female anatomy, abnormal
sexual personality, sex and mor morality,
ality, morality, and sex and law.
Organizers hope possibly to set
a nationwide example or trend.
So they are going carefully, ex explained
plained explained WTHS-TV executive vice
president, George Dooley. Every Everything
thing Everything must have full community
approval first.
Already, there has been
opposition.



Phi Kappa Phi Adds Welcome

TTie love of learning rules the
/orld,'' says Phi Kappa Phi hon honorary
orary honorary fraternity at UF.
A new year of study and of fun
begins. College years are among
the most important in life. They
very well may be the last oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity you have to use your time
for personal improvement in an
atmosphere of academic inquiry,
excellence and freedom.
Phi Kappa Phi members in
Gainesville wish you well. We are
always glad to lend an ear, a
helping hand and, often, dol dollars
lars dollars when you need them to
improve scholarship.

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From the beginning, two things
stand out as the guiding philosophy
of Phi Kappa Phi. One is the con conviction
viction conviction that by recognizing and
honoring those who have excelled
in scholarship, other students may
be inspired to work for such ex excellence
cellence excellence and honors. The other is
the equally strong belief that schol scholarship
arship scholarship is not limited to any single
field of endeavor but may be, and
should be, universal." The first
is characteristic of every honor
society; the latter is unique in
practice with Phi Kappa Phi.
The Florida Chapter elects to
membership those undergraduates

(seniors), by colleges, who have at
least a B average and are in
the top 10 per cent of their grad graduating
uating graduating class. Graduate students
must have undergraduate and grad graduate
uate graduate honor point averages of at
least 3.0 and 3.5, respectively,
and be in the top 10 per cent of
those receiving a particular grad graduate
uate graduate degree. Thus, those who are
elected are truly students whose
scholarship has been outstanding.
Finally, and in some ways most
significant, there is the privilege
of participating in the affairs of
an organization of people who place
a high valuation upon mental alert alertness
ness alertness and education as a lifetime
process. It is people like these who
influence the direction of society,
and your place is with them. Wel Welcome!
come! Welcome!
The society came into being in
1897. The Florida Chapter was
established in 1912. Thus for 54
years, superior performance in all
academic pursuits has been
honored here.
Nationally the Society devotes its
income to the annual award of
$2,000 fellowships for first-year
graduate study. It endows publica publications
tions publications and ( it publishes The Phi
Kappa Phi Journal.
Membership in this fraternity
is among the best recom recommendations
mendations recommendations for one seeking admit admittance
tance admittance to any graduate school in
the world. It is the best evidence
of demonstrated scholarship.
During the lifetime of our Chap Chapter
ter Chapter 6,162 Gators have pledged
membership. Os these 114 were
initiated last April, and 86 in
August.

Wednesday, August 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,
p 9

CanplS
N*s
Briefs L ~

PRESENTED AWARD
The Clearwater Association for Mental Healths award for the
furtherance of psychiatric nursing was presented recently to
Mrs. Martha Harrell, a graduate of the UFs College of Nursing.
The association each year presents three SSO book awards to
graduate students in the college for outstanding academic per performance
formance performance and professional promise in psychiatric nursing.
cipients are chosen by the College of Nursing faculty.
MAKES DONATION
The Ocala Heart Association has donated SI,OOO to the UF
to help purchase diagnostic equipment for the cardiovascular
laboratory in the J. Hillis Miller Health Center.
The device will be used in research and diagnosis of heart
lesions and will allow patients to be turned at any angle for
X-rays of the heart.
The cardiovascular laboratory is under the direction of Dr.
Myron Wheat Jr., professor of surgery and chief of the Division
of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery in the College of Medicine.
PINSTRTPERS
The Pinstriper Program at the University Infirmary will be
beginning the first of October. This program consists of volunteers
who work one or two hours a week in assistance to the professional
staff of the Infirmary.
These volunteers assist in such ways as preparing syringes,
assisting in the Out-Patient Clinic, caring for flowers, making
beds and helping pass nourishment and trays.
Applicants for this program may pick up their application
at dormitory offices or sorority houses from Sept. 5-9. Appli Applications
cations Applications will be screened, and applicants selected and contacted by
mail. Because of academic demands, it is suggested that first
trimester freshman not apply.

GET SCHOLARSHIPS
Eleven UF Air Force ROTC
cadets were among 1,000 college
students throughout the nation re recently
cently recently selected to receive scholar scholarshlps
shlps scholarshlps provided by the ROTC
Vltalization Act of 1964.
MAY FAVOR REGIONS
Certain scholarships favor spe specific
cific specific regions in Florida.
Bracht scholarships, for
example, require that students
from Brevard County be given first
priority. This year there will be
$7,000 awarded through
scholarships.
Wilder said that the largest
single scholarship source is the
Metta Heathcote Fund, which will
begin this fall. $20,000 will be
awarded in scholarships, t c :*irst
and second priority goes to St.
Petersburg and Pinellas County
residents.
Scholarship qualifications us usually
ually usually include being a student in
good standing and need. Also,
citizenship is nearly always re required.
quired. required.
SEEK EMPLOYMENT
Students seeking part-time em employment
ployment employment on campus must go
through the student financial aid
office. It is here that academic
and conduct records are checked
and a student okayed for em employment.
ployment. employment.
More than 1500 students are
employed on a part-time basis.
Students with a B average or bet better
ter better may work 20 hours a week,
others only 15. They receive any anywhere
where anywhere from $1 to $3 per hour.
Students are employed in all
the colleges, Wilder said, and
have all types of jobs -- clerical,
library workers and lab assis assistants.
tants. assistants.
Is more financial aid being given
now than in the past?
Yes, Wilder said. There are
more qualified applicants and the
average financial need per appli applicant
cant applicant has risen.

Page 9-A



Page 10-A

L The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, August Hi, 1966

Prof Says Student Fees Un/ust

Student registration fees are a
tax and should be abolished,
according to Dr. Roe L. Johns,
department chairman and profes professor
sor professor in UF's College of Education.
Registration fees are merely
a tax on students and I believe they
should be abolished, Dr. Johns
said.
For instance, the money a stu student
dent student pays for registration cannot be
used to pay a professor's salary. It
is sent to the Florida Legislature
which in turn appropriates all funds
for the university, he explained.
UF students do not pay a tuition
as such. Florida law requires only
the payment of a registration fee.
At the present time a typical full

Jack Zucker is Chairman of the
Forums Committee of the Florida
Union Board. His job: bring na nationally
tionally nationally known speakers to the UF
campus several times a year.
His problems: how to get the
speakers, where to get the money
to pay for them, and how to get
the students to come hear them.
Zucker relates the effectiveness
of his committee to its degree of
institutionalization. He says:
Once we lay the groundwork,
make sure the channels are there
for Forums Committees of coming
years, then we can solve the prob problems.
lems. problems.
And he adds: If we lay the
groundwork well.
Zucker, who has been chairman
of the speaker procurement com committee
mittee committee since Janaury 1966, has
already gone a long way in his
program of institutionalizing
success. Some of his plans to put

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Forums furnishes Speakers

time undergraduate student
enrolled at the university pays,,,.
$l3O per trimester.
Only $72 of this fee is used for
matriculation. A building fund re receives
ceives receives a $20.50 portion, and the
remaining $37.50 is allocated for
the university health service and
student activities.
TTie present fee isn't very high
and I would not raise it, Dr.
Johns said. It should be reduced
rather than increased.
Its an inefficient method of
taxation because the student is in
the worst position of all to pay
it, he said.
If the registration fee were
abolished and this institution fi-

permanent improvements into
Forum fare have already been
put into operation.
Last trimester, he took a poll
of student opinion by running a
daily ad in The Florida Alligator.
He asked students to answer the
questions in the ad and turn their
questions in to the Forums Com Committee:
mittee: Committee:
Replies were relatively few
441 but, says Zucker, It was
certainly larger than our commit committee
tee committee of ten. The questions asked
in the poll were:
What speakers would you like
to hear on campus?
What professors would you
like to hear debate?
What topics would you like to
hear discussed?
The list of preferred speakers
was used by Zucker in inviting
the three speakers he has already
* signed for next year: Gerald Ford,

nanced completely by state funds,
it would amount to a negligible in increase
crease increase in the citizens taxes, said
Dr. Johns.
Don McDowell, director of fi finance
nance finance and accounting for UF,
agrees with Johns concerning the
amount that taxes would increase
if the university were financed
wholly by state funds.
Student registration fees a amount
mount amount to only $4 million of the
total university budget, said
McDowell. The budget for the
1965-66 biennium is S2O million,
of that amount sl6 million will be
appropriated by the state legis legislature,
lature, legislature, and the remainder will

