Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Vol. 58, No. 151

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Tigert Hall houses the UF administration: Registrar, deans, IFC, accounting all
the vital functions of the University are carried out here. Above is a shot of Tigert Hall
along with the people who administrate UF and its 17,000 students. From center moving

AN EDITORIAL
/
Think And Be Yourself

The freshman is a strange creature. He
doesnt know yet that all the guys on the hall
arent smarter than he is. He isnt sure that
cramming can get him through college. He
doesnt think verbosity goes very far on a
college paper. He knows little of the pecu peculiar
liar peculiar language of the place he has come to
live in. All these the freshman will pick
up quickly, almost as quickly as he learns
his way around the campus.
One thing the freshman does know: that
he has come to college to learn. But this,
on the other hand, he may as quickly forget.
That obvious creature, the freshman, then,
is in a period of transition.
His fearfulness will soon give way to con confusion
fusion confusion confusion about college, about what
he is doing in college, about himself, about
all that he has learned before. He may be

t)e Jflortlna alligator

TIGERT HALL: AN OVERVIEW

confused by a bit of pure hogwash given out
in the classroom in the guise of formal
scholarship. Or the freshman may be con confused
fused confused by the conflict of new goals with the
old one to learn.
Any number of self-adjustments may de demand
mand demand his attention. There may be the ne necessity
cessity necessity to adapt to a fraternity image. There
may be a drive to take advantage of loosened
restrictions on personal freedom. There
may be the need to succeed in certain social
circles. There may be a need to fulfill am ambition
bition ambition and gain recognition through activities
outside studies.
But perhaps it is only in confusion and
in a subsequent break with most of the ideas
he now has that the freshman will be able
to learn what is most important in college.
Perhaps only in the midst of confusion can

University of Florida

counter-clockwise are: UF President J. Wayne Reitz; Vice President Frederick W.
Conner; Vice President for Academic Affairs Robert Mautz; Dean of .Women Betty Cosby;
Dean of Men Frank Adams and Dean of Student Affairs Lester Hale.

the freshman learn something so new that
he couldnt have imagined it previously.
He may walk out of biology class one day
and understand for the first time what he
has seen a thousand times. He, may learn
what a truly unlimited instrument the slide
rule is. He may learn to distinguish the
hogwash from the legitimate. It might not
even be incorrect to say that the freshman
may learn to think for himself, and to be
himself.
This issue of The Alligator is largely
designed to help the freshman learn his
first and most elementary concern -- the
lay of the campus. In this section of The
Alligators freshman edition, informa information
tion information has been concentrated on the official
side of UF -- the administration, student
government, the Honor Court. Beyond this

Friday, July 29, 1966 Section B

and beyond the placement of buildings,
beyond all the campus banalities of slang,
dress, the things to do and not to do lie
all the things that cannot be taught in a
newspaper and perhaps not in books. Many
freshmen will be so happy to learn the ob obvious
vious obvious that they will forget the difficult.
It is not for these, as it is not for football
weekends or social success or grades
that college is meant.
What is valuable in college, even in a
large university like UF, is still for the
few. But there is always the hope that each
years new class will be one in which many,
not just a few, succeed in discovering it.
So, with our word of welcome, we would
like to add some sincere, if simple, advice:
Dont be satisfied with whats on the surface.



Page 2B

l, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

The Quarter Gives Time For Education

By MARGIE GREEN
Alligator Staff Writer
Think of it registration without long
lines in Tigert Hall and Florida Gym.
Elimination of registration lines is just
one of the changes the quarter system will
bring to UF. The other changes will occur
in: examination procedures, curriculum,
counseling, graduation and tuition.
At the present time the plans are ten tentative,
tative, tentative, said Dr. Franklin A. Doty, dean
of University College.
There will be four quarters per year
under the new system. Each of the quarters
will be 10 weeks long and it will take three
quarters to complete an academic year.
What this is doing is using the time
available more effectively, said Robert
Mautz, vice president for academic affairs.
The quarter is stretching the current
trimester academic year from 27 weeks to
30 weeks. This will allow more class time
for the courses. For example, humanities
will be extended to three terms instead of
the present two terms.
TTiere is always more to learn and this
slows down the pace somewhat, said Doty.
You need time for education.
Extending courses to three terrns will cut
their credit value.
Credits under the quarter are worth two twothirds
thirds twothirds of a trimester credit. In order to get
the equivalent of six trimester credits it
will be necessary to take nine quarter hours.
Some of the quarter classes will be given

Student Rights
Protected At UF
By MIKE MALAGHAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Chancellor of the Honor Court
Herb Schwartz will distribute
pocket cards to students register registering
ing registering this fall explaining their rights
when detained by campus police.
According to Schwartz a student
must not resist arrest, obey orders
by an officer, not talk back and
identify himself on request.
A student has the right to refuse
to make any statement or answer
questions and refuse permission
to search his room or car unless
presented with a search warrant.
At the police station the rights
of a student include being told of
the charge, refusing to answer
questions and calling counsel. The
police station will have a list of
Defense Staff of the Honor Court
available to students.
The campus police will give this
card to any student if he is de detained
tained detained at the police station. Stu Students
dents Students may waive their right of
counsel by signing a form which
will be presented by the police.
Both Schwartz and his senior
counsel, Barry Kempson, are a available
vailable available to students on a 24-hour
basis if the student is in need of
legal advice concerning his rights
as student on this campus.
I PATRONIZE
I GATOR
I ADVERTISERS
I THEYRE A
I GOOD GROUP

more credit than they currently get. For
example, some course credits will be five
hours one term and four credits the next
term.
Class attendance requirements will be
determined by how many credits the course
is worth. Classes for a five credit course
will be held five times per week.
I am concerned with the amount of
courses the freshman will have to take to
get the normal term requirements, said
Mautz.
I am working with the faculty and deans
to be sure freshmen will not have to take
over four courses per quarter.
The normal credit load to be carried on
the quarter will be fifteen hours.
Because there are three terms to an
academic year, there will be two breaks
after Christmas. As it currently stands,
the fall quarter will begin on Sept. 25,
and examinations will be from Dec. 11-18.
Winter term will begin on Jan. 18, and
Spring term will begin on April 1. The term
will be out in the middle of June.
Classes will be 50 minutes long with
fifteen minute breaks in between. Firsts
period will begin at 8 a.m. and tenth period
will end at 6:45 p.m. Evening sessions will
be three periods long, beginning at 7:10
p.m. and ending at 10 p.m. For evening
classes there will be only 10 minutes be between
tween between classes.
Under the quarter system, students wont

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have to worry about taking finals while
classes are still in session. Final exami examinations
nations examinations will begin on Saturday with classes
ending on Friday. The exam period will run
one week with five two-hour exams given
per day. Students will not be permitted to
take over three exams a day.
Individual colleges will give commence commencement
ment commencement exercises at the end of each quarter.
UF graduation exercises will be held in June
at the end of the spring quarter.
Registration will be divided into two
phases: counseling and sectioning by the
Registrars Office.
During the counseling session the coun counselors
selors counselors will have the course cards. These
cards will be filled out for the fall, winter
and spring terms.
Counseling appointments will be distri distributed
buted distributed according to the students average.
There will be no privileged registration.
After counseling the student will take his
course assignment card to Tigert Hall for
sectioning.
There will be a computer system which
will be installed in the colleges to keep
counselors informed on which sections are
being closed, said Registrar Richard H.
Whitehead.
If a student is placed in a section which
is closed his registration will not be com completed.
pleted. completed.
The student will be contacted and told
what to do, said Whitehead.

The course assignments will be sent or
distributed to the students, and as it now
stands registration for the entire university
will not take over three days.
Tuition for each quarter will be SIOO.
This will mean a S4O increase for the
academic year.
UF and other state universities were
placed on the trimester system because
the state legislature wanted the buildings
to be used on a year-round basis. This was
supposed to be more efficient.
The trimester went against us culturally
since we must fit the academic year to the
cultural habits of man, said Vice President
for Academic Affairs Mautz.
Parents want their children at home
during the Christmas season. They take
vacations in the summer, so they want
the children at home then. Then after Labor
Day its time to go back to school.
The only part of the trimester that lent
itself to the pattern was Christmas, Mautz
said.
The quarter system will fit into the sys system.
tem. system. Most of the larger colleges (such as
Northwestern) use the quarter system. This
will enable professors to go to other col colleges
leges colleges in the summer.
One reason for the quarter was to get
people to attend school all year. However,
Dean Franklin Doty said he did not think
any system could entice students to go
all year.



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PHOXIE 378-2304 2035 N.W. 13 ST.
WELCOME TO THE UNIV. OF FLORIDA

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3B



Page 4B

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

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MIXING BUSINESS AND PLEASURE
We all come to college to get an education. If we can manage to mix a little socializing with our
studying -- all the better.
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STILL A GRIND

Studying is a grind. Whether you do it in the Main
a grind.

SUirSES^Sf^^^

What would studying be without the good old Bull
times they take more time than actual studying.

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A,. CANT BEAT EM
It all comes back to one thing you just cant beat study dates. Os course, if you really want to get some studying done

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Library or in the Campus Club its stillthe same

session? The only problem with them is that some-

Successful Student
Gives Study Hints
'
JHHHH
Barry Malter, 19, 2UC, from Miami Beach, is president of Phi
Eta Sigma, freshman scholastic honorary.
A major in political science, he has maintained a perfect 4.0
average for his freshman year. Malter is a member of Tau Ep Epsilon
silon Epsilon Phi (TEP) social fraternity and serves on its executive
board.
In the following column he offers new students his ideas on the
question of How to Study Successfully in College.
As incoming freshmen at the University of Florida, you will
probably hear the complaint that at such a big school, Everyone
is just a number in the big IBM machine. In many cases this
may be true, but with a little bit of extra effort on your part, it
doesnt necessarily have to be the case.
Newcomers at any institution need some pattern to guide them,
and for freshmen at a large university such as the UF, this is
especially so. For as you will soon learn, college is much differ different
ent different than high school ever was. Here, academics is the prime
concern, but with so many competing interests it can easily
be ignored.
To avoid such a situation and its consequences, it might be best
to set up a pattern of rules as a guideline to your study habits:
1) Set yourself an academic goal and work towards it. The
higher you set the goal, the higher the results will be.
2) Set aside a definite time for study and find a place where you
can most effectively concentrate on your work.
3) Dont procrastinate and dont get behind in your work
at college they play for keeps: one day lost is extremely hard to
make up.
4) Dont spend all of your free time at study; make sure your
schedule includes adequate time for leisure and extracurricular
activities, for as you will learn, they will almost be as big a part
of your liberal education as your scholastic activities.
5) In class, pay attention and get the important points into your
notes, dont waste time with unneeded trivia. If class notes are
essential in a particular class, set aside a weekend time for a
review, reorganization, and recopying of these notes, to get them
into the best condition for later study and to Insure familiarization
of the material.
6) Using a text, underline material you think is essential, making
note of especially important matter. Review this underlined
material as often as is necessary for proper retention. Often
an outline of the material based on the underlining is an invaluable
study aid.
Tliese are just a few hints for better study which should be of
aid to you during your stay at the university. Os course, the list
is not complete; it is meant only as a start to stimulate your own
personal good study habits.
Heres wishing you a successful year!
Barry Malter



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Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5B



Page 6B

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

CAMPUS POLITICS

By FjLANK SHEPHERD
For jrtsarsstudent government
and related activities have been
the butt of many student jokes and
puns. Sometimes a genuine ani animosity
mosity animosity can be detected by indivi individual
dual individual members of the student body
toward any campus politico.
Apparently, however, campus
politicos feel the entire affair is
worth considerable sacrifice. To
people not familiar with politics
at the UF these campus politi politicos
cos politicos often appear to be immature
boys trying to play a reckless
game and shirking the ultimate
priority of their studies.
If I could point out the men who
will run the state of Florida to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow do you think it would be
wise to make every effort to know
these men on a personal basis?
I think most people will recognize
the value of such acquaintances
regardless of their occupation.
So, we come to the question:
Is there any way to identify these
future leaders? The record seems
to indicate we can. The record
reveals an amazing correlation
between success in UF student
politics and future leadership in
almost every area of life, both
public and private.
The following is only a very
limited list of prominent Flori Floridians
dians Floridians who have served the UF
student body as president or held
some other position of prominence
in student government.
Dan McCarty past governor
of Florida.

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Fuller Warren past governor
of Florida.
Leoy Collins past governor
of Florida and candidate for the
U.S. Senate.
Spessard Holland past gover governor
nor governor of Florida and current U. S.
Senator.
Earl Faircloth attorney gen general
eral general of Florida.
Stephen OConnell Justice of
the Supreme Court of the state of
Florida.
In addition, if you had held a
prominent position in student
government in the past year, you
would have had an excellent oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to hob nob, on a fairly per personal
sonal personal basis with such men as
Haydon Burns, George Smathers,
Claude Pepper, Charley Johns,
Scott Kelly, Bud Dickinson, Robert
King High, Spessard Holland, all
university administrators, and
many other prominent state
leaders.
Apparently, the campus politi politico
co politico feels the opportunities to meet
these leaders and to develop lead leadership
ership leadership patterns similar to theirs
is worth the effort of running a
half million dollar a year business
-- which student government is,
spending night after night without
sleep, which is usually required at
one time or another; spending close
to SIO,OOO a year out of their own
pockets or fraternity treasuries--
which is what a campaign costs,
and spending many out of class
hours doing service for the univer university
sity university which is the ostensible
reason for the existence of student
government.

Dental College Dean Named

July 15, 1966 UF President J.
Wayne Reitz yesterday announced
selection of Dr. Edmund Ferris
Ackell, 40, a nationally known den dental
tal dental educator and consultant on the
building of dental schools, as dean
of the Universitys new College of
Dentistry.
The appointment of Dr. Ackell
followed Board of Regents approval
at the meeting here.
Dr. Ackell, a doctor of medicine
and dental medicine, is now asso associate
ciate associate dean of the School of Dentistry
at Western Reserve University,
Cleveland, Ohio.
The choice thus activates the last
originally planned unit of the Uni Universitys
versitys Universitys J. Hillis Miller Health
Center, and places into motion the
administrative organization of the
state of Floridas first dental
school
A College of Dentistry for Flor Florida
ida Florida students was conceived in 1949
and recommended by the 1953
Medical Center Study as a major
unit of the Health Center complex.
The 1957 Legislature authorized
the school, the 1963 session appro appropriated
priated appropriated preliminary funds and the
1965 Legislature appropriated
minimal funds for firm planning
of the school as an integral part
of the Health Center.
The state of Florida has been
contracting dental education for
its students for some years under
a plan of the Southern Regional
Educational Board which places

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students at six schools in the South:
Emory University, University of
Louisville, Loyola, Medical
College Os Virginia, Meharry
Medical College and the Univer University
sity University of Maryland. At the present
time over 200 Florida men annually
recede their dental education out outside
side outside the state.
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The appointment of Dr. Ackell
is an extremely fortunate one for
the University of Florida, Dr.
Reitz said. Dr. Ackell is emi eminently
nently eminently qualified to assume leader leadership
ship leadership of the state of Floridas first
College of Dentistry. He has per performed
formed performed with exceptional ability in
the planning and building on dental

programs as a consultant on na. I
tional committees and as a member I
of the faculty at Western Reserve 1
University. He is fundamentally in. 1
terested in education and in 1
devising programs of dental edu- I
cation which would develop dentists I
of the highest caliber. 1
Health Center Provost Samuel
P. Martin said of the appointment: I
Dr. Ackells broad experience in I
medical and dental education qua- I
lifies him to design a new and
exciting program for Florida stu students.
dents. students. It is rare to find this breadth
of experience. He brings us excep exceptional
tional exceptional clinical experience and sen sensitivity
sitivity sensitivity to the problems of patient
care. His assistance to the federal
government in the area of dental
education adds to his talents as a
promising administrator for the
Health Centers dental college.
Dr. Ackell, an oral surgeon, is
a diplomate of the American Board
of Oral Surgery and a member of
the Review Committee established
to administer Congressional Bill
HR-12 and the Aid to Education
Act of the 88th Congress.
Dr. Ackell has been at Western
Reserve since 1957. He has served
its dental school as associate pro professor
fessor professor and as chairman of the De Department
partment Department of Oral and Maxillo-
Facial Surgery, as associate dean
and chief of dental services in the
universitys hospitals and a mem member
ber member of the building and planning
committee of Western Reserve.



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Be rtte first chto on Your block to Sam mb
BhTcY -re pevc/Kydf BecORPeoRjeMORtRS. Look far!
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(Your. (jccD ol' Yearbook.)

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7B



Page 8B

1, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

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KELLY MAN FOR HIGH
With a High button pinned to his coat, Scott Kelly
urges support for gubernatorial candidate Robert
King High. Kelly had lost in his own efforts to win
enough votes for the second primary, but he came
out in unexpectedly strong support for High.
JMT M m m m A
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PACKED HOUSE
More than half of the 7,000 students on campus
for summer term showed up to hear High give a
mid-afternoon speech in University Auditorium.

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BOUQUET FOR HIGH
Robert King High receives a bouquet of flowers from past Miss UF,
Jinny Jasper. High spoke a few minutes later on campus to a packed
house of UF students.

State Politics Hits UF Life

The University of Florida played a sizable part
in the Florida gubernatorial primaries earlier this
year.
Not only was education a main issue, but the
winning Democratic candidate, Robert King High,
chose the UF campus as kickoff point for his cam campaign.
paign. campaign.
Visits by the candidates began during early Feb February
ruary February when Scott Kelly came to see UF students and
talk of the importance of education in Floridas future.
Education will be the winner in the upcoming
gubernatorial election no matter which candidate is
chosen, Kelly said to a packed room of students in
the Florida Union.
Kelly spoke that day of many other things -- in industry
dustry industry and highways to name a few but he always
returned to that subject of education.
The first primary election came on May 3 and
Kelly was eliminated from the race, leaving the in incumbent
cumbent incumbent Haydon Burns and Miami Mayor High to
fight it out.
The next three weeks were a fury of activity for
the candidates. The UF campus became a popular
stopping point for gubernatorial hopefuls.
On May 13, High officially kicked off his second
campaign in University Auditorium.
He stood on the stage platform in front of an
audience that was literally packed to the rafters
and pledged to remove the ugly hand of politics
from Florida education.
High ticked off the vitaLstatistics of Florida which
place this state ninth in population but 49th in per percentage
centage percentage of expenditures for higher education, in
addition to housing 84 per cent of all the disaccredited
schools in the south.
The pace of the campaign was picking up. Only
four days after Highs visit, on May 17, Burns came
o
to Gainesville.
Burns did not speak on campus, but at the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville airport he made sharp c harges about the High
campaign. later in an interview Burns said if elected

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Haydon Burns speaks at the Gainesville airport.
He stopped in town for a short speech before taking
off for the next stop on his statewide tour.

he would advocate a legislative change putting more
responsibility into the hands of the Board of Regents.
This was a solution much advocated by all can candidates
didates candidates to help solve Floridas higher education
spending problems.
By this time, Kelly had joined the High organiza organization
tion organization as an angry reaction to oharges made by Burns
that Kelly had offered to sell his support.
On May 24, Kelly made a quick stop in Gainesville
as a part of a last minute state-hopping tour. Kelly
stepped out of his personal jet that had served him
while he was campaigning for his own cause, and
urged Gainesville residents to throw their support
behind High.
Later that day the UF joined with Florida State
University and the University of Miami in sending
education-grams to friends and relatives. A
special arrangement was made with the local tele telegraph
graph telegraph office to send the telegrams statewide.
The second primary put a temporary end to all
this. Robert King High won the Democratic nomina nomination
tion nomination and took a short vacation before marshalling
his forces to face the Republican man, Claude Kirk.
But the campaigning was soon renewed and Kirk
paid his respects to the UF campus during the second
half of summer term. In a personal interview with
The Alligator, Kirk talked of his belief that Florida
can become number one in all endeavors.
Kirk, a successful business executive from Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville and Palm Beach, had come to campus to
visit a Board of Regents meeting.
He talked of his businessmans approach to run running
ning running the state. Im not in politics, he said, Im
running for a job in a $2 billion business.
Kirks vis., to campus also served to recognize
the birth of a Students for Kirk group. Many of the
Kirk people are former Burns supporters.
On the other side is the Students for High group
made up of the original High supporters plus many
Kelly supporters who joined when Kelly threw his
support behind High.



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Page 9B



Page 10B

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, i Q Rfi

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929 East University Ave. Gainesville, Florida 32601
Phone 376-3701 or 376-6506

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 12B

3, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29. 1966

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Are we a nation of cynics? Or is the youth of today facing up to the task
facing us? >
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Right or Wrong? I pledge allegiance to . .
"These are men, Americas best.

'Responsibility Os Dissent
Dissent Chosen
By STEVE SMITH
Alligator Managing Editor
January of 1967 will see the first ACCENT sym symposium
posium symposium put on at UF.
A joint effort of UFs students and administration,
ACCENT will present a varied array of nationally
known speakers on the theme The Responsibility
of Dissent.
The idea is a new one for education in Florida,
although similar symposiums on vital issues* have
been successful at other universities, mostly in the
north. The purpose of ACCENT is to give students
an educational opportunity beyond the range pf or ordinary
dinary ordinary classroom experience closer to reality.
The theme of ACCENT, says chairman Charles
Shepherd, is one which should force students to ask
themselves a lot of questions. Some of the questions
Shepherd thinks will be raised under Tbe Respon Responsibility
sibility Responsibility of Dissent are these:
How can a student become involved in national
issues beyond the classroom? Is his role naturally
that of a critic -- and is it limited to this?
Is todays prevalent student dissent a contri contribution,
bution, contribution, or merely a disturbance? Would a realization
of the critics responsibility in dissent raise the
value or effectiveness of the dissent?
Should the responsible dissenter limit his at attention
tention attention to certain issues and methods?
Chairman Shepherd says, I think the most im important
portant important question we want students to ask themselves
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New Realities or Old Myths? Surrender Hell! Attack
in the Other Direction.



Accent Theme
is a short one: Is dissent the rebellion of youth or the responsibility
of the thinker? Is our dissent disruption or leadership?
so discuss these issues Shepherd and his committee of six have
already invited a number of nationally prominent politicians, writers,
and leaders In many fields.
No speakers have been announced yet, but Shepherd says that re response
sponse response has been largely favorable. Its too early to get most speakers
to sign on the dotted line unless we can commit a large honorarium,
but we are going to come up with at least several national figures,
says Shepherd.
Among those who have expressed a willingness to speak at ACCENT
are William Buckley; Max Rafferty, California educator and national
newspaper columnist; and Sydney Harris, also a columnist; Richard
Nixon; and James Farmer.
A list of contributors to the ACCENT magazine, which will be pub published
lished published during the symposium and dedicated to its theme, is more
definite. Magazine editor Mike Dowling says he has received replies
from almost half of those he wrote to ask for contributions.
Those who have indicated that they will write an article on The
Responsibility of Dissent include Robert McNamara, Hans Morgen Morgenthau,
thau, Morgenthau, William Fulbright, Wayne Morse and Norman Cousins.
Arnold Toynbee, says Dowling, has said that he may also contribute.
But Dowling is happiest about his reply from Norman Thomas, the
aging socialist patriarch who is now almost totally blind. Thomas wrote
that he would write an article if at all possible, although it will be
relatively short.
Although the symposium is moving along smoothly in the areas of
its speakers and its magazine, the ACCENT idea has not always moved
smoothly.
Originally, Shepherd brought the plan for ACCENT back to Florida
from an Atlanta meeting of the Association of Student Governments of
the United States. Shepherd, who is student body president Buddy
Jacobs* administrative assistant, was appointed chairman of the
symposium by Jacobs.
The very birth of ACCENT thus gave rise to fears that it would
become a political football. Shepherd, however, has refused to
let politics enter into ACCENT whether the politics be student
government or personal.
The Alligator pushed hard for an independent ACCENT, and that is
substantially what Shepherd has set up. He points out that the program
is not just an arm of SG, but is also sponsored by the university ad administration
ministration administration and is independently chartered by the legislative council.
When the ACCENT charter came up before leg council for approval,
the fear of political interference seemed to have been well founded for
a time. The council refused to pass the charter without amending it to
put a leg council member on the ACCENT executive committee. But so
far, says Shepherd, this has not meant any exertion at all of leg council
power over ACCENT.
A more realistic problem arose in connection with setting a date for
ACCENT. Shepherd and Jacobs wanted to have ACCENT make its debut
during the Jacobs administration, so that a change in the SG offices
could not slow down the symposium.
But basketball coaches were reluctant to part with the gym for
speaking occasions during January, the month picked by the ACCENT
planners. First the answer was yes, then it was no; finally the date was
set for the week of January 19, 20 and 21.
And, of course, there has been the problem of raising money for
ACCENT. The leg council has made an appropriation, and the univer university
sity university will also support ACCENT.
The ACCENT committee hopes to receive donations from interested
alumni throughout the state, but so far this plan has not been put into
operation.
What will go on during the week of the symposium? Wayne Rich,
ACCENTS program chairman, plans to present a variety of activities
in addition to the basic format of lecture, debate and discussion by the
featured speakers.
Among Richs plans are art exhibits, stage productions, movies and
concerts. Hiese activities, says Rich, can only be added to ACCENT
with the help of the humanities department, the Florida Players, the
Gator concert band or other interested groups.
In an interview with The Alligator July 18, Shepherd (who has been
ACCENTS mover from the beginning) expanded on his hopes for
the program. He became interested in the symposium idea, he said,
after thinking about the inadequacy of academic education.
The classroom and its academic atmosphere necessitates a de detached
tached detached and sometimes a static viewpoint of the issues confronting our
generation, said Shepherd.
The need to supplement normal classroom experience with the
ideas and contact of men who are recognized thinkers or spokesmen
and active leaders brought about the formation of ACCENT.
Students lack an awareness of real Issues. Since they are out of
touch on campus, they may become indifferent to remain ignorant on
many of these issues.
ACCENT will give the Florida student a chance to meet men who
are prominent thinkers on these issues or men who deal with them
day to day. We hope this will lead the student to a deeper understanding
of the responsibility he will one day assume.
Shepherd pointed out that there are more practical benefits of
a program such as ACCENT. It will put UF in the national news
spotlight. It will enhance UFs educational and intellectual prestige.
It will also make it easier in the future for UF groups to attract
national speakers. And it will offer an ideal time to rally the alumni
around the UF during the winter trimester and for a purpose other
than football.
But most important, Shepherd reminds, is that ACCENT provide
a stimulating and educational experience for both students and faculty
members, as well as for observers. ...
Shepherd believes that the theme chosen for the first ACCEN win
lend itself to such an experience. Its an apt theme for any ver
sity, he said, because of the amount of controversy over today s
student dissent on such topics as Viet Nam, civil rights, and a em c
freedom.

to Africa Movement?

This is a tneme, says Shep Shepherd,
herd, Shepherd, which can be used to look
at national and international affairs
as well as local affairs. And it will
bring things close to the student.
Shepherd also emphasized that
ACCENT will be a permanent pro program
gram program at UF. Like similar sym symposiums
posiums symposiums at Vanderbilt, Emory,
Duke and North Carolina, ACCENT
will be held annually.
It was the Vanderbilt symposium
which Shepherd says he used as
the model for the UFs ACCENT.
If Florida cant match the efforts
of some of the other schools who
have put on these symposiums,
says Shepherd, then we ought to
be ashamed of ourselves.
The Vanderbilt symposium last
year featured The Responsibili Responsibilities
ties Responsibilities of Democracy as its theme.
Other typical themes are The
South in Transition, The Amer American
ican American Social Revolution, or Ac Accent
cent Accent on International Relations.
ACCENTS executive committee
consists of six students in addition
to Shepherd. Bill Haverfield, a law
student from Miami, is assistant
chairman. Together with Shepherd,
he was appointed by the student
body president and chose the re remaining
maining remaining committee members in a
series of interviews with over 100
students.
Other members of the commit committee
tee committee are Wayne Rich, program
chairman; John Ritch, speakers
chairman; Mike Dowling, maga magazine
zine magazine editor; Steve Smith, publicity
director; and Steve Schultz, fi finance
nance finance chairman.
Also working on ACCENT are
Nel Laughon, who edited a bro brochure
chure brochure presenting the ACCENT idea
(2,000 copies have been printed for
use in acquainting people outside
the university with ACCENT); Don
Braddock, off campus funds solici solicitation
tation solicitation chairman; and Mary Kay
Cooper, executive committee sec secretary.
retary. secretary.
Two representatives of the ad administration
ministration administration also serve on the
executive committee: Dr. Franklin
Doty, Dean of University College;
and Dr. Raymond Fahien, chair chairman
man chairman of the department of chemical
engineering.
All of the committee members
were chosen through an extensive
elimination process in interviews
with Haverfield and Shepherd. Care
taken was not only to procure the
best candidates possible, but also
to make sure that personal or po political
litical political preferences did not enter
the selection of committeemen.
Both Shepherd and jacoos took
extreme care that selection be done
impartially. The Alligator also
called for impartiality in its edi editorial
torial editorial policy. The Alligator pointed
out: With good leadership, good
results are sure to follow.