Jules Feiffer ana A1 Capp.
The speakers invited were cho chosen
sen chosen from the top twenty names
listed in the student poll-
For debates between professors
Z ucker says that he will pick pro professors
fessors professors who were ranked in the
top ten in the poll. The topics of
their debates will be chosen also
from the suggestions most often
made. Sample topics are:
Last trimesters Alligator
firings.
What next in Viet Nam?
Negro evolution.
Zucker points out that by next
fall or winter, he may feel that
one or more of these topics are
dated. He feels that it will be his
role as leader of the committee
to make that decision.
But the idea of debates by fa faculty
culty faculty members is something new
in Itself, if Forums Committee
can get them going on a regular

come from student fees,, he said.
Actually the money from stu student
dent student registration fee#is deposited
locally in a University Incidental
Fund and does not go directly
to the legislature, McDowell ex explained.
plained. explained.
According to the annual report
of the Florida comptroller this
state collected over $515 million
in general revenue for the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1965.
But out of this general revenue
the state only spent $494.6 million.
McDowell described this as beiv
rather unusual for a state.
So you can see, the $4 million
in student fees is only a drop-

basis.
Zucker has also scheduled for
next fall two state speakers
men who have not achieved na national
tional national prominence, but who are
leaders in Florida politics. Scott
Kelly and Tom Adams will be this
falls speakers.
Zuckers program also covers
the realm of finance. He is keep keeping
ing keeping records of how to get money
and who to get it from, for the use
of future chairmen.
Past Forums Chairman Bill
McCollum, who initiated the policy
of stressing nationally known
speakers, managed to begin this
policy on a budget of less than
one sixth of what he requested
from the Union Board.
Miss Conner, the next chair chairman,
man, chairman, brought Ted Sorensen, Henry
Kissenger, and Colin Wilson, all
nationally prominent, during her
term as chairman.

In-the-bucket compa
total revenue ofT *
McDowell said. S
In theory the fee m
ax, but speaking
is no way around it t, ic ythei
he said. s a
McDowell explained
asata
hits all people f or n,.,
amount. e sa
An efficient tax wouldhe*
tributed among the people £
able to pay it, he said.
We have no trouble collpph
the fee from students, h
I think they plan for it
the loans and scholar
traUon a e dUrir **
Dr. E. R. Bartley, political
science professor, disagrees J
Johns about the registration
charged students.
In the legal sense, the f ee ii
not a tax, Dr. Bartley said."
think the fee is very nominal if
is considerably less than the tuition
charged by various private insti.
tutions. Dr. Bartley pointed oat
that Duke University charged a
tuition of SBSO for its under undergraduate
graduate undergraduate students in contrast to
the UF $l3O registration fee.
Dr. Bartley is a professor of
American constitutional law In the
political science department.
Politically, I dont think the
idea that every citizen has the
right to a free college education
will be adopted in Florida very
soon.
Although it may eliminate some
deserving students, the registra registration
tion registration fee tends to cut down on those
students who view this institution
as a four year loaf, Dr. Bartley
said.



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at your service.
' *SF-5 .
Traditional apparel for the college man and woman has been
a byword at Silverman's tor many years. Our extensive
selections of nationally clothings and furnishings are
designed to take care of all your needs.
We are proud of our many national brands and would like to mention just
a few. For the Men: Raquet Club by Hart, Sbhaffner & Marx, Densgate,
Cricketeer, Boston Shoes, Hathaway and Manhattan Shirts, London Fog
Maincoats, and Jackets, Gold Cup and Camp Sox, Lord Jeff, Manhattan
and Forum Sweaters, and many other lines. For the Ladies: Garland,
Lady Bostonian, Country Set, Norman Davidson, Petti, Jr. Accent, Lon London
don London Fog, Evan Picone, James Kenrob, Jr. Sophisticates, and many others.
In every .college town the students have a special store they
like to call their own. A place that makes them feel right
at home whether buying orbrowsing. We at Silverman's
would like to think that our store is such a place.
Our student charge plan ( a Silverman's first on campus
exclusive to UF men and women ) makes shopping
a little more convenient.
#
FREE CUSTOMER PARKING ON THE HUGE FIRST FEDERAL BANK
LOT, AT REAR OF STORE
. : ..
SitvetoMwZ'
0
225 Wo Uni versify Ave.
Specialists inLU n i vers ity ,C loth ing

Wednesday, August 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

IN 10 YEARS
South To Solve
Problems : Prof
A UF professor believes that 10 years from now the South will
have solved its racial and poverty problems better than any other
region of the country.
Dr. Hal G. Lewis, foundations of education professor at the
universitys College of Education, included this statement in re remarks
marks remarks addressed to participants in a recently concluded institute
for teachers of disadvantaged children held on campus.
A grievous error has been made by the white Southerner, Lewis
said, in attributing the behavior of the lower class Negroes to the
entire race. The white Southerner has not recognized, he said,
that there is a class structure within Negro society.
Dr. Lewis pointed out that there is a class structure in the Negro
society consisting of a small upper class, a growing middle class,
and a large lower class.
In making predictions about the South of 1976, Dr. Lewis said
the South has advantages and disadvantages.
Three disadvantages facing the South are its desire to cling to
history, its one-party system which has led to the poorest kind
of politician, and its poor, nonindustrial land and the resultant
desire to cling to an agricultural way of life.
The Souths assets are also threefold.
First, the agricultural way of life could be turned into an
advantage. We have the opportunity to move into adecenttype
of industrialization, he said.
Secondly, the religion of the South can be turned into an
advantage, although it has been a detriment at times.
Third, the Southern white and the Southern Negro have built
up a reservoir of affection, he said, and in many cases the bonds
are very deep.
In his following speech, Dr. Lewis said teachers, especially
teachers of the culturally deprived child, need some type of yard yardstick
stick yardstick with which to measure behavior in terms of good and bad.
What right, he asked, does a teacher have to attempt to remake a
lower class child with the teachers middle class values? In doing
this, the teacher runs the risk of alienating the child from his
family and peers.
Teachers had better be sure, he said, that they have something
worthwhile to offer the child that is worth the risk of alienation.
A teacher must go about this business in a kindly fashion, he
emphasized, so as not to shake the childs confidence in his parents.
In his closing statement, Dr. Lewis said teachers should beware
of shooting sparrows with cannonballs.

Information Service
r v
Names New Editor

Irving Edelson has been named
news and feature editor of the UFs
Division of Informational Services
by Director Bob Lynch.
Edelson, a 38-year-old native of
Tampa, succeeds James Couch in
the position. Couch resigned this
month to accept a teaching post at
Florida Keys Junior College in Key
West.
Edelson has been news editor
at Tulane University in New Or Orleans,
leans, Orleans, La., since February, 1964,
following eight years on the edi editorial
torial editorial staff of the Sarasota Herald-
Tribune and Journal. He worked
for newspapers in Colorado
Springs, Colo., Sidney, Ohio, and
Bradenton prior to joining the
Sarasota publications.
A journalism graduate from the
University of Missouri (1952),
Edelson has a broad and diversi diversified
fied diversified background in news coverage.
While in Sarasota, he also wrote
for United Press International,
Associated Press and St. Peters Petersburg
burg Petersburg Radio Station WLCY. He has
had numerous magazine articles
published during the past 10 years.
Edelson received the Presi Presidential
dential Presidential Award of Honor from the
Sarasota Chamber of Commerce
in 1964 after extensive civic ac-

NEW YORK Babies,
lake second place only to beer
drinkers in the bottle and jar
business. They are the glass
container industry's No. 2 cus customer.
tomer. customer. accounting for about 3
billion food jars a year, says

<
\1 5 |
| l
EDELSON
tivity as publicity director for the
Sarasota County Fair, the Miss
Florida Pageant and the Miss
Sarasota Pageant.
At the University, Edelson will
be responsible for regular con contact
tact contact with newspapers, radio and
television stations throughout
Florida, as well as with regional
and national media desiring spe special
cial special feature material about the
institution.

Beer, Babies

the Glass Container Manu Manufacturers
facturers Manufacturers Institute.
But the glass manufacturers
ship more than 5 billion new
bottles a year to keep pace with
the nation's beer drinkers, the
Institute reports.

Page 11-A



Page 12-A

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, August 31, 1966

Many Loan Plans
Available At UF

The price of living is rising and
the cost of higher education is
rising right along with it. This
rise presents a significant problem
to many UF students.
Loan programs are beginning to
be a popular solution for those
students finding it difficult to meet
the financial demands of college.
Loans, whether public or private,
are gaining in number, in propor proportion
tion proportion to student enrollment.
UF, with a student body of ap approximately
proximately approximately 17,000, offers a sig significant
nificant significant number of loan programs
in an effort to fill this painful void.
These programs have enabled stu students
dents students that possibly would never
have been able to complete their
education to finish with far less
worry.
Loan programs for higher
education date back to the 1930 s
with such programs as the National
Youth Administration and the Stu Student
dent Student Employment Program. Other
funds were of r private nature,
ofteh a trust fund left specially
for loan purposes.
Space Age Push
With the ushering in of the
space age in 1958 when the
Russians placed the first satellite
in orbit (Sputnik), the federal
government jumped into the edu education
cation education business with all four feet.
Out of the big push to up upgrade
grade upgrade Americas education system,
the National Defense Education
Act sifted down to the nations
campuses in an effort to compete
with the rumored advanced me methods
thods methods used in Russia.
Hie NDEA is known around the
UF campus as Dollars for Scho Scholars.
lars. Scholars. In this program, the federal
government matches $9 for every
$1 the UF can put up. Loans are
granted primarily on the basis of
need, as determined by a com computer,
puter, computer, with a 10-year-repayment
period. The amount of money avail available
able available per student in a given year
is limited, however, to enable the
program to reach more students.