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 13B



Page 14B

~ The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

| Student Partys Platform j
Following is a complete plank by plank analysis of Student Partys
platform, presented to the student body during the winter trimester
when Jacobs was a candidate for president, with Jacobs analysis of
Its relative success:
I. STUDENTS IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT.
A. Establish an Intercampus Activities Committee to coordinate so social
cial social and service projects and direct cooperative efforts. COMPLETED.
B. Increased funds and aid to Interhall Councils. COMPLETED.
Student Party claims nearly a $3,000 increase.
C. Increased appropriations to Gator Band. COMPLETED. From
$5980 to S6IBO for out of state tours.
D. Lobby for the elimination of compulsory ROTC. COMPLETED.
* ROTC will be reconsidered by a faculty-senate committee which has
been reactivated.
E. Weekly dormitory visits by SG cabinet officials. NOT COMPLETE.
F. Require Legislative Council members to attend meetings of
dorm hall councils. RECOMMENDED. Jacobs points out that he can
onlv strongly recommend that all members do this.
IL PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION.
A. Create immediately the following parking areas:
1. A commuter parking lot behind McCarty Hall. COMPLETED.
It was found more feasible to put this lot across from the student
depository.
2. Reserve half of the orange grove lot for student parking.
COMPLETED.
3. Make a parking lot on the upper drill field across from the
School of Journalism. IN PLANNING STAGE.
4. Petition to reinstate dorm parking on East-West Drive. IN
PLANNING STAGE.
5. Construct a parking lot on the Northeast corner of Norman
Field. IN PLANNING STAGE.
B. Increase the size of scooter zones on University Avenue near
Anderson Hall. IN PLANNING STAGE.
C. Purchase Mini-Buses to transport students to classes. COM COMPLETED.
PLETED. COMPLETED. Completed through the use of new buses, not Mini-Buses.
D. Investigate the possibility of securing federal funds for a multi multilevel
level multilevel garage. COMPLETED. Funds are available.
E. Consult with City Planning Board to make streets north of Uni University
versity University Avenue one way to provide more parking. COMPLETED.
F. Conducts campus police-student government orientation program
each fall. COMPLETED.
HI. MARRIED STUDENTS.
A. Investigate apparent discrepancies in electric rates in married
villages. COMPLETED. Discrepancies have been corrected.
B. Establish a rebate system such that one half of the traffic fines
collected in a married village will be returned to that village for in internal
ternal internal improvement. COMPLETED.
C. Look into differences in salaries of UF secretaries as opposed
to secretaries in the federal government. COMPLETED. Solutions are
being formulated.
D. Improve baby sitting service by extending the hours of the Secre Secretary
tary Secretary of Labors office until 8:00 Friday night. COMPLETED.
E. Extend services offered by the Infirmary to student wives. NOT
COMPLETED.
IV. INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS.
A. Provide an International Center including adequate room for
banquets and social activities. COMPLETED. This need has been met
by other means.
B. Increased allocations for the International Committee of the
Florida Union Board. NOT COMPLETED. Still under consideration.
C. Aid and extend the International Culture Bureau. NOT COM COMPLETED.
PLETED. COMPLETED. Still under consideration.
D. Provide definite opportunities for foreign students to participate
in SG and make the Secretary of International Affairs a major cabinet
post. COMPLETED.
V. CAMPUS IMPROVEMENT.
A. Develop recreational and retreat facilities on SGs undeveloped
property at Wauburg. COMPLETED. Major steps have been taken to
assure this in the near future.
B. Utilize the artificial lake in front of the new Florida Union as a
pen for Albert. IN PLANNING STAGE. Will be done when the new
Union is completed.
C. Have a night watchman for Sorority Row. IN PLANNING STAGE.
D. Open more distribution windows for football tickets. WILL BE
COMPLETED IN FALL.
VI. STUDENT SERVICES.
A. Lobby for an addition to the Infirmary. IN PROCESS.
B. Purchase an ambulance for the Infirmary. WILL BE PURCHASED
IN FALL.
C. Demand Immediate admittance of students to the Medical Center
in emergency cases. IN PLANNING STAGE.
D. Improve Food Service. COMPLETED.
E. Revitalize the book exchange to operate on a year-round basis.
COMPLETED.
F. Establish a Gator Consumer Report to publicize unfair business
practices in the city of Gainesville. IN PLANNING STAGE.
G. Arrange to have a Laundry Adjustment Bureau in area offices.
IN PLANNING STAGE.
H. Install new and better vending machines in the living areas. COM COMPLETED.
PLETED. COMPLETED.
VH. ACADEMICS.
A. Increase funds to bring prominent speakers on campus. COM COMPLETED,
PLETED, COMPLETED, through Accent and Increased allocations to the Forums
Committee.
B. Sponsor a joint effort by SG and the Alumni Association to en encourage
courage encourage more top-flight students to come to the UF. COMPLETED.
C. Work for expanded early registration and improved counseling.
COMPLETED.
D. Provide additional grants to improve area libraries. COM COMPLETED.
PLETED. COMPLETED.
VIII. SOCIAL LIFE.
A. Conduct a student referendum on the question of privileged bloc
seating for SG. WILL BE COMPLETED IN FALL.
B. Give independent groups bloc seating privileges at football games
on an equal basis with all other groups. WILL BE DONE IN FALL.

... t...
Student Body President Buddy Jacobs
Jacobs Reviews Platform,
Says Over Half Completed

By FRANK SHEPHERD
Staff Writer
Student Party, after over a tri trimester
mester trimester of operation under Presi President
dent President Buddy Jacobs, reports that it
has completed over half of the
platform which it presented to the
student body during the winter tri trimesters
mesters trimesters general election.
Jacobs was confident that the
new academic year would bring
further success to his adminis administration.
tration. administration.
'Mp '.'s- I -Ib
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In reviewing the past months
in office, Jacobs said that he was
especially pleased with his ad administrations
ministrations administrations success with three
particular items: ACCENT, Lake
Wauburg, and Multi-level Parking
on campus.
ACCENT 67 has proved to be an
unqualified success, according to
Jacobs. ACCENT has bloomed
from an idea into a tangible rea reality
lity reality for the winter term of 1967.
Under the direction of Charles
Shepherd, j aco bs administrative
assistant, the program promises
to be an outstanding addition to the
UF academic community. Jacobs
includes ACCENT in his platform
as a fulfillment of his pledge to
bring more nationally prominent
speakers to campus.
A second campaign fulfillment
of which Jacobs is proud is the
plan to improve Lake Wauburg.
Jacobs pointed out that SG owns
72 undeveloped acres on the south
side of the lake in addition to the
13 acres already developed on
the north side.
Jacobs said that his administra administration
tion administration plans to use the 13 acres on
the north for pavilions while de developing
veloping developing the south side into a picnic
area at a cost of roughly $70,000.
The third accomplishment to
which Jacobs points is a definite

possibility of establishing a multi multilevel
level multilevel parking facility on campus in
the near future. In a recent trip to
Washington, he found that there is
a source of federal revenue for the
improvement of parking on campus.
Although I do not expect these
things all to be an established fact
by the time I leave office, my ad administration
ministration administration will have laid the
foundation for making them a rea reality
lity reality during the next administra administration,
tion, administration, Jacobs said. It will take
the cooperation of several admin administrators
istrators administrators following up on these
foundations.
Substantial plans for construc construction
tion construction of a multi-level parking
facilty and Lake Wauburg im improvement
provement improvement wUI be finalized by
next February, Jacobs said. I
hope this attitude will be kept going
after I leave office.
Not only wiU these plans be
finalized, but we will be the first
administration in several years to
have a written record of our ac accomplishments
complishments accomplishments to make it easier
for the next administration to take
up where we leave off, Jacobs
said, pointing out the lack of com communication
munication communication which caused him
trouble at the beginning of his
administration.

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Jacobs said that his adminis administration
tration administration has started an official
archives and is keeping mater materials
ials materials to pass on.
In other accomplish me nts*
Jacobs noted increased appropri appropriations
ations appropriations to Gator Band, the Lyceum
Council, Mayors Council, Wo Womens
mens Womens Student Association, Mens
Interhall Council, and the Board of
International Activities.
For freshmen and sophomores,
Jacobs said that his administration
has lobbied for the elimination of
compulsory ROTC and that the re result
sult result is that the faculty senate com committee
mittee committee on the subject has been
reactivated. The ROTC question
will be reconsidered again in the
fall
Finally, in the area oj
academics, Jacobs claims that
this section of his platform fs
completely finished. Through
ACCENT 67 and increased funds
to the forums committee, the next
year will see more prominent
speakers on campus, Jacobs said.
Jacobs promised to concentrate
the efforts of his party on these
and other important issues when
the fall trimester beings.



SG : UFs Oldest, Most
Cherished Tradition

Dear Entering Student:
It is indeed my pleasure to
welcome you to the University,
but as part of my welcome I
also wish to challenge you.
You have selected the larg largest
est largest and best University in the
South. We have learned to
blend the quantity so that qua quality
lity quality is its synonym.
Student Government at the
UF is its oldest and most
cherished tradition. Every Everything
thing Everything that is done at the UF
outside the classroom is spon sponsored
sored sponsored by or associated with
student government. We as
students are very proud of the
responsibilities we are able
to assume and of the impor important
tant important part we play in the
governing of the University
community.
Student Government is big
business here at the Uni University.
versity. University. Our annual budget
approaches one half million
dollars each year. But it is
the students business.
Without your interest, con concern
cern concern and enthusiasm we as
leaders will be unable to pro provide
vide provide the services, projects
and stimulation this university
needs to remain on the road
toward greatness.

v MUBm
-; BF. ~Xj|ipMEpjMfM|F!llliitew. r
The ideal atmosphere for pleasurable browsing, with a well-stocked inventory of best
sellers, fiction and non-fiction, reference, instruction, art, music, cooking, humor, re religion,
ligion, religion, philosophy, politics THE WORKS plus a fine selection of college reference
paperbacks, childrens books, magazines, newspapers' and foreign periodicals. Infor Informality
mality Informality and friendliness pervade, like a library with talking allowed.
A Smokers Havea j
A genuinely complete selection of smokers needs, an unusual selection of imported
and domestic named-brand tobaccos, cigars and cigarettes, and pipes to satisfy the
discriminating smoker as to price and quality. A wide array of smokers accessories
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JACOBS
I am very pleased that you
have decided to become a
member of our student body.
We all welcome you. It is the
wish of those who have come
before you, that you assert
your talents successfully in
your studies but also join in
with the rest of your fellow
students in the work of service
that lies ahead.
Just as you will join a com community
munity community upon graduation, you do
so now. The worth of the com community
munity community to itself, and to you then
as now depends upon your atti attitude
tude attitude and interest. The service
you receive or render depends
upon your willingness to ex explore
plore explore and become part of your
surroundings.
Best of luck,
Buddy Jacobs
Student Body President

Adventures In
Higher Education

To Entering Freshman Students:
This is to welcome you to the
beginning of your adventure in
higher education and to assure
you that we who teach and ad administer
minister administer in the University College,
which will be your academic home
for the next two years, want to
make it a place in which you will
feel at home and at ease with the
people there who teach you and
guide you in your educational de decisions.
cisions. decisions.
A distinctive feature of the edu education
cation education of every UF graduate is that
his degree, regardless of his field
or his major, represents an edu educational
cational educational experience in which both
breadth and depth have been a achieved..
chieved.. achieved.. The depth is gained in the
upper divisions where concentra concentration
tion concentration is appropriately given as the
foundation of professional or vo vocational
cational vocational competence.
It is the function of University
College to provide every student
with a breadth of acquaintance
with the human experience in
the sciences, the arts, the social
order, and in communications.
This is the objective of the com comprehensive
prehensive comprehensive courses.
There will be days when you will
be less than enthusiastic about your
C-courses. We are prepared for
this. You will find yourself saying
that you would like to get them
out of the way so that you can do
more important things.
We dont really expect most of
you to appreciate the worth of your
general education until five to ten
more years from now. The know knowledge
ledge knowledge and skills which you acquire

llllliMP bL 1 ll?
|j| f|
DOTY
in your field of special interest may
or may not be relevant and perti pertinent
nent pertinent twenty years from now, but the
meaning of joy, tragedy, beauty,
squalor, affluence, poverty, jus justice,
tice, justice, valences, genetics, truth,
honor, numbers, quasars, atomic
nuclei!, war, peace these are
the constant concerns of the human
spirit.
Your familiarity and knowledge knowledgeability
ability knowledgeability in the common denomina denominators
tors denominators of the human experience will
not only make you more proficient
in your chosen field of endeavor,
but make you a civilized person
with whom it is a great joy to live.
What can I say that may help

Help Support Gators!

Dear Freshmen:
Welcome to the UF campus and
to the growing ranks of loyal Gator
fans.
Although at this stage you are j
most certainly somewhat confused
and perhaps lost, it wont be long j
before you get your feet on the |
ground and begin the true trans transformation
formation transformation from high school to
college student.
Im hopeful that athletics will be
a part of your collegiate interests, j
both from the standpoint of taking I
part in the outstanding intramural j
and physical education programs
on the campus and in your being
ardent and vocal supporters of the
Fighting Gators.
The power you students wield
as supporters is great and of tre tremendous
mendous tremendous value to these student studentathletes
athletes studentathletes who represent you and
this institution on the playing field.
Each year the support and spirit
from our student body improves.
I think it now ranks with any in

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Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

you to succeed in this great task?
Primarily, I would encourage your
cultivating an intellectual curiosity
about everything around you that
you see and hear and read and
learn about. You never really stop
learning, you know, until you die,
and you might as well make it as
rich and fascinating a journey as
possible.
Second, I would encourage ha habits
bits habits of free and open communi communication
cation communication in classes, in the dorms,
in social groups. Dont withdraw
from the exchange of ideas, but
instead stimulate it. Next, I would
insist that you early become mas masters
ters masters of the disposition of your time
and energy. This may involve such
a simple discipline as writing out
a time schedule of classes, study,
recreation, work, and sticking to
it. I am sure this sounds real
square, but I challenge you to do it.
Finally, be optimistic about the
whole affair. You and your parents
and we have entered into a part partnership
nership partnership to launch you into the world
as an effective human being. Give
us a chance. Have faith in us. We
have faith in you.
When things seem to get rough,
drop into the College office and
have a talk with an adviser
before they get rougher, and let
us help you out. That is our sole
purpose here to serve you.
The faculty and the other ad administrators
ministrators administrators in University College
join me in wishing for you a happy,
challenging, and successful college
experience.
Franklin A. Doty
Dean, University College

ip iw
B|if -> -***' jpp
- JK. /
GRA VES
our league, including the much muchpublicized
publicized muchpublicized school spirit at Auburn
and LSU.
So, welcome to the campus and
to becoming part of our athletic
tradition. Good luck to each one
of you and we look forward to your
support of our athletic teams.
Ray Graves
Director of Athletics

Page 15B



Page 16B

l, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

Documentary: A Day In The Honor Court

By STEVE SMITH
Alligator Managing Editor
Comes now the Attorney General before
the Court and charges that: On April 31, the
defendant, X, did willfully take information
with the intent of wrongfully aiding himself
on a comprehensive final examination ..
On the third floor of the Florida Union,
the trial of Student Body v. X had begun.
Above the racket of an air conditioner,
the defense counsel entered a plea of not
guilty.
In the courtroom were six jurors, the
defendant and his two attorneys, three
attorneys for the student body, the Honor
Court Chancellor, two student body Justices
(it is the duty of the Justices to formulate
the sentence if a guilty verdict is reached)
and several observers.
Earlier, it had taken two sweltering hours
to choose a jury in un-air conditioned
Florida Union Room 324. Seventy students,
the body of prospective jurors who were
summoned, waited it out while the six-man
panel was chosen.
Five jurors were chosen, struck on chal challenges
lenges challenges and released before both sides could
agree on six members.
The opening statement of the prosecution
charged that the defendant had been observed
cheating by copying answers from the stu student
dent student sitting next to him. The student body
revealed that the test administrator had
been under instructions to watch X, who
was under suspicion of having cheated on
previous tests.
Completing the charge against X, the
student body produced statistics showing
that out of 90 incorrect answers on the
defendants paper, 70 correlated to in incorrect
correct incorrect answers on the paper of the student
from whom the defendant allegedly copied.
The case against X, for the moment, seemed
convincing.
But the opening statement of the defense
quickly told the jury that any conclusions
they may have reached before hearing the
other side of the story would have to be
forgotten.
A veil of presumed innocence protects
the defendant from the prosecution at this
point, the defense told the jury. Re Remember
member Remember that the prosecution cannot yet
have pierced this veil; and it is up to you
to decide if they can overcome the pre presumption
sumption presumption of innocence.
The defense played its trump card early:
the defendant, it was alleged, actually knew
that he was being watched for cheating. Is
any student likely to cheat when he knows
the proctors eyes are on him?
After the opening statements the court
recessed for lunch. Honor Court Clerk
Tom Smith took the jury to the campus club
to eat in order to make sure that there was
no discussion of the case outside the court courtroom.
room. courtroom. The stage was set for the introduction
of witnesses when the court re-convened
The lead-off witness was the star witness
for the student body: the test administrator
who allegedly observed the defendant cheat cheating.
ing. cheating. During his testimony the first of some
50-odd objections which punctuated the trial
were made. Every point made, every bit of
evidence introduced, was heatedly fought
out by both sides.
The test administrator substantiated the
charges made by the prosecution in its
opening statement. He also testified that the
alleged pony was a cheating suspect him himself.
self. himself. However, on cross-examination the
defense brought out the fact that the defen defendant
dant defendant had entered the test-room before his
pony had. The witness testimony was
also weakened when the defense asked if he
had left the room at any time during the
exam: a number of times, the witness
admitted.
Next to testify was the University ad administrative
ministrative administrative official who had correlated
the defendants paper with that of his
alleged pony. The witness was effectively
prevented from zeroing in on mathematical
evidence of cheating by objections from the
defense that the witness was being called
on to make conclusions he could not be qua qualified
lified qualified to make.
The third witness was the student whose
paper the defendant was charged with copy copying.
ing. copying. The defense scored a major point when
the student testified that he could not have
been sitting in relation to the defendant
as the test administrator had testified.
The student testified that he had no know knowledge
ledge knowledge that anyone sitting around him was
cheating.
The fourth witness was produced by the

defense over the objections of the student
body.
This witness, a girl, made another major
point for the defense. It was she who testi testified
fied testified that the defendant knew that he was
being watched for cheating; The girl said
she had seen the defendant just before the
exam, and that the defendant had implied,
though not actually stated, that he was under
suspicion.
Last to take the stand was the defendant
himself. Often a defense counsel will not
put his client on the stand because the pro prosecution
secution prosecution thereby is handed the opportunity
to ask questions that may lead to self selfincrimination.
incrimination. selfincrimination. But the defense at this point
seemed confident.
Under his counsels quiet questioning,
the defendant testified that he wore glasses
and could not have seen the desk next to
him without them. He testified that he had
not worn the glasses during the exam; the
test proctor, earlier, had not been able to
recall whether the defendant was wearing
glasses.
Did he realize he was being watched as
a suspected cheater? I assumed that I
was. Did he look to the left during the
exam? Occasionally I would look out the
window when I was tired.
The defense had scored another victory
by putting the defendant on the stand. When
the student body examined the defendant,
it asked whether he had known beforehand
the questions he would be asked. The de defendant
fendant defendant admitted this. Youre well pre prepared,
pared, prepared, arent you? demanded the prose prosecution.
cution. prosecution.
Defense counsels objection to this line
of questions was sustained, but the student
bodys attack on the testimony for its being
coached was too late anyway. The de defendant
fendant defendant had given a strong impression of
innocence.
In making closing statements both sides
reviewed the evidence. The student body
reminded the jury of the testimony of the
test administrator and of the mathematical
correlation between the defendants test
answers and those of his alleged pony.
There was no real evidence, claimed the
prosecution, that the defendant knew he was
being watched by the test administrator.
Will you accept the testimony of the test
administrator, a disinterested university
official, or that of the students who testi testified?
fied? testified? One of these students was a cheating
suspect himself, and the other admitted to
be a friend of the defendant.
The student body of the University of
Florida asks you to returun a verdict of
guilty, concluded the prosecution.
Then the defense made its closing argu argument.
ment. argument. Using a blackboard, the attorney said
he would prove that it was more likely that
the pony copied from the defendant than
vice versa. The figures were confusing, but
the defense at least proved that statistics
can mean anything.
The jury was reminded that the defendant
had entered the room before his alleged
pony came in. Point by point, the defense
refuted the arguments of the student body
by pointing out inconsistencies in the tes testimony
timony testimony and facts.
After going over the entire case, the
defense asked the question Can you fit
all the evidence together in a plausible
theory of innocence for the defendant?
Remember that if anything Ive said
makes sense, there must be a reasonable
doubt in your mind as to the defendants
guilt. You cant convict on a reasonable
doubt. Youve got to be sure, beyond and
to the exclusion of a doubt.
The trial had gone on for about six hours.
There was left to be heard only the closing
rebuttal of the prosecution, which is allowed
to open and close the arguments.
With the end in sight, the chancellor turned
off the air conditioner to make it easier to
hear the student body attorney. The clerk
snapped a new cartridge into his tape re recorder.
corder. recorder.
The attorney for the student body, who
had been relentless in his pursuit of the
witnesses, now took a softer tone in address addressing
ing addressing the jury. Ladies and gentlemen, you will
search in vain for the basis of a reasonable
doubt. You can return no other verdict but
guilty. But across the room, his cohorts
glanced at each other uneasily.
In his instructions to the jury the chan chancellor
cellor chancellor instructed them not to be swayed
by any prejudice, sympathy or bias. The
test of guilt, he said, was whether the jury

was convinced to a moral certainty that
the charge is true.
If the jurv finds a verdict of guilty, said
the chancellor, the circumstances must
be inconsistent with innocence, and not just
consistent with guilt.
Then the jury was left alone in the court courtroom
room courtroom to come to its verdict. Outside, in the
Honor Court offices, the defendant chatted
with his counsel; he seemed less nervous
than the attorneys.
It took the jury only a few minutes to
reach a verdict: We find the defendant
not guilty; so say we all.

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Chancellor Herb Schwartz presides over
a trial in the Honor Court chambers on the

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Chief defense counsel Wilson Crump (r)
confers with co-counsel Dave Cox (1) and
Ed Dunn (center). It was Crump who hantued

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View from prosecution table: attorneys watch as chancellor questions a witness.

The conclusions of the observer would
have to be these: The Honor Court goes
through a trial just as realistic, just as
dramatic, as a state or federal court, and
more so than any TV or movie production.
The attorneys all of whom are law
students are competent and take their
seriously. The chancellor, Herb Schwartz,
presides with all the dignity and much of
the sternness of a real judge.
Whether the Honor System works in the
classroom or not, it definitely works in
the courtroom.

third floor of the Florida Union. Schwartz
makes frequent use of the gavel on his desk.

the defense in the case documented on this
page.



By HERBERTSCHWARTZ
Chancellor of the Honor Court
Every organized community has
a set of expressed rules, called
laws, by which the com munity sets
forth the values and modes of con conduct
duct conduct it considers important. The
way we conduct our everyday ac actions
tions actions involves adherence to laws
of our society.
We stop at a red light at 2 a.m.
even when we are sure there is
no traffic coming. When we write
a check to pay a debt we know that
the funds must be on deposit to
cover that amount; when we regis register
ter register with the draft board or answer
a census questionnaire we are
complying with provisions of ex expressed
pressed expressed public policy, generally
called law.
The University of Florida is no
different with regard to rules by
which our daily activity is regu regulated
lated regulated than any other typical com community
munity community of 18,000 persons. We too
have values and norms expressed
which obligate the citizen of our
community, the student, to conduct
or refrain from conducting himself
in certain ways.
Most of these rules of obligated
activity are administered by those
state-employed officials charged
with the duty of running a large
university. But there is, however,
a very significant portion of uni university
versity university life which is administered
by the student body itself. This is
our Honor System.
It is often said that the Honor
System is the most cherished tra tradition
dition tradition at the University of Florida.
This is an assertion with which I
am sure most students and alumni
will agree.
The Honor System is that code
promulgated by the student body
which expresses our firm belief
in the inherent honesty, integrity
and maturity of todays university
student.
We are very fortunate to be
attending a university that chooses
to treat its students as persons of
honor but, only so long as stu students
dents students choose to support the Honor
Code can it be effective. One of
your first decisions as a student at
the University of Florida should be
that you will adhere to the provi provisions
sions provisions of the Honor Code.
Many of you as freshman will
find classes under an honor sys system
tem system a new experience. Most of the
professors do not remain in the
room while exams are being given.
This places the burden on the hon honesty
esty honesty and integrity of each student.
The Honor System asks each
student to be honorable but it
asks more. It asks each student
to be responsible to a certain ex extent
tent extent for the honor of other students.
Without this, an honor system can
never be effective. Many of you

LANGUAGE $ FOREIGN
STUDENTS
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The University of Florida
WL/Uwlf f 376-7171 or 378-1681
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Honor Court: Most Cherished Tradition

will have no trouble at all accepting
the Honor Code and applying it in
vour own actions. However, you
may find it distasteful to be*con be*concerned
cerned be*concerned with violations of others.
Unfortunately, this is where the
Honor System most needs your
support to stay alive. A moments
reflection will surely convince you
that this is the backbone of an
honor system. Those of you who
accept the Honor Code as applied
to your own actions would in all
probability live by the same code
under a proctor system. But under
a proctor system, you'would not be
required to concern yourselves
with the actions of others.
Life as a student under the Honor
Code is not really so very different
from the life you will be expected
to lead as citizens of a community
after you leave the University of
Florida. Many of the violations of
the laws in any community are re reported
ported reported to the police by citizens.
Certainly there are not enough
policemen for them to be present
at the commission of every crime.
Here, when the Honor Code is
broken, you are expected to report
the violation to the Honor Court
or the professor, or to talk to
another student about the violation
and then, together, report the of offense.
fense. offense. If the violator is a friend,
you may first want to speak to the
friend but if your friend refuses
to heed your advice you will be
doing him a favor if you report
the violation. The very least that
is expected of you is that you exert
all the influence of your friendship
to stop the violation. Concededly,
this is the hardest choice to make
under the Honor System.
You will probably never see an
Honor Code violation but if you
do, remember that the choice you
make may well set a pattern of
action for your life. It will cer certainly
tainly certainly have an impact on your
self-respect.
The following section of this
article describes the operation
of the Honor Court and explains
the offenses under the Honor Code.
CHEATING: the GIVING or
TAKING of any information or
material with the intent of
wrongfully aiding yourself on any
academic work which is considered
in any way in the determination of
the final grade.
STEALING: the taking of the
property of another and with the
intent of depriving the owner of the
use of the property.
BAD CHECKS: knowingly ne negotiating
gotiating negotiating a worthless check of
your own or another, or failure
to make good a returned check
within a reasonable period of time.
Ail of the above provisions have
very practical applications in stu student
dent student life. For example, the ef effectiveness
fectiveness effectiveness of the bad check

IHlMir typm.
SjagSagE v jjyy
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SCHWARTZ
provision is largely responsible
for the ease with which students
can cash personal checks through throughout
out throughout Gainesville. Each time a
student cashes a bad check, the
merchants trust of the Florida
Man is proportionally lessened
and becomes more difficult for
other students to cash checks. In
regard to stealing, trust and con confidence
fidence confidence among students is directly
injured by such acts. For example,
even temporarily taking the bicycle
of another without permission is
within the definition of stealing.
Consider the problems resulting
from students borrowing
bicycles after each class and a abandoning
bandoning abandoning them on other parts of
campus, despite a lack of any in intent
tent intent to permanently steal them.
Finally, and probably most im importantly
portantly importantly in an academic context:
cheating. Every student who cheats
not only lessens his own self selfrespect,
respect, selfrespect, but at the same time
breaches the trust to his fellow
students that has been placed upon
him under the Honor System. The
System itself is not a faculty im imposed
posed imposed means of discipline. It is
instead fully a student institution
that is entirely dependent upon
student operation and cooperation
for its success. Herein lies the
hardest concept for most new
students to understand: the re responsibility
sponsibility responsibility to report violations of
the Honor Code does not involve
tattling on a fellow student,
any more than it is tattling to
tell a policeman that you just saw
one person shoot another, or
maliciously slash anothers tires,
ect. Any student that has violated
the Code has breached your trust
and that of every other student.
In the context of cheating, his
violation and consequently un unearned
earned unearned grade will, in the long run,
affect you and every other student
if it goes unreported because of an
unwarranted mind your own busi business
ness business attitude. In fact, where a
student violates the Honor Code,
it is your business. In high school
perhaps a lack of maturity might
view acceptance of this responsi responsibility
bility responsibility as tattling, and thus re-

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liance is placed upon proctors. At
the University of Florida, reliance
is placed completely upon you.
In effect, the entire system rests
upon the principle of academic
honesty. A diploma from the Uni University
versity University of Florida is as much a
stamp of approval of the character
of the graduate as it is a certificate
of courses completed. The student
who cheats his way through school
and proves after graduation that he
has not earned his diploma, serves
only to reflect adversely upon the
standards of the University of
Florida and thus upon all other
Florida graduates. In addition,
since many courses are graded on
a curve or sliding scale, your
grades and the grades of your
fellow classmates are adversely
affected by a student who cheats
and whose violation goes unre unreported.
ported. unreported.
THE HONOR COURT
The present Honor Code pro provisions
visions provisions mentioned cheating,
stealing and the issuance of
worthless checks are ad administered
ministered administered by a completely stu student
dent student operated Honor Court. The
Honor
Government, us invested with full
authority to investigate and try all
reported violations. During orien orientation
tation orientation you will hear more about the
Court and fts operations. Briefly,
it consists of an elected Chancellor
who is the presiding judge over all
trials as welkj as the chief adminis administrator
trator administrator oftheHonorSystem,aclerk,
and sixteen justices elected from
the various colleges. The Court has
a courtroom and offices located in
Rooms 304 and 306 of the Florida
Union, as well as a fulltin\e sec secretary.
retary. secretary. A thorough investigation of
all reported violations is made by
advanced law students who serve
as counsel for the Court. Every
student is afforded every oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to maintain his innocence.
A student who pleads guilty is tried
summarily before the Chancellor
and two Vice-Chancellors to de determine
termine determine the penalty.
If a student pleads not guilty,
he is tried by a court of six jurors,
chosen at random from the Student
Body, similar to the procedure
used in regular jury trials. Every
effort is made to see that every
student has a fair trial the possi possibility
bility possibility of an arbitrary conviction or
a summary dismissal from school
based on the possibly erroneous
belief of a professor, an inherent
defect of the proctor system, is
successfully eliminated.
The defendant is afforded the
same basic rights he would have
under state law, with trials con conducted
ducted conducted by qualified law students,
who voluntarily devote their time
to the implementation of the prin principles
ciples principles of the Honor System. In
addition, the proceedings them themselves
selves themselves are kept secret to protect
the innocent. Verdicts and penal penalties
ties penalties are posted by number in order
to afford a first offender the op-

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

portunity to rehabilitate himself
without public disgrace. The penal
power of the Honor Court itself
can include any or all of the follow following:
ing: following: a severe reprimand, a failing
grade in a course, penalty hours,
suspension for up to one year,
permanent expulsion.
The real value of the System,
however, lies not in its penal
authority or efficiency, but rather
in its educative purpose. Without
student enforcement and cooper cooperation
ation cooperation the System is meaningless,
and honor becomes a hollow
word. The Honor Court does not
initiate action; it relies upon you
to accept your responsibility under
the System and report violations.
The future of the System is thus
completely in your hands.
I urge you to give your active
support to the Honor System and
to have the courage to report a
violation if you become aware of
one. If you nave any questions, I
will be happy to try to answer
them. Call university extension
2374, or come by the Honor Court
Office on the third floor of the
Florida Union.
Always remember that any. dis dissatisfaction
satisfaction dissatisfaction with the HommSystem
that
and administrators- is-tne respon responsibility
sibility responsibility of students who have chosen
not to live by the Honor Code.
The strength of the Honor Sys System
tem System lies in your hands. Will you
merit the trust of the Honor Sys System?
tem? System?
There is another area of student
interest which comes within the
ambit of what I believe the function
of the Honor Court to be. That area
consists of the rights of students
to live in a University community
while possessing the same rights
in relation to the law he would have
in any community.
It is often believed that a Uni University
versity University student somehow becomes
a second class citizen subject to
the caprice and whim of often oftentimes
times oftentimes arbitrary administrators
and public officials simply because
of his status as a student.
In todays era of great concern
for the rights and privileges of the
individual citizen, I believe it is
not only proper but incumbent upon
the judicial arm of the student
community to vigorously represent
that community in all matters of
judicial and legal consideration.
Todays student does not become
any less a citizen or a second
class citizen shnply by attendance
at a state university.
In matters of the students re relationship
lationship relationship to our university law
enforcement agencies and admin administrative
istrative administrative procedures there is no
clear focal point for asserting the
protected rights, privileges and
immunities of the citizen-student
other than the court which ulti ultimately
mately ultimately enforces the obligations
borne by the student.
As entering students it is im important
portant important for your realize that be besides
sides besides the obligations of good
citizenship and scholarship you
also possess the privileges of
citizenship under the law that you
had the day before you came to
campus.
AL LIANCE
TV SERVICE
Fast, Expert Service
on al! makes
TELEVISION
RADIO
STEREO
10% DISCOUNT
on parts to al I
U of F students
"817 W. Univ Ave
Phone 376-9955

Page 17B



Page 18B

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

A Sample Os
Gator Humor
'""l 00 If rST
TV ip W I V SPPrtAI I
So l/ie ne*£ time you go shopping, ask yourself this question . Why
don't you dll go to hell?" 6
U>

WHO Br
CHARLATAN, 64 Cr-<^^

)
J
' \
j n* i i
rAii

m a%s^*
,^k.
And remember, Son, when you get to college, theres gonna be
some smart-alec come up and say, Bny, i can get you in Blue Key!
Son, thatll be the Devil, standin right there beside you.
NEW ORANGE PEEL, 64



* ****
** & Mil
lipppiMk p| i
9
.IKSagf
' '|p
i ¥Yt/
% Dear Freshman Students: :;:
It is a pleasure for me to welcome you to the University of $:
iv Florida campus. You are about to embark into what can be the £:
5 most valuable learning experience of your life as well as a period ::
6 when many of your lasting and most enriching associations will ::
& be made. $:
The University affords numerous opportunities for your personal X;
x and professional development, however, the initiative for taking >:
x advantage of these opportunities rests with you. Enter into those ::
:: activities which will enrich your life and give added stimulus to ::
:: your intellectual and professional advancement. :£
* The faculty of this University are among the most capable of £
x our nation. You will find that they are dedicated to their profession &
:j: and willing to assist you in your educational objectives. Talk with #
x your professors frequently about your work, your interests, and ;:
* your plans. You will find that they are interested in each of you
S individually. :£
The record you make here as a student will largely determine ::
: your future opportunities. This is a challenge, but a healthy one. ::
On the basis of your high school records and other evidences, I £:
know you are all capable of becoming graduates of the University £:
v of Florida. We cherish for you the opportunity which is yours wtiile
$ you are here so that you may leave this campus as mature and £
£ educated citizens.
Sincerely yours, ::
:: J. Wayne Reitz
>: President :$
iV **#*

Adams Adds Two To Staff

Dean of Men Frank T. Adams
announced the appointment of two
new assistants to his staff this
week, filling two of the slots left
by one of the largest turnovers
of personnel in his office in re recent
cent recent years.
Appointed to the position of as assistant
sistant assistant dean of men were John L.
Arnette and Charles B. Keenan.
One other assistant deanship re remains

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THERMO-JAC KORET
HOWARD WOLF THERMO-JAC
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SUITS BLOUSES
LILLI ANN COS COB
GLENHAVEN ELLEN TRACY
MARIE PHILLIPS LADY MANHATTAN
LINGERIE FOUNDATIONS
ROGER'S FORMFIT
SHADOWLINE PLAYTEX
311 AND 313 N. W. 1 3TM STREET
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA
=

mains remains open with the announcement
expected soon.
Dean Arnette will receive his
doctor of education degree from
UF in August and has been on
campus since his childhood days
when P. K. Yonge School was in
Norman Hall. He has also re received
ceived received his B.A. and M.Ed. degrees
from UF.

SG Treasurer Explains
Student Financial Situation

By JOHN DARLSON
Student Body Treasurer
Congratulations on having chosen
the University of Florida. This is a
great and growing university with
an expected fall enrollment of over
17,000. It is a university which de demands
mands demands much of its students, but
offers more in education and extra extracurriculars
curriculars extracurriculars than one can explore in
the course of receiving a degree.
Student Government plays a vital
role in supporting the more than
200 organizations on campus which
give one a chance to supplement
his chosen field of study or to get
away from the books. The money
required for these activities is the
responsibility of the Student Body
Treasurer working with the Leg Legislative
islative Legislative Council and its Budget and
Finance Committee.
Twenty-three organizations ap appear
pear appear in the official Student Govern Government
ment Government Budget. All other chartered
organizations may be given finan financial
cial financial aid at various times upon
submission of a special request to
the Treasurer who in turn pre presents
sents presents the request to the Budget
and Finance Committee with
recommendations. The committee
acts on the request and then pre presents
sents presents it to the Legislative Council
for their approval or modification.
The official budget follows the
same course except that each of the
23 organizations must submit a
proposed budget which is reviewed
by the Treasurer and Secretary of
Finance sitting with the Budget and
Finance Committee. Each of these
budgets becomes part of the total

For a time, he was a preacher
in North Carolina and Florida. He
to Ids, in addition to his degrees
from the UF, a degree in divinity
and a Masters of Theology from
the Southeastern Theological Sem Seminary.
inary. Seminary.
He was also a catcher for the
UF baseball team between 1954
and 1956.
Dean Keenan comes to the Dean
of Mens office from the Office of
the Registrar where he was direc director
tor director of freshman admissions.
Previously, he was a high school
guidance counselor and student
dean at Lincoln Sudbury High
School, Sudbury, Mass.
He holds a B.A. from Dartmouth,
an M.S. from Springfield College
and has done all the work necessary
for a Ph.D., except for his disser dissertation,
tation, dissertation, at Boston University.

sl| d>
I Specialized Porsche service for
I North Central Florida. Factory
I mechanics recommended by Central
I Floridas Porsche Club of America.
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ws
'Wf*
*
jflV a?
mjjmm |
mk 'BK I
DARLSON
Student Government Budget which
is submitted to the Legislative
Council for their approval and any
changes. This procedure occurs
during March and April in order
that funds may be available Sep September
tember September Ist, the beginning of each
fiscal year.
Specifically, these 23 organiza organizations
tions organizations will share in $288,633.50
from September 1, 1966, through
August, 31, 1967. Also, the Inter Intercollegiate
collegiate Intercollegiate Athletic Department will
receive $157,735.00 and the Flori Florida
da Florida Union $92,786.00. This amounts
to $539,154.50 in student fees. Your
Student Government has direct
control over more money than does

Conner Named
New UF Veep

After more than a year of
vacancy, the chair of the vice
president of the UF will be fill filled
ed filled by Dr. Frederick W. Conner
of the University of Alabama on
Sept. 1.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz, in
announcing the appointment of Dr.
Conner said, lam indeed pleased
that Dr. Conner, an outstanding
scholar in the area of the human humanities
ities humanities with splendid administrative
experience, has agreed to return
to the UF to accept the important
responsibilities of this post.
Previous to an absence of five
years from the UF campus, Dr.
Conner has spent a total of 26
year on campus from 1935 to 1961.
He taught English, humanities and

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

any other university student
government in the nation.
Where does this money come
from? From you, the students.
$23.50 out of each $l3O resident,
or $330 non-resident tuition goes
to student government. This $23.50
multiplied by the anticipated en enrollment
rollment enrollment for the year is the sum
available for distribution to the
student organizations. A portion of
the fee you pay tomes back to you
byway of services, recreational
activities, entertainment, and
extra- curriculars.
The Secretary of Finance, Bruce
Rogow, is a member of the budget
and finance committee, and con concerns
cerns concerns himself primarily with keep keeping
ing keeping special requests up to date and
making the necessary financial
arrangments for graduation invi invitations.
tations. invitations.
Russell Blank, Administrative
Assistant to the Treasurer, is
chairman of the Student Economy
Committee which was organized
to investigate the ways in which
students, especially freshmen, can
make the most of their dollars in
Gainesville. The committee hopes
to publish a pamphlet on this in
time for distribution to incoming
students.
The best of luck to each of you
in the coming year, and if you are
interested in working in student
government or if you have some
questions, please feel free to stop
by Room 307 of the Florida Union.
I would be pleased to help in any
way possible.

philosophy, and served as assistant
dean of the graduate school before
going to the University of Alabama
in 1961.
In filling the spot of vice presi president,
dent, president, Dr. Reitz has culminated a
search of over a full year to find
a man for the position. The chair
has been vacant since early last
summer when Vice President
Harry M. Philpott left to become
President of Auburn University in
Alabama.
But while the UF lost one man
to Alabama, it also gained one.
Conner is presently dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences at
the University of Alabama.
A native of Rochester, N. Y.,
Dr. Conner received his bache bachelors
lors bachelors degree from the University
of Rochester. He received his
masters and Ph.D. degrees from
the University of Pennsylvania.
He is a member of Omicron
Delta Kappa leadership society,
American Association of Univer University
sity University Professors, Modern Language
Association, College English As Association,
sociation, Association, National Council of
Teachers of English, American
Studies Association, Amer American
ican American Conference of Academic
Deans, Southern Conference of
Academic Deans and a council
member of Oak Ridge Associated
Universities.
Conner is married to the former
Jane Speese Bronson. They are the
parents of two sons, William 8.,
now a law student at UF, and James
F., age 15.
Got Something
for sale
Use Gator Ads

Page 19B



Page 20B

1, Hie Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

. a site to EeboLd?
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Were a growing bank in a growing town... sodoalittle
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site-seeing and watch us grow.
I with complete ultra-modem
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Let Us Help...
Special Attention
4| PAIIKING To Student Accounts
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Putting The Puzzle Together

Jflortfta Alligator

Vol 58, No 151

The University of Florida is a large,
complex creature 17,000 students spread
out over 1,800 acres. Continually growing,
UF is 26th in the nation in terms of students.
And as the university grows it changes.
The face of the university is changing.
Stark, modern glass and steel edifices stand
next to the older ivy- covered buildings,
linking together the past, present and pro promise
mise promise of the future.
The image of the university is changing.

University of Florida

No longer is UF centered around agricul agriculture.
ture. agriculture. It has expanded itself into many areas.
Thirteen colleges and two schools offer a
wide field of endeavors from which to choose.
Yes, UF is changing, but even to those of
us who have been here for some time, the
university is puzzling.
This special issue is an attempt to ac acquaint
quaint acquaint you with the university, an attempt
to help you piece together that puzzle. We
hope this issue will allow you, the new-

comer, to know the campus its problems,
its moods and its people.
In addition to regular campus news, this
issue contains a guide to UF. Section D
spotlights the year in review. Section C
covers UF activities, while Section B deals
with extracurriculars. The first section
covers UFs problems, now and in the future.
We hope you will read this issue carefully
and begin to piece together the complex
puzzle known as the University of Florida.

Friday, July 29, 1966



Page 2A

The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

EDITORIAL
Leg Council, 0-2
*jt rom the minute it opens its eyes, a baby duck
will follow blindly its mother. So long, that
is, as its mother is the first moving object of the
right size the baby duck sees.
For a duck, this is natural.
But for a human, its a bit different.
Humans dont naturally follow blindly, theyre
conditioned to do it. This is what has happened to
almost half the members of the Leg Council serving
the summer term.
The entire term has been one gigantic leaderless
episode of blind-following as if the Council was
composed of thousands of the small suicidal lem lemmings
mings lemmings who move in masses toward certain death in
the ocean.
Only two important bills were suggested to the
Council during the latter half of the summer term.
Both were doomed to die a political death.
A bill was brought before the Rules and Calendar
Committee of the Leg Council requiring the presi president
dent president of the student body to be elected by a majority
vote.
Under present conditions, a president can be
elected by an extremely limited number of students,
so long as he receives the largest number of votes.
With three or four candidates running for the office,
a president can be elected on as little as 33 or 25
per cent plus one vote.
The bill would have required a runoff election in
the event no candidate received a majority.
The Rules and Calendar Committee with the
two dissenting votes of the majority party refused
to place the bill on the Councils agenda to have its
members even CONSIDER the measure.
The other legislation to face the Council was the
famed Fair Bloc Seating Bill.
The purpose of the bill was to insure all groups
applying for bloc seating at UF football games would
receive an equal opportunity to have good seating
arrangements.
Under the present conditions, seating is left up to
the president of the student body, or a committee
appointed to carry out his intentions.
The past has shown this system is unreliable:
Some organizations like Florida Blue Key,
Student Government, and fraternities controlling
campus politics have received seating on the
fifty at all home games.
Arrangements in the past have not been made
public for the entire student body to observe and
evaluate how justly or unjustly the arrangements
had been made.
A large number of the good seats have been
devoted to bloc seating while purchasers at the ticket
windows were forced to take the hindmost.
The Fair Bloc Seating Bill also failed to get the
Councils consideration.
While not the majority of the members, enough of
the Council refused to attend meetings because of
pressure from fraternities and political leaders.
Two successive sessions of the Council did not
convene because of a lack of a quorum.
We think that such action is nothing short of
asinine childs play.
The Leg Council, Student Government, and even
The Florida Alligator have each suffered in the
opinions of many students.
Why?
This is why. Because the majority of the students
have turned an apathetic ear to the organizations
which really make up what is called the college
experience.
Only slightly more than half of the student body
even bothers to vote in the campus governmental
elections. And its only a small portion of this
number that gives any consideration to SG officials
after theyre elected.
Leg Council meetings are generally open to the
public. But few bother to come. Just the fact that it
will unceasingly be in full public view should bring
a greater sense of responsibility to the legislative
body.
Each day, decisions are made at all levels of SG
which affect every student on campus. Thousands of
dollars are appropriated annually to student organi organizations
zations organizations from student fees. Thousands are spent on
entertainment for the student body, and thousands
spent to make your years at the university more
significant.
The composition of the Leg Council will change in
September when the term of the summer replace replacements
ments replacements most of those who are responsible for
the quorum failures will end.
In the fall there will be an election. In the spring,
another election.
We think all students those remaining, those
returning from summer vacations, and the incoming
freshmen and transferees should take a new look
at the student government, and at the other organi organizations
zations organizations which control the campus.
The level of responsibility shown by these campus
groups is proportional to the amount of interest
exhibited by the student body.
The authority and scope of these organizations are
likewise proportional to the responsibility shown by
the students who run them.

- r~ 4k, vmk JkL B
" Er, You're Sure We Can Coax
Him Back Into That Little Bottle?"
ERNIE LITZ'S aboard the
schooner
Now listen my children and you shall hear
Os The Midnight Ride of Blue Key Fear;
One if by land and two if by sea,
Thats enough to keep out of the Key.
Let it be told, by the young and the old
That leadership ends and decisions lie cold,
Because the status-quo, it must remain,
And those who disagree go down the drain.
Old Campus Folk Song
And now my good children (both in the law school
and those of the class of 1970) we shall take one
final glance for the summer at our noble leaders of
the grand and glorious U of F.
Remember when Orientation is over and classes
begin beware of the well dressed stooge from the
law school who will come to you and say, Come
with me boy and Ill make you a star, and get you
into Florida Blue Key. That, my dear freshman,
will be the devil talking so beware!
WOULD YOU BELIEVE:
That Jim Crabtree, that noble friend of the students
who passes out football seats as political plums, is
seriously thinking about running for God on the
independent ticket.
That Buddy Jacobs will stop smiling long enough
to make a decision on Bloc Seating himself. The
Bloc Seating Bill is a many faceted wonder. At one
fell swoop everyone has gotten overlayed, parlayed
apd intralayed. &
That Eric Smith has a mind (of his own). He is the
only campus politico that enjoys disgust of ALL
parties and personalities. Bouyed by such stalwarts
as Dick Thompson (Culpeppers son?) and Bill Hoppe
how could he ever go right? To be a leader you must
be headed in the right direction, not backwards.
In these concluding summer remarks on the bill
I must reiterate my stand that I think the bill is the
best thing that could happen to football seating. Un Unlike
like Unlike the pseudo-campus leaders (who inform you the
premise for seating at football games is activity on
the third floor of the Union) the payment of your
student activity fee in your $l3O or $l5O to the UF
is the purchase of seating. The bill merely grants
equal seating to all on a shifting basis and eliminates
privileged seating. The only argument against the bill
is to maintain the status-quo (some are more equal
than others).
At this point the biggest gripe is that these arro arrogant
gant arrogant student politicos (such as Jim Crabtree, Eric
Smith and John Ritch) are applying pressure to Leg
Council members not to come so the Council will
lack a quorum and thus be unable to conduct business.
My feeling is that the Council and its members should
at least have the guts to go and vote on the bill (one
way or the other) so that at least we can get on to
other business. Unfortunately in the present system
elected officials are more responsible to their Blue
Keys and politicos than to those that elected them.
They and the System are a farce and mockery of
campus democracy.
This weeks episode in the fiasco saw Jim Crab Crabtree
tree Crabtree inform student body veep Fred Breeze that if
hes going to print an agenda for every member,
hell only need about ten copies because thats all
that will be there.
You, the intellectual (?) elite of the UF will have
a choice in the coming year to allow students to
really speak far themselves instead of pseudo pseudoleaders,
leaders, pseudoleaders, who say they speak for you, when they
speak only for their self-interests.
To Hie class of 1970 Do You Care?

JIM MOORHEAD'S
thinking mpf*
out hud \rf
There comes a time in every boys ~ and every girls life known
as the Difficult Age.
As far as their parents are concerned, these ages are innumerable,
unfathomable and infinitely variable.
But THE Difficult Age for the child, the one of which I speak, is the
first one he or she is ever actually aware of in himself or herself.
They actually realize something is all fouled up, and they first realize
it at about the instant their high school diplomas are shQved into their
hot little hands.
For the average boy, it is a realization that he is suddenly caught
in the middle of a very perilous tightrope. He is aware of
a number of critical realities that he is too idealistic (scared) to go
to Viet Nam; that he is too smart to go to work; that he is too dumb
to land on Easy Street right away; that he is too inferior to get a big
league offer in whatever sport he made all-conference in the year
before; and that his father is too young and too low down on the cor corporate
porate corporate ladder to offer him the presidency of the company.
For the average girl, it is a similar, perilous awakening to the
fact that she is too unlearned to go to work; too much in love with the
entire male sex to get married; too poor to become a well-traveled
woman of the world; too nasal and pimply-faced to become a mavie
star; too thick around the hips to become a model or a Playmate; too
proud (and too good, really, at this point) to commercialize herself;
too attached to her vanity case to go into the Peace Corps; and too
much of a swinger to retire to a convent.
The boy and the girl frantically grope for away to turn.
This is what colleges are for. Hiis is why we are here. Welcome.
College is too vast a subject to be treated at this point in detail. To
get the complete picture, we commend you to the complete works of
John Dewey, Robert Hutchins and Mario Savio.
But there is room here to briefly explore one aspect of college life,
and that is that all your education does not take place in the classroom.
There are practical and valuable subjects never mentioned in the Uni University
versity University Catalog which the University of Florida will, sometimes un unwittingly,
wittingly, unwittingly, teach you during your stay in Gainesville.
A few of them are as follows:
ARSON AND CONFLAGRATION: Classes meet in late evenings,
usually on football away-game weekends, at the corner of University
Avenue and Thirteenth Street. Sophomore experts will pass along to
you proven techniques in fire-building, rock and beer can throwing,
law enforcement officer name-calling, and tear gas evasion. They will
also demonstrate to you, at the critical time, a tactic called Abandoning
Young Accomplices. Friendly local police officers, however, will step
in and fill the breach. You wont be alone for long.
INTERROGATION, JAIL, BAIL, AND THUNDER FROM HOME:
The second half of Arson and Conflagration.
UNIVERSITY DISCIPLINARY ACTION: A probable sequel to the
above. Quick survey course in reprimands, suspensions and dis dismissals.
missals. dismissals. Meets regularly in Tigert Hall.
OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING: A comprehensive course which may
meet daily and nightly for practically your entire enrollment, if you
happen to be what is known as one of the lucky ones. Course is
conducted in thousands of different locales, ranging in luxury from
squalid to wow! to yech. Topics covered include boy-girl
relationships, communication of the spirits (86- 180-proof), neighborly
ire, weekend sleeplessness, housewrecking, group degeneration, mus musical
ical musical keys, free expression and unplanned parenthood (optional).
BEAT LIVING: An expensive elective which requires the sacrifice
of all ones toiletries and decent clothing. Beats must also furnish
their own laboratory supplies such as picket signs, draft cards,
matches, sandals, beards and scratch remedies. LSD, birth control
pills and pot are optional.
SIMPLE MAGIC: Students sit in blocs, learn how -- within a
three-hour time limit to make asses of themselves. Classes meet
in Florida Field on Saturday afternoon. Fall Trimester only.
LESSONS IN LOCALIZED INFLATION: Classes take place
wherever UF Athletic Department game Cokes and other items
are sold.
POLITICS IN OUR DAILY LIVES: Class meets openly once each
year, during Homecoming Weekend, and continuously, round-the-clock,
behind closed doors at all other times.
THEORY AND USE OF RED TAPE, INERTIA, COMPLEXITY
AND MANIFOLD PROBLEMATICS ON THE CONTEMPORY CAMPtS:
Classes meet daily in Tigert Hall.
EXPLORING YOUR PHYSICAL SELF: New concepts of bodily
utilization are investigated, including ducking of issues, stabbing of
backs, hiding of real intentions, talking out of both sides of the mouth
at once, swatting at gnats, pounding of fists, gnashing of teeth, and
making of sounds and furies signifying nothing. Classes meet daily o n
third floor, Florida Union.
EXPERIMENTS IN DIGESTIVE ENDURABILITY: Classes meet
regularly in all University Food Service establishments.
EXPERIMENTS IN COURAGE: Classes are continuously in ses session
sion session in University Infirmary waiting room. First visit good only for
half-credit.
PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF GRADUATION ETIQUETTE:
Prerequisites are completion of hours leading to undergraduate degree,
boundless patience and mastery of boredom. Class meets once yearly
in Florida Gymnasium.
Completion of the final course above may mean nothing more than a
full cyclical sweep back to the same predicament you faeed four years
before. Congratulations! You have now reached the Difficult Age of
Young Adulthood . and the echo you hear is your own voice saying
What do I do now?!?
Ah, but wasn't that four years worth it?



To Hold
Orientation
For OCS
Orientation sessions regarding
the College Option Officers Can Candidate
didate Candidate School (OCS) program of the
U. S. Army will be held Aug. 1-2
at the Army ROTC Building. Ses Sessions
sions Sessions are planned at noon and 5
p.m. each day.
The OCS option program will
allow the student to pre-select
his branch of service within the
Army. If the student meets the
necessary mental and physical re requirements,
quirements, requirements, he will be interviewed
by a board of officers. Upon being
accepted, the applicant will choose
his branch, then complete his edu education.
cation. education.
After graduation, individuals
will be sent to basic and advanced
training before attending the OCS
program of their choice.
Successful candidates are re required
quired required to serve two years of
active duty as commissioned offi officers.
cers. officers.
I.D. Pictures
To Be Taken
In Fla. Gym
Identification card photographs
of all incoming UF students will
be made from Aug. 29 to Sept. 5
in the basement of Florida Gym.
Students who already have had
their photographs taken may pick
up their identification cards on
those dates; they will not be mailed
to individuals.
The new identification card
which will include the students
name, Social Security number,
address and color photograph
will become an official document
of the University in September.
These cards will be used for
certain activities on campus, in including
cluding including procuring of football
tickets, checking out books from
the library, obtaining tickets for
Lyceum Council events, etc.
Students are urged to bring their
Social Security cards when appear appearing
ing appearing for photos.
Hr Hlllpi.
I
i W
I <
FROLICS
A-GO-GO
o
If you didnt go to Summer
Frolics Saturday night, you
missed such attractions as
this lovely go-go girl.
Featured were the Cyrkle
and the Highwaymen. The
Maundy Quintet, a local group,
also performed.

jje iflortoa Alligator

Vol. 58, No. 151

66 HC Slogan Is Chosen

Announced
By Cabinet
UFs 1966 Homecoming Slogan
was announced Tuesday by the
State Cabinet at their regular
session.
The winning entry, Gators Em Embark
bark Embark On A Disneyland Lark, was
submitted by Mrs. J. A. Booher,
Jr., who lives in Schucht Married
Students Village on campus.
A five-day trip for two to Ja Jamaica
maica Jamaica is Mrs. Boohers prize for
winning. A round-trip flight will
be provided by BWIA. She will also
receive accommodations at the
Holiday Inn and two tickets to the
Homecoming game between the
Gators and Auburn. The Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming festivities are traditionally
sponsored by Florida Blue Key.
The states top elected officials
also announced the contest run runnersup.
nersup. runnersup. Miss Nancy McCreary,St.
Petersburg, will receive the se second
cond second prize, a Florida vacation for
two with three days at Cape Coral
and a weekend at Miami Beachs
Balmoral Hotel, plus two tickets
to the game and a $50.00 shopping
trip compliments of Gainesville
merchants.
A Jacksonville resident, Nancy
Garnick, took third place prizes:
a portable stereo phonograph from
Couchs of Gainesville, plus a
$75.00 shopping trip.
Over 1200 entries were re received
ceived received from as far away as Penn Pennsylvania,
sylvania, Pennsylvania, Washington, D. C., and
Hawaii. Over 23 per cent of the
slogans submitted dealt with a
Walt Disney theme. Other subjects
dealt with included state politics,
the space race, education and even
Batman. Homecoming 66 is sche scheduled
duled scheduled for October 28-29.
Last years winning slogan was
Gators Cheer Floridas 400th
Year. Slogans had to be based
on a topic dealing with the Uni University
versity University of Florida and suggesting
a current topic. When President
John Kennedy was elected the slo slogan
gan slogan was Gators Appear on the
New Frontier.
Brennan Is
Featured At
Law Banquet
The University of Florida Law
Review has announced that William
J. Brennan, Jr., associate justice
of the Supreme Court of the United
States, will be in Gainesville on
September 20 and has agreed to be
the guest speaker at the annual Law
Review Banquet, at which he will
reflect upon his experiences on the
nations highest court.
Justice Brennan received his
formal education at the University
of Pennsylvania and Harvard Law
School and holds honorary degrees
in law from several well-respected
universities.
Before his appointment to the
United States Supreme Court by
President Dwight D. Eisenhower
in 1956, Brennan practiced law in
Newark, N. J., for ten years, and
was instrumental in the nationwide
drive to clear up court conjestion
while a member of the New Jersey
Supreme Court.
Justice Brennans appearance
before the Law Review Banquet
and the Scholarship Convocation
will be his first visit to the Uni University
versity University of Florida.

ANNOUNCE SLOGAN WINNERS
Homecoming Chairman Butch Wooten (left) stands with Governor Haydon Burns and Florida Blue Key
President Chip Block as Burns announces the winning slogan in 1966s slogan contest.
Leg Council Is Shut Out
For Second Straight Time

A lack of quorum plagued the
second successive meeting of the
Leg Council Tuesday night. Roll
call shortly after the beginning of
the meeting revealed only 24 mem members
bers members present. Twenty five were
needed for a quorum.
A special meeting of the Council
last Wednesday also was doomed to
failure because of the lack of
quorum. Only 23 members were
present at last Wednesdays
session.
Top on the agenda at both
meetings was the Fair Bloc Seat Seating
ing Seating Bill. The bill, introduced Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday two weeks ago by minority
leader Tom Carnes, was sent to a
special committee of the Council
for student and recommended
changes.
The bill was reported out of
committee last Wednesday with
some major changes. But the bill
has yet to reach the Council floor
for its first reading. The call for
a quorum failed at both meetings.
Absent from the Tuesday night
meeting were: Sam Block, Lee
Porder, John Dodson, Dane
McGovern, Pam Johnson, Ed Dunn,
Bruce Flowers, Jack Harkness,
Mike Monagham, Bob Rhodes, A1
Schlecter and Jack Zucker in Stu Student
dent Student Party.
Fred Baggett, Randy Kramer,
Marcia Mann, John Mann, and
Sandra Kincaid of Decision Party
were absent.
Freshman Issue
Staff
Editor Managing Editor
Gene Nail Steve Smith
Executive Editor
Bob Menaker
Section Editors
Section A . Bob Menaker
Section B . . Steve Smith
Section C . Yvette Cardozo
Section D Gene Nail

Page 3A

Thirteen of the seventeen absent
Tuesday also missed the meeting
last Wednesday night.
Several members of the Council
Tuesday night criticized Council
President Fred Breeze for not first
calling for any amendments to the
agenda. The faction wanted to
amend the agenda to two mone monetary
tary monetary requests to reach the floor
before the Fair Bloc Seating Bill.
After opening the meeting,
Breeze immediately recognized
minority leader Tom Carnes.
Carnes sought to have the Council
convene as a Committee-of-the-
Whole for the purpose of deciding
which of the two bloc seating bills

' I IIE^Er f
#fc Vj l*iV £'-t 'V' J;;\/i*'*. ;V * 0
BBHK
THEYRE 'FANTASTICK'
El Gallo (Jim Moorhead) separates two feuding fathers (Denver
Sherry and Chris Smith) in Monday nights production of The Fan Fantastics."
tastics." Fantastics." The play ran three nights to overflow crowds.

Friday, July 29, 1966

would be voted onthe one Carnes
introduced two weeks earlier or the
bill reported out of committee last
Wednesday.
Before the motion could be voted
on by the Council, Majority leader
Eric Smith suggested the absence
of a quorum.
The roll call turned up only 24
members.
Breeze announced at the close of
the session that another special
meeting was being called for
Thursday night in an attempt to
get the bill on the Council floor.
(Early press time for the
Freshman Edition prevented re reporting
porting reporting of this meeting.)



Page 4A

The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

)h£ M > x V" V l: : 'WMm "' 0B& t- v-
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EAStYiDE ADDITION GOING UP

The new east side addition to Florida
Field begins to take shape. The addition,
which will bring the stadiums seating
capacity up to 56,164, is a marked im improvement

Room For Gainesville--
And Micanopy Thrown In

The new addition to Florida Field
will provide enough seats for every
person living in the city of Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville even a few from Micanopy
can find a seat or two.
According to Norm Carlson,
Gator sports publicity director,
the increase in seating will bring
the capacity of Florida Field to
56,164.
When the stadium is completed
in September, said Carlson, it
will be the second largest in the
Southeastern Conference. Only
LSUs Tiger Stadium (67,510) will
exceed Florida Field in size.
Carlson said the addition to the
existing structure was necessary
to accommodate the increase in
student enrollment and meet de demands
mands demands by alumni.
Last year we could have sold
60,000 tickets to the FSU and LSU
games, said Carlson. In the past
five years 12 games have been
sold out.
The new stadium will do more
than provide seats for fans. A
dormitory housing 250 students
will be incorporated into the build building.
ing. building. The dormitory will house stu students
dents students on athletic scholarships and
a small number of men not on
scholarship.
Carlson said the athletic dor dormitory
mitory dormitory will not be completed until
January of 1967. When it is finished
it will contain study rooms, laundry
and will be fully air conditioned.