COMING SOON
IN THE ALLIGATOR
/ \
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1 a 1
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The Higher Education Act of 1965
will enhance existing private loan
systems for students desiring
loans. The Florida Bankers
Association now has a program
which enables students to borrow
money from their hometown bank at
6 per cent interest. The federal
program will make this a guar guaranteed
anteed guaranteed loan program. Such a pro program
gram program will take the load off the
banks by subsidizing funds and thus
will make more funds available for
loan to students, yet at only 3 per
cent interest. A student can still
use his hometown bank.
What this guaranteed loan
programs aid does will be deter determined
mined determined by a students need, citizen citizenship
ship citizenship (American), if he is a full- time
student, and satisfactory grades.
In 1965, the UF Financial Aid
Office handled loans for approxi approximately
mately approximately 15 per cent of the student
body. This, however, does not
include short-term loans. During
that period, approximately
$998,000 was loaned to students
out of federal funds. Private funds
available to the university for loan
purposes put up $250,000 to stu students
dents students in that same period and
$50,000 was loaned by the
Guaranteed Loan Program.
Computerized Snow
WEST LONG BEACH, N.J.
A computer company
is simulating snow to help the
Armys Cold Regions Labora Laboratory
tory Laboratory in Hanover, N.H., learn
how to keep its cold weather
outposts from being engulfed
by heavy snowfalls.
The snow simulated by
Electronic Associates, Inc., is
not the snowflake of American
wintertime, but rather the
spherical snow pellets such as
fall in the frigid zones. Since
melting is impossible in the
extreme cold of these regions,
accumulations of snow eventu eventually,
ally, eventually, engulf buildings and equip equipment.
ment. equipment.

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BE



RESTING ALBERT V AWAITS FOR THE NEW FRESHMEN
. usually he prefers girls

Segregation Still

WASHINGTON (UPI) Twelve
years after the U. S. Supreme
Court ruled school segregation un unconstitutlonal,
constitutlonal, unconstitutlonal, the great majority
of American children are still
attending schools where almost all
of their fellow students are of the
same racial background.
That is the key fact underscored
by the -U. S. Office of Education
in a new report on Equality of
Educational Opportunity. The re report
port report is based on a nationwide
survey.
It indicates that four of every five
white children attend schools
whose student bodies are from 90
to 100 per cent white.
Two of every three Negro chil children
dren children attend schools whose student

X \ School I 4
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bodies are from 90 to 100 per cent
Negro.
Applying the courts finding that
segregated schools arein areinherently
herently areinherently unequal, the Office of
Education concludes that Ameri American
can American education remains largely un unequal
equal unequal in most sections of the
country, including all those where
Negroes form any significant pro proportion
portion proportion of the population.
From that general conclusion,
the report goes on to spotlight some
specific ways in which public
schools attended exclusively or
predominantly by white children
are better than those attended
mainly or entirely by Negroes.
In elementary schools for the
nation as a whole, the number of

Hard Fact Os Life

children per classroom averages
29 in white schools, 32 in Negro
schools. In high schools, the aver average
age average is 31 for whites, 34 for
Negroes.
White schools also come out per perceptibly
ceptibly perceptibly better on several other
tests. They are more likely to
have gymnasiums (74 per cent of
the white schools do, compared to
64 per cent of the Negro schools);
physics labs (94 per cent com compared
pared compared to 80 per cent); and suffi sufficient
cient sufficient supplies of textbooks (95
per cent against 85 per cent).
On the other hand, there are
some areas in which Negro schools
enjoy a clear statistical edge. They
are more likely, by 74 per cent
to 59 per cent, to have free lunch
programs. Sixty per cent of the
Negro high schools and 63 per cent
of the Negro elementary schools
are relatively new that is, they
were built within the past 20 years.
Only 53 per cent of the white

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Wednesday, August 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Medical College
Receives Grant
For Heart Study

The UFs College of Medicine
has received a research grant of
$117,890 from the John A. Hart Hart.
. Hart. ford Foundation, Inc., New York
City, for studies of the ultra ultrastructure
structure ultrastructure of the muscular wall of
the heart In which the inside of
cells are magnified from 1,000 to
500,000 times.
The award, which Is for a three threeyear
year threeyear period, was announced jointly
by Ralph W. Burger, foundation
president, and Dr. Emanuel Suter,
dean of the college.
Dr. Myron W. Wheat Jr., di director
rector director of the project, said the
studies are a continuation of
earlier Investigations also sup supported
ported supported by the Hartford Foundation.

high schools and 60 per cent of the
white elementary schools are in
that category.
The most significant differences
turn up in comparison of student
scores on standard achievement
tests. These tests do not measure
intelligence, potential or motiva motivation:
tion: motivation: they do measure the skills
which are most important in getting
a good job.
At the first grade level, the
average Negro child is about eight
percentage points behind the aver average
age average white child in achievement
test scores. This gap reflects the
cultural deprivation common to
minority group environments.
In other words, the Negro child
starts out with a handicap, and the
U.S. school system as it now stands
does not help him to overcome it.
On the contrary, when he graduates
from high school, hes at an even
bigger disadvantage in terms of
the skills which open the door of
opportunity in a highly competi competitive
tive competitive technological society.

The new fund will make possible
additional effort in evaluating the
various procedures used in open
heart surgery by: (1) probes Into
the subcellular structure of di diseased
seased diseased hearts subjected to heart
by-pass techniques and (2) studies
to clarify the role of the lysosome
(an enzyme-containing cellular
particle) in human heart tissue.
RELATED TO HEART
The Florida researchers have
been able to show that the lyso lysosome
some lysosome may be directly related to
the stress and strain of heart
disease in the human, and have
noted a relationship between lyso lysosomes
somes lysosomes and certain human heart
diseases such as mitral stenosis.
The College of Medicines Di Division
vision Division of Thoracic and Cardio Cardiovascular
vascular Cardiovascular Surgery is believed to
be the only such unit currently
investigating heart tissue by ultra ultrastructural
structural ultrastructural techniques. Most stu studies
dies studies in progress on human tissue
are by pathologists who obtain
tissue during autopsies.
But the UF investigators are
able to examine fresh tissue di directly
rectly directly from the beating heart.
The earlier grant of $98,765
enabled the college to establish
the John A. Hartford Laboratory
of Thoracic and Cardiovascular
Research and to include in the
laboratory two electron-micro electron-microscopes
scopes electron-microscopes one considered the most
advanced instrument available
today.
REPORT PUBLISHED
A report of some of the work
accomplished during the past year'
under this grant was reported in
May before the American Asso Association
ciation Association for Thoracic Surgery in
Vancouver, B.C. It will be pub published
lished published in the Journal of Thoracic
and Cardiovascular Surgery this
fall.
The medical report concerns the
use of the electron microscope
in studying the ultrastructure of
the heart muscle and establishing
the best method of preservation
of the heart during cardio cardiopulmonary
pulmonary cardiopulmonary by-pass in open heart
surgery.
Taxed Whiskers
NEW YORK (UPI) Peter
I of Russia once ordered all
noblemen to shave their beards,
and levied a beard tax to en encourage
courage encourage the practice, according
to the Chase Manhattan Bank
Money Museum.
Pawnshop Patrons
Jt
NEW jYORK Most
people who borrow money from
pawnbrokers are of the middle middleincome
income middleincome and professional groups
who desire temporary or emer emergency
gency emergency financial aid, according
to the New York Pawnbrokers
Information Bureau.
Such borrowers, says the
Bureau, might include a house housewife
wife housewife who has exceeded her bud budget;
get; budget; a company executive who
needs funds to entertain an
unexpected customer, or even
a wealthy matron who, before
taking an extended trip, wants
extra cash and a safe place
for iher furs, jewelry or silver silverware.
ware. silverware. 1

Page 13-A



Page 14-A

L The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, August 31, 1966

Jf|.. ip^iiP 7

ft§ $r INTRODUCTORY |jj
||| O FLIGHT LESSON \ gU
|flgj| wb una wok unw ra raw

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HHBbh.Wv9 h|^[
books j
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(You* §ocp ot' YeARBooK)

The Florida Alligator, -Wednesday, August 31, 1966,

Page 15-A



The BROWSE SHOP
FOR OVER 1700 DIFFERENT TITLES OF PAPERBACK
BOOKS & OVER 500 TECHNICAL & REFFRENCE
BOOKS IN MANY FIELDS

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Page 18-A

~ The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, August 31, 1966

STUDENT PUBLIC A TIONSTHE NEW RAGE

Wanna Do Something Thats Challenging?