INb matter how you like your hair cut,
lOng, short,
or somewhere IH between. i
. FLA. UNION .... .
the BARBER SHOP Wlil do ,f perfectly perfectly\
\ perfectly\
FLA. UNION BASEMENT
Open 8-5 Weekdays, 8-Noon Sat,
The Flortte Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical too* of all advertisements and
to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
WO POSITION E GUARANTEED, though desired poaltlor. will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustment* of payment for any advertisement Involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless wtlce 1* given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator wlli not be responsible tor more than one Incorrect Insertion of an edrertl*'ment
scheduled to i jn several times. Notices for correction trust be before nart insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and Is
pirlt .K~t flve times wee Sly eicept during May. June, and July vise It U published semi-weekly. Only
editorials rt press-' the official opinions of their authors 'the Alligator U sate red as second class
matter ml the Unite.: trts* Poet Office at Gaines villa.
<
I ;

provement improvement over the old bleachers which
stood on the site.
When the addition is completed, Florida
Field will be second in the SEC in seating

Our first concern is to finish
the outside seats, said Carlson.
We want to have the stadium ready
for the opening game against
Northwestern Sept. 17.
Carlson said the addition to the
stadium is being financed by the
Athletic Department. A bond issue
for the $2.2 million structure will
be paid off by increased revenue
from ticket sales. The sale of the
additional seats will bring an in income
come income of $44,784, providing each
game is a sellout.
According to figures over the
past 10 years, football provides
money to run the entire sports
program at Florida, Carlson said.
I feel, and so does the Athletic
Department, that UP" should have
the best, Carlson stated. As I
said before, increased student en enrollment
rollment enrollment means more alumni in
the years ahead.
We have to have some place to
seat these people and the old sta stadium
dium stadium was not doing the job. In
fact, ticket sales have reached
13,000 already this year.
Carlson said the new stadium
will mean more than dollars and
cents to the athletic program.
The athletic dormitory will aid
in our recruiting program, said
Carlson. I dont like to count the
times we have lost promising ath athletes
letes athletes to Auburn or Georgia. Both
schools have new dormitories for
their boys on scholarship.

It means a lot when you bring
a prospect to the school and you
can promise him he will be living
in special quarters, Carlson said.
The part about being air con conditioned
ditioned conditioned is frosting on the cake.
Carlson said that the increase
in seating capacity makes it easier
to schedule big time schools.

I I
I \ v,
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SAO" C
II > p vw I

capacity. Only LSUs Tiger Stadium, which
houses 67,510, will be larger.
Also included in the complex will be an
air-conditioned dormitory which will pri primarily

N. CEN. FLORIDAS LARGEST SELECTION
F 3IH Hearing Is Believing
'SCOTCH BRAND MAGNETIC TAPES
RETAIL WHOLESALE INDUSTRIAL
AND GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTS
No Order Too Large Or Small
mi 608 N Main st
WULrI 0 PH 376-7171
Complere Selection Scotch

marily primarily house students on athletic scholar scholarships.
ships. scholarships.



Education Needs Reassessment;Reitz

UF President J. Wayne Reitz
sees five major problems con confronting
fronting confronting higher education in Flor Florida.
ida. Florida.
He lists them:
The problem grown out of
adjusting to a year-round opera operation,
tion, operation, and particularly the
trimester system.
0 The Board of Regents, chan chancellor,
cellor, chancellor, administration and faculty
of the universities confronted with
uncertainties and, not infrequently,
frustrations concerning where au authorities
thorities authorities and responsibilities lie.
0 Greater financial support of
higher education is needed.
A problem in higher educa education
tion education concerning the structure, or
role and scope, of the universities
to avoid unnecessary duplication
of certain professional schools
which are so necessary, yet costly.
These, including graduate schools,
must be concentrated rather than
widely dispersed.
Overall financial support and
ability to retain and hire quality
professors.
While he realizes that there is
considerable unawareness of these
problems in the state, he also
added, There'is by far greater
awareness now than at any other
time in history.
In discussing the year-round
university operation President
Reitz said, * The problems evolving
from the trimester system are be being
ing being resolved now by the adoption of
the quarter plan. The important
thing now is that various institu institutions,
tions, institutions, working with faculty groups,
must develop a satisfactory quar quarter
ter quarter program and bring about an
effective transition from the tri trimester
mester trimester system.

I Campus American, I
I Tk Nmtf, Mart Modern Station In Saintwilln I
I We Offer COMPLETE 1 Stop Service I
I NEAREST TO THE UNIVERSITY... i I
I No Time Wasted On Yonr Way To Class >? j I
I FASTEST & BEST Service In Town I
I We Specialize In Minor Repairs
I | / BRAKES / LUBRICATION £ f j I
I A Florida /tires /batteries .'/"* I I
I E /top QUALITY ACCESSORIES %' I'
I "WE DON'T TALK SERVICE -WE GIVE IT" I
I YOU EXPECT MORE FROM } AND VOU ll

We didnt approve of the tri trimester
mester trimester plan. Nevertheless, we
worked diligently to make it effec effective,
tive, effective, he said. Admitting that it had
some advantages, Reitz said the
disadvantages offset the ad advantages.
vantages. advantages.
He believes the major overall
problem the trimester created was
that it threw us out of phase with
the national academic community
and brought about pressures of
time for students and faculty.
One of the crucial points here
is that faculty salary contracts
were never quite meaningful in the
national salary structure for col colleges
leges colleges and universities, he con continued.
tinued. continued.
It did not give faculty flexi flexibility,
bility, flexibility, in terms of contract, or
time to plan a years program
with the best professional ad advantage.
vantage. advantage.
He continued to mention the
quarter system will satisfy the
primary advantage students saw
in the trimester system: exams
will be over before the Christmas
holidays and a student will have
an opportunity to accelerate his
education.
Dr. Reitz noted another prob problem.
lem. problem. The state is still operating
under statutes affecting higher
education which are outmoded and
hinder needed flexibility by not
permitting needed authority to be
vested in the Board of Regents and
at university levels.
There is reason here to have
great hope for the future, he said,
because the Board of Regents,
all gubernatorial candidates, the
State Chamber of Commerce,
Council of 100, leading citizens
and numerous members of the

'
REITZ
legislature have announced their
intentions to correct this si situation.
tuation. situation.
Since World War 11, Reitz point pointed
ed pointed out, higher education has made
tremendous progress, but has done
this without adequate financial sup support.
port. support. Time has come for Florida
(9th nationally in population) to take
its proper place among leading
states, he said.
Citizens in general have come
to realize that the quality of higher
education is absolutely vital to a
progressive society and advance advancement
ment advancement of a state socially, economi economically,
cally, economically, culturally and politically.
The solution is to call for
special recognition by the legisla legislature
ture legislature in allocation of increasing
general revenue, he said. The
past several years the percentage
of general revenue going to higher

education has remained practically
constant, he reported.
The great importance of higher
education and trained people will
require a reassessment of our
scale of values in general revenue
allocations. This calls for allo allocating
cating allocating increased revenues to edu education
cation education rather than spreading such
increases over all government ac activities,
tivities, activities, Reitz said.
The structure of universities
poses other problems, he con continued.
tinued. continued. It is essential that gradu graduate
ate graduate education and certain
professional schools, which are so
necessary, yet costly, be concen concentrated
trated concentrated rather th a n widely dis dispersed.
persed. dispersed.
To disperse such functions is
to spread our available resources
so thinly that quality in graduate
education, and the cost of pro professional
fessional professional schools could lead to
mediocrity. Therefore, the poli policies
cies policies established by the Board of
Regents with respect to role and
scope of institutions under its
jurisdiction must be carefully stu studied
died studied and enunciated.
Dr. Reitz said the demand for
college and university professors
is the keenest in the history of
the nation, and it is equally in intense
tense intense in almost every subject area.
This means the environment for
supporting a good academic at atmosphere
mosphere atmosphere and the financial re responsibility
sponsibility responsibility for hiring good
teachers and scholars, is of tre tremendous
mendous tremendous importance. The real
quality of the university in the fi final
nal final analysis is determined by the
quality of the faculty working in
conjunction with its student body.
In all of these problems, weve
made notable progress, President

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Reitz says, but still there is much
to be done if the quality of a uni university
versity university is to be in keeping with
the needs and aspirations of the
state of Florida.
If we can get these resolved
it is perfectly amazing what fu future
ture future developments of universities
of excellence can be. It is a mat matter
ter matter of committing ourselves to it.
This state is getting to the point
of committing, he concluded.
Registrar
Announces
Changes
UF Registrar Richard Whitehead
has announced several new regis registration
tration registration procedures for the up upcoming
coming upcoming fall trimester.
Registration will be conducted
from Monday, August 29, through
Saturday noon, September 3. All
students are encouraged to com complete
plete complete their registration during this
extended period.
For the first time, late regis registration
tration registration 'will be limited to one day
-- September 5. It normally has
been three days in the past.
In another move to limit the
- .ft
number of late registrants, thus
keeping disruption of class ac activities
tivities activities to a minimum, the fee for
late registration has been in increased
creased increased from $5 to $25.

Page 5A



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
STUWART TRAILER, 8' x 38 with
10 x 30 alum, cabana, fully a/c.
378-3504 or see at Hickory Hill
Trailer Park, 10t35. (A-i&O-tf-c).
SPECIAL FOR STUDENTS. Air
conditiooCTs Admiral. Perfect
for Diamond, Corry and Schucht
Villages, apts, and trailers. All
sizes. Cost plus 10%. Sudden Ser Service
vice Service Fuel Oil Co., 907 SW 3rd St.,
Ph. 376-4404. (A- 42-ts-c).
BOLEX Bmm ZOOM REFLEX P-1.
$374 retail; $195. Call 372-6178.
(A- 148-ts-c).
ATTENTION: Employees Uni University
versity University of Florida. We have 7Fla 7Flavet
vet 7Flavet units left. Delivered to your
lot for SISOO cash. Midstate En Engineers,
gineers, Engineers, Inc. 378-2151, P.O. Box
14491, Univ. Station. (A-149-3t-c).
...
8 x 30 LUXOR TRAILER with
8 x 21 cabana. A/C, carpeted
living room. TV and antenna, new
20 gal. hot water heater, insurance
premiums, 6-3211, ext. 5637, or
6-0959 after 5:15 p.m. (A-149-
3t-c).
8 x 30 A/C HOUSE TRAILER.
Can be seen at Lot F-6, Hillcrest
Park. Call 372-1627. (A-149-
3t-p).
SACRIFICE. Bolex Bmm zoom re reflex
flex reflex movie camera. Retail value
$374. Best offer. Call Jim, 372-
6178. (A- 150-2 t-c).
1965 HONDA CB 160, low mileage.
Excellent condition. Flat truck and
scrambling extras s4so, Call
376-9351 or see at Rm. 210, East
Hall, Tandy or Chip. (A-150-2t-p).
FOR SALE, 35 x 8 2-BR, com completely
pletely completely furnished house trailer.
New, A/C, Archer Road Village.
Call 378-3369. (A-150-2t-p).
HOUSE TRAILER with attractive
cabana. 2-BR, bath, den, dining
room, kitchen, and separate study.
Excellent condition. $895 cash or
terms may be arranged. See at
Lot C-25, Archer Road Village, or
call 376-2269 or 378-4368. (A (A---151-Itc).
--151-Itc).tc). (A---151-Itc).
MANS BICYCLE, guaranteed to
carry heavy weights. S2O. Call
378-1655. (A-151-lt-c).
FOR SALE BY OWNER leaving
country, 1962 Rambler Classic
station wagon. Automatic trans transmission.
mission. transmission. Excellent condition. S7OO
or best offer. Call Parkinson, ext.
2271. (A-151-lt-c).

Wk $r INTRODUCTORY |§|
||| O FLIGHT LESSON ||g
PS| THIS CERTIFICATE PLUS FIVE DOLLARS ENTITLES ggj
|s|j| BEARER TO A SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY |gg|
|§p| MB BIB nOB BN fB IBSM <1 IB 9KUL tS ICK

for sale
SACRIFICE 1964 10x50 Mar Marlette,
lette, Marlette, with extras. Call 376-4959
after 5 p.m. or may be seen at
lot 84, Pinehurst Trailer Park.
(A-151-lt-c).
GIFTED DACHSHUNDS (reared in
enriched environment). 6 wks. old,
AKC reg. with shots and wormed.
Males S6O, females SSO. See Dr.
Purkey, Norman Hall or call 372-
7744. (A-150-lt-c).
1965 BULTACO MATADOR motor motorcycle,
cycle, motorcycle, 200cc Scrambler, 14,050
miles. For sale, best offer. Day Daytime
time Daytime call Mike at Med. Center.
Ext. 5434. (A-151-lt-c).
WALNUT BREAK-FRONT, $75;
walnut bookcase, S2O; TV antenna,
sls; small round table, $10; mo modern
dern modern floor lamp, $65; two living
room chairs, $35 each. Miscel Miscellaneous
laneous Miscellaneous items. 376-9094. (A-151-
lt-c).
1958 CHEVROLET IMPALA V-8,
automatic, excellent condition.
Best offer. Norge 12 electric
refrigerator freezer, frostfree --
unused. Norge electric stove
unused. Call 378-1395 or 372-
5898. See refrigerator and stove
at 1924 NW 2nd Ave. (A-151-lt-c).
1957 MOBILE HOME, 8 x 34,
2-BR. Completely furnished, good
condition. Glynwood Trailer Park,
lot #l7. Call 376-9138. (A-151-
lt-c).
1965 YAMAHA 55cc. Sports model,
perfect condition, low mileage,
only $l5O. Call D. J. Silversmith,
UF ext. 2258. (A-151-lt-p).
1964 HONDA Super Hawk, 305 cc.
Runs, looks good. $450. Call 376-
0237 after 5:30 p.m. (A-151-lt-p).
COLD for sale. Aquamarine Norge
Refrigerator. 9 cu. ft. of space.
$45/ Call Alan, 378-4547. (A-151-
lt-p).
for rent
ONE BR, A/C APT. One block from
campus. SBS/mo. Call Keystone
Heights. 473-4135. (B- 149-ts-c).
NOW RENTING FOR FALL. A/C
APTS AND HOUSES. Occupancy
for 3 or 4 students, male or fe female.
male. female. CHARLIE MAYO, Owner,
Town & Country Realty. 376-4664.
(B-140-ts-c).

Page 6A

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

for rent
2 ROOM UNITS, furnished. Re Refrigerators,
frigerators, Refrigerators, no kitchen, private
entrances, ground floor. Two
blocks from campus. Call 376-
6494. (B-149-3t-c%
LARGE 3-BR FURNISHED HOUSE
-- four persons sl6s/mo. 2-BR
furnished duplex 3 persons
$ 125/mo. A/C. Quiet area. 12 mo.
lease. 3 blocks from campus. 376-
6494. (B-149-3t-c).
FURNISHED APTS, 3 blocks from
campus. Spacious 1-BR, Danish
Modern, S9O. 2-BR a/c apt., slls.
Lease required. Call 372-8840.
(B- 150-2 t-c).
A/C APT for rent by trimester.
Close to campus. See at 1513 NW
sth Ave. or call 376-8990 until
5 p.m. (B-151-lt-c).
TWO MATURE RESPONSIBLE
MALE STUDENTS wanted to share
3-BR house. Individual bedrooms.
Approximately S4O apiece includes
everything. 2 blocks from campus.
Also need one or two coeds to share
apt., same location. 372-1508.1414
NW 2nd Ave. Mike Brown. (B-151-
lt-c).
3 ROOM APT. $55 per mo. Stu Students
dents Students only. No calls please. See
Mary Stewart, 222 SE 12th St. or
314 W. Univ. (B-151-lt-c).
ATTRACTIVE MODERN A/C fur furnished
nished furnished 3-BR, 1 bath, CCB house.
Large sliding glass doors to patio.
Built-in oven and range, carport,
storage, $l5O on lease. Available
now. 3831 NW 16th Place. 376-
0894. (B-151-lt-c).
iSIWTE Jf-g,
IWEIRD; WICKED I
llpPlti
liim.*' V/IMI 1 tk truMiit |
uih mini w m Tim! |
*
wS/tk ) M 8

for rent
2-BR FURNISHED APT. 1/3 block
from campus. 1236 SW Ist Ave.
Call 372-3853, Mon.-Thurs., 5-6
p.m. (B-151-lt-p).
FURNISHED ROOMS 1125 SW
4th Ave., block from campus. Four
two-man rooms with use of kitchen,
$l3O tri./man. Two single man
rooms, $l5O a term (utilities in included).
cluded). included). Contact David Hague, 378-
3314. (B-151-lt-p).
lost-found
MISSING IN ACTION Small
Beagle, white with black spots,
brown face, chain collar. Please
call Sharon, 378-2705. $lO Reward.
(L-151 Itp).
I
I LOVES I
IA FRESHMAN I
but his mother! I
I ... OH NOW WE I
I DON'T KNOW... I
1 WHY SOME OF OUR I
1 BEST FRIENDS USE I
I TO BE FRESHMEN. I
I. .Like Batman I
land Under Dog wel
are champions of the
oppressed and down-1
trodden. ~aFresh-|
man to us is still a|
human being and
grades willing he I
may be at U.F. tor a|
number of years I
I SO TO GET I
I YOU HOOKED I
when you come to
U.F. stumble up to I
I
I THEATRE 1
Bring this ad andl
your I. D. card!
(unbent) and we will!
(bestow upon you 1
I A PASS I
a what Roy? I
I A PASS, I
I I SAY I I
Good for any show!
at the I
in hopes that you will I
think it is so fine I
you will never go to
another theatre and I
will bring all your
money to us thru your
entire college!
career!
Its sneaky, but it I
works. . I
I GOOD THRU ||
Oct. 4th 11

wanted
ONE OR TWO ROOMMATES to
share new A/C apt. with swim swimming
ming swimming pool, near Univ. Gardens.
Student or upperclassman pre preferred.
ferred. preferred. $38.75 per mo. Call Steve
at 378-3043 after 5. (C-151-lt-c).
CLEAN 2 ROOM APT. S4O/mo.
All utilities furnished, except gas.
Also single room, $25/mo. Boys
only. 1614 NW 3rd Place. 372-
7366 or 372-2946. (C-151-lt-c).
1 FLORIDA STATE THEATRES
N 0 h| r
'^WIN THpi TrM 6:42
9:33
Riotous Romantic Adventure!
tS* fill WALT DISNEYS
TOvJPlt. robin
j o crdsoe.
mmw I,SN
AiAM ro VAN DYKE
/i(Q nancy kwan
JilL., akimTAM irqff
i 'nn
6-21
WSVMPlfmigll
BATTLE OF
THR BULGE
ULTRA-PANAVISION
technicolor*
FROM WARNER BROS. Kgafl
-CENTURY FOX presents
mMtrn
V COLOR BY DE LUXE CINEMASCOPE
NO SEATS RESERVED
Every Ticket Holder Guaranteed A Seat
Elizabeth
. Taylor
Richard
Burton
IN ERNEST LEHMAN'S PRODUCTION
OP EDWARD ALBEE S
Whos
Hfraid Os
VIRBINIA
Woolf?



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

\Vltyfche If we told
CR&ZY m
feifele *P "ts ,?*&-
ll i
BfIHHHHBBHHHF
tCARL REINER EVA MARIE SAINT
ALANARKIN BRIAN KEITH iJSVj
* JONATHAN WINTERS THEODORE BIKEL
COLOR BY DELUXE NINISM' |
NOW SHOWING
at 1:00 3:15 5:25
7:40 10:00 !|N!w!l3thSt!t23rdod|
V h T*f>hone 378-2434
( yfOHJPQj yt :.
:#£. cis-w y^g/ife
jfo*> jf >*

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

wanted
MALE ROOMMATE to share 2-BR
A/C apt. in Village Park. Ph. 372-
1541; 1001 SW 16th Ave. Apt. 20.
(C-149-3t-p).
COED TO SHARE 2-BR APT. at
Georgetown. Call 378-4321 after
5 p.m. (C-151-lt-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED,
2-BR, A/C apt., 3 blocks from
campus with one other girl. SSO a
mo. Call 372-2995 after 6 p.m.
(C-151-lt-c).
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE to
share 1-BR apt. in Village Park
area. Call Donna, 372-3073. (C (C---151-lt-c).
--151-lt-c). (C---151-lt-c).
NEED ROOMMATES. 3-BR house,
A/C, quiet residential area, 620
NW 35th St. 378-2358. (C-151-
lt-p).
WANTED RIDERS. Law student
leaving Aug. 5. Chicago via U.S.
41. Share expenses and driving.
Call 372-0933 after 6. (C-151-
lt-p).
| Watch I
Fop The j
OPENING i
t Os 2
DIPPER DAN
X ICE CREAM SHOPPE 1
Westgate Shopping Ctr. ?
T.nfi Wijr.fj.rU every m
UMUaUyHIUdLU^MiTE^
IH.W. 13* ST. 372-952 S
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
At 7:55 & n :05
[?Hisr
ll Hawns!
iteip <
Jpoivy* l
IN PANAVISION'AND MeTROCOLOR ./ }
I 2 First Run Hits
ft Qgnn .nnnfyi^oo^
I/ # |T§ REALLV no MVSTeR/ >*
WHY This GIRL IS MURDER
JfjgS' |
PL ft to v... t w I
mJr T ONY ANITA §
I
I On Saturday night, July 30,
there will be a record hop
I after the show. Cec Tindall
I of WGGG will be the MC.
See the show and dance after-
H wards at no extra charge.
B Courtesy of station WGGG and
The Record Bar.

Page 7A

wanted
RIDE TO MIAMI AREA on Aug. 3rd
or 4th. Please call Karen at 378-
4739 or 376-1345. (C-151-lt-nc).
real estate
2-BR FURNISHED A/C HOUSE.
Ideal for student family. One mile
west of city limits. Call 372-5511
after 6 or weekends. (I-150-2t-c).
COOL COOL CentraUy A/C
and heated, 4-BR, 2-bath house
with pool privileges on large cor corner
ner corner lot. This comfortable home
features cathedral ceilings, large
modern kitchen with breakfast
area, built-in oven & range, 14 cu.
ft. refrigerator. Imagine, 7 spa spacious
cious spacious closets & roomy utility room
equipped for washer and dryer.
Owner leaving town. Must sacri sacrifice.
fice. sacrifice. Immediate occupancy in this
conveniently located home. slll.B
P. plus I. Will leave drapes. 376-
1851. (I-151-lt-c).
NICE 2-BR WOOD FRAME HOUSE
with spacious kitchen for sale.
S3OO, my equity, S6O mo. payment.
Call 376-0556 after 6 p.m. (1-151-
lt-c).
Gator Ads Just Kill Me!
vfrjt*-

I I
1 I 2400 Hvwthontm Road W. 20 W 4-50tf I I
I I 1 BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 7 P.M. I
I I// sophiT TONIGHT I
I 11:45 PECK STANLEY TON LOREN THRU I
show aESI TUES.
I time l ARABESQUE i 7:50 I
L__l TKHWCTtW PAWAVISIOr I
I AUGUST E d^ JLAR I
I Strange Bedfelidws I
| TECHNICOLOR' J

- ;
autos
1963 CORVAIR MONZA SPYDER,
convertible, new tires, new paint,
4-speed, lots of gauges. Asking
$1250. Call 8-2742 after 2 p.m.
(G-150-2t-c).
ALFA-ROMEO, late 1965, 4-door
sedan, low mileage, extra features,
cash equity, take over payments.
$1,650 total. 372-8818. (G-151-
lt-c).
1953 PLYMOUTH. One owner,
81,000 miles. Good mechanical
condition. $75. Contact 376-3211,
ext. 5301. (G-150-lt-c).
1964 VW. 1500 Variant-S Station
Wagon. Radio and sunroof. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Call 378-1260
or stop by 203-T Flavet HI. (G (G---151-lt-c).
--151-lt-c). (G---151-lt-c).
1962 AUSTIN HEALEY 3000 MK U
-- 4-seater. Excellent condition.
454-1017 after 5 p.m. (G-151-
lt-p).
LIKE NEW 1965 Burgundy MUS MUSTANG.
TANG. MUSTANG. 28,000 miles. 289 cu. in.,
4-barrel, 4-speed transmission,
SI9OO. Call 372-6469. (G-151-
lt-p).
1965 HONDA 305 Super Hawk and
Omega DII Enlarger. Call Bob at
376-2320 or call 376-4995 and
leave message. (G-147-tf-nqj).



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

services
IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios. 372-0300. (M (M---146-ts-c).
--146-ts-c). (M---146-ts-c).
Table Lamps, $1 and up. FAMILY
THRIFT STORE. 202 SE Ist Ave.
Ph. 376-9255. (M- 141-ts-c).
l... .. - '
help wanted
GOOD INCOME. Part or full time
in selling the new line of Holiday
Magic Cosmetics. Call Mr. Croy
or Mrs. Gill, 378-1591. (E-143-
ts-c).
TWO COLLEGE GRADS not satis satisfied
fied satisfied with less than SIO,OOO a year,
age 21-30, married preferred,
military obligation completed, sell
CIP to senior and grad students on
deferred payment plan. Two men
selected with receive extensive
home office training. Contact Roy
Girod, Mng., American General
Life Insurance Co., 201 Security
Bldg. Ph. 376-8527. (E-148-4t-c).
HALF-TIME STUDENT beginning
fall term. Excellent salary. Must
be able to work 30 hours per week.
Ph. 376-8314 after 5 p.m. (E-150-
2t-nc).

. ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE
urange and blue bulletin
Campus Calendar

Tuesday Union Board: 215 FU, 4:45 p.m.
August 2 Tuesday Evening Supper Club:
Presbyterian Student Center,
6:30 p.m. Non-denominational.
Everyone single and over 21
invited. SI.OO.
College of Education Lecture:
Norman Hall Aud., 1:30 p.m.
William Alexander: Curricu Curriculum
lum Curriculum Innovations 1966.
Phi Kappa Phi: McCarty Aud.,
4:30 p.m.
Wednesday Society: 212
August 3 FuJPpp.m.
Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity: 116
FU, 7:30 p.m.
Florida All-Star Marching Band:
McCarty Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Secretary of Married Student Af Affairs:
fairs: Affairs: 118 FU, 5:30 p.m.
Thursday Christian Science: FU Aud., .5:15
August 4 p.m.
Theology Lecture: Hillel Founda Foundation,
tion, Foundation, 8 p.m. Harvey Cox: The
Secular City. Thomas Preston,
speaker.
Florida Band Masters Concert:
P. K. Yonge Aud., 8:15 p.m.

1 I f A II Mk I | VACATION 1
* BUDGET MONTHLY /I/I t I |\| H I Ul/MIIZX MM If" TRAVEL EXPENSE
I* $75 30-DAY Isl V/l it w niLni/bki $ 1003 Monthly
I Cost: $2.25 Interest $25 S6OO Payments of $35 I

help wanted
LIFE GUARDS and gate men to
work at Camp Wauburg. Start to
work immediately. Call Mr. Scott,
466-3171. (E- 150-2 t-c).
PART TIME MALE STUDENTS
WANTED, Dipper Dan Ice Cream
Shop. Check listing, University
Employment, ext. 2261. (E-151-
lt-c).
PART TIME WORK FOR UF STU STUDENTS.
DENTS. STUDENTS. If you have a 2.0 or better
and are experienced in offset paste
up or general composition, then
Student Publications may have a
job for you. We need students
(male or female) to help in ready readying
ing readying The Florida Alligator for print printing.
ing. printing. We have different shifts which
range between 8 a.m. and approxi approximately
mately approximately 11 p.m. from Sun. thru
Thurs. Hourly wages. Contact Ed
Barber, Univ Ex. 2832, or by mail:
Rm. #9, Fla. Union Bldg., U of F,
between Aug. 22 and 26, 1966. (E (E---151-lt-nc).
--151-lt-nc). (E---151-lt-nc).
personal
VISIT GATOR GROOMER where
romance blooms. Next door to
Univ. P.O. Self-service and pro professional
fessional professional laundry and dry clean cleaning.
ing. cleaning. (J-146-ts-c).

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

Page 8A

v'- 1
I I
I I 1 *i
I l" v\

Friday Chess Club: 215 FU, 7 p.m. All
July 29 players invited, regardless of
strength.
Florida Players: Norman Hall Aud.
8 p.m. Papa Is All.
Saturday Florida Players: Norman Hall Aud.
July 30 8 p.m. Papa Is All.
Movie: MSB Aud., 7 & 9p.m. Wild
and Wonderful.
Gatorland Summer Music' Clinic
Final Concert: Plaza of the
Americas (Univ. Aud. if it rains),
6:45 p.m.
Chess Club: 215 FU, 10 a.m.
5 p.m. 30-30 Tournament.
Everyone invited.
Sunday Christian Science: 118 FU, 6:45
July 31 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge: 215 FU, 1:30
p.m. Students, faculty, staff only.
University Choir: First Presby Presbyterian
terian Presbyterian Church, 4 p.m.
Monday Student Economy Committee
August 1 (Treasurers): 210 FU, 4 p.m.
Christian Science: 118 FU, 6:45
p.m.
T

Others MENSA: Daily, reserved section,
west wing,.Main Cafeteria, 11:15
to 1:15. Students and faculty in invited.
vited. invited.
FU Trip to Guatemala: Aug. 15
Aug. 22. $255.00 per person.
For more information come by
or call 315 FU, ext. 2741. Also
sign up at 315 FU.
FU Trip to St. Augustine: Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, July 30. Leave FU at 12
noon, return 12 midnight. SB.OO.
Make payment in 315 FU, or
send check payable to Florida
Union to 315 FU. For more in information,
formation, information, call ext. 2741.
Notices
TO STUDENTS:
FINAL EXAMINATIONS: All examinations
in Spring and Spring B administered by the
Board of Examiners will be held in Walker
Auditorium, starting at times indicated in the
schedule of courses for 1965-66.
GENERAL NOTICES
RELIGIOUS DISCUSSION: Dr. Thomas
Preston will lead the discussion of Harvey
Coxs The Secular City at 8 P. M. Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, Aug. 4, at the Hillel Foundation.



1 111 oH \*
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The growth of UF by leaps and
bounds puts a much greater strain
on the schools residence facilities
today than during 1906 when Buck Buckman
man Buckman and Thomas Halls fulfilled the
needs of the enrolled 135 students.
Since 1906, the UF has added 18
dormitories and four married stu student
dent student villages to accommodate an
approximated 6,650 single students
and 956 married students and fam families
ilies families and is planning to add more.
In 1930, Sledd Hall was added to
the list of UF dorms making the
total three. Ten years later,
Fletcher and Murphree Halls were
added. Thus, the complex of red
brick dormitories on the northwest
section of campus was completed.
A more modern complex, with
stretches of landscaped lawn to
add to its beauty, was built on the
west section of campus in 1950.
Tagged Tolbert Area, the com complex
plex complex includes five dorms.
Hume Hall, south of the Tolbert
Area, was completed in 1959.
After 44 years of construction
of mens dorms on the west side,
the time for the inevitable was at
hand since the university be became
came became co-educational in 1948
construction of womens dorms on
the east side!
Nancy W. Yulees name was be bestowed
stowed bestowed upon the first dorm area
for women in 1950. She was wife
of a Florida educator. The area,
with tall Florida palm trees and
sloping lawns to add to its spacial
attractiveness, parallels U.S. 441.
There are three dorms in the area,
Mallory, Yulee, and Reid Halls.
The growth of the womens en enrollment
rollment enrollment dictated a need for more
dorms.
Consequently, Broward Hall was
completed in 1954, Rawlines Hall
(named for Marjorie K. Rawlings,
the Florida author) was completed
in 1959, and Jennings Hall was
ready for occupancy in the fall of
1961.
Graham, built in 1961 for men,
has been serving both men and
women since 1963 due to the addi additional
tional additional space needed for women.
The dorm has two wings which are

joined by a student service center
(office, bookstore, and cafeteria).
According to William E. Neylans,
assistant director of housing, the
university has had no problems
with the coeducational Graham
area. The plan works out very
nicely.
Trusler and Simpson Halls for
men, completed in 1961, are also
in the Graham Area.
The campus of 1967 will witness
the construction of a dormitory
complex on its east side where the
Flavet II (married student village)
unit once was. According to Ney Neylans,
lans, Neylans, the complex will house 800
students.
There will bo two 13 or 14
story dormitories, one for men
and one for women, Neylans said,
with a library, bookstore, and
recreation room in the central
facilities building. He said that
there will also be a service build building
ing building and counsellor apartments.
The new complex will be in con contrast
trast contrast with the other dormitories
which range from four to five
stories.
The assistant director of housing
said that, as in the past, a univer university
sity university committee will suggest a name
to the Board of Regents for the new
dormitory complex.
The names, he said, have come
from Floridians (such as Marjorie
K. Rawlings), and former univer university
sity university educators (such as Albert A.
Murphry, UF president 1909-1927).
The campus married student
housing began when the Flavet
Areas (a blending of Florida Vet Veterans)
erans) Veterans) were ready for occupancy
in about 1946, according to Ney Neylans.
lans. Neylans.
Three Flavet Villages with a apartments
partments apartments of one to two bedrooms
once were located on the campus.
One was on the east side, parallel
to U. S. 441, and two were more
centralized on campus. Play Playgrounds,
grounds, Playgrounds, with slide boards, swings,
sandboxes, etc., were in the vil villages
lages villages to facilitate the families
children.
Then in 1959, two modern, red redbrick,
brick, redbrick, married villages were con-

A bunch of pilings and some wood dont look
like much now, but soon workmen will transform
them into UFs new Twin Towers dormitory.
The dorm, which will consist of two towers, one
14 stories and one of 13 stories, will be co coeducational

structed. trimesstructed. W. W. Corry Memorial
Village, on the west side, accom accommodates
modates accommodates 216 families, and H. C.
Schucht Village, on the southeast
side (adjacent to the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center), accommo accommodates
dates accommodates 104 families.
j
Emory Gardner Dimaond Me Memorial
morial Memorial Village, the most recent,
was ready for occupancy in the
fall of 1965. It too, is adjacent to
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center j
and is north of the Schucht Me Memorial
morial Memorial Village.
When Diamond was added, it
increased the net capacity to about
135 apartments even though Flavet
I and II were closed. Diamond has
208 one and two bedroom apart apartments.
ments. apartments.
i
Each of the new villages has s
a service center (study lounge, <

§ /T-, j hC
i'CuSWM J
~'fiv j. :v ,.
.-*> mngqofr-~~ ;Tl'
. .-u
"" tMy 'P* .J," xh4i&%*
'KEEP OFF THE CRASS

Drat it, Charlie Brown. Keep off the grass.
Thats what Lucy seems to be saying. This sign
was placed in Diamond Village following heavy
rains last trimester. The grass that was

NOT MUCH NOW

store, laundry facilities, and play playgrounds).
grounds). playgrounds).
Neylans pointed out that Flavet
111 is the only married housing unit
which has passed the point origi originally
nally originally intended for its use. We
know that Flavet m will not remain
forever, but will be replaced with*
permanent facilities, Neylans
said. He stated further that the
year and site of the permanent
facilities to replace Flavet 111 are
not yet known.
Neylans said that names of de deceased
ceased deceased UF student body presidents
are given to the married students
villages.
According to Neylans, the dor dormitories
mitories dormitories and married students
apartments are upgraded on a
cycle. During the third trimes trimesstructed.

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator, :

educational coeducational and will have furnished apartment apartmentlike
like apartmentlike rooms. It is built on the site of the old Fla Flavet
vet Flavet n married village and is next to Jennings
Hall.

planted didnt hold and the area turned into one
big mud hole. New living areas like Diamond
Village offer married students a chance for
economical, pleasant living near campus.

ter (summer), some buildings are
closed for painting, plaster work,
tile replacement, and ceiling re repair.
pair. repair. The cycle, he explains,,
depends on the needs of individual
buildings.
We dont have a definite cycle
yet. A definite cycle, according
to Nolans, would be a plan where whereby
by whereby the maintenance department
would know definitely to repair one
dorm every two years, or paint an
apartment every three years.
Neylans said that married stu students
dents students put in work orders for re repairs
pairs repairs to be made and painting to
be done in their apartments. He
explained that the work orders are
requests made in writing.
According to Neylans, mainte maintenance
nance maintenance of the present housing fa facilities
cilities facilities will continue on the cycle
and new facilities will be built as
the enrollment dictates the need.

Page 9A



L, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

Page 10A

FEATURING
TOWN HOUSE DESIGN
/
FULL BATH UPSTAIRS
HALF BATH DOWNSTAIRS
CENTRAL HEATING
(Low Cost Water To Air)
CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONING
(Low Cost Water To Air)
1 OR 2 LARGE BEDROOMS
i
DISHWASHER & DISPOSALS
(In Two Bedroom Units)
PRIVATE PATIOS
CONVENIENT TO UF
CONVENIENT TO RESTAURANTS & SHOPPING
/ FALCON PATIO GRILLS
l # HADCO GAS STREET LIGHTING
by GAINESVILLE GAS
LARGE PRIVATE SWIMMING POOL
(With Special Cold Deck Patio Around Pool)
APPLIANCES BY
GENERAL ELECTRIC

THE La]

Truly A "Landmark" In Creation
1
V n TfT For people of discriminating tastes
h\ U m w y lQ p r efQY the excitement and joys
of community living and yet insist
on the privacy, peace and serenity
of home living.
f
JTnTJfT For people who do not care to share
their neighbors troubles but are
willing to share their companionship.
JTnTTT For people who want to sit home
undisturbed and yet who at the very
next moment want to seek out friend friendly
ly friendly neighbors.
NOW For the first time you can have your
cake and eat it too.
j
N
_ !)
Univ. of Florida
4
oo
CO
' 1 e
. SW _}6
landmark



.^K^tjj^^
****,.o**^
( 5 ; ; ; V : t 'sbi-M%-'\<. :
- 1 * . %-
'<'- "Cj
rr in :^1 l iiP~nMlf :rt!;> HfflfW a>it>ii>iii T iiiaat>a i> ><>iiii T^^^^^^^^^^^^^^<^^^^ pis : LZ.W
- -..!R%.v&:?W:.:- wUw> 1 .wyww,... <7^ ; ww *. : c
8 .. /&£*>>:> :>& ; xSr jO^F^ 9r wfe,
_, : <-- . :::;
IDMARK
.
l Style, Beauty And Comfort.

The sponsors of The Landmark, after months of interviewing
apartment dwellers have carefully blended in the ingredients that
bring joy and pleasure to the concept of apartment living and with
the same care and study have diligently excluded those features
which frustrate happy living by providing a sophisticated TOWN TOWNHOUSE
HOUSE TOWNHOUSE type apartment.
Imagine, if you will, the joy of living in your own select exclusive
neighborhood completely enclosed by beautifully landscaped fences.
Contained within this, your neighborhood, is your private swimming
pool, your private patio, and MOST IMPORTANT YOUR PRIVATE
HOME. Yes, your private home no one will be living above you
or below you but yourself.
O.K. you say so youre sold on the living concept and you
agree that we have this for YOU; but, how about creature comforts?
Is 1080 square feet of living space ample sot your needs? How about
a half bath downstairs and a full bath upstairs with a dressing room
thrown in? How about central heating and air conditioning? Bedrooms!!
Take your pick: you can have one or two. Fully equipped kitchens?
Os course! Dishwashers and disposals in two-bedroom units. All
Electric by General Electric! Ample storage closets? You bet!!
YOU WANT IT WE HAVE IT.
THE NEXT QUESTION IS WHEN?
If you have kept up with the apartment market, you will realize
that the turnover period generally is in September. This means that
those poor souls who have lease agreements terminating at other
periods have to default on their lease and lose their deposit or con continue
tinue continue to live in sub-standard apartments because, lets face it, the
demand for adequate apartments exceeds the supply. And what about
those other poor souls who come to Gainesville in the ofi-season?
We have the answer!!
WE ARE GOING TO COMPLETE OUR APARTMENTS IN THE OFF
SEASON.
WHEN?? DECEMBER 15, 1966.
WHAT IS THE RENT? 1
2 Bedrooms $145 Unfur ilshed
$l7O Furnished
1 Bt'h-ii.im slls Unfurnished
$135 Furnished
HOW DO YOU GET IN ON THIS DEAL?
Fill out an application and bind us with a $25 Dollar deposit.
If we dont produce, you get double your money back.
ACT NOW! CALL 372-3392.
Water to air central air conditioning and heating. A new principle
in air control designed to reduce electric costs by more than one-half.

m. ;yte Wm

I 1
! APPLICATION I
| Yes, I'll get by somehow until Dec. 15.
Here is my $25 to bind you. I understand
* if you don't produce I will get double my
| deposit back providing, however, I
receive an acknowledged acceptance
within 30 days of submittal.
Name i
I Address
i i
Phone __
i i
Cut out, enclose check and mail to: |
LANDMARK APARTMENTS I
c/o Joseph Canto
. 537 N.E. 1 St. |
Gainesville, Florida
t.
cut iere

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11A



Page 12A

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

Distinguished Profs Present Views

Why does a scholar elect to
remain at an institution which is
below the national average in
salaries and whose administrative
policies are constantly embroiled
in politics? Four distinguished
professors at UF were presented
with this question.
Surprisingly, though all of them
admitted that problems existed and
that Florida was below the national
average in salaries and other areas
such as time off for lecture tours
and study, all four said their per personal
sonal personal and departmental relations
with Tigert were from moderately
to highly favorable.

UPP^*
IS THIS UNJUST? In the following article, two UF professors give different views on the subject of
student registration fees.
Are Student Fees Unjust?

Student registration fees are a tax and should
be abolished, according to Dr. Roe L. Johns,
department chairman and professor in UFs College
of Education.
Registration fees are merely a tax on students
and I believe they should be abolished, Dr. Johns
said.
For instance, the money a student pays for
registration cannot be used to pay a professors
salary. It is sent to the Florida Legislature which
in turn appropriates all funds for the university,
he explained.
UF students do not pay a tuition as such. Florida
law requires only the payment of a registration fee.
At the present time a typical full time undergraduate
student enrolled at the university pays $l3O per
trimester.
Only $72 of this fee is used for matriculation. A
building fund receives a $20.50 portion, and the re remaining
maining remaining $37.50 is allocated for the university health
service and student activities.
The present fee isnt very high and I would not
raise it, Dr. Johns said. It should be reduced
rather than increased.
Its an inefficient method of taxation because
the student is in the worse position of all to pay
it, he said.
If the registration fee were abolished and this
institution financed completely by state funds, it
would amount to a neglible increase in the citizens
taxes, said Dr. Johns.
Don McDowell, director of finance and accounting
for UF, agrees with Johns concerning the amount
that taxes would increase if the university would
increase if the university were financed wholly by
state funds.
Student registration fees amount to only $4
million of the total university budget, said Mc-
Dowell. The budget for the 1965-66 biennium is
S2O million, of that amount sl6 million will be
appropriated by the state legislature, and the re remainder
mainder remainder will come from student fees, he said.
Actually the money from student registration

QUALITY MORE IMPORTANT
Dr. Manning J. Dauer, chairman
of the political science department,
said the total quality of a depart department
ment department and university and the quality
of the rest of the faculty and of the
students is of more importance to
a professor than salary alone.
There is a combination of fac factors
tors factors which offset salary, Dauer
said. Important considerations are
the adequacy of the library, po potential
tential potential for personal study, con contacts
tacts contacts with colleagues, students,
research and funds available to
graduate students.

fees is deposited locally in a University Incidental
Trust Fund and does not go directly to the legis legislature,
lature, legislature, McDowell explained.
According to the annual report of the Florida
comptroller this state collected over $515 million
in general revenue for the fiscal year ending June
30, 1965.
But out of this general revenue the state only spent
$494.6 million. McDowell described this as being
rather unusual for a state.
So you can see, the $4 million in student fees is
only a drop-in-the-bucket compared to the total
revenue of this state, McDowell said.
In theory the fee may not be a tax, but speaking
practically there is no way around it. It is a tax,
he said.
McDowell explained that the fee, as a tax, is in inefficient
efficient inefficient because it hits all people for the same
amount.
An efficient tax would be distributed among the
people best able to pay it, he said.
We have no trouble in collecting the fee from
students, he said. I think they plan for it, and
besides, all the 1 ans and scholarships are awarded
during registration.
Dr. E. R. Bartley, political science professor,
disagrees with Johns about the registration fee
charged students.
In the legal sense, the fee is not a tax, Dr.
Bartley said. I think the fee is very nominal. It
is considerably less than tuition charged by various
private institutions. Dr. Bartley pointed out that
Duke University charged a tuition of SBSO for its
undergraduate students in contrast to the UF $l3O
registration fee.
Dr. Bartley is a professor of American constitu constitutional
tional constitutional law in the political science department.
Politically, I dont think the idea that every citi citizen
zen citizen has the right to a free college education will be
adopted in Florida very soon.
Although it may eliminate some deserving stu students,
dents, students, the registration fee tends to cut down on those
students who view this institution as a four year
loaf, Dr. Bartley said.

Dr. Dauer especially likes the
faculty-student relationship atUF.
I think we have retained more
than other institutions of this size
the idea that the professor should
devote some time to the students,
Dauer commented.
Dauer explained that conditions
vary from area to area or depart department.
ment. department. to department within the uni university.
versity. university.
When questioned about the
budget commission Dauer replied,
Control on the Budget Commis Commission
sion Commission has been loosened a little but
a problem still remains.
Hiram Williams, head of the

graduate art program and a well wellknown
known wellknown exhibiting artist himself,
said it was about time that the
professors were given a chance
to express their views on the
situation at UF.
EVERYTHING WITHIN MEANS
Williams feels the administra administration
tion administration in Tigert does everything
within its means to help a depart department
ment department that shows potential.
Williams put it this way: First,
a department must internally show
its value. Secondly, when value is
evident, then Tigert goes to its
help. Thirdly, excellence must
come from within the department,
it cannot be created by the ad administration.
ministration. administration. Desire and ability
must start in the department,
Williams said.
Administrations treatment of
the art department has been ex excellent.
cellent. excellent. As the art department has
indicated its growing worth, the
administration has given it every
advantage, Williams stated.
Journalism professor H. G.
(Buddy) Davis, a winner of Blue
Keys 1965 Distinguished Teach Teaching
ing Teaching Award, feels he has a parti particular
cular particular advantage in understanding
the universitys problems because
he is a Florida product.
A lot has to do with the depart department.
ment. department. The School of Journalism
is a small close knit group where
the personality of the instructor
is not subordinated to the insti institutional
tutional institutional machine, Davis said.
Davis had several things to say
about the problems that exist at
the university.
LACK OF RESPECT
He listed several situations that
are disturbing to the academic
mind and might be sufficient to
drive people away. First, he said
there is a lack of respect for aca academic
demic academic pursuit. This lack of respect
forces on the university adminis administration
tration administration parallel pressures such as
cutting corners.
Secondly Davis cited the adoption
of the trimester system, which he
feels was adopted' in order to get
more work out of professors. He
also feels the adoption of the quar quarter
ter quarter system is politically motivated
without sufficient study in depth.
The academic community is also
disturbed by the constant wrangling
of the Board of Regents, he said.
MONETARY FRILLS
Davis said UF could use some
of the monetary frills of other
schools such as every third sum summer
mer summer off with pay. However, I dont
think we will ever get anything like
that out of a state university, he
said.
You cannot build a great univer university
sity university without a strong graduate
school and Davis is disturbed by
the resignation of some of UFs
distinguished graduate professors.
These men (Tigert) are wor worried
ried worried about building a great univer university
sity university which cannot be built without
internationally known men to staff
the graduate schools, Davis said.
To rehire good people you will
have to give them things that these
people who are leaving should have
had. The whole thing seems like
rats abandoning a ship, Davis
said.
WARNS AGAINST
COMPLACENCY
Dr. A. E. S. Green, graduate
research professor in two separate
fields, nuclear theory and plane planetary
tary planetary aeronomy, warned against
complacency in UFs role as a
research center.
The recent National Science
P oundation grant to UF was given
because of a belief in the potential

of the university as a great re research
search research center.
UF should stop reading its own
publicity notices and avoid the no notion
tion notion that we have become a center
of research. The funds we have
received were for a potential which
hasnt be reached yet, Professor
Green explained.
Dr. Green has had extensive
experience as an administrator
in academic circles and also in
industry. He said we must re remember
member remember that the administration
of any institution is a complex
and man-killing job.
LAUDS .REITZ
Green lauded President Reitz on
the leadership and stability he has
given the university over a long
period of time.
He also praised Dean of Acade Academic
mic Academic Affairs Robert Mautz for the
job he has done in fighting the day
to day battles of an impossible
administrative framework.
Green said much is to be done
within the present framework be before
fore before the research program can
begin to realize their potential.
I do not subscribe to the theory
that all of our problems are in
Tallahassee. Many of our problems
are due to internal carry over
procedures that should be modern modernized,
ized, modernized, Green said.
RED TAPE
Research is so demanding in
itself that you want the backing
of the administration and you dont
want to waste time with unneces unnecessary
sary unnecessary red tape. Research programs
need an efficiency expert to go
through administration procedures
at the state level and internally to
see whether they really serve
their basic purposes, he added.
UF can only be a center of
excellence if it serves the whole
state. Therefore, we must get rid
of any internal porkchop philoso philosophies
phies philosophies and work for the entire state
as a center of learning. However,
UF has a headstart in the struggle
ahead thanks to the work of Reitz,
Mautz and Graduate School Dean
L. E. Grinter, as well as other
deans and the departmental chair chairmen,
men, chairmen, Green concluded.
There were several other areas
which are important to UF that all
four professors mentioned during
their interviews.
All four agreed that research
and teaching are reciprocal. Dr.
Green summed it up when he said,
The mature view is that good
teaching cannot be separated from
research.
MUST RECOGNIZE TALENT
All agreed that the loss of out outstanding
standing outstanding men occurs when the
administration fails to give re recognition
cognition recognition to its own talent. Such
losses, they said, represents de defeat.
feat. defeat. Generals should be fired who
lose many battles of this sort, the
professors contend.
None of the professors, however,
panicked by the so-called mass
exodus of professors from the
history department, nor did they
panic over some of the other pro professors
fessors professors who have left recently.
POTENTIAL GREATNESS
These four professors are chal challenged
lenged challenged by the opportunity to help
mold a great future center of
learning. Their desire to remain
and fight the present battles is
based on a belief in the future. As
one of the professors said, UF
potentially has one of the greatest
futures in the country.



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|||bis map illustrates the campus, with a special emphasis to where you can and cannot drive or park.
Hpjjb the exception of one or two areas, all restricted areas are now bunched together under Area One.
Campus Parking Scarce

|>l wouldnt mind college if I
didnt have to go to class, goes
*iiliar saying at the university.
I off-campus students the
em is doubly true, because
i parking problem.
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But next year the problem may
be solved, according to Captain
C. A. Roberts, head of the Traffic
Division of the Gainesville Police
Department.
We have made a complete study
of every street in the large section
north of the university, Roberts
said.
The network studied is between
N.W. 13th Street west to N.W. 20th
Street and from West University
Avenue north to N.W. 7th Avenue.
All streets in the area have
been measured for consideration
of a one-way network to utilize
as much on-street parking for the
convenience of residents and off offcampus
campus offcampus students, he said.

Roberts said the study is now in
the hands of Harry Howard, a con consultant
sultant consultant traffic engineer from
Jacksonville. The study should be
complete soon and the one-way
system put in within the next year.
The system should make over
1,000 more spaces available, he
said.
Also in consideration is a pos possible
sible possible parking lot somewhere in
the district, though this is com complicated
plicated complicated since the city owns little
land in the area.
Another suggestion would be to
have a parking mall on campus,
though this has been rebutted, he
said, by those who say it would
cost too much and that ground
space is needed by the university
for classrooms.
Streets, Roberts said, are
designed to handle traffic as a
primary function. They arent de designed
signed designed for parking. But in the
university area, where conditions
are such as they are, parking must
be considered in the function of a
thoroughfare.
Another traffic problem which
affects the university will also be
relieved soon, Roberts said. The
intersection of 13th Street and Uni University
versity University Avenue will be widened into
six lanes. Above each lane there
will be an individual directional
light.
This intersection of two state
roads is burdened with traffic
from the buildup on campus and the
hospital and the increased develop development
ment development of 13th Street, Roberts said.
The improvement of the inter intersection
section intersection has been approved and con construction
struction construction will be carried out within
six months, Roberts said.

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UF Driving Rules
May Be Confusing
UF rules concerning car ownership and driving privileges are not
always clear, especially to incoming freshmen.
If you are a freshman, you may not drive a car in Alachua County
unless you fall into one of the following categories:
Live at a commuting distance from campus.
Married, living with family in Gainesville.
At least 21 years old.
Disabled to the extent that locomotion is impaired.
Those who are permitted to drive a car in Alachua County include:
Graduate students, juniors and seniors.
Faculty, academic staff and certain non-academic staff members.
Sophomores who have successfully completed 64 hours.
Sophomores who have attained a 3.0 academic average their
freshman year. (Must have at least 28 hours.)
All vehicles must be registered with the Campus Police Department.
A student may register only his automobile or one owned by a member
of his immediate family. To register a car,a student must produce an
operators license, proof of ownership, and must establish that he is
eligible to register his car.
If you have a bicycle, you must register it with the Campus Police.
There is a service charge of SI.OO. All scooters and motorcycles must
also be registered with the Campus Police. Any student may operate
a bicycle, scooter or motorcycle.
If you are a freshman or sophomore and not otherwise restricted
from driving, take heart. You may operated automobiles in Alachua
County and on campus from 3:00 p.m. Friday until 7:00 a.m. on Mon Monday
day Monday if these automobiles have been registered with the Campus Police.
This does NOT mean that you may have your own car in the county.
No cars bearing border zone, commuter or campus resident wiy be
permitted to drive on campus between 8:00a.m. and 4:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday, within the following boundary: 13th Street to Inner
Drive to Newell Drive to Radio Road to North-South Drive to Univer University
sity University Avenue down to 13th Street. (The map accompanying this article
shows restricted campus areas.)
Theres 6 New Look
In UF Freshmen

A new look is seen in Florida
freshmen and the look is good,
according to L. Vernon Voyles,
former director of Records and
Registration at UF, and now
assistant dean of men.
The student type at the univer university
sity university is definitely changing with the
changing of Florida from a rural
to an urban state, Voyles said.
In a study of the 1965 freshman
class, Voyles collected data which
he says may cause some of the
stereotyped ideas of the past to be
subjected to re-evaluation.
Voyles cited the fact that most
of the freshmen come from cities
with populations over 100,000 and
were graduated with more than 500
students in their high school class classes.
es. classes. This is partially due to the
tremendous growth rate of the
state, he said.
This past freshman class is the
best academically prepared and
most able the UF has ever had,
Voyles said.
Only about three per cent of the
1965 freshman class will not make
it through the freshman year be because
cause because of academic failure.
Each year the new freshman
class is better prepared than the

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

last their high school back background
ground background is more comprehensive
and their attitude towards college
is more sophisticated, he said.
Over 70 per cent of the 1965
freshman class were in the top
one-fifth of their graduating high
school class, according to Voyles.
The average freshman made
about 415 on his senior placement
test and maintained an approximate
3.0 grade average in high school,
he said*
The UF accepted no freshman
applications for the Fall Trimes Trimester
ter Trimester of 1966 after the first 6,500
were received.
Experience has taught us that
it takes about that number to get
the approximate 2,800 limit set for
the freshman class," Voyles said.
It also seems that good poten potential
tial potential students tend to get their appli applications
cations applications in early, Voyles added.
Most UF freshmen come from
families with an average income
of SIO,OOO per year or more.
The families are small, usually
with not more than two children,
he said.
Some 80 per cent of the 1965
class came into the UF without
any type of scholarship aid and
only 11 per cent of the freshmen
gave lower costs as a reason for
attending the UF, according to
Voyles.
Most of the freshmen have one
parent who either attended or
graduated from a college -- and
about 42 per cent of the freshmen
have parents who both attended
college, he stated.
High school background of UF
freshmen is extremely good, ac according
cording according to Voyles.
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Page 13A



Page 14A

~ The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

The Quarter: What It
Will Mean To You

Most o t the deans at UF are In
favor of the switch from trimester
to quarter system
Reasons given include better
study conditions for students, bet better
ter better contracts for professors, and
better adaptation of classes and
courses to schedules. These fa favorable
vorable favorable aspects of the quarter
system are largely attributed to
the work of the Schedule and Ca Calendar
lendar Calendar Committee, which is hold holding
ing holding regular meetings to create
new guidelines.
Each college and department
will work within these guidelines,
which are being designed so the
entire university will be coordi coordinated
nated coordinated under the quarter system.
Dr. Franklin A. Doty, Dean of
the University College, stated the
trimester system had been given
a fair trial. He said it had failed
because it allowed too little time
for the amount of learning re required
quired required by the students and research
done by the faculty.
The deans acknowledged there
will be problems in the change changeover.
over. changeover. The guidelines from the
Schedule and Calendar Committee
will set up the dates for the be beginning,
ginning, beginning, end, vacations, and final
examinations for each quarter. The
committee will also decide time
schedules for classes. The re revamping
vamping revamping of individual courses to
fit within the guidelines is up to
each individual department.
Faculties of many colleges are
already considering the problems
of revising introductory courses
so they will coordinate with more
advanced course sequences. In
most colleges the adaptation of
advanced courses will be left up
to individual professors.
This situation is so compli complicated
cated complicated that categorical answers to
the problems involved are im impossible/'
possible/' impossible/' Dr. Ralph E. Page,
dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences said. Conditions are
such that year-round operation
of facilities is not only desirable,
but inevitable.
The trimester system as uti utilized
lized utilized here was extremely hard to
administer. It is important to
recognize, however, that both the
trimester and quarter systems are
forms of machinery, neither good
nor bad in themselves. There was
a lack of time for advance planning
before the trimester was created
and introduced.
The machinery of the quarter
system is not going to solve or
create any problems in itself. The
way it is being administered, as
opposed to the administration of
the trimester system, appears as
if it will solve many problems
of the past four years, Dr. Page
concluded.
In several colleges it may be
necessary to create special cour courses
ses courses to bridge the gap between
trimester and quarter.
Dr. John A. Nattress, assistant
dean of the College of Engineering,
explained their largest problem
in the switch would be students who
had taken the first half of a two
trimester course.
Each two trimester sequence
of courses will have to be spread
over three quarters, Dr. Natt Nattress
ress Nattress said. Tills means that the
second quarter will include work
previously done during the last
third of the first trimester and the
first third of the second trimester.
Hus, a student who has taken
the first course will either have to
repeat work that he has already
done, or he will have to skip work
that may be vital to his under understanding

standing understanding of later courses.
Dr. Nattress said the quarter
system will be better for the Col College
lege College of Engineering than the tri trimester,
mester, trimester, for it will allow a better
balance of courses.
The College of Engineering,
more than most colleges here,
is based on course sequences. With
the quarter system offering an ex extra
tra extra session per year, it will be
easier for students to take the
necessary courses in the proper
order.
The solutions to the problem of
overlapping courses were offered
by Dr. Donald J. Hart, dean of the
College of Business Administra Administration.
tion. Administration.
Our first solution to this prob problem
lem problem would be to offer two five fivecredit
credit fivecredit courses under the quarter
system, and design these courses
so they would be comparable to
two three-credit courses under
the trimester.

The Quarter And
University College
Faculty and students of the University College will benefit under the
quarter system when it is instituted at UF, according to Dr. Byron S.
Hollinshead, but public schoolteachers may be hurt by it unless special
provisions are made for them.
Dr. Hollinshead, former Dean of the University College, said the
quarter system will be good for students because it will place UF on
a level comparable to the majority of universities throughout the nation.
Students here will be attending classes at similar periods of time to
students in other schools. Transferring between institutions will be
easier.
Similarly, it will solve faculty problems that exist under the tri- >
mester system pertaining to summer vacations and jobs. No longer
will teachers have vacations such as the April-June breaks under the
trimester, when jobs and opportunities for research in other schools
are almost nonexistent.
The problem created for public school teachers raised by the quar quarter
ter quarter system involves time. Each quarter is approximately 10 weeks
long. Because public school teachers have only from late June to
August in which to do research work or studies, they simply do not
have 10 weeks which are necessary for one quarter, according to Dr.
Hollinshead.
The smaller quarter will be both good and bad for students, Dr.
Hollinshead explained.
Because a smaller amount of material will be covered, final exams
will be easier, but there will be more of them, he said.
The paperwork involved in the extra session of school each year
will present some problems, Dr. Hollinshead said.
There will be a problem in revising courses to fit into the quarter
system. For example, some courses are designed now to be taught in
two segments, and two texts have been written for these courses. We
will have a problem in deciding what portion of the books shall be
taught in which quarter, he said.
Os course, he added, because we are revising whole courses
to fit the quarter system, we may change the books as well. Each ',
department within the University College will make its own decision
about that.
Dr. Hollinshead is not sure whether or not the trimester failed.
What standards do you use to describe failure?he asked. UF
students have scored higher than average on national tests, both before
and after the trimester was instituted. It also succeeded in using the
facuilty on a year-round basis. But, obviously, it created problems,
too.
The year which we will have to workout the problems of the quar quarter
ter quarter system will help immeasurably, Dr. Hollinshead concluded.
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The second solution would be
to maintain the three-credit ba basis,
sis, basis, but design three courses under
the quarter system which would be
comparable to the two courses un under
der under the trimester.
Aitnough the deans generally
agree that the trimester had been
a failure, many of them felt that
under different circumstances it
might have succeeded.
I hold no grief for the passing
of the trimester system, Dr.
Charles H. Fairbanks, chairman
of the Department of Anthropology,
said. But I don't think itgotafair
trial. Without the planning and re revising
vising revising of courses that the quarter
system is getting, it too might fail.
The trimester might work in
theory, Dr. Hart said. The im implementation
plementation implementation of the theory at Flor Florida
ida Florida didnt work however, and it is
too late now for satisfactory mod modification
ification modification of the system.