Have a little extra time on your
hands? After a full days classes,
an hour or two at your job, and
of course an hour or two at your
fraternity or sorority.
Perhaps youd like a little some something
thing something to keep you occupied. For
those restless souls who find them themselves
selves themselves in such a predicament, the
UF has something just for you.
Whether your interests be identity
dilution or the mechanics of rais raising
ing raising nutria for fun and profit, there
is sure to be a student organi organization
zation organization to fill those extra hours.
If you are but a freshman, still
free from the burdens of the uni university,
versity, university, you will, of course, want
to join one of these organizations
as scon as possible. Since every everyone
one everyone likes to see the finished product
of their work you might enjoy our
little phantom empire The
Fun World of Student Publica Publications.
tions. Publications.
.Here you can have not only one
but as many products as you de desire,
sire, desire, for as long as you desire;
to keep yourself or send home to
mother.
And what, you might wonder, is
Student Publications? We thought
youd ask.
First and foremost, we have The
Alligator, which, if were not mis mistaken,
taken, mistaken, you are reading at this very
moment. The Alligator, as you can
see, is Floridas Student News Newspaper.
paper. Newspaper. It speaks via editorials,
letters to the editor, etc., for
17,000 UF students, give or take
a soul.

I §*ou &re UresselJ
I WHEN YOUR CLOTHES COME FROM
I y
I Unturratti}
I
Having 12 UNIVERSITY SHOP STORES at famous Colleges and Universities we not only carry the most
I wanted styles for men and ladies; we set the trends. Nationally advertised in PLAYBOY and GLAMOUR |
I magazines.
(NlltTAttmiNT fOI M I f
I PLAYBOY SAYS GLAMOUR SAYS I
Clothes That Make Women, JVomen Clothes That Men Can Understand
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I 4> \ ~~ I
I DIRECTLY ACROSS UNIVERSITY AVENUE FROM THE CAMPUS I
I IN CAROLYN PLAZA
| 1

Occasionally there are dire con consequences
sequences consequences meted out for its doing
this. Last year, for instance, a
couple of hairy editors were fired.
And the summer editor, another
loudmouth, found his contract un unrenewed
renewed unrenewed for the fall. Perhaps you,
too, have what it takes to inflame
administrators, outrage poli politicians,
ticians, politicians, and in general, raise mer merry

FIGHT YOUR WAY ON DO*TO THE BASEMENT
. . join up with the fun gang

ry merry ned in five directions. Lome
by and see us.
Os course, if your a little less
volatile, the Gator serves other
functions too. It has been known to
relate the news, delve into goings goingson-about-campus
on-about-campus goingson-about-campus and investigate
the people who make things go
not to mention one or two who
generally prefer to stop every everything.

thing. everything. Ah yes, The Alligator, praise
be, tis the backbone of the UF,
for better or for worse.
If the Gator is not your cup of
tea, then you might be interested
in UFs elegant yearbook, The
Seminole.
The Seminole, as yearbooks are
wont to do, publishes photographs
of practically every organization.

event, personality and what have
you, to make the
University what it is. Think about
that for awhile. And then, if youre
still interested, hop on over to the
Seminole office and scratch your
name on the dotted line.
The coming year marks the es establishment
tablishment establishment of yet another publi publication
cation publication at the UF, this one a humor humorfeature
feature humorfeature magazine called Release.
The keen observer is aware that
there are many benefits to be de derived
rived derived from an apprenticeship with
any or all of the above listed pub publications.
lications. publications. Mainly, of course, you
have the opportunity todearn an in infinitesimal
finitesimal infinitesimal amount about pub publications
lications publications starting from scratch,
because thats sure what you start
with here.
How to join you ask?
Simple. You just trot on down to
the basement thats right, the
basement (nothing but class for our
troops) of the Florida Union,
turn on your flashlight, grope your
way down the corridor to the offices
of the editors of the publication(s)
you wish to serve or victimize.
Turkey Portions
PHILADELPHIA lUPD At
a typical turkey dinner, each
person on the average will eat
about a half pound of meat,
according to an institutional
food service company.
The company. Automatic Re Retailers
tailers Retailers of America, Inc., bases
its estimate on the fact that it
serves 9,700 pounds of turkey
daily to 19.400 persons, or a
half pound per serving.



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Wednesday, August 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19-A



Page 20-A

l, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, August 31, 1966

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Page 21-^



Page 22-A

i t The Florida Alligator,'* Wednesday, August 31, 1966

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Page 23-A



Page 24-A

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, August 31, 1966

Parking Off-Campus
Scarce Most Os Time

**l wouldnt mind college if I
didnt have to go to class, goes
a familiar saying at the university.
For off-campus students the
problem is doubly true, because of
the parking problem.
But next year the problem may
be solved, according to Captain
C. A. Roberts, head of the Traffic
Division of the Gainesville Police

UF Driving Rules
May Be Confusing
UF rules concerning car ownership and driving privileges are not
always clear, especially to Incoming freshmen.
If you are a freshman, you may not drive a car in Alachua County
unless you fall into one of the following categories:
Live at a commuting distance from campus.
Married, living with family in Gainesville.
At least 21 years old.
Disabled to the extent that locomotion is impaired.
Those who are permitted to drive a car in Alachua County include:
Graduate students, juniors and seniors.
Faculty, academic staff and certain non-academic staff members.
Sophomores who have successfully completed 64 hours.
Sophomores who have attained a 3.0 academic average their
freshman year. (Must have at least 28 hours.)
All vehicles roust be registered with the Campus Police Department.
A student may register only his automobile or one owned by a member
of his Immediate family. To register a car, a student must produce an
operators license, proof of ownership, and must establish that he is
eligible to register his car.
If you have a bicycle, you roust register it with the Campus Police.
There is a service charge of SI.OO. All scooters and motorcycles must
also be registered with the Campus Police. Any student may operate
a bicycle, scooter or motorcycle.
If you are a freshman or sophomore and not otherwise restricted
from driving, take heart. You may operated automobiles in Alachua
County and on campus from 3:00 p.m. Friday until 7:00 a.m. on Mon Monday
day Monday if these automobiles have been registered with the Campus Police.
This does NOT mean that you may have your own car in the county.
No cars bearing border zone, commuter or campus resident wil) be
permitted to drive on campus between:ooa.m. and 4:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday, within the following boundary: 13th Street to Inner
Drive to Newell Drive to Radio Road to North-South Drive to Univer University
sity University Avenue down to 13th Street. (The map accompanying this article
shows restricted campus areas.)

'The Plays The T

The plays the thing for any
UF student who wants to join in
cast, crew or committee work in
one of the dramatic productions of
UFs Florida Players.
Players put on two shows each
trimester, selected and directed by
staff members of the Speech De Department.
partment. Department. The variety of shows is
great. Plays performed in past
years have included Oedipus, Tar Tartuffe,
tuffe, Tartuffe, Pygmalion, Our Town, You
Cant Take it with You, Death of
a Salesman, Rain, Bell, Book and
Candle, Picnic, Teahouse of the
August Moon, and Bus Stop.
Participation in plays requires
no previous experience and com committee
mittee committee work is always there for
the interested student. The first
step in joining the cast of the play

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Department.
We have made a complete study
of every street in the large section
north of the university, Roberts
said.
The network studied is between
N.W. 13th Street west to N.W. 20th
Street and from West University
Avenue north to N.W. 7th Avenue.
All streets in the area have

is the tryout period.
According to one play director,
often students who didnt think they
had the ability were cast in a show
as the director felt they had po potential.
tential. potential. More work is needed with
those who are new to show busi business
ness business but individual work and some
basic training helps to overcome
this.
One member of Florida Players
explained that theater at UF
means experience for both begin beginner
ner beginner and veteran since production
crew and casts are made up ex exclusively
clusively exclusively of students. In addition
there is an experienced and ac accredited
credited accredited theater staff to provide
the professional touch to their
efforts and insure that awjiences
get theater at its best. \

been measured for consideration of
a one-way network to utilize as
much on-street parking for the
convenience of residents and off offcampus
campus offcampus students, he said.
Roberts said the study is now in
the hands of Harry Howard, a con consultant
sultant consultant traffic engineer from
Jacksonville. The study should be
completed soon and the oneway
system put in within the next year.
The system should make over
1,000 more spaces available, he
said.
Also in consideration is a pos possible
sible possible parking lot somewhere in the
district, though this is complicated
since the city owns little land in
the area.
Another suggestion would be to
have a parking mall on campus,
though this has been rebutted, he
said, by those who say it woulfr
cost too much and that ground space
is needed by the university for
classrooms.
Streets, Roberts said, are
designed to handle traffic as a
primary function. They arent de designed
signed designed for parking. But in the
university area, where conditions
are such as they are, parking must
be considered in the function of
a thoroughfare.
Another traffic problem which
affects the university will also be
relieved soon, Roberts said. The
intersection of 13th Street and Uni University
versity University Avenue will be widened into
six lanes. Above each lane there
will be an individual directional
light.
This intersection of two state
roads is burdened with traffic
from the buildup on campus and the
hospital and the increased develop development
ment development of 13th Street, Roberts said.
The improvement of the inter intersection
section intersection has been approved and con construction
struction construction will be carried out within
six months, Roberts said.