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p doings at your youngster's new Alma Mater than to read the Florida Alligator, so we've arranged
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offer will be void after SEPT. 1, 1965.
I Daily Mail Subscription SIO.OO
5 Days a week, September thru April (First Two Trimesters)
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y oom 9, Florida Union
{ I University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Mom Dad
Foot Bills
Sometimes
Though it may not seem like it
at the first of the month, Mom and
Dad dont always foot the bill.
More than 50 per cent of UF.
students receive some financial
assistance while in college.
So said Daniel B. Wilder Jr.,
student financial aid officer.
This assistance, Wilder said,
includes loans, scholarships, stu student
dent student employment and funds from
local organizations.
Excluding those from local or organizations,
ganizations, organizations, the funds those for
undergraduates are administer administered
ed administered through the student financial aid
office.
Local funds are usually from
civic organizations in a students
hometown.
Loans come from federal and
state governments, private insti institutions
tutions institutions and the university.
For the period of September 1965
through April 1966, Wilder approx approximated
imated approximated the following amounts in
loans: National Defense Loans in
excess of $900,000; Florida state
loans in excess of $60,000; United
Student Aid funds in excess of
$25,000; University of Florida long
term loans in excess of $200,000.
Loans granted within each col college
lege college although administered
through the student financial aid
office come to approximately
$15,000.
Short term loans sums bor borrowed,
rowed, borrowed, for example, when checks
from home dont come on time
are paid back within 90 days. In Interest
terest Interest rates are two-thirds of one
per cent per month on the unpaid
balance.
Approximately $50,000 in uni university-wide
versity-wide university-wide scholarships will be
given in the period of September
1965 to August 1966. In addition,
there are o ut-of-state tuition
scholarships, competitive awards,
etc.*
MAY FAVOR REGIONS
Certain scholarships favor spe specific
cific specific regions in Florida.
Bracht scholarships, for
example, require that students
from Brevard County be given first
priority. This year there will be
$7,000 awarded through these
scholarships.
Wilder said that the largest
single scholarship source is the
Metta Heathcote Fund, which will
begin this fall. $20,000 will be a awarded
warded awarded in scholarships, but first
and second priority goes to St.
Petersburg and Pinellas County
residents.
Scholarship qualifications us usually
ually usually include being a student in
good standing and need. Also,
citizenship is nearly always re required.
quired. required.
SEEK EMPLOYMENT
Students seeking part-time em employment
ployment employment on campus must go
through the student financial aid
office. It is here that academic
and conduct records are checked
and a student okayed for em employment.
ployment. employment.
More than 1500 students are
employed on a part-time basis.
Students with a B average or bet better
ter better may work 20 hours a week,
others only 15. They receive any anywhere
where anywhere from $1 to $3 per hour.
Students are employed in all
the colleges, Wilder said, and
have all types of jobs clerical,
library workers and lab assis assistants.
tants. assistants.
Is more financial aid being given
now than in the past?
Yes, Wilder said. There are
more qualified applicants and the
average financial need per appli applicant
cant applicant has risen.

Page 15A



Page 16A

l, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

fS PORTS
With Jeff Denkewalter*-
' -Sports Editor
At the close of last season, Hank Bauer was an unhappy man.
The rough-speaking and even rougher looking manager of the
Baltimore Orioles had failed to guide his team to the American
League pennant.
Although he was in the same boat with eight other managers in
the league who trailed the Minnesota Twins at seasons end, Bauer
had deeply believed that his Orioles should have won. They didnt.
The final standings showed the Birds a full eight games behind the
Twins and in third place.
Reasons for the Orioles lackluster display in the 1965 season
were many: first baseman Boog Powells prolonged batting slump;
an erratic pitching corps; and most important, the noticeable lack
of a slugging outfielder.
This third area was promptly dispensed with in a mid-winter
deal with the Cincinnati Reds that netted Baltimore the services
of rightfielder Frank Robinson. The rest took care of itself.
Result History
The result, as Mel Allen used to say, is now history. In the
latest standings, Bauers Birds lead the American League by 12
games.
Frank Robinson has hit more home runs and teammate third
baseman Brooks Robinson has driven in more runs that any other
player in the junior circuit.
Boog Powell, whose real name is John, is batting a lofty .307
after a .248 campaign last season.
Luis Aparicio has bounced back from a miserable season at
the plate and in the field to once more take his place as the
leagues top shortstop.
Pitcher Steve Barber has curbed somewhat his furious
temper and also has brought down his earned run average con considerably.
siderably. considerably.
All this, plus the firm hand of Bauer at the helm have trans transformed
formed transformed Baltimore into a town overtaken with pennant fever.
A Quick Glance
As of now, it looks like the Pittsburgh Pirates will furnish
Baltimores opposition in the World Series. The Bucs have power
to spare at the plate . Other fearless predictions . Jack
Nicklaus will win the World Series of Golf in Akron later this
summer . Whitey Ford and Mickey Mantle will announce their
respective retirements at the close of this season . The
Cleveland Browns, or for that matter all of professional football,
will never find another fullback equal to the now-retired Jimmy
Brown ...
News You Might Use
Portion of the proceeds from sales of the booK Go Gators
will go into a scholarship fund at UP, author Arthur Cobb an announced
nounced announced recently.
Cobb, the managing editor of the Pensacola Journal, said the
scholarship will be run through Gator Boosters and will go to the
senior football player making the highest honor point average his
final two trimesters. It will be for graduate study.

Maravich
Heads Up
Clinic Staff
Basketball portion ofthesummer
coaching clinic in conjunction with
the prep all-star classics in
Gainesville will be headed by LSUs
Press Maravich.
Maravich, former head basket basketball
ball basketball coach at Clemson and North
Carolina State, went to LSU in May.
He is regarded as one of the coun countrys
trys countrys finest cage coaches.
The basketball clinic is sponsor sponsored
ed sponsored by the Florida Athletic Coaches
Association and the Florida High
School Activities Association. It is
set for August 4-6, with lectures at
the University of Florida Medical
School Auditorium and demonstra demonstrations
tions demonstrations at Florida Gym.
Joining Maravich on the clinic
staff wiU be Gator assistant coach
Dick Davis, FSU assistant Hugh
Durham, Joe Fields of Lake City
Junior College, Jim Harley of
Florida Presbyterian, Glenn
Wilkes of Stetson, Russell Porter Porterfield
field Porterfield of Macclenny, Bob Shiver of
Tampa Hillsborough and Joe Dean
of the Converse Rubber Company.
Tom my Bartlett, new head coach
at the University of Florida, will
be unable to take part in the clinic
because his Gators will be in the
midst of a tour of South America
on behalf of the People-to-People
Sports Committee.

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Univ. of Fla. Staff, Students & Faculty Since 1933

TIDE WINS 90%
'Bama '6O-65 Top Winner

A compilation of the won-lost
records of the 115 major college
football teams for this decade, the
19605, reveals that Alabama leads
the nation by winning a flat 90 per
cent of their games. The Crimson
Tide regular-season record for the
Trio Heads
All-Stars
Seldom has any one all-star high
school football team in the State of
F lorida had a group of quarterbacks
to equal those who represent the
South this summer.
A trio of talented athletes whose
achievements match the best pro produced
duced produced in Florida prep circles will
guide the Southerners of Coach
Bobby Carlton in the August 6
contest at Florida Field.
Led by prep all-American Guy
McTheny of Sarasota the South
quarterback list also includes Tom
Warren of Coral Gables and Rick
Anderson of Winter Haven, both of
whom are tremendous football
players in their own right.
Warren, 6-0 and 170, was a first firstteam
team firstteam All-Southern choice this year
and led Dade County scorers with
102 points, an unusual scoring fi figure
gure figure for a quarterback. He was
named Gold Coast Back of the Year
for leading Coral Gables to an 8-2
record. Warren will attend Florida
State University this fall.
McTheny, a three-sport star for
the Sailors of Sarasota, also scored
heavily with 109 points his senior
year and a record 169 in two sea seasons.
sons. seasons. He is 6-2, 195 and will attend
the University of Florida.
Anderson, 6-2, 192-pounder, ex excelled
celled excelled as a passer and placement
expert for Winter Haven. He booted
a 33-yard field goal in 1965 and
hit on 50 of 58 extra points during
his career.
Last fall Anderson, who will
attend FSU, completed 58 passes
including a school record 89-yard
TD toss.
With a hefty line in front of them
this trio should expect to make the
South an offensive football team
this year.

six years (1960-65) is 53-5-2.
The exhaustive chart, compiled
by Harvey Kirkpatrick, Sports In Information
formation Information Director at Utah State,
also shows that for these six sea seasons
sons seasons Ole Miss has the fifth best
record, 49-5-4, for a winning per percentage
centage percentage of .810 and that LSU is
tied with Missouri for tenth at .758
with 44-13-3.
Other schools in the top ten are:
Bowling Green (2), Texas (3), Ar Arkansas
kansas Arkansas (4), Utah State (6), Dart Dartmouth
mouth Dartmouth (7), Ohio State and Princeton
(tie for Bth).
Auburn rates the top twenty with
a 40-18-2 record and .683 pet. for
18th place, and UF is tied with Duke
for 28th on 37-21-2 for .633. Other
SEC schools ranks as follows:
Tennessee is 42nd on 32-23-5,
Georgia is 63rd with 28-27-5,
Kentucky 72nd at 27-29-4, Miss.
State 87th on 23-31-3, and Van Vanderbilt
derbilt Vanderbilt 111th with 12-44-4.

£ SCHOOL WON-LOST-TIED PCT. $j
5: 1. ALABAMA 53- 5-2 .900 V
j:j: 2. Bowling Green 47- 8-1 .848
$: 3. Texas 50- 9-1 .842
4. Arkansas 50-10-0 .833
:£ 5. OLE MISS 45- 9-4 .810 j:j
6. Utah State 47-11-2 .800 ;j:j
7. Dartmouth 42-12-0 .778
X 8. Ohio State 40-12-2 .759 V
:* 8. Princeton 41-13-0 .7*59 :*:
$lO. L. S. U. 44-13-3 .758 :;j:
§: 10. Missouri 43-12-5 .758 :;j:
12. Memphis State 43-14-1 .750 xj
13. Arizona State 43-15-1 .737 X;
14. Southern Mississippi 41-15-2 .728 xj
£ 15. Nebraska 43-16-1 .725 :£
16. Michigan State 38-15-2 .709 $
& 17. Syracuse 41-18-0 .695
V 18. AUBURN 40-18-2 .683 £
V 19. Penn State 40-19-0 .678 V
V 20. Georgia Tech 39-19-2 .667 V
:i|: 20. Southern California 39-19-2 .667 £j
x 22. Wyoming 37-18-4 .661 :£
23. Washington 38-19-3 .658::-:
% 24. Miami (Ohio) 37-19-4 .650 £j
£ 25. Harvard 33-17-4 .648
£ 26. Navy 37-20-3 .642 £:
x 27. Minnesota 34-19-2 .636 £:
£: 28. Duke 37-21-2 .633 X;
:£ 28. FLORIDA 37-21-2 .633 :£.
£: 30. Oregonf State 37-22-1 .625 :£

SB YOU*
IMM
I IrWlwW
UL_ MM r UMO MM*
W bt Iff}

Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Uniors

Bowl games are not included in
this chart. During the six-year
period, however, Alabama has add added
ed added a 4-1-1 record in the Bluebonnet,
the Sugar and the Orange Bowls.
Ole Miss won 3 and lost 3 in the
Cotton, the Sugar, the Bluebonnet
and the Liberty Bowls. LSU won 4
and lost 1 in the Cotton, Orange,
Sugar and Bluebonnet. Auburn lost
twice, in the Orange and the Liber Liberty,
ty, Liberty, while the Gators won two and
lost one in the Gator and the Sugar,
Tennessee won their only bowl
game, the Bluebonnet, as did Geor Georgia
gia Georgia in the Sun and Mississippi State
in the Liberty.
Exactly half the members of the
ten-team Southeastern Conference
are rated in the first 30 of these
115 schools classified major majorcollege.
college. majorcollege. For complete details,
see chart below.



I.
V
i_^g^My|
SB wm
fV H igy^
- '^ :
Jp Hh :
ij.
:
Sntegritp
|_ ; '. '.-. ; '' v ; _". _.. _ - ' _
our most precious commodity
I We keep nothing in our cases or our racks that we 1
I value as highly as your belief in us. It is that 1
{ faith in our integrity that brings you here. It I
I is also the reason we are honored by the patronage I
I of many responsible citizens who believe in our I
, I values, our high standards of quality and our way of 1
doing business. J
I These men have equal faith in the integrity of the I
I great British and American names behind our products. j
j When you make a purchase here, you know that quality 1
I can be no finer, nor value yield a greater measure 1
I of satisfaction. It would be a pleasure to demonstrate: 1
n <& ii
I Natural shoulder suits by I
I Norman Hilton and Nottingham I
I Corbin Ltd., Lord Jeff sweaters, I
I London Fog, Burberry of England, I
I Pringle of Scotland, Pendleton Woolens I
I are among the names we feature I
H v. ts
~ 9
I Number Six Main Street South I

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

UFers In
Need Can
Usually Get
A Loan
With higher education costs
mounting, where to find the
money to complete an education
Is becoming a significant prob problem
lem problem to serious students.
Loan programs, both private and
federal, are being considered more
and more by students strapped by
the cost of getting an education as
a painless way out of the problem.
UF, with a student body of ap approximately
proximately approximately 17,000, offers a sig significant
nificant significant number of loan programs
in an effort to fill this painful void.
These programs have enabled stu students
dents students that possibly would never
have been able to complete their
education to finish with far less
worry.
Loan programs for higher edu education
cation education date back to the 1930 s with
such programs as the National
Youth Administration and'the Stu Student
dent Student Employment Program. Other
funds were of a private nature,
often a trust fund left specially
for loan purposes.
SPACE AGE PUSH
With the ushering in of the
space age In 1958 whej the
Russians placed the first satellite
In orbit (Sputnik), the federal
government jumped into the edu education
cation education business with all four feet.
Out of the big push" to up upgrade
grade upgrade Americas education sys system,
tem, system, the National Defense Educa Education
tion Education Act sifted down to the nations
campuses In an effort to compete
with the rumored advanced me methods
thods methods used In Russia.
The NDEA is known around the
UF campus as Dollars for Scho Scholars."
lars." Scholars." In this program, the federal
government matches $9 for every
$1 the UF can put up. Loans are
granted primarily on the basis of
need, as determined by k com computer,
puter, computer, with a 10-year-repayment
period. The amount of money a available
vailable available per student In a given
year Is limited, however, to enable
the program to reach more stu students.
dents. students.
The Higher Education Act of 1965
will enhance existing private loan
systems for students desiring
loans. The Florida Bankers Asso Association
ciation Association now has a program which
enables students to borrow money
from their hometown bank at 6
per cent interest. The federal
program will make thi a guar guaranteed"
anteed" guaranteed" loan program. Such a
program will take the load off
the banks by subsidizing funds
and thus will make more funds
available for loan to students, yet
at only 3 per cent interest. A
student can still use his hometown
bank.
What this guaranteed loan pro programs
grams programs aid does will be determined
by a students need, citizenship
(American), if he Is a full-time
student and satisfactory grades.
15 PERCENT TOOK LOANS
In 1965, the UF Financial Aid
Office handled loans for approxi approximately
mately approximately 15 per cent of the student
body. This, however, does not
include short-term loans. During
that period, ap roximately
$998,000 was lot *ed to students
out bf federal funds. Private funds
available to the university for loan
purposes put up $250,000 to stu students
dents students In that same period and
$50,000 was loaned by the Guar Guarartteed
artteed Guarartteed Loan Program.

Page 17A



Page 18A

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

UF Engineering Complex
Under Construction

' ; S, IS $ WTZ m*tz? a *?' *V* y "Ji&.-*RJP ; -'s^''''
iM. ?

The University of Florida, Flor Floridas
idas Floridas only state institution with an
accredited undergraduate en engineering
gineering engineering program, is in the
process of building a $5.5 million
engineering complex.
The project includes a five build building
ing building complex southeast of the uni universitys
versitys universitys sewage treatment plant,
two coastal engineering facilities,
a new $786,000 mechanical engi engineering
neering engineering unit and air conditioning
expansion in two other engineer engineering
ing engineering areas on campus.
McElvy and Jennewein Archi Architects,
tects, Architects, Inc., of Tampa, designed

(Bll^^^^ l^l^^ M |nnBIa|aaHaaaHHaaHIHaHMIHaiBMaHBM rt HH MBaaaaMMBMMar
S S *** sheSays ** g^|g|
Mnwill welcome to gainesville
ffli welcome to the u. of f.
wdcome to tWIQ
I I window .. .come i n... browse around... and en en*>
*> en*> r-r ] i 1 ( % iy my rustic decor. .i'm a touch of americana
| y i 1 \" ...and i'm sumptuously situdte at one-one one-one_
_ one-one_ 1r I A three-one university avenue.. .one block
I ylwm _* I from campus. .see ya 500 n....
%

the complex which will occupy
more than 185,000 feet.
The work is being done by the
Allen M. Campbell Construction
Company of Clearwater and Ty Tyler,
ler, Tyler, Texas. Proposed completion
of the complex is March, 1967.
The $546,000 Engineering Annex
has already been completed. Cur Currently
rently Currently under construction are the
Chemical Aerospace, Electrical,
Mechanical, Coastal Engineering
buildings, and the Bio-Environ Bio-Environmental
mental Bio-Environmental Research Building.
Still on the drawing board is the
Metallurgical Materials Building,

which will go up on the site of the
present Plants and Grounds com complex.
plex. complex.
The College of Engineering
building programs are being fi financed
nanced financed by an allocation of
$5,715,000 from the College Bond
Program and a National Science
Foundation grant of $81,500.
The new engineering complex
will solve the problem of the Col College
lege College of Engineering having to be
spread over 15 locations, 11 on the
university campus and four in var various
ious various parts of Gainesville as far
as 9 miles from the main campus.

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Some UF Rules Not Compatible Off-Campus

Regardless of your age or lo location,
cation, location, as an off-campus resident
at UF you are not permitted to
entertain persons of the opposite
sex in student living quarters.
But, how does the housing office
enforce this regulation? Obviously
they dont. So, why not change the
rule?
Consider the controversial si situation
tuation situation concerning search of a
dormitory students room. Until
recently, the Campus Police De Department
partment Department could search a students
room without a warrant. This also
applied to off-campus as well as
dormitory and fraternity-sorority
housing. But, the Campus Police
have received directives that will
require them to present a warrant

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before searching a students room.
The student regulations concern concerning
ing concerning off-campus housing provide
that it is not in the best interest
of the university for a student to
drink or possess liquor. The reg regulations
ulations regulations further state that violation
of this rule may subject a student
to disciplinary action. Thus a stu student,
dent, student, although legally of age, is
deterred from the use of alcoholic
beverages. But, is this enforce enforceable?
able? enforceable?
The rules governing off-campus
housing provide for the natural
conditions of private housing. Stu Students
dents Students must respect rules against
noise-creating activities, destroy destroying
ing destroying private property, and delinquent
payment of rents and bills. These

provisions are both enforceable
and proper, according to housing
officials.
But, student reaction to many of
the laws of off-campus housing
dont coincide with this point of
view.
Bennie Lazzara, an advertising
senior, feels that the student is not
really afforded the responsibility
of managing his own affairs under
the regulations.
Im 22 years old and feel that I
am responsible enough to have a
drink when I so desire, he said.
Besides, Im engaged, and if the
rules were enforced, my fiancee

technically wouldnt be able to
come into my apartment.
Don Alfonso, 21 year old sopho sophomore,
more, sophomore, points out that the student
shouldn't be required to live under
these rules.
I wanted to move out of the
dorms for several reasons, Don
added. One reason was to be able
to have more freedom.
Perhaps the biggest problems in
the past have come from discon discontented
tented discontented neighbors, who are subjected
to The Rolling Stones latest
album at 3 a.m. Sunday mornings.
To end this trouble, the University
regulations meet their needs.

Phi Kappa Phi Is Unique
Phi Kappa Phi is unique among the honor societies on campus. It
recognizes and encourages superior scholarship in all fields of study.
Its membership is university-wide. Phi Kappa Phi is the largest honor
society at UF. It was established here in 1912 as the seventh of ninety ninetyseven
seven ninetyseven chapters now in existence throughout the nation.
Membership in Phi Kappa Phi is extended at graduation, except in
the case of three or four outstanding juniors who compete for the SSOO
and $250 scholarships awarded annually by the UF Chapter. To be
eligible for membership in Phi Kappa Phi, seniors must have an
average grade of B (honor point of 3.o)and be in the top 10 per cent
of the graduates in their college or school. Graduate students must
have an honor point average of 3.5 and be in the top 10 per cent re receiving
ceiving receiving the particular graduate degree.
The philosophy of Phi Kappa Phi since its beginning in 1897 has
been twofold. One is the conviction that by recognizing and honoring
those who have excelled in scholarship, other students may be inspired
to work for such excellence and honors. The other is the equally strong
belief that scholarship is not limited to any single field of endeavor but
may be, and should be, universal The first is characteristic of*every
honor society. The latter is unique in Phi Kappa Phi.
UFs Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi functions with an active membership
of more than 100 faculty and local professional people. Prof. M. H.
Johnson of the College of Architecture and Fine Arts is the current
president. Other officers include Dr. L. C. Hammond, vice president;
Dr. A. A. Straughn, secretary; Mrs. Alice Murphree, treasurer; and
Dr. R. A. Eastwood, journal correspondent.

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Neighbors merely have to call the
police or a dean to quell the racket.
The part of the system that needs
revamping is the rules that are
somewhat asinine as one land landlord
lord landlord put it.
Six out of ten landlords ques questioned
tioned questioned who rent to college students
felt that landlord-student-tenant
relations were very good. The
remaining four felt that relations
were good.
One homeowner, living near the
campus, said, I have had very
little trouble with the students
living around me. The only
occasions I can think of werent
due to anything unusually bad.

Page 19A



Page 20A

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

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INCLUDES ALL COSTS TO ACQUIRE PRIVATE LICENSE

INCLUDES:
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WHY^Y?

Other than the fact that flying an airplane by yourself is one
of the most exciting and personally satisfying experiences you
can ever have, what usefulness could being a pilot be to you?
YOUR WORTH TO AN EMPLOYER automatically goes up
when you have this ability added to your accumulated bag of
tricks.
YOU ARE PERSONALLY CAPABLE OF BEING MORE
PLACES FASTER at your convenience which gives you
an edge on a competitor.
YOU BECOME A MEMBER OF ONE OF THE MOST ELITE
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COST OF FLYING IS LESS THAN USING ANY FORM OF
TRANSPORTATION to cover the same amount of miles and
time consumed. AND BY FAR THE SAFEST -- and this has
o-

been proved statistically.
AS A UNIVERSITY STUDENT, YOU ARE IN AN IDEAL PO POSITION
SITION POSITION RIGHT NOW to budget time and money to take advan advantage
tage advantage of the most economical flying school opportunity available
to you today. In a nutshell, THE MOST VALUABLE ASSET
YOU HAVE IS TIME to use these college years to your ad advantage.
vantage. advantage.
PERHAPS LEARNING TO FLY IS ONE OF THE MOST IM IMPORTANT
PORTANT IMPORTANT EDUCATIONAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS YOU COULD
TAKE WITH YOU.
These are just a few of the many reasons which may apply
to your plans for your future. If you feel that these may be
interesting to you, come out to the Gainesville Municipal Air Airport,
port, Airport, ASK FOR OUR $5 INTRODUCTORY FLIGHT LESSON to
see if you have the ability and interest to complete our
program.

REG. PRICE YOUR PRICE SAVE
CESSNA 150 $771.55 $595 176.55
CHEROKEE 140 $841.55 $675 176.555
YOU WILL BE EXAMINED BY OUR OWN FAA EXAMINER.
OUR SCHOOL ENJOYS A PERFECT SAFETY RECORD. WE
HAVE NEVER HAD AN ACCIDENT!



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Page 2C

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

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VIKING PARTY
This is how to really act out a costume party. Another fraternity,
Phi Gamma Delta, has an entire weekend devoted to a Polynesian
theme. Kappa Alpha bases its weekend on the Old South and seceeds
from the Union each year.

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The question of which
sorority or fraternity to join
will be a pressing one to many
freshmen this fall.
But Greek supporter or not,
almost all people agree that
Greek life at the UF is well
worth getting acquainted with.
The spirit and friendships
built in a house are often
long enduring and rewarding.
Date night and frater fraternity-sorority
nity-sorority fraternity-sorority socials, parties
and weekends provide ample
opportunities for meeting
Greeks of the opposite gender.
But sororities and frater fraternities
nities fraternities are more than self selfcentered
centered selfcentered concerns of the UF
campus. Although they make
up a minority of the student
body, the Greeks hold a ma majority
jority majority of campus leadership
positions.
Sororities and fraternities
also mean service to the cam campus,
pus, campus, to the community and to
society. In the past, Greek
organizations have annually
raised funds for such causes
as the Alachua County Heart
Fund Association, theJ. Hillis
Miller blood bank, and the
needy families of Gainesville
for Thanksgiving dinners.

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SIGMA CHI DERBY
II you think this looks like a mess, youre right. Each spring Sigma
Chi fraternity sponsors a derby which is highlighted by contests like
the shoe scramble, egg toss and the poker chip scramble you see
above.

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QU/ET EVENING AT HOME



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Off-Campus Publications
Still A Part Os UF Life

UF activity isnt all on campus.
Theres another branch that of
off campus publications.
One of these was a newspaper
named The Crocodile. The paper
came out once a week during most
of the summer. It was a protest
publication, born from The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator firings of Winter trimester.
After the top Alligator editors
had been fired during Winter term,
the new paper emerged as an off
campus protest sheet.
It made no bones about the fact
that its main purpose was to pro provide
vide provide an outlet for opinion. Its
content was made up mostly of
letters to the editor, interviews
with top people on campus and
the word of The Crocodile editors
themselves as expressed through
the papers editorials.
Another off campus publication
of equal interest was the Charlatan
Magazine, a humor publication.
The original UF humor magazine,
The Orange Peel, had been banned
from campus because the adminis administration
tration administration felt its content was too off
color. For a while, there were two
Orange Peels, the old one published
off campus and a New Orange Peel
published on campus. Both pub publications
lications publications died last year.
But Gainesville was not without
a humor magazine for long. Char Charlatan
latan Charlatan Magazine editor Bill Killeen
moved his headquarters from
Tallahassee to Gainesville. The
magazine is now going into its
fourth year of publication.
Last year it was a center of
controversy for a while when Kil Killeen
leen Killeen tried (but failed) to obtain
permission for on campus sales.

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UNCLE BILL WANTS YOU?
Not exactly. Charlatan editor Bill Killeen just happened to be caught
during one of his more creative moments. The Charlatan, one of the
off-campus publications, is a humor magazine that runs along the lines
of the now departed infamous Orange Peel.

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3C



Page 4C

The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

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UFs answer to the ole swimming hole isnt the backyard, but
nine miles south of Gainesville in a shady tree-lined area.
Camp Wauburg, Lake Wauburg, or simply Wauburg, as it is often
called, is the official playground for UF students, faculty and staff, and

is operated by the Florida Union.
The site of many natural colle collegiate
giate collegiate activities, including study studying,
ing, studying, sleeping, and scrutinizing the
opposite sex, Wauburg has an ap appeal
peal appeal that brings a pile of dusty
books in the library stacks. From
opening day in mid-February to
closing in mid-December, the
recreation park is often seen
filled with groups of students and
families.
An artificial beach was created
in North Central Florida in 1960
when 50 truckloads of white sand
were dumped around Lake Wau Wauburg.
burg. Wauburg. The swimming areas are
divided into places for swimmers
and non-swimmers and are
supervised by two lifeguards.
For the water-sport minded,
there are three canoes, ten boats,
a 144-foot dock with diving area
and four navy rafts.
Operated by the University
since 1939, the park is also equip equipped
ped equipped with concession stands, a bath
house, a number of outdoor fire fireplaces,
places, fireplaces, volleyballs, badminton
sets and horseshoes. There is
no charge for the use of this
equipment.
The concession stand which
serves sandwiches, ice cream,
candy, soft drinks, and cigarettes
is open on Saturdays and Sundays.

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PARADE OF THE YEAR
One of the highlights of Homecoming weekend is the parade. Just
about everyone manages to get a float into the procession.
B
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Each year some 60,000 students, alumni and friends of the UF return for the Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming weekend. An all-student produced weekend, the UF Homecoming is the largest
in the nation.
a
Florida Blue Key, men's leadership fraternity, has sponsored Homecoming since its
beginning. The many functions which are traditional for the weekend necessitate a budget
of nearly $27,000 in contributions from Student Government, the Athletic Association,
Interfraternity Council, the campus concession fund, and any profit from the Alumni
Barbecue.
The weekend begins this year on Friday afternoon with the Homecoming Parade.
Bands from all across the state participate, floats are entered by fraternities, and
state and national dignitaries lead the parade in shining new convertibles.
Both the late President John F. Kennedy and the current President Lyndon B. Johnson
have been keynote speakers at the Florida Blue Key Banquet, another Homecoming tra tradition.
dition. tradition. Alumni of the mens honorary look forward to the annual banquet for entertain entertainment
ment entertainment as well as a chance to see old classmates again.
The largest all-student produced show in the world is Gator Growl, the Homecoming
pep rally. Florida Field fills to its 55,000 capacity as the football team is introduced,
and as fraternities and sororities present humorous skits of professional standards
about the UF, the state and the nation. The two-hour show is topped off with a huge
fireworks display.
Os course, Saturday afternoon is reserved for SEC football. This year the Fightin
Gators will meet the Plainsmen of Auburn University.
All told, Homecoming is an event to highlight this year, and one that no student would
miss. See you all this fall and see you at Homecoming.
jmP!
BBBIB* BBBP^
AND THEN THE SKJTS
Gator Growl is the big night for skits. The skits satirize anything from dorm regu regulations
lations regulations to state news.
The Law School skits are also popular, especially with state politicians who usually
find themselves represented on stage in one way or another.

INTO THE NIGHT
This is one all nighter thats fun. Sorority and fraternity houses
and the dorms all join in on the yearly competition to see who can
build the best Homecoming decorations. Below is one of the finished
products.
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Friday, July 29. 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5C



Page 6C

:, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

Pen Vs. Sword
OUCH!

It* *\C
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ONE OUT FOR SG


Dean of Men Frank Adams, who found himself umpire for a day,
takes a auirk rofreshex-
-
~m
The games over and Alligator editor Gene Nail (The Bdard) isnt
looking too happy as he walks off the field past UF President J. Wayne
Reitz, who was serving a temporary hitch as umpire.
| AGNES' /osSSs}\
§ HA^m UST W^pml
IWI
& From Fantasy . If
- - To Simplicity .&
* 3/6"9922 BODY WAVES SHAPING*
* EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT COLORING FROSTING
*> INDIVIDUAL STYLING
* AGNES MANN. 0
WPer
I AGNES 1
I HAIR STYLISTS |
If 16 N.W. 13 STREET
J JUST OFF CAMPUS ACROSS FROM RAMADA INN ft
£************ 3|M|C*4C^*********3|

Bringing a longstanding feud to
a head, the staff of The Alligator
took on the softball giants of Stu Student
dent Student Government in an epic lass
riot played at UFs Perry Field
on the afternoon of July 12.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz,
Vice President of Academic Af Affairs
fairs Affairs Robert Mautz and Dean of
Men Frank Adams lent their um umpiring
piring umpiring talents to the occasion.
SGs Good Guys, resplendent
in Housepainters White, roared
off to a quick 6-0 lead, leaving
the Gators Muckrakers gasp gasping.
ing. gasping. The journalists recouped,
however, and by the top of the last
inning had forged a shaky 8-7 lead.
Here, disaster suddenly struck
as one of the Good Guys had the
poor taste (in the opinion of Alli Alligator
gator Alligator staffers) to lambaste a liner
to right center. It skipped past the
Muckraker outfielder (who is still
hiding underneath his desk) for a
two-run homer and an 9-8 SG
victory.

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T7T So Fine
gary lewis iB
II FATS a the playboys
t Everybody Lm t dew.
Mk Ro Drusky'i 11
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PWI White
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to mom --.
Saints
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Were NOT The Only Record = i£IH
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Z)on'£ /e/ anybody tell you the Greeks
have all the fun. It*s been proven that
dorm activities can get you just as messy
as the Greek parties.
For instance, there*s the dorm area
playdays where everyone competes to see
who can smear more cold cream on his
best buddy or pitch eggs and ice cubes.
There are also the dorm dances. One,
for instance, is a computer dance. Every Everyone
one Everyone submits his or her vital statistics and
the mechanical brain makes the match.
Graham Area (the coed dorms) sponsors
two special parties each year One is the
Playboy Club Party, complete with bunnies
The other is a Harold*s Club Party, fash fashioned
ioned fashioned after famous gambling casino in
Las Vegas.
The dorms also take part in decoration
competition for Homecoming weekend so
the chicken wire artists can get their
hands into the fun also

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BUNNIES AND MORE BUNNIES
. . at the Graham Area Playboy Club party.

DORM

I

Moving in may
not seem like a
real activity, but
those who have
gone through that
day of lost suit suitcases
cases suitcases and gen general
eral general confusion
might disagree.

activities
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COMMUNICATION?

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Friday. July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

MUSH AND CHOMP
Dorm area playdays take care
of anybody who happens to have a
hankering for the messy. The
messing is usually done with a
contest prize at stake and every everyone
one everyone has a general blast.

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Page 7C



The Florida AUigator, Friday, July 29. 1966

Page 8C

.y Jff A fl
/i : 1

Last year saw Bob Hope, Simon and Garfunkel, Art Buchwald, and
Ted Sorensen visit the UF.
If you didnt like those, you could have seen Lesley Gore, The Plat Platters,
ters, Platters, Henry Mancini, or the Four Preps.
Most of the entertainment and lectures at UF each year are spon sponsored
sored sponsored by the Lyceum Council, the Florida Union Board, or the Inter Interfraternity
fraternity Interfraternity Council (IFC).
Lyceum Council regularly presents varied entertainment. Last year
it brought Mancini and the Four Preps. The council is composed of
members elected by the student body at large and its activities are
underwritten by Student Government (SG).
The Florida Union Board, which brought Buchwald and Sorensen
last year, puts on lectures usually restricted to a somewhat smaller
appeal, but having a claim to intellectual value.
The IFC is responsible for Fall and Winter Frolics weekends.
Last year the Frolics entertainment featured Simon and Garfunkel,
Lesley Gore and The Platters.
Summer Frolics was sponsored this year by SG, which donated
the proceeds to Dollars for Scholars, a fund drive for scholarships.
Entertainment for Summer Frolics consisted of The Highwaymen
and The Cyrkle.
Although IFC, Lyceum and Florida Union Board sponsor all major
entertainment on campus, last years biggest hit apperance was Bob
Hope, who was brought to the campus by the Arnold Air Society.
Next years major Florida Union lectures will be given by Gerald
Ford, Jules Feiffer, and A1 Capp. Scott Kelly and Tom Adams, Flor Florida
ida Florida political personalities, are also on tap.

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Friday, July 29* 1966, The Florida Alligator,

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. *#* *'**
AH...TEN...TION!

Page 9C



Page 10C

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29. 196fi

WELCOME TO PLUSH LI
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Planned With YOU In Mind

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.
Il I M I
')m|i|m[|W | mm Wm hBH V I B B.
i JjlXa iML Ii & &

C BALCONY
S'o"xl2'o" t
very g,
LIVING BEDROOM BEDROOM Very fr
ROOM ~ -1
15'8'k 14'0" ir4 x 10 '" 13'8"x 10'9"
~ CLO.-^
I 100 l HALL JJcLO. |
kitchen d,n,ng BTT mm^Lm
7'V'x'O" ROOM Sg! BATH (f
7 x 8 0 12'0x lO'O" 01, | | £^[_
Two Bedroom

1 I Wr s
H §&|
Private Patios And Balconies

GAINESVILLE'S REI



VING

in be very pleasant,
icious,
e of worries.

THE DECISION MAKERS:
FEATURES OF YOUR APARTMENT HOMF
Handball Courts
Private Shuttlebus To And From Campus
Big Swimming Pool
All Utilities Paid Except Electricity And Phone
Sun Deck
Individual Central Air-Conditioning And Heating
Separate Buildings For 1. Non-Student And Families
2. Graduate Students
3. Undergraduates
Wall-To-Wall Carpeting
Private Lake
Cabana Club
Barbecue And Picnic Facilities
Private Patio Or Balcony
Campus Commuter Rating For Students
Several Conveniently Located Laundry Rooms
Separate Storage Area For Each Apartment
Fireproof Construction. Sound Conditioned
Inside Corridors For Complete Privacy
Spacious Apartments 700 And 900 Square Footers
Hotpoint "All Electric" Kitchen, Range, Refrigerator-
Freezer, Garbage Disposal, Exaust Fan
Sliding Glass Doors To Patios, Balconies
Oversize Walk-In Closits
Colorful Ceramic Tile Baths
Ample, Formica Kitchen Cabinets
Attractive, Easy-To-Clean Parquet Oak Floors In Dinettes
More Than 18 Beautiful Acres
Inexpensive, Especially For Four Students

ntal apartment value

I Y Gardens

~ 4BBsP- jijL
nr r iffl TF^*~ Ir'-BPWffiijff Ji ~ ;
*** : WBt jJt'A
hKk. At j3hkSshmM QoilHKi
JB *" TJ jjpPL.
wt a JHk Avfiflr J
iMi, Br Wlm !BlliSjfr,. C itjitfiWV-.
'mm* m Jwmmm Hmm. M NHr -*M
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J *&' v .t. 4aRKHBmBMBk a--- slliwfeimimv^
360 ULTRA-MODERN APARTMENTS
.. .ONLY 1/2 MILE FROM THE UF CAMPUS AT 700 SW 16th AVENUE.

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l. SHOPPING
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UNIVERSITY
OP FLORIDA |

The Perfect Note
In Off>Campus Living;
STUDIOUS
STYLISH
SOCIABLE

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11C



Page 12C

The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

the troops () of ,

There are, at the University of Florida, a terri terrifying
fying terrifying number of student organizations, these dedi dedicated
cated dedicated to everything from identity dilution to the
mechanics of raising nutria for fun and profit.
Because you are a freshman, you will of course,
want to join several of these organizations. And
since youre going to get sucked into something, we
naturally feel that you might as well get sucked into
our little phantom empire The Fun World of
Student Publications.
And what, you might wonder, is Student Publica Publications?
tions? Publications? We thought youd never ask.
First and foremost, we have The Alligator, which,
if were not mistaken, you are reading at this very
moment. The Alligator, as you can see, is Floridas
Student Newspaper. It speaks via editorials, letters
to the editor, etc., for 17,000 UF students, give or
take a soul.
Occasionally there are dire consequences meted
out for its doing this. Last year, for instance, a couple
of hairy editors were fired. And the summer editor,
another loudmouth, found his contract unrenewed for
the fall. Perhaps you, too, have what it takes to in inflame
flame inflame administrators, outrage politicians, and in
general, raise merry ned in five directions. Come
by and see us.
Os course, if you a little less voliatile, the Gator
serves other functions too. It has been known to re relate
late relate the news, delve into goings- on-about-campus

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and investigate the people who make things go
not to mention one or two who generally prefer to
stop everything. Ah yes, The Alligator, praise be,
tis the backbone of the UF, for better or for worse.
If the Gator is not your cup of tea, then you might
be interested in UFs elegant yearbook, The Seminole.
The Seminole, as yearbooks are wont to do, pub publishes
lishes publishes photographs of practically every organization,
event, personality and what have you, which combine
to make the University what it is. Think about that
for awhile. And then, if youre still interested, hop
on over to the Seminole office and scratch your name
on the dotted line.
The coming year marks the establishment of yet
another publication at the UF, this one a humor humorfeature
feature humorfeature magazine called Release.
The keen observer is aware that there are many
benefits to be derived from an apprenticeship with
any or all of the above listed publications. Mainly,
of course, you have the opportunity to learn an in infinitesimal
finitesimal infinitesimal amount about publications starting from
scratch, because thats sure what you start with here.
How to join you ask?
Simple. You just trot on down to the basement
thats right, the basement (nothing but class for our
troops) of the Florida Union, turn on your flash flashlight,
light, flashlight, grope your way down the corridor to the offices
of the editors of the publication(s) you wish to serve
or victimize.

jB. ,;v,A x ~'
f * r \' :Â¥?; y *- ../, *. -c, <: '.Cj
viPpiH I
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ii n mitar mA v d
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laHoif ffilm ltt!i3^Bi :; ? I WFZ** *
P E||t c v Wff
y flj



Success For Forums.. Institutionalization

jglfcek Zucker is Chairman of the
npns Committee of the Florida
liifoll Board. His job: bring na natflpy
tflpy natflpy known speakers to the UF
cjunpus several times a year.
. BBte problems: how to get the
gHpers, where to get the money

B Experienced)
EREOS RADIOS
3.E. MAGNA VOX
C.A. ZENITH ETC.
SED T.V. & F.M.
> & ACCESSORIES
ey Saving Prices
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TH DEALER I
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et more value for your dollar,
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I tremendous savings
I on
vacation and
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GIANT
Ulftll I VALUES... Grants 70 I
I buying specialists concentrate on making the
best buys for nearly 1100 stores coast-to-coast
I The place so save is at Grants.. .the time to save is
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1 HARDWARE DOMESTICS MEN'S WEAR
H STEREO COLOR T.V. RADIOS
SHOPPING CENTER
1 NORTH MAIN STREET I

~to pay for them, and how to get
the students to come hear them.
Zucker relates the effectiveness
of his committee to its degree of
institutionalization. He says:
Once we lay the groundwork,
make sure the channels are there

for Forums Committees of coming
years, then we can solve the prob problems.
lems. problems.
And he adds: If we lay the
groundwork well.
Zucker, who has been chairman
of the speaker procurement com committee
mittee committee since January 1966, has
already gone a long way in his
program of institutionalizing
success. Some of his plans to put
permanent improvements into
Forum fare have already been
put into operation.
Last trimester he took a poll
of student opinion by running a
daily ad in The Florida Alligator.
He asked students to answer the
questions in the ad and turn their
opinions in to the Forums Com Committee.
mittee. Committee.
Replies were relatively few
441 but, says Zucker, It was
certainly larger than our commit committee
tee committee of ten. The questions asked
in the poll were:
What speakers would you like
to hear on campus?
What professors would you
like to hear debate?
What topics would you like to
hear discussed?
The list of preferred speakers
was used by Zucker in inviting
the three speakers he has already

signed for next year: Gerald Ford,
Jules Feiffer and A1 Capp.
The speakers invited were cho chosen
sen chosen from the top twenty names
listed in the student poll.
For debates between professors
Zucker says that he will pick pro professors
fessors professors who were ranked in the
top ten in the poll. The topics of
their debates will be chosen also
from the suggestions most often
made. Sample topics are:
O Last trimesters Alligator
firings.
O What next in Viet Nam?
O Negro evolution.
Zucker points out that by next
fall or winter, he may feel that
one or more of these topics are
dated. He feels that it will be his
role as leader of the committee
to make that decision.
But the idea of debates by fa faculty
culty faculty members is something new
in itself, if Forums Committee
can get them going on a regular
basis.
Zucker has also scheduled for
next fall two state speakers
men who have not achieved na national
tional national prominence, but who are
leaders in Florida politics. Scott
Kelly and Tom Adams will be this
falls speakers.
Probably Zuckers most striking
innovation is Florida Cross Crossroads.
roads. Crossroads. This is a program through
which the Forums Committee will
present mayors from Florida
cities for very short speeches on
their cities before a major
speaker is introduced.
Zucker says the plan is aimed

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|
Do you earn too much to afford one? I
For many people the Volkswagen would be an I
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It doesn't cost enough. I
They're afraid nobody will realize they have I
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themselves. §
Then there are those who earn enough to buy I
a much better car than the VW. But they don't. 1
Because they can't find one. I
For them the best car is one thats simply com- I
sortable and economical. One they don't have to
worry about. That doesn't make many stops for 8
gas. And rarely needs repairs. 1
A car where the rare repairs don't cost a lot. A 8
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They feel they can afford to save money with a 8
Volkswagen. 8
Now next time you see somebody driving a 8
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Who knows? Someday the bank might use his 8
monev to aiyeyou a new car loan. B
MILLER-BROWN I
MOTORS INC. I
4222 NW THIRTEENTH STREET M '££* to |

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

at giving students an idea of prob problems
lems problems of which they may not be
aware unless they are from the
respective mayor's city. Also, he
hopes, the mayors will be able
to give valuable information as to
some of the vast business and po political
litical political opportunities in Florida.
Besides, says Zucker, it will
give the mayors a guaranteed au audience.
dience. audience. Florida Crossroad,
then, should make everybody
happy.
The Forums Committee, says
its chairman, has a constant
publicity problem. Students are
just not aware of some of the ac activities
tivities activities we sponsor.
To remedy this, Zucker is think thinking
ing thinking of institutionalizing a pro program
gram program booklet to be given at every
Forums program, listing all For Forums
ums Forums activities for the trimester.
Zuckers program also covers
the realm of finance. He is keep keeping
ing keeping records of how to get money
and who to get it from, for the use
of future chairmen.
Past Forums Chairman Bill
McCollum, who initiated the policy
of stressing nationally known
speakers, managed to begin this
policy on a budget of less than
one sixth of what he requested
from the Union Board.
Miss Conner, the next chair chairman,
man, chairman, brought Ted Sorensen, Henry
Kissenger, and Colin Wilson, all
nationally prominent, during her
term as chairman.

Page 13C



Page 14C

:
The musically minded freshman
heading for the UF campus this fall
can choose from the Gator Band,
orchestra, glee clubs and UF choir.
Gator Band plays for all the foot football
ball football games. Someone once figured
that over 1,000 man-hours go each
week into the making of a Gator
halftime show.
V*3^B
i jE*
* f
N L
flhflfck.
* > "<*! ; '"t *'' P y^r
...FOR PLAYING...

mgm. ~ I Hr MW I
Bp /nf -^OiB
~ 1 M
- s'v^Bb
...FOR SINGING
WE COME STUDENTS
| If Youre Interested In Music 1
j Stop In And See US. i
I FEATURING PIANOS & ORGANS BY WURLITZER (
I ALSO PIANOS BY MASON HAMLIN FISCHER (
/-CHICKERING I
I m
[ MUSIC INSTRUCTION ON 1
The 3 iano Organ & Guitar 1
Hay's Music Center j
: 1227_W.JJnjversi ty Ave. Ph. 376-0031

Music...

The band isnt limited to music
majors. Members represent al almost
most almost every college on campus.
Total membership averages a around
round around 165 members under Band
Director Richard W. Bowles.
Whipping up a halftime show is
like training a small army.
The marching formations are
mapped out by the band drum ma major.
jor. major. A big wooden board is set up
to represent a football field and
small toys representing band
members are placed in position.
Charts are then made and handed
out to band members who must
learn to master this formation
during the one or two weeks be between
tween between each football game.
The care taken in producing
these halftime shows can be seen
by the fact that some of the boys
are given ROTC credit for their
part in the marching.
On the other side of the intra intramural
mural intramural organization is the univer university
sity university orchestra, led by Edward
Troupin.
The orchestra is made up of
UF students, faculty and Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville residents. It usually puts on
two or three concerts per year
and plans are now in the making
for a tour of Floridas west coast
during next school term.
For those who prefer the vocal
end of music there are the Mens
and Womens Glee Clubs. Again,
as with band and orchestra, a stu student
dent student doesnt have to be a music
major to join.
The Glee Clubs have performed
in shows ranging from Gator Growl
during Homecoming weekend to the
Worlds Fair and are under the
directorship of Guy Webb.
There is also the UF Choir un under
der under Dr. Elwood J. Keister. The
Choir annually has four on-campus
concerts followed by a tour during
spring vacation.
These tours carry the Choir up
and down the Florida coasts and
through the southwestern states.

I GAINESVILLES NEWEST! I
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I QSaF apartments I
. k^rM^fP' 5 l L psp iln
HHIHn M ft BMW f U
W&WF* i
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I ments offering all of the outstanding features usually I
I found only in much higher priced rentals. I
I Central Air Conditioning And Heating I
I By Westinghouse I
\ ..
isl
I Beautifully Landscaped Pool And Patio Area I
I Free, On Premises Parking I
I Master TV Antenna (Cable Facilities Available) I
I Complete Laundry Facilities A. I
I Economical Natural Gas Cooking I
I And Water Heating I
I Gainesville Gas ay&gr I
fl UMKHSIH M I H
I CALL I
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II B &?. NOW I
I Summit House I



I m K^fe^S
\CO^M
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- HIMSIi
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I 4 MW SPAGHETTI ITALIAN TOSSED SAUD a- XjJ
4 01 GARIK HEAD VA^ & A \
I m IAKED POTATO J. 30 >Uu M I
II OPEN 5 PJL-1J I
I PNONE 1

|jk WELCOMES YOU
I tenneui to our town fm
ALWAYS FIRST V
I Compare The Quality I
I \' Os Penneys Shirts, (I
I Slacks, Parkas, Canvas
I Shoes, Sox, Sports Wear
I AlWlm And Dorm Wear. jS|H J
I / lllllllmlllntKl Penne y s Home Furnishing iBBy <
u 01 W
I \ Sheets, Spreads, Drapes, liF I
I VST Pillows, Towels And If I
I / Other Dorm Needs. Ai I
I Use Your Hometown Penneys Charge 1J
I Card Here Too!
| Penneys Is DowntownW. University Ave.Walking Distance From The Uof F I

Religious Centers
Available For All
The freshmans first contact with college religious life is with the
organized religious centers around campus.
Several religious groups have foundations buildings a short distance
off campus. The centers sponsor services, socials, discussion groups
and brunches for their members.
Denominations that have foundations located near campus are:
Baptist, Catholic, Episcopal, Jewish, Lutheran, Methodist, Presby Presbyterian
terian Presbyterian and Mormon.
The Unitarian Fellowship, Christian Science Organization, United
Church and Congregational Christian churches hold their meetings in
the Florida Union. Society of Friends attend services in downtown
Gainesville.
Methodist, Episcopalian, Lutheran, Baptist, Presbyterian, Catholic
and Jewish centers provide worship services, social and educational
programs.
The center seeks to help the student grow in understanding his
faith through discussion, recreation and worship experiences. They
form the the
college student. |
The University Religious Asso Assonation
nation Assonation (I R A i s a stud n t
or :> i : > St',-
late the di Jr us non of religious pu
issue-,. Rie 1 R\ hel I e< u>r iiuate t
the re re,
, re, in pub- f
lishing a semi-weekly bulletin of
religious activities available to X\
the student. H|
The URA encourages andstimu andstimulates
lates andstimulates discussion of religious issues Ihv\\|| mm AhhJ
within the educational and intellec- X
tual context of tlie university com community,
munity, community, to further inter-religious
M.
or organizations
ganizations organizations at IT
The URA is connected with the
Department of Religion. Regular BHHRHHHI BBBBBBHBI
academic professors in the department direct and advise the activities
of the association.
One of the main features sponsored by the URA is Religion-In-Life
Week, which brings to campus each year guest speakers who discuss
the questions and problems of religion in modern life.
Last year the distinguished author, lecturer and commentator on
cultural problems, Barbara Ward (Lady Jackson) was the guest
speaker at the Religion-In-Life Convocation in January.

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15C



Page 16C

:, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

T"'" 11 |
a HHI fc
/r -'... Bp : < ?' x &tWsm.

'Knight Os Burning

The plays the thing for any UF student who wants to join in cast,
crew or committee work in one of the dramatic productions of UFs
Florida Players.
Players put on two shows each trimester, selected and directed by
staff members of the Speech Department. The variety of shows is great.
Plays performed in past years have included Oedipus, Tartuffe,
Pygmalion, Our Town, You Cant Take it with You, Death of a Sales Salesman,
man, Salesman, Rain, Bell, Book and Candle, Picnic, Teahouse of the August
Moon, and Bus Stop.
Participation in plays requires no previous experience and commit committee
tee committee work is always there for the interested student. The first step in
joining the cast of the play is the tryout period.
Tryouts are held for three nights and are open to all UF students.
Students are chosen on ability, voice, and appearance in ensemble.
According to one play director, often students who didnt think they
had the ability were cast in a show as the director felt they had po potential.
tential. potential. More work is needed with those who are new to show busi business
ness business but individual work and some basic training helps to overcome
this.
Rehearsing for the play takes a minimum of 40-50 hours for actors
having major roles.
As the actors rehearse, mucy backstage action is taking place to
produce the effects which complement the acting. Student and graduate
assistant committees, aidedby speech instructors, work on the lighting,
set construction, costuming, publicity and tickets, house management
and sound effects.
' t.
One member of Florida Players explained that theater at UF means
experience for both beginner and veteran since production crew and
casts are made up exclusively of students. In addition there is an ex experienced
perienced experienced and accredited theater staff to provide the professional touch
to their efforts and insure that audiences get theater at its best.
Membership in the Players is determined by a point system based on
time and effort of students working in productions. Three levels of
proficiency are available: Player, Journeyman, and Master.
On September 7, during orientation week programs, Florida Players
will present an open house to meet the staff and members of the group,
view slides of past productions, and get a preview of whats-to whats-tocome.
come. whats-tocome.
Productions are held in Norman Hall Auditorium. The new theater,
capable of many variations in theater production, will open in the new
Florida Union in the fall of 1966.
Tryouts for the first play of the season will begin during the first
week of classes. The play is a Roman farce called Mostellaria
(the haunted house) and will be directed by Dr. Donald Berchardt.
USED TVs, RADIOS
STEREOS-TAPE RECORDERS
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USED TV ANTENNAS, ROTORS
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AND ACCESSORIES AT
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couchs M 6 r,,
SERVING GAINESVILLE
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On Stage
With
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THEY'RE G-R-E-A-T!!!!



iPp^K*'
life.
L *3. iw *s
Miss Betty Wendt
holds, among others,
the titles of Military
Ball Queen and Sigma
Chi Derby Queen.
; &H '.J*
Miss Donna Berger
is the current Miss UF.

I NEW STUDENTS) I
I n Ationai n I
I "Ho, I dont play football. kjfa I
I This stands for First National! H=jjU I
I *>~7 I I
I I -m *- I
l Every Florida Man or Woman just like every other I
I Gainesville citizen has good reason to be proud U I Lfl
lof banking with The First National Bank of Gaines- fV I I / j'Sb /
I ville. It marks you as a wise person, with the sense \'J J i'l // / A
Ito deal with an old, established firm whose good A I /. ll I m I i 7
I reputation is part of Gainesville's history. | j I
I Look for the First National Bank in the heart of \JJJ j I
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I ESTABLISHED ISSS I
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GIRLS...GIRLS...AND MORE GIRLS

Hal
HL w . 3
jjj^V
jjpV V
k,
Hk,

Kris Watson, up-and-coming beauty, has
already attained the titles of Coed Calendar
and Miss Gator Growl finalist.

There sometimes seems to be a title for just about every girl
on campus. Miss UF is joined by Miss Wauburg, the Military
Ball Queen, Miss Gator Growl, Miss Seminole, the Calendar girls
and a host of others. Here on this page is just a sampling of the
UF beauties.
iflnniVM>niv i ini¥>rin(*fffi******** a ******** aa *** <
ILibbyes invites you to come in |
and browse. We feature sports j!
clothes ... blouses, slacks, bermudas, ]!
skirts, and 2S 3 pc. Suits. Select j;
from newest of fashions by: ]|
JAYSON CLASSICS QUEEN CASUAL ]
MAC SHORE MISS PAT OF CALIFORMIA i |
HIS FOR HER FRITZI OF CALIFORNIA ] i
PANTS MAKER MARIE PHILLIPS <
FOREVER YOUNG |
USE CENTRAL CHARGE OR LAYAWAY j
FREE PARKING ON Ist FEDERALS LOT |
BBYE'S
235 W. UNIVERSITY NEXT TO FLA. THEATRE

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 17C



M WHHMATH l J Ks| HHBI
*. *1 >' rn BHPII iMHliiil Ille^Ht. : I- ||K
4H f-:--^" ... wTP : M h*m ?f^S
PI
S v / />'.<
\ IjfP : r It -'. \ '£&' mr jNH^K : rSK : & M| | KHg£ v.#
BEFORE THEIR PUBLIC
The presidential candidates used debates to get the word across to their public the student body.
Several debates were held in different campus areas. The image a presidential hopeful projected to his
audience could often make or break his chances.

mmoo m
\ as# rlf)iS;%iS§s
*
i
Apathy Party
ERNIE LITZ


BA
,4dJyNd*-BL
jXij&j >r iW'- A ?V" v\
yWW ~ y '*WM.
...AND THE PARTYS ALL OVER

THE FACE
OF
CAMPAIGNING
T :w>
#j
Decision Party
STEVE CHEESEMAN

SG: Its Elections

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ALAN LEVIN, LUCIEN CROSS


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Each spring, so the saying goes, a young mans interests turn to the
nearest available specimen of the opposite sex.
Everywhere, that is, but the UF campus. As new leaves begin to
grow on trees, student politicians are busily making preparations for
Student Government (SG).
Actually, elections are not limited to the spring. Political contests
also appear in the fall to fill Legislative Council seats. But since the
presidential race comes during spring, the falls elections are tame
in comparison.
The election weeks are a time of secretly thrown poop sheets
(listing all the worst points of the opposition), hand shaking, speeches,
and debates. It is also a time when old friendships wear thin and the
mud grows deep.
But above all, its a time of work, work, work sometimes through throughout
out throughout an entire night and then through the next.
New students learn what its really like to take part in politics, for
the UF political battles are often training grounds for future state
leaders.
Some of the campus politicos of yesterday include:
Dan McCarty past Florida governor.
Fuller Warren past Florida governor.
Leoy Collins past Florida governor, undersecretary of com commerce
merce commerce and past chairman of the Democratic National Convention.
Spessard Holland past Florida governor and now U. S. senator
from Florida.
George Smathers current U. S. senator from Florida.
Mallory Horne past Speaker of the House, Florida Legislature.
Jimmy Kynes past attorney general of Florida.
Earl Faircloth -- current attorney general of Florida.
Stephen OConnell justice of Florida Supreme Court.

The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

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THEN THE VOTE...



And The Days After
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THE WINNER
Buddy Jacobs of Student Party gets a winner's kiss from his wife after
the other major candidates conceed. Jacobs had won over four other
candidates with 3,362 of the more than 9,000 votes cast. His nearest
opponent was Steve Cheeseman (Decision Party) with 2,976 votes.
Below, the three top officers, president, vice president and treasurer
get to work.

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SG /N ACTION
A SG committee meets. Among the numerous parts of SG are the committees,
assigned to study various problems. This committee is looking into the summer
appointments made to fill in vacent cabinet seats.
At right is a diagram showing where your money will go during the coming
school year.

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FRACTIONAL BREAKDOWN OF '66-67
STUDENT GOVERNMENT BUDGET
/Student Activities Athletics \
$152,545.50 $157,735.00 \
28.3% I 29.3% \
\ Intramurals /\\ ty /
\ $53,213.00 / / 1 /
\ 9.9% / / 7
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Student Salaries
$25,510.00
4.7%
TOTAL: $539,154.50

Friday, July 29, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19C



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1965-66: The Year In Review

'Our History ...
The 1965-66 academic year was one of tur turbulence
bulence turbulence at the University of Florida.
From the start of the school year, state
politics, UF administrative activities and stu student
dent student activities kept the pages of The Alligator
hot with controversy.
Ex-Polk County Senator Scott Kelly, Miami
Mayor Robert King High, and Gov. Haydon
Bums each made several appearances at the
UF. Kelly officially opened his first county
headquarters here, High opened his guberna gubernatorial
torial gubernatorial runoff campaign with a speech in the
University Auditorium, and Burns made sever several
al several trips to the UF earlier in the year seeking
to explain his position in the controversy over
control of finances for higher education.
This section of The Alligators annual Fresh Freshman
man Freshman Edition will provide our incoming students
with a brief view of the highlights of the year
gone-by.
STORY OF THE YEAR

UF Battles For Fiscal Autonomy

Reitz Reply:
'Have Not Resigned
On October 5, 1965, a St. Petersburg Times
front page banner head announced the reported
resignation of UF President J. Wayne Reitz.
This news story brought out into the open
the biggest battle between the university and
state government in many years.
The following stories show the action that
followed on the university campus.
Oct. 5, 1965 I have not resigned. Period.
With these words UF President J. Wayne Reitz categorically denied
reports of his resignation.
Reitzs office was flooded with telephone calls yesterday following
a story in a St. Petersburg newspaper, The Times, which reported he
had resigned due to too much meddling by state officials in univer university
sity university affairs.
The report, signed by the newspapers Tallahassee correspondent,
Martin Waldron, said that there was a top-level meeting at the guber gubernatorial
natorial gubernatorial mansion Sunday to discuss the matter. It said Reitz was not
at the meeting.
In Tallahassee Board of Control President Chester Ferguson, State
University Chancellor Broward Culpepper and outgoing School Supt.
Thomas D. Bailey said there has been such a meeting but denied em emphatically
phatically emphatically it had anything to do with Reitz.
Ferguson said there is absolutely no basis for any report tliat Reitz
has resigned. But he added that Dr. Reitz has threatened to resign
frequently.
Ferguson also denied any agreement to accept such a resignation
and that if he did I would probably try to talk him out of it.
Bailey said that university finances in general were discussed at
the meeting as well as a possible president for the new state univer university
sity university to be built near Orlando.
It was casually mentioned at the meeting that Dr. Reitz was talking
of resigning again, said Bailey. This has been going on for years,
though.
Culpepper said that the meeting was not really an emergency talk
but that education officials wanted to discuss finances and the general
layout of the university system at the present time with the governor
who just returned from a trip to the Orient.
Reitz, a tall, bespectacled man who is a leader in the state univer university
sity university systems move for higher salaries, has threatened to resign often
in the past. But he has never submitted a resignation.
He has been outspoken recently as to his opposition of salary cutting
of university personnel by the State Budget Commission.
Gov. Haydon Burns, who returned from his trip Saturday, said there
has been no official resignation from Dr. Reitz but he too conceded that
Reitz has been unhappy for some time about the right of the Cabinet
Budget Commission to have the final say on some operating expendi expenditures.
tures. expenditures.
Governor Burns said he asked for the meeting at the mansion Sunday
however in order to be brought up to date on everything that has
transpired since his absence.
State School Supt. Thomas D. Bailey and Atty. Gen. Earl Faircloth,
who attended the meeting, confirmed this.

alligator

The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966,

Alligator Top Stories
For 1965-66 Terms

The end or start of every year
inevitably calls on the talents of
journalists to pick-and-choose
the top stories of the year.
Past choices have shown two

Stories Os The Year
The following are The Alligator's pick
of the top stories of the past school year:
1. Battle between state government and
the universities for fiscal autonomy.
2. Removal of three Alligator editors.
3. Food Service inquiry and subsequent
changes in leadership.
4. Academic freedom question involving
the resignation of several History Depart Department
ment Department professors, and the Zabeeh case.
5. Viet Nam: the campus debates.