J
mg

Membership in the Players is
determined by a point system based
on time and effort of students
working in productions. Three
levels of proficiency are available:
Player, Journeyman, and Master.
On September 7, during orienta orientation
tion orientation week programs, Florida
Players will present an open house
to meet the staff and members of
the group, view slides of past
productions, and get a preview of
whats-to-come.
Tryouts for the first play of the
season will begin during the first
week of classes. The play is a
Roman farce called Mostellaria
(the haunted house) and will be
directed by Dr. Donald Berchardt.

JD
KHUDSEH

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'Like Training A Small Army'



DOUBLE, DOUBLE, T01L...

Wednesday, August 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

The musically minded freshman heading for the UF campus this
fall can choose from the Gator Band, orchestra, glee clubs and UF
choir.
Gator Band plays for all the football games. Someone once figured
that over 1,000 man-hours go each week into the making of a Gator
halftime show.
The band isn't limited to music majors. Members represent almost
every college on campus. Total membership averages around 165

members under Director
Richard W. Bowles.
Whipping up a halftime show is
like training a small army.
The marching formations are
mapped out by the band drum
major. A big wooden boarcl is set
up to represent a football field
and small toys representing band
members are placed in position.
Charts are then made and handed
out to band members who must
learn to master this formation
during the one or two weeks be between
tween between each football game.
The care taken in producing
these halftime shows can be seen
by the fact that some of the boys
are given ROTC credit for their
part in the marching.
On the other side of the intra intramural
mural intramural organization is the univer university
sity university orchestra, led by Edward
Troupin.
The orchestra is made up of
UF students, faculty and Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville residents. It usually puts on
two or three concerts per year
and plans are now in the making
for a tour of Floridas west coast
during next school term.
For those who prefer the vocal
end of music ther§ are the Mens
and Womens Glee Clubs. Again,
as with band and orchestra, a stu student
dent student doesnt have to be a music
major to join.

Patronize Gator Advertisers
They All Wear White Hats!
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Page 25-A



Page 26-A

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday* August 31, 1966

Grants Up
$2 Million
At UF
Figures recently released by
UF's Division of Sponsored Re Research
search Research show that the contracts and
grants in force at the university
as of June 30 total $19,826,443.
This amount reflects an increase
of some $2.33 million over the
last six months of last year.
The National Science Foundation
currently has some $6.9 million
in research in progress on cam campus,
pus, campus, while the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare has
about $4.68 million. Other large
research sources include the Na National
tional National Aeronautics and Space
Administration 51.99 million;
and the Department of Defense
$2.82 million.
The area in which the largest
amount of funds is being used is
in science development 54.24
million; engineering, medicine and
arts and sciences also have grants
of around $3.5 million each.

These figures include total
amounts received for new con contracts
tracts contracts and grants as well as
amounts received as a result of
extensions or renewals of con contracts
tracts contracts and grants.
The Department of Health, Edu Education
cation Education and Welfare contributed the
largest single increase of contracts
and grants 23 for SBOI,OOO.
The College of Agriculture and
School of Forestry have the
greatest number of contracts and
grants in force 178; the College
of Medicine ranks second with 124.
By departments, the College of
Medicine also received the largest
number of extensions and re reaewals
aewals reaewals 37; the College of Agri Agriculture
culture Agriculture and School of Forestry
received a total of 35.
In categories of services per performed
formed performed 11.67 per cent of the total
research is of direct probable
benefit to industry; 88.47 per cent
is basic research and education
contracts. Further breakdown in includes
cludes includes contribution to human
health 21.43 per cent; direct
probable benefit to agriculture and
forestry 7.32 per cent; and
contribution to the national safety
(defense) 14.20 per cent. Many
of the projects contribute to more
than one service objective.
Architects
Estate Goes
To University
Otis Ainsworth Skinner, aft
architect and designer in Chicago
and Sarasota in the thirties, has
left his estate to the UF. The
same to be used for a scholarship
for worthy students in the archi architectural
tectural architectural school.
Skinner, born in Chicago in 1892,
died on Feb. 6, 1964, in Sarasota.
The estate has now been settled,
and $8,679.29 will be available to
architecture students.
- Skinner attended the University
of Illinois, was a member of Alpha
Delta Phi Fraternity, served in the
Navy in World War I and travelled
extensively in Europe.
E. M. Fearney, associate pro professor
fessor professor of architecture and Rudolph
Weaver, founder of the Department
wd College of Architecture here
were friends of Skinner.

ATTENTION PARENTS
' 1 Vj
HERES A SPECIAL SUBSCRIPTION
OFFER DESIGNED JUST FOR YOU

With your son or daughter enrolled at the University of Florida, you'll take a special interest in
the news and activities of the university community. There's no better way to keep abreast of the
doings at your youngster's new Alma Mater than to read the Florida Alligator, so we've arranged
this Special Offer to parents and relatives of new Gators. Clip and mail this coupon now. This
offer will be void after SEPT. 10, 1966.

Daily Mail Subscription SIO.OO
5 Days a week, September thru April (First Two trimesters)
* r a '-I t
Special Twke-a-week Subscription $4.50
-j- ; -v
Tuesdays &. Fr'qcys, September thru April

I j
! NAME ;
j ADDRESS..... I Mail To:
{ CITY,,,, *. v. .STATE 4-.. t- .. * i FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
! ZIP CODE __ JL CIRCULATION DEPT.
Please enter my subscription for Dai!y[ |SI0; £4.50. j """I Room 9, Florida Union
(Make checks & money orders payable to The Florida Alligator, Do \ I University of Florida
j not send cash or stamps.) \ Gainesville, Florida
i i



y STARTING OFF SPIRITED PRACTICE
UF President J. Wayne Reitz, right, football coachay Graves,
left, and Student Body President Arthur (Buddy) Jacobs of Fernan Fernandina
dina Fernandina Beach signal the start of football practice last week with a
wave of the straw spirit hats that are now available to students,
alumni and Gator grid fans. The hats are encircled with an orange
and blue band of ribbon and proved quite popular during the 1965
season when nearly 4,000 were sold by the student government
office. Jacobs said hats can be purchased by sending checks for
$4.25 (payable to Student Government) to his office in the Florida
Union. Hats will be sold on days of Florida home games (Sept. 17,
Sept. 24, Oct. 29, Nov. 12, and Nov. 26) and all proceeds from sales
wil| go toward Dollars for Scholars, a scholarship fund which
matches each dollar earned by the project with $9 in federal
support.

Increased College .Costs
Mean More Financial Aid

Increased costs for higher edu education
cation education in recent years have
resulted in increased financial
assistance. More than 50 per cent
of UF students now receive some
financial aid while in college.
This assistance, according to
Daniel B. Wilder Jr., student fi financial
nancial financial officer, includes loans,
scholarships, student employment
and funds from local organizations.
Excluding those from local or organizations,
ganizations, organizations, the funds those for
undergraduates are administer administered
ed administered through the student financial aid
office.
Local funds are usually from

!
Gator Ads V
The Lively Ones! I
m
civic organizations in a students
hometown.
Loans come from federal and
state governments, private insti institutions
tutions institutions and the university.
For the period of September 1965
through April 1966, Wilder approx approximated
imated approximated the following amounts in
loans: National Defense Loans in
excess of $900,000; Florida state
loans in excess of $60,000; United
Student Aid funds in excess of
$25,000; University of Florida long
term loans in excess of $200,000.
Loans granted within each col college
lege college although administered
through the student financial aid

WORLD
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'1
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ESCORTED TOURS INDEPENDENT PLANNED TOURS TO YOUR PREFERENCE.
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office come to approximately
$15,000.
Short term loans sums bor borrowed,
rowed, borrowed, for example, when checks
from home dont come in time
are paid back within 90 days. In Interest
terest Interest rates are two-thirds of one
per cent per month on the unpaid
balance.
Approximately $50,000 in uni university-wide
versity-wide university-wide scholarships were
given in the period of September
1965 to August 1966. In addition,
there are out-of-state tuition
scholarships, competitive awards,
etc. v

Wednesday, August 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Da,vis To Represent
UF At Symposium

Dr. George K. Davis, director of
the Division of Biological Sciences
at UF, will represent the Univer University
sity University at a symposium devoted to
science and engineering in the
Gulf of Mexico.
The symposium, sponsored by
the Gulf Universities Research
Corporation, will be in New Or Orleans,
leans, Orleans, La., Sept. 8-9.
Purpose of the symposium is
to give scientists and administra administrators
tors administrators an opportunity to review what
is now known about the Gulf and
to discuss the need for new re research.
search. research.
Dr. Davis will lead one of several
discussion sections on Sept. 9.
The symposium is the first func function
tion function of this type sponsored by
GURC, a non-profit organization
formed in 1965 to provide a focal
point for universities, corpor corporations,
ations, corporations, foundations and government
agencies with research interests
in the Gulf as a great natural
laboratory.
It will include presentations on
subjects in the fields of ocean oceanography,
ography, oceanography, meteorology, biology,
geology, geophysics, marine en engineering
gineering engineering and economics.
GURC membership covers ma marine
rine marine and engineering research

in Mens and Boys Wear
.WOODROW J for Florida I I
&
Regular Collar jfcyOre
fpri Short Sleeve
y\ Permanent Pressed
Plaid Sports Shirts
$2.99*
W\ PERMANENT PRESSED
tP||, -W casual slacks
$5.50
MfcsjNjft
V\\\ GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER

institutions from Texas to Florida,
including the University of Texas,
Texas Christian University,
Louisiana State University, Texas
Technological College, Tulane
University, University of Miami,
University of Florida, Florida
State University, University of
Houston, Rice University, Texas
A&M University, Southern
Methodist University, Southwest
Research Institute and Gulf South
Research Institute.
Right Turn
On Red
Abolished
A favorite pastime of UFs mo motorized
torized motorized population is no more.
Last month the Gainesville City
Commission passed an ordinance
prohibiting turning right on the red
light. This brings Gainesville in
line with the rest of the state.
Previously, state law said
turning right on red onto a state
road was illegal, i.e. U.S. 441
(13th Street) but enforcement was
limited.

Page 27-A



Page 28-A

~ The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, August 31, 1966

J ._ j
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HELPING TO MOVE CHEMICALS
... is pretty Diane Goff
Surfers 9 Jarjon Leaves
Non-Surfer All at Sea
PACIFICA. Calif. (VPI) The gremmies and the hodads
have invaded the beaches and hoy, are the hot doggers mad!
The surging popularity of surfing has filled already-crowded
beaches with novices (gremmies) and hangers-on (hodads).
And the hot doggers, the pros of the surfing world, tell a
tale of woe. It seems that collisions with beginning surfers are
on the rise.
The hot doggers can easily he recognized hy the fancy turns
and maneuvers they make as they ride their rocketing boards
into shore.
Cqnally easy to spot are the gremmies. They can he identi identified
fied identified hy the amount of gas they take bailing met, blowing out and
wiping mil.
. And takirrg gas from a surfhmrrd going Hfl miles per hour
can he dangerirus. say the more experienced surfers.
As you may have guessed, there is a great dial more to surf surfing
ing surfing than meets the eye. That is, if you want Ur talk abirut it
with surfers.
tt iping out, for example, is getting knocked off your surf surfboard.
board. surfboard. Railing out is literally that jumping from the board
for safety's sake. And blowing out is being tossed out of a wave,
or being thrmrn back while trying to climb it.
That isn't all. There's walking the board, pulling out, the
curl, the drop, the set. the skeg, trimming, the peak, and you've
got to he able to hang fire, and later ten.
And, of course, you must be able to recognize a break, as
well as, the wall of a ware.
It all sounds very much like 20th century teen-age culture.
Rut it has been quite a few hundred years since the roaring surf
of the Pacific Ocean attracted the Polynesians on Tahiti and
Itora lltwa. The islanders were hot doggers as far back as the
( >th century, when the beaches weren't so crowded.
Don't be fooled by the casual jargon of today, either into
thinking the suntanned young girl or hoy clearing along a 10-
foot nave sit effortlessly is doing something easy.
It's a talent that must be developed through long practice.
First you've got to be an expert swimmer able to push a
surfboard a half mile out just to get to the nates. Then you hare
to be able to, recognize and catch the good ones and have the
courage to stand up and fight them through the plunging surf.
It is when you've reached that point that you begin to wojty
about meeting a gremmie.

SllllliH HOME 0F THE
MNfWyM WORLD'S BEST
Ml/lMf'Vj HAMBURGER
M^ll\jT| DRIVE IN WALK IN
\Br -fl FOOD TO GO
Of Campus
mFoodHoslf 441
off Watch for Hie opening of
th e new King's Food Host
across from the men's dorms
on Univ. Ave. another
Wft store to serve you better.

Change Name Os Game
For UFs Chemistry Dept.

Change is the name of the game
today.
And you cant move ahead with without
out without change. But change usually
brings headaches. And headaches
are painful.
Take the UFs Department of
Chemistry, for instance. A beau beautiful,
tiful, beautiful, four-story $1,425,100 re research
search research unit is ready, set to ful fulfill
fill fulfill the dreams of the universitys
research specialists in organic
and inorganic chemistry.
But what good is an empty
building?
It has to be equipped. And thats
where the headaches begin even
though the new unit is attached
to Leigh Hall, the Department of
Chemistry building.
Problem 1: 10,000 bottles (and
some drums), small, large, med medium-sized,
ium-sized, medium-sized, round and, yes, even
square containing everything
from TNT to cyanide pellets now
in the Leigh Hall chemistry store storeroom.
room. storeroom.
Problem 2: Heavy scientific
equipment, such as nuclear mag magnetic
netic magnetic resonance spectroscopes,
pose a heavy problem for the
movers.
Problem 3: Two conference
tables too long for the stairs.
Problem 4: Where to put the
fire extinguishers.
These are but some of the diffi difficulties.
culties. difficulties. But where there are pro problems,
blems, problems, there are solutions. And
when problems are solved, abetter
way of life usually follows.
Morris Mixon, storekeeper and
the man in charge of moving chemi chemicals,
cals, chemicals, equipment, furnishings and
accessories into the new unit, is the
individual with the most woes. .
and answers!
And Dr. Paul Tarrant, profes professor
sor professor of organic chemistry and
chairman of the building com committee,
mittee, committee, predicts a better way of
life when the move is complete.
The new Building is virtually
finished . V and moying is al already
ready already in process . with prob problem
lem problem solutions being mapped out.
For instance:
The bottles Operation change changeover
over changeover will take manpower, man
hours and two and three-tier labor laboratory
atory laboratory carts six men working
eight hoiys a day for one week.
Shelves of the chemistry store storeroom
room storeroom now resemble a miniature
chemical factory, with many
solutions and solids potentially
explosive, inflammable, poisonous
and noxious. Sample chemicals are
Tri-nitrotoluene (TNT), ether, po potassium
tassium potassium cyanide and acetylchlor acetylchloride.
ide. acetylchloride.

In addition to the shelves, one
filing cabinet contains 1,000 small
bottles with chemicals not often in
demand, but necessary to have in
small quantities. In the solvent
room, there are gallon-size bottles
and 55-gallon drums with such
chemicals as benzene, acetone and
carbon tetrachloride.
Included among the 1,575 stock
items and 400-500 non-stock items
are gold and platinum compounds.
Nuclear magnetic resonance
spectrometer Aluminum rods,
1-1/2 inches round, will be used
to roll the two MNRS machines
along the ground floor corridors
to the elevator and up to the third
floor. The two-unit machines have
single magnets weighing 3,500
pounds the approximate capa capacity
city capacity of the new elevator.
Other heavy equipment, such as
the new $65,033 mass spectro spectrometer
meter spectrometer from Japan, is yet to be
uncrated. It could be too big for
the elevator. If so, Operation
Airlift may be required with the
use of a crane.
Conference tables To move
tljem upward, Mixon contemplates
an airlift to second floor corridors
with a crane.
Fire extinguishers This
headache belongs to Dr. Tarrant
-- and the question is: should they
be in or out of the labora laboratories.
tories. laboratories. The philosophy of Dr. Tar Tarrant
rant Tarrant is If something blows, clear
out fast and then look back to see
if a fire extinguisher can be used
safely.
And there have been other prob problems,
lems, problems, normal with moving, such as
what to do when two 45-ton vans
arrive with office equipment for
immediate unloading ... or when
a bottle of ether drops and breaks
... or how to move a machine
shop.
But theres the brighter side of
the coin, too, which Dr. Tarrant
can appreciate more readily. For
instance:
Versatility will be much greater
in the new building. New two-man,
four-man and six-man laborator laboratories
ies laboratories will facilitate better group

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Florida's Largest Selection Os
ZENITH STEREOS
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-1 SO
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vvUtn 0 Ph. 376-7171
Selling & Servicing ZENITH, And To
Univ. of Fla. Staff, Students & Faculty Since 1933

coordination and convenience in
research. Instrument rooms, con conference
ference conference rooms and offices are
centrally located and the building
is air conditioned.
Increased size 60,000
square feet of space will ac accommodate
commodate accommodate 14 professors and 106
post-doctoral fellows and graduate
students conducting research in
organic and inorganic chemistry
areas.
New, modern scientific instru instruments
ments instruments and apparatus costing
$222,000 will boost chemistry re research
search research and help accelerate the
Universitys role as a Center of
Excellence.
Safety features are much great greater
er greater in the new unit. Approximately
75 hoods (closed compartments)
with separate flue systems will
permit safer experimentation with
flammable, noxious and toxic ma materials.
terials. materials. In the old building, dan dangerous
gerous dangerous fumes can be exhausted
from one laboratory on the same
flue system.
More running room is avail available
able available should an explosion occur,
lighting is better, smaller labs
enable students to be more aware
of the next students experiments
(so a match wont be struck to light
a burner while ether is being used),
fireproof refrigerators are being
installed and faculty offices are
isolated from laboratories.
In addition, the high pressure
laboratory removed from Leigh
Hall has been rebuilt in the new
addition. Located on the roof, it
can be used for experiments where
high pressure will be generated.
When the pressure reaches the
danger point, the roof of the high
pressure room opens to reduce
pressure.
Moving research faculty and stu students
dents students to the new unit will free
additional space in Leigh Hall for
classroom teaching and laboratory
study.
Dr. Tarrant, extremely pleased
with the new building, predicted
the facilities wiU lift the morale
of researchers and stimulate
them to do an even better job of
research.



Quarter Gives Time For Education

Think of it registration
without long lines in. Tigert
Hall and Florida Gym.
Elimination of registration lines
is just one of the changes the
quarter system will bring to UF.
The other changes will occur in:
examination procedures, curri curriculum,
culum, curriculum, counseling, graduation and
tuition.
At the present time the plans
are tentative, said Dr. Franklin
A. Doty, dean of University College.
There will be four quarters per
year under the new system. Each

Welcome j
JUDENTS |
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ft SWEATER (9.00
£ SKIRT $12.00 2
* ITS A GREAT CENTURY J
i
Let yourself go in Century's beautifully-crafted IT
slim skirt. Os soft, supple, sumptuous Doveskin 2
£ gently persuaded, rather than tailored, into
$ shape via clever contouring. So luxuriously right
I for today's young elegante. Kick pleat in back £
makes the going easy. Seat lined for shape
retention. ] #
Century's perennially perfect cardigan to ?
fling over a blouse, button to the chin or merely IT
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Open Friday Night 'Til 9 p.m.
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| The Personality |
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$ 8 E. University Ave. J
# On The North Side of The Square 2
****** ************************ #

of the quarters will be 10 weeks
long and it will take three quar quarters
ters quarters to complete an academic year.
What this is doing is using the
time available more effectively,
said Robert Mautz, vice president
for academic affairs.
The quarter is stretching the
current trimester academic year
from 27 weeks to 30 weeks. This
will allow more class time for the
courses. For example, humanities
will be extended to three terms
instead of the present two terms.
There is always more to learn



and this slows down the pace some somewhat,
what, somewhat, said Doty. You need time
for education.
Extending courses to three
terms will cut their credit value.
Credits under the quarter are
worth two-thirds of a trimester
credit. In order to get the equi equivalent
valent equivalent of six trimester credits it
will be necessary to take nine
quarter hours.
Some of the quarter classes will
be given more credit than they cur currently
rently currently get. For example, some
course credits will be five hours
one term and four credits the next
term.
Because there are three terms
to an academic year, there will be
two breaks after Christmas. As it
currently stands, the fall quarter
will begin on Sept. 25, and exami examinations
nations examinations will be from Dec. 11-18.
Winter term will begin on Jan. 18,
and Spring term will begin on April
1. The term will be out in the middle
of June.
Classes will be 50 minutes long
with fifteen minute breaks in be between.
tween. between. First period will begin at
8 a.m. and tenth period will end
at 6:45 p.m. Evening sessions will
be three periods long, beginning at
7:10 p.m. and ending at 10 p.m.
For evening classes there will be
only 10 minutes between classes.
Registration will be divided into
two phases: counseling and sec sectioning
tioning sectioning by the Registrars Office.
During the counseling session
the counselors will have the course
cards. These cards will be filled
out for the fall, winter and spring
terms.
Counseling appointments will be
distributed according to the stu students
dents students average. There will be no
privileged registration.
After counseling the student will
take his course assignment card to
Tigert Hall for sectioning.
There will be a computer sys system
tem system which will be installed in the
colleges to keep counselors in informed
formed informed on which sections are be being
ing being closed, said Registrar
Richard H. Whitehead.
Tuition for each quarter will
be SIOO. This will mean a S4O
increase for the academic year.
UF and other state universities
were placed on the trimester sys system
tem system because the state legislature
wanted the buildings to be used on
a year-round basis. This was sup supposed
posed supposed to be more efficient.
The trimester went against us
culturally since we must fit the
academic year to the cultural ha habits
bits habits of man, said Vice President
for Academic Affairs Mautz.
The quarter system will fit into

11l $C INTRODUCTORY §§§
sM O FLIGHT LESSON M
THIS CERTIFICATE PLUS FIVE DOLLARS ENTITLES fjgg
g|| BEARER TO A SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY ||||s
tmmtmnmami mmMvntataMiiun

Wednesday, August 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

the system. Most of the larger
colleges (such as Northwestern)
use the quarter system. This will
enable professors to go to other
colleges in the summer.

Religious Centers
AvailableFor All

The freshmans first contact with college religious life is with the
organized religious centers around campus.
Several religious groups have foundations buildings a short distance
off campus. The centers sponsor services, socials, discussion groups
and brunches for their members.
Denominations that have foundations located near campus are:
Baptist, Catholic, Episcopal, Jewish, Lutheran, Methodist, Presby Presbyterian
terian Presbyterian and Mormon.
The Unitarian Fellowship, Christian Science Organization, United
Church and Congregational Christian churches hold their meetings in
the Florida Union. Society of Friends attend services in downtown
Gainesville.
Methodist, Episcopalian, Lutheran, Baptist, Presbyterian, Catholic
and Jewish centers provide worship services, social and educational
programs.
The center seeks to help the student "grow in understanding his
faith through discussion, recreation and worship experiences. They

form the spiritual basis for the
college student.
The University Religious Asso Association
ciation Association (URA) is a student
organized group designed to stimu stimulate
late stimulate the discussion of religious
issues. The URA helps coordinate
the events between various re religious
ligious religious groups, in addition to pub publishing
lishing publishing a semi-weekly bulletin of
religious activities available to
the student.
The URA encourages andstimu-l
lates discussion of religious issues
within the educational and intellec intellectual
tual intellectual context of the university com comm
m comm unity, to further inter-religious
understanding gain cooper cooperation
ation cooperation between the religious or organizations
ganizations organizations at UF.
The URA is connected with the
Department of Religion. Regular

academic professors in the department direct and advise the activities
of the association.
One of the main features sponsored by the URA is Religion-In-Life
Week, which brings to campus each year guest speakers who discuss
the questions and problems of religion in modern life.
Last year the distinguished author, lecturer and commentator on
cultural problems, Barbara Ward (Lady Jackson) was the guest
speaker lit the Religion-In-Life Convocation in January.

GATOR ADS SELL!
CALL UF EX: 2832
For Specialized Service

One reason for the quarter was
to get people to attend school all
year. However, Dean Franklin Doty
said he did not think any system
could entice students to go all year.

L'Fe.
I
-m -m--i
-i -m--i

Page 29-A



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS!

| for sale |
ROYAL STANDARD typewriter,
good condition, $45. Royal por portable,
table, portable, S4O. Large tricycle, $lO or
best offer. Bathinette, $7. Phone
after 4:30 p.m. 372-2493. (A-l (A-l-lt-c).
lt-c). (A-l-lt-c).
for rent
NEW FURNISHED APT. Will be
ready Sept. 4th. Studio, bedroom,
living room-kitchen. $75 a month.
Preference given to advanced art
students. Art Center 10 miles South
of Univ. 466-3459. (B-l-lt-c).

Orange
BLUE BULLETIN
ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE,
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE
le-
Campus Calendar
'*
Wednesday Union Board: Freshman Talent
August 31 Auditions, Music Bldg., 1
p.m.
Blue Key: Homecoming Parade
Comm., 118 FU, 3 p.m.
Student Govt: Book Sale, FU
Social Room, All day and
evening.
Presidents Welcome: Fla.
Gym, 7 p.m.

p
Thursday Panhellenic Forum: Univ.
September 1 Aud., 8 p.m.
Dean of Mens Forum: Fla.
Gym, 7 p.m.
- jhtmi *. mr\ \
a J
Friday Panhellenic Rush: Second Sign
September 2 Up, 324 FU, 2 p.m.
Freshman Talent Night: Univ.
Aud., 8 p.m.
Movie: Becket, MSB Aud.,
7 & 9:05 p.m.
Chess Club: 215 FU, 7 p.m.,
All interested persons in invited.
vited. invited.
Dollars for Scholars: Service
Booth, 10 a.m. 5 p.m.
Campus Pacs & Spirit Hats.
*
Saturday Dollars for Scholars: Service
September 3 Booth, 10 a.m. 5 p.m.
Campus Pacs & Spirit Hats.
Movie: Hie Unsinkable Molly
Brown, MSB Aud., 7 & 9:23
P-m-
... r
~ 7.'/ i
Sunday Alpha Chi Sigma: Graduate
September 4 Student Picnic, Lake Wau Wauburg,
burg, Wauburg, Noon 6 p.m.

I for rent
ONE TRAILERSPACE FOR RENT
Shady & quiet. Coeds omy. Cal]
466-3300. (B-l-2t-c).
VACANCY for male students.
Air conditioned. Double room. 3
blocks from campus. Refrigerator.
Private entrance, bath. 327 NW
15th Terr. 372-8929. (B-l-st-c).
TWO upstairs 1-Bedroom Apts.
Share bath. Located at 503 SW 2nd
St. Phone 378-1652. (B-lr6t-c).

Page 30-A

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, August 31, 1966

wanted
WANTED: Female student to share
expenses. Private bedroom SIO.OO
weekly. Call 372-7688 after 5:30
p.m. (C-l-lt-c).
help wanted
PART TIME MALE STUDENTS
WANTED. Dipper Dan Ice Cream
Shop. Good pay. 378-4010. (E-l (E-l---lt-c).
--lt-c). (E-l---lt-c).
APPLICATIONS from qualified
students and student wives in invited.
vited. invited. Apply at Board of Student
Publications Office, Room 9,
Florida Union. (E-l-lt-nc).

r K
glwfe/
<
/f S
T* ** |U {+- r{+ > '* t r* j
Leadership
' '' ;f
An admirable trait, Leadership. Some have it, some don't. We have,
at least in the field of satisfying our advertisers with tangible results/
We're leaders in this field because of our readership, which is concen concentrated,
trated, concentrated, specialized, and more affluent than you might think. We
4jet seen by thousands of people each issue, and our ads get read, too.
, r .
i

t
help wanted
EXPERIENCED PRINTERS for
part time work on Friday and
Saturday nights. Call George
Doyle. 378-1411. (E-l-2t-c).
WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
WANTED. Full-time or part parttime.
time. parttime. Apply in person Larrys
Restaurant, 1225 W. Univ. Ave.
(E-l-ts-c).
CAMPUS JOB, PART TIME. Per Persons
sons Persons interested in Plant Biology
Research, Lab & Clerical, and can
qualify under Federal Work-Study
Program. 378-2600. (E-l-3t-c).

help wanted
ENGLISH RIDING INSTRUCTOR.
Trail & practice riding by appoint appointment.
ment. appointment. Horses boarded & pastured.
Horse Haven Riding School, New Newberry
berry Newberry Road. 376-3494. (E-l-3t-c).
POSITION OFFERED: Student,
Male or Female, junior standing,
science major, to act as on-campus
representative for established
laboratory supply firm. Send full
resume including grade average
to P.O. Box 1202, Cocoa Beach,
Florida. (E-l-2t-c).



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Victor Rodney Hentz, right, third year sclent in the University
of Floridas College of Medicine, is presented a gold watch and
certificate as winner of the 11th annual Roche Award. The $250
watch, presented by Dr. Emanuel Suter, dean of the college, is
given to outstanding students in approved medical colleges in the
United States.

Dentist
Donates
Books
*
UFs new College of Denistry
has received more than 300 denis denistry
try denistry books and journals, and a
variety of ancient and modern tools
of dentistry from a retired St.
Petersburg dentist.
Dr. Robert R. Gillis, 84, do donated
nated donated the books and instruments
after Dr. Edmund Ackell was
named dean of the College July 14.
Among the old books, some
dating back to 1900, are several
first editions and many rare text textbooks
books textbooks Dr. Gillis used as a dental
student at the University of Indiana
jin 1901-04.
Included in the gift is a complete
set of the American Dental Jour Journal,
nal, Journal, which began publishing in
1914.
I Dr. Gillis practiced dentistry in
Indiana from 1904 to 1952, whenhe
retired and moved to St. Peters Petersburg.
burg. Petersburg. But I got tired of pulling
I weeds. .1 didnt like retirement,
I he recalled.
[ He set up practice in St. Peters Petersburg
burg Petersburg in 1953, and retired "again
[last year after injuring his arm in
lan accident.
[ I probably would still be in
Ipractice today if I hadnt had that
Ifall Dr. Gillis said.
I Included in the instruments is a
11920-vintage X-ray machine given
Ito Dr. William Enneking, chief of
the division of orthopedics in the
College of Medicine.
I The collection will be housed
in the J. Hillis Miller Health Center
Library.

Williams Not From Tennessee
mi %
I DETROIT Tennessee was
born Thomas Lanier Williams.
O' in Tennessee but in Col Colnibus,
nibus, Colnibus, Miss.
Williams, who was raised in
Columbus and in St. Louis, Mos,
'hanged his name to distin distinU
U distinU s h his future writing from
last works and chose "Ten "TenH.-,ssee"
H.-,ssee" "TenH.-,ssee" because his forebears
ad fought for that state
uainst the Indians, according
' Contemporary Authors,
published by Gale Research Co.
Detroit.

Education Students Get Grant

A $90,000 grant to the UFs
College of Education for the sup support
port support of the first year of training
in educational research has been
approved by the Board of Regents.

It is expected that this support
will be renewed in subsequent
years to provide full support for
the three-year program. The Col College
lege College of Education is planning to
request 15 new fellowships rlext
year in addition to the continuing

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I for those of you venturing to gatnefnlle for the first time, allow me to introduce
| myself. .i am twig, and youll be seeing me from time to time in this paper making
I announcements of great import concerning my emporium, which is sumptuously
|| situate at one-one-three-one west university ave. . .one block from campus
I I (comer of 12th st. and university ave.)
II >
I! twig is for the gals. and specializes in the latest in campus styles at what we
| think you will consider reasonable prices.
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It sbme of lh e mny fine fronds ye* will find. Mister Pants. Sir For Her. John
I Romatn, Modem Jr.. Misty Harbor. Debutogs. Country Miss. Cos Cob. Misty
if Lane, Thermo-Jac. Personal, Donath, Junior House, Ellen Tracy, Jeune Leigue,
II and on and on. come in. browse around, and see for yourself.
I *

fellowships received this year.
Fellowship appointments which
have already been made are dis distributed
tributed distributed among students in the
departments of administration and
supervision, curriculum and in instruction,
struction, instruction, foundations of education,
and personnel services. These fel fellowships
lowships fellowships will lead to a doctor of
education degree.

Dr. Wilson H. Guertin, who re-

ceived the grant, i will be on a

Wednesday, August 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Dean Os Women
Names Assistants

Ruth Jenelle Spear and Phyllis
Mahdeen Meek have been named
as assistant deans of women at
UF.
Dean of Student Affairs Lester
L. Hale and Dean of Women Betty
Cosby announced the appointments.
Miss Spears appointment was ef effective
fective effective Aug. 1, and Miss Meek will
assume her duties Aug. 15.
Dean Cosby said, in announcing
the two appointments, These
young women will be a fine addi addition
tion addition to the student personnel
activities at the university.
Miss Spear, a graduate of Agnes
Scott College, has a masters
degree from Syracuse University,
and is presently completing work
for a doctoral degree at the Uni University
versity University of Denver. She has also
attended Longwood College and
Emory University.
She has worked in re research
search research at Oak Ridge National
Laboratory, and was assistant dean
of women at Longwood College,
Farmville, Va., from 1958-63.

she says:
welcome, gals!
welcome to gainesville
welcome to the u. of f.
welcome to
B r
V
*fc
look for my stable door, and look for me in the window and browse around in my
rustic little shop. ask about opening a student charge account . .ifs easy. .
come see us soon %
r | twig

Fullbright lectureship in Egypt
for the coming year. Dr. Vynce A.
Hines will be directing the
research training program in his
absence.

Fellowship recipients are: Dale
Kallstrom, Earl Blekking, Edward
Boddy, Tom Freijo, Joan Honey Honeycutt,
cutt, Honeycutt, George Pringle, John
Maurelli, Thomas Tocco, Michael
Schafer, Henrianne Vickers, John
H. Neel, Arthur Land, Russell H.
Schmidt, and George Teats.

MEEK

ation of Women Deans and Coun Counselors,
selors, Counselors, Delta Kappa Gamma and
Phi Sigma.
Miss Meek, a graduate of South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern State College (Okla.) has a
master's degree from Ohio Unit Unitversity
versity Unitversity and is presently working
for a doctoral degree at the UF.
She has taught at Okmulgee High
School (Okla.), Muskingum College
(Ohio) and at Madison College
(Va.) where she was also assistant
dean of women, 1960-63. She came
to UF in 1963 as a clinician in
the counseling center and since
last September has been a re research
search research assistant.

Page 31-A

A native of
Kinston, N. C.,
Miss Spear is a
member of the
American Asso Association
ciation Association of Uni University
versity University Women,
the American
Personnel and
Guidance Asso Association,
ciation, Association, the Na National
tional National Associ-



.: 'i
t fhp Florida Alligator, Wednesday, August 31, 1966

Page 32-A

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