Burns Denies Rumors
He Wants Reitz Out

Copyright, 1965
The Florida Alligator
Oct. 5, 1965 Gov. Haydon
Burns yesterday labeled absurd
and ridiculous rumors that he is
trying to torce the resignation of
UF President J. Wayne Reitz.
Reliable sources in Tallahassee
have hinted Burns wants Reitzs
resignation because of several dis disputes
putes disputes between the UF president and
the State Budget Commission.
Anyone who* would suggest such
a thing deals in lies and misrep misrepresents
resents misrepresents the facts, Burns told The
Alligator in an exclusive interview.
The states Chief Executive said
his relationship with Reitz has been
excellent, and said there has
been no friction between the two.
The governor reaffirmed Reitzs
statement that he has not resigned,
but revealed that the UF president
has indicated he might resign ten
or eleven times in the last five
years.
But he hasnt said anything
about resigning while Ive been in
office, Burns said.
Burns denied reading what was
described as a blistering six sixpage
page sixpage letter written by Reitz to the
budget commission while the
governor was on a four-week jun junket
ket junket to the Far East.
The letter allegedly denounced
salary cuts made in state univer university
sity university budgets.
If Dr. Reitz has protested some
budget decision, its his preroga preroga

Foir Enostqfc
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VOL. NO 72 M PAGES

Reitz Reportedly Resigns As U. Os F. President

By MARTIN HALMON
Timm Burma
TAI.LaHA.SSKE l>r J Wavrw Retfz 17 rprent.y ha* re
dfttod pre*lent of the l n.wrvtv of Ftonda apparent.y u
a prete*t m meddling n: Mm un.vcrsi** h. politician*
Go* Havdon Burn* and three other member* of the Slat*
Board id fed* alma iw' in an emergency session yesterday a!
trrnnrn a' Mm Governor a Mansion
Budget Director Wallare Henderson and I m.ersity Chan
reiW Broward Culpepper pined in Mm meeting which the Mate i
Mftruia thought au being held in secret
There *u a report that Burns agreed with Board of Re- I
*eot Chairman Chester Ferguson nf Tampa prior tr the meet

TIMES REPORTS REITZ RESIGNATION

Page 1D

alternatives to selection: space
devoted to a topic or news event,
or the importance of the event
whether or not it receives lengthy
news coverage.

§t. Petersburg Himes

florid*' i ietf Sruipopr*
ST. PETERSBURG FU'Rlt>A. MONDAY. OCTOBER 4 1915 m*m

ing that Rem resignation would he accepted
Another errrrgeriry wsu r. I -* Cabinet f.aa been v)et v)etuieri
uieri v)etuieri 'or today
Repei missmms nl 'u* 'at of e\> are eypec'ed to be felt
for m.*nths in pu. 'i\ ir; o,n ed-nain n
National *!u< I'ma aireadv have eyeing for three
>*r* pni a] interference ,r the Honda uimm.iy system
Reiti resjgr.ai -m appealed tx> have hern pmriplrd by rut*
trade r. saiary raiw* 'hat *ie had granted to 'C. ttiembr-rs of hit I
tuff at Game* lie
These ut were made by the governor and Cabinet in Au t
gust
Re n also embarrassed after he offered an educator a

V W
BURNS
tive to do so, Burns said, "but I
havent seen the letter.
Burns also denied reports of
"hot words between he and the
UF president at Saturday's Flori Florida-LSU
da-LSU Florida-LSU football game, which both
men attended.
"Our relationship was most cor cordial,
dial, cordial, Burns said, "and there was
no discussion of business or poli politics.
tics. politics.
Chester Ferguson, chairman of
the State Board of Regents, also
discredited rumors that Reitz had
resigned or would resign soon and
said he had not discussed anything
of this nature with Burns.

'ha* vice president of fh# t nivenuty of Florida at a aalarv nf
S22.UUU a year and the Bui*'-' Communion rnmponed .if ali
Suie tab net member* and Ihe governor rut the salary to
IX V>
( abinet official* at yesterdav a meeting in the flovrrnur
Maru. at were Atf\ In- Kar! Fainloth Treasurer Broward
William* (.'..ft pirollrr Frod O 'Hurii Du kinsnn and Stale
School Supt fdotg Cbnatian A., ate member* of the State
Board of education i-icepf [iwkmnon
Krtirmg Sta'e School Supt Thotna* T Railev also wa at
the meeting
Christian appointment to (tarred Bailey dne* not bei-ome
effe. live ur-il tha jftermmn and Ba ley will have the power nf

For the past school year, Sep September
tember September 1965 to August 1966, The
Florida Alligator has made its
choices of top stories on the basis
of both criteria.
Especially important to consider
in these choices is whether the
stories should be limited to the
university, or include those stories
of importance which involve the
university relations with outside
agencies which are closely akin
to the state university system.
Last year was an important one
for the determination of the role
of higher education in Florida.
The outcome of the Democratic
primaries, and legislative elec elections,
tions, elections, should prove to be strongly
determinant of the universities*
status.
On this basis, The Alligator has
made its selection of the top stories
of the year.

this position until then
The meeung between Burn*, the three Cabinet member*,
and the other state offu tala began about J B pm and laawd
well into the nigh'
Secretary of Stale Tom Adam* fifth member of the Board
of Kdui atmn did net show up at 'he meeting
An aide said Adams ai out of town and may not hare
known of the overling
Rein and uther university presidema have been r plaining r Commission in raise* they had granted staff members. larhaF
ing administrative assistant* a* welt an professor*.
i plea*# w trrrz. ua>

Ferguson also said Reitz has had
no "grave dissatisfaction with
salary cuts, made by the budget
commission, and indicated he and
the university administrator are
"in complete agreement as to how
to handle the salary cuts.
J. Broward Culpepper, executive
secretary to the Board of Regents,
had no comment to make when
asked if Reitzs money problems
were discussed at Sunday's Board
of Education meeting, held "in
secret in the Governors Man Mansion.
sion. Mansion.
Both Burns and Ferguson said
the meeting was held to name a
president of the new state univer university
sity university at Orlando.
Wallace Henderson, State Budget
Director, snarled a quick "no
comment when questioned about
statements made by Alachua Coun County
ty County Rep. Ralph Turlington.
Turlington said there has been
an "excess of nit-picking by the
Budget Commission and Wallace
Henderson.
"I have a high regard for Ralph
Turlington, Henderson yes yesterday.
terday. yesterday.
The Budget Director, who ad admitted
mitted admitted he attended the Sunday
meeting, growled another "no
comment when asked if the pos possibility
sibility possibility of Reitzs resignation was
discussed at the meeting.

if w cui
iW w' urns

10 GENTS A CDPY
t navi noire Mures* a cant*



Page 2D

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

To The Rescue
AAUP Blasts States
Excessive r ed Tape

Oct. 11, 1965 lf the best
professor in the country were to
come into his office, President
(J. Wayne) Reitz could not hire
him because of the budget
machinery, the Commission of
One Hundreds Subcommittee on
Higher Education said recently.
UFs chapter of the American
Association of University Profes Professors
sors Professors (AAUP) said in a bulletin
that despite progress in Floridas
universities in research, quality of
teaching and high caliber faculty
they are still prohibited from
achieving their maximum poten potential.
tial. potential.
Higher education in Florida is
increasingly complex and more
than ever decisions need to be made
on the local level the booklet said.
Floridas universities are not per permitted
mitted permitted this, it said.
Other states give their univer universities
sities universities sufficient freedom in opera operational
tional operational matters to perform effec effectively
tively effectively their distinct functions, the
AAUP had said.
But Floridas universities may
drown in the same sea of red
tape.
Florida is the only state in which
salaries and other requests of gov governing
erning governing boards of the universities
are double checked.
In Florida for instance, the Leg Legislature
islature Legislature appropriates the money to
the universities. The State Budget
Commission reviews line by
line thousands of items, set by
the universities, and slashing
salaries or whatever other items
they see fit to cut.
Why do it twice, the AAUP
asks.
This double review has meant
that Florida universities are
delayed even six or eight rponths
in granting contracts to faculty, as
compared to other states, thus hin hindering
dering hindering their ability to recruit high
caliber faculty members.
Floridas universities must
compete for faculty in a national
market place and for research
grants on a nation-wide basis,
the AAUP said.
Floridas universities cannot be
equated to other state employees
in regard to salary, leave and funds
for research.
A university is not a factory
or a brickyard, the AAUP has
said concerning educational ef efficiency.
ficiency. efficiency.
Productivity rations, so
called, have continuously pushed up
the student-faculty ratios in
Floridas universities, when it is
known that higher quality of edu education
cation education comes when there are com comparatively
paratively comparatively fewer students per pro professor.
fessor. professor.
Qualitative factors are often
ignored, the AAUP said.
Instead of a wise and prudent
use of funds there is rather, a
dilution of the quality of higher
education in Florida.
Compared with 17 other state
universities throughout the nation,
which award 100 or more
doctorates each year, Floridas
universities rank well at the
bottom.
Os all full and associate pro professors
fessors professors currently on the staff of
these institutions, 96 per cent are
paid higher average salaries than
their colleagues at the University
of Florida, the AAUP reports.
If no adjustments other than
those recommended by the Cabinet
are authorized, average University
of Florida faculty salaries, now
$1,533 behind those at other uni universities,
versities, universities, will lag by $1,925 in the
last year of the coming biennuim
(1966-67), the AAUP said.

Thus, under the budget recom recommended
mended recommended by the state Legislature
for 1966-67, a professor at theUF
who teaches the equivalent of two
semesters and a summer session
will receive $649 less than a pro professor
fessor professor who teaches two semesters
at one of these other universities.
The average salary for faculty
numbers at UF who teach two and
a half trimesters is $10,120. For
teaching two semesters (or a 20
per cent lighter load) his col colleagues
leagues colleagues at the University of Ken Kentucky
tucky Kentucky receive $10,773; those at
University of North Carolina re receive
ceive receive $11,364; and those at the
University of Virginia receive
$11,960.
The State of Florida cannot af afford
ford afford to be third rate, the AAUP
said.
Florida leads the entire South Southeast
east Southeast in per capita income and yet
in higher education devotes the
least per capita.
If the state continues in this way
students in Florida will receive
a lower caliber of education than
those states with superior systems
of higher education, the AAUP
concludes.

"LEAVE THE DRIVING To US"
Burns Comes To UF;
Explains State Budget

Oct. 8, 1965 -- Gov. Haydon Burns came to the
UF yesterday and delivered a lecture on operation
of the State Budget Commission.
Some observers at the gathering in the Medical
Center Auditorium termed the Governors explan explanation
ation explanation little more than a political science lect lecture.
ure. lecture.
Burns als6. said there was a gross misunder misunderstanding
standing misunderstanding by UF students concerning the hiring
of a vice-president, a position now vacant.
He said the Budget Commission did not cut the
salary recommendation when UF President J. Wayne
Reitz tried to hire a vice-president.
The university budget was cut, but the actual
salary wasnt, he said. The salary was actually
increased by $1,500 although the Budget Commission
did not approve the entire request.
Burns said he doesnt forsee any change in the
set up by which the university budget requests
now go through the Budget Commission. He said
any change would have to be made by the legis legislature.
lature. legislature.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz has asked that the
control of the university funds be handled by the
university presidents and the Board of Regents
rather than the Budget Commission.
Burns said another problem was created because
all the state universities didnt get their budget
requests in until July 13. The deadline for the uni university
versity university budget requests had been set at June 15.

: AAUP, UF Senate
UF Senate Supports
Reitz Budget Stand

The University of Florida Sen Senate
ate Senate and faculty members, in a
strongly-worded resolution last
Tuesday, condemned policies of the
State Budget Commission (com (composed
posed (composed of Gov. Haydon Burns and
the Cabinet).
Included in the resolutions
were statements which expressed
support and confidence in UF Pres President
ident President J. Wayne Reitz and com-

Because of this, temporary approval was given the
requests until they were investigated and then some
adjustments had to be made, the Governor said.
Burns, who had little time to spend here because
he was due in Ocala for festivities in connection
with the Florida Thoroughbred Breeders Sale this
weekend, did not open the meeting to general ques questioning,
tioning, questioning, but allowed three student government of officials
ficials officials to ask a total of six questions.
Student leaders were originally invited to sit on
stage and form a panel to discuss the issues with
the Governor. However, they were removed from
the stage before Burns appeared to make room for
Board of Regents members who accompanied the
Chief Executive.
Burns entourage included J. Broward Culpepper,
Chancellor, Wayne McCall, Board of Regents mem member,
ber, member, Chester Ferguson, Chairman of the Board of
Regents, and Henry Cramer, chairman of the Budget
Commission.
Under questioning, Burns denied that there had
been any political meddling in the state univer university
sity university system and said If there has been, I havent
been a party to it.
Speaking on the rumored resignation of Reitz,
he said. I would be hopeful that there would not
be one (a resignation).
The states Chief Executive said he came to
speak here because he was concerned over the
resolutions passed Tuesday by theUF Faculty Senate.

mended him for his stand on uni university
versity university fiscal autonomy.
Senators and other faculty mem members
bers members -- double the number that
usually come, noted one ob observer-
server-- observer- jammed Me Carty Hall
Auditorium for the resolution
meeting, which, in an unusual
move, was open to the press.
A loud aye resounded
throughout the auditorium when the

resolution supporting Reitz finally
came to a vote.
In tlie resolution, the UF Sen Senate
ate Senate warned that the entire status
of higher education in the State
of F lorida can well be placed in
jeopardy.
The action referred to the pol political
itical political meddling in state univer university
sity university budgets after they have been
approved by the university pres presidents
idents presidents and the Board of Regents.
The principle involved is the
right of the universities to make
educational decisions subject to the
approval of the Board of Regents
and subject to regular state audit
of expenditures, the resolution
said.
The resolution added that the
position taken by Reitz is con con/Si
/Si con/Si in >)
gsf&' ,'a^m
Jk
BURNS
sistent with the standard mode ot
operation in higher education in
the other 49 states.
It is not one in which he re requests
quests requests unusual powers or complete
autonomy for the individual uni universities.
versities. universities.
Dr. Manning J. Dauer, chairman
of the UF Senates Steering Com Committee,
mittee, Committee, said he thought Tuesdays
resolution spoke for itself. It
showed that the faculty is com completely
pletely completely behind the president and
approves of his position.
Inside
The Gator
Academic Freedom 9D
UF Food Service 15D
UF Infirmary 1 1 0
\ History Resignations lOD



A Welcome
...And An Invitation From
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FERGUSON GLEN of MICHIGAN JEUNE LE LEIGUE
IGUE LEIGUE by CHERBURG NORMAN DAVIDSON
Bags by BURLINGTON Sweaters by TWEEDS TWEEDSBURY
BURY TWEEDSBURY MISTER PANTS Rainwear by DEBUTOGS

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13 W. Univ. Ave.

Free Parking on First Federal Lot

ASK ABOUT OUR
STUDENT CHARGE
c-
The proprietor of this emporium takes great
pleasure in welcoming all studentsnew and
old to the &tag n Drag
The informality of this shop constitues a
pleasure for the lady in love with casual fash fashions
ions fashions or the gentleman who likes to indulge an
extra flair for tradition.
IVs the desire of the proprietor to derive
frequent pleasure seeing how well-dressed his
patrons look in fashions from &tag n Drag
You'll love it, and we in turn will be flattered
to see you. Do come in and browse.

/

The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966,

iSISs

Page 3D



Page 4D

), The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

Gator Joins Budget Wars

The Florida Alligator joined in
the UFs battle with the state Bud Budget
get Budget Commission with a special
4-page section on October 11.
The special edition explained the
causes of the problem in the UF
budget cuts which was responsible
for the outbreak of the Budget Com Commission
mission Commission fight.
The Alligator published a front
page editorial challenging the state
to give more freedom to the uni universities,
versities, universities, to remove the direct and
implied controls that the governor
and other state officials can ex exercise
ercise exercise over education officials.
Another article in the special
edition mail-away was an inter interpretative
pretative interpretative article on the three UF
salary cuts, how the Budget Com Commission
mission Commission could cut them and other
university budgetary requests.
The section also contained a
wrap)-up of the events that had
followed the reported resignation
of President Reitz. It told of the
student, faculty and city or organizations
ganizations organizations that had publically sup supported
ported supported Reitz in the controversy.
The edition also contained a col collection
lection collection of the editorial support the
university had gained in local and
state newspapers in the Budget
Commission fight.
The Gainesville Sun, the St.
Petersburg Times and the Miami
Herald among others editorially
supported the university against
the incroachments of the state gov government.
ernment. government.
Galor AOs Sell!
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Students took advantage of the
mail-away edition and sent copies
of the paper to nearly 3000 per persons
sons persons in all parts of the state and
nation.

I'S UNIVERSITY...
TOADSTOOL?

The Florida Alligat#r

AN EDITORIAL
the political sea
xjlace one brick atop another and teal It with mortar. Sod the
ittJearth. Install chimes in a tower. Erect foal posts In a field.
Hafif paintings In a hall. Connect tube.<> and vials in a laboratory.
Stand a gray head behind a lectern. Seat lithe figures in ugly and
worn writing desks.
It Is called a university.
THE UNIVERSITY is not difficult to build. All II takes is money
money lor the mortar and the sod and the chimes and the paint painting*
ing* painting* and the vials and the salaries. Money is cheap. Money comes
from productivity, which comes from skills and knowhow, which
comes from universities. So universities are "Investments' and
have proliferated, springing up Uke toadstools in a meadow after
a friendly rain.
But a university Is not a toadstool
A UNIVERSITY also is ideas. And courage. And faith. And
challenge. And audacity. A university Is a marketplace for the
exchange of views and poppled with brains courageous enough to
express them. It U dignity. It Is status. It Is Inspiration. It is two
humans reaching out to one another, one with thirst and the other
wisdom. They touch and both are enriched -one with knowledge,
the other with fulfillment.
What have we at Gainesville - university, or toadstool?
Our Chancellor was selected, by edict from the Governor's
office In defiance of constitutional procedures.
tout administrators are told which architects to hire for
bunding designs.
#Our educational salary scales are established and lobbied
ttuough by minor Tallahassee functionaries although the salaries
were previously established by the Board of Regents and the
Legislature.
#Our Medical School physicians are told how many aide* lo
provide for the safe-keeping of psychotic children.
tOur business manager* are told where to buy institutional
Insurance.
tOur professors are openly slandered as "pinks and Com Communists*
munists* Communists* by the incoming Chief Executive.'
Our buildings are named bv legislative enactment or political
"suggestion
nil Bo.ird ol Regents i~ .1 bone of contention, slubbered over
by two massive polittr.il figures each seeking to cache t\ In his
lair.
' * Presi position of vne president.
util educational -il.rte' ire slashed because a I*tiDteaching
history to two thousand students must not be paid more than a PhD
copying Whig resolutions In the musty archives of Tallahassee.
Our trimeslei is tlimned and discarded before a substitute is
contrived.
one of iw.iding adnunistr itors is brow-beat by the Governor
In a public hearing
The l Diversify of florid,, never before experienced such.. time
of troubles. *t h.l- vnthed In disillusionment The student govern government
ment government protested. The faculty protested. The University Senate
protested. The President protested. The City of Gaine-ville pro protested
tested protested we screamed in agony as we sank into a political sea.
OUR CRY summoned Governor Haydor Burns to our campus
last week He did not lift us from our abyss. Instead he sealed
It over. Th.- University is enmeshed he told us in the machinerv
Os government. Our unhappy plight is due to the Inevitable working'
Os the law* and budgetary proceduies
He did not tell u why we never had such trouble .before.
Goverijor Burns should know whv we suffer. He appointed a
majority of the State Budget Commission. He appointed j majority
of the State Uoartkof Education. He appointed .1 the members of
the State Board of Regents. He appointed the C hancellor of the
entire university system.
Governor Burns has the power We are his creatures. Vie serve
at Ins pleasure and bend with each of his breaths. Which will it he
l Diversity Or toadstool

Governor Haydon Burns and the
Board of Regents received the larg largest
est largest number of duplications. Burns
received 20 copies, and the Board
of Regents received 12.

name__
ADDRESS
CITY STATE
Florida .. a progressive, leading state.
Thats what the chambers of commerce
say. But those m higher education have a
different story. Theirs is a tale of political
meddling, of red tape, and of bureaucracy.
The story centers around Gov. Haydon
Huiois and the State Budget Commission.
These four pages will explain it.

LEAVE toe DRIVING To US'
'Political Meddling
Whats The Story?

mission should exercise no such
power over university budgets --
even though the power is so dele delegated
gated delegated by law
In a sense this Can be termed
political meddling*' -- the unique
use of powet by the Budget Com Commission
mission Commission of Florida.

Bv MAUREEN COLLINS
Alligator Staft Write'
Whats behind this so-called
political meddling Or whjt signi significance
ficance significance are the accusations made
by the University Faculty Senate
anil the resulting denials by Gov.
Haydon Bum*
F lorida 1* unique among Ole fifty
slates in its system of budget c on ontrols
trols ontrols in higher education In 49
stales the Budget Commission or
Its equivalent exercises a broad,
general control over stale univer university
sity university budgets
In tnis State the Budget Com Commission
mission Commission and Budget Director
Wallace Henderson scrutinize the
budgets lit* item by line item --
alter they have been so scrutinized
by the university presidents the
Board of Regents and after appro appropriations
priations appropriations have been nude by the
Legislature.
The Budget Commission has
and uses -- us authority to cut
faculty sal.n ie*.


Mail It Away!
Wed like people around the state to
become more familiar with the present
higher education budgeting setup in Flor Florida.
ida. Florida. Please address the space provided
at the top pf this page. Just drop tne
paper in the cardboard boxes you'll find
at the main Alligator pick-up stations thts
morning. Well mail them immediately.

Reitz complains that he cannot
hire new personnel because of this
system of chopping faculty salaries
after approvalby him and tile Board
of Regents because he does not
know until almost the beginning of
See MEDDLING on P 3-A

UF Salary Boosts Fad ]
Budget Commission War

Oct. 20, 1965 -- Tallahassee
The State Budget Commission yes yesterday
terday yesterday unanimously increased
three previously cut UF salaries
in an action that seemingly
mellowed the current budget con control
trol control controversy. The approval fol followed
lowed followed Mondays justification of the
increases by the Board of Regents.
The administrative vice presi presidents
dents presidents salary was raised from
$20,500 to $22,500. The commis commissions
sions commissions lowering of the vice presi presidents
dents presidents salary last month was the
chief cause of the heated
controversy centering around UF
President J. Wayne Reitz and the
Budget Commission.
The commission also jacked the
salaries of Law College Dean
Frank Maloney from $21,500 to
$22,500 and Graduate School Dean
Dr. L. E. Grinter from $19,500 to
$20,500.
TTie pay increases were unani unanimously
mously unanimously approved along with 13
others at Florida State University
and the University of South Florida.
After the meeting, Assistant
Budget Director Joseph P. Cresse
said the commission will recon reconsider
sider reconsider its decisions when it appears
that the universitys stands are
justifiable.
Cresse said the commission
might have erred when it originally
cut out the pay raises, but added,
I feel the system of control now
exercised by the commission is
essential.
The budget administrator said
the commission has only two real
guidelines for control over higher
education fiscal matters:
We try to keep salaries com comparable
parable comparable to the national average and
make sure appropriated money is

used as recommended, he si
The administrator said I
Florida does not necessarily J
to pay salaries above the natij
average because the staj
climate and location is sufficfl
to attract men of high calibefl
the universities. 1
Cresse argued for lme-by-fl
control over state agencies fl
university finances, saying fl
lack of specific control over 1
allotted monies would result!
unmanaged items. 1
UF Won Battll
But Not Waj
Oct. 22, 1965 The UF hi
won the skirmish but not the war!
Dr. Ernest R. Bartley, professJ
of political science, said of the prJ
sent Florida Budget Commissia
controversy. j
On Tuesday the Budget Coni
mission restored three previousl
cut salary raises in a move thJ
seemingly mellowed the heatd
controversy surrounding UF Pred
ident J. Wayne Reitz andGoverno
Haydon Burns. The action followd
the recommendation of the stat
Board of Regents.
Bartley referred to the news'
papers as the educators great
est ally by keeping the contro controversy
versy controversy hot.
Burns biggest mistake wa
coming to the University to speal
as his visit created more furo:
when the situation was dyin|
down, said Bartley.
Bartley cited Florida astheonl;
state in the union with a budge
commission autonomy.



KEEP YOUR 'EDUCATION'
MONEY SAFE
In Your Own Checking Account
Its Easier To Budget Your Cash
Save Time
EACH CHECK BOOK (WITH
QDEKI YOU P 20 CHECKS) COSTS $2.50
1 IN ADVANCE WHICH WILL
BE DEDUCTED FROM YOUR
ACCOUNT v \ OPENING DEPOSITCOVERS
vnt" cVieC \ ALL MONTHLY SERVICE
_ .. ... o0 a\" G D "** \ CHARGES.
BY MAIL \
\
\ **S \
\
.i*US\'' \ a*'** CUPFILL INMAIL OUT
\ r- n
\ I TO: UNIVERSITY CITY BANK
\ DRAWER U, GAINESVILLE, FLA. 32601 1
I I
I I
NAME
(please print)
DO NOT CARRY LARGE AMOUNTS OF CASH WITH YOU AIKICCWII c
n .t .-r itic rAr-ri I GAINESVILLE I
PUT IT WHERE IT'S SAFE! ADDRESS 1
I I
WHEN YOU ARRIVE IN GAINESVILLE, REMEMBER THERE HOM c TOWN
WILL BE SEVERAL THOUSAND MORE "GETTING SETTLED."
TURMOIL WILL PREVAIL! I UL,Kt:>:) |
SAVE TIME I STUDENT NUMBER I
YOUR FINANCIAL ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE COMPLETED 1 A PF M IKr nFPrwtFMnnccru 1
NOW-BEFORE YOU LEAVE HOME! YOUR MONTHLY I NING DEPOSIT ENCLOSED
TO E ,ANK 1 1 W "- L " UP MY CHECKBOOK I
FOR DEPOSIT TO YOUR ACCOUNT. I bank ON
1 SIGNATURE
(as you will siqn your checks) \
*** LOCATED m i o
ONLY &
two mumTmavwm
Banking BLOCKS ;
Monday-Thursday EDOM Jj llllt
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Friday CAMPUS o*m E sv,LL. fuor.da
9:30 to 6:00 pm w. UNIVERSITY AVE.
A" Departments MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966,

Page 5D



Page 6D

), The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

'Gator Shaken By The Tail

Like so many other organizations on the
campus, The Florida Alligator didnt make
it through the last year unscathed. Rather,
more symbolically The Alligator was tarred
and feathered.
Steve Vaughn, starting editor in Septem September
ber September 65, was replaced by Benny Cason in
January when Vaughn graduated. Cason had
been Vaughns managing editor.
After a rough and tumble three months,

Editor Cason Fired;
Replaced By Moor
March 30, 1966 The Board of Student Publications last night fired
Benny Cason as editor of The Alligator and named Summer editor editorelect
elect editorelect Andy Moor editor for the remaining week of publication this term.
Meeting as the Publications Electoral Board, which handles per personnel
sonnel personnel matters for student publications, the board removed Cason as
a result of a petition presented by leaders of numerous student or organizations.
ganizations. organizations.
Cason was named editor in December to fill the remainder of the
September to April term when then Editor Steve Vaughn graduated
from the university. Cason was managing editor for Vaughn.
His replacement, Andy Moor, had previously been named by the
board as editor for the twice-weekly summer Alligator. Yvette Car Cardozo
dozo Cardozo was named managing editor for summer.
Moor had previously been sports editor for Vaughn, and was named
editorial director by Cason. Miss Cardozo was an associate editor
for Cason.
In the petition which was presented to the board by ex-officio mem member
ber member Buddy Jacobs president of the student body seven allegations
were made calling for the removal of Cason and the re-election for
summer editors.
Though the board did impeach Cason, the motion to dismiss Moor
and Miss Cardozo as summer editors failed to receive the necessary
two-thirds vote.
Moor and Miss Cardozo are both members of the board.
The seven charges in the petition were:
The Alligator coverage and editorial comments regarding the
History Department, Vice President Robert Mautz, and Dean of Arts
and Sciences Ralph E. Page.
Inaccuracy in reporting events concerning the dismissal of Gay
Welborn, and remarks leading to the belief of dishonesty of Business
Manager William E. Elmore.
Constant and unprofessional harrassment of state governmental
officials and friends of the University of Florida.
Unwarranted rudeness both privately and in print regarding Uni University
versity University of Florida Administrative officials.
Childish antics and irresponsible conduct unbecoming a student
in such a leadership position regarding incidents last Friday night
and early Saturday morning at the Florida Blue Key tapping session.
Use of the students newspaper as a personal vehicle for indivi individual
dual individual dislikes and vendettas.
Wanton lack of editorial responsibility for accuracy in coverage
of the Infirmary.
The meeting opened as nearly 50 members and representatives of
various campus organizations filed into the small Honor Court meet meeting
ing meeting room to air their charges against the editors.
Often out of order while numerous personal attacks were launched
by both sides, the open portion of the meeting lasted nearly two hours.
Following the meeting, Alligator staffer Gene Nail reported the in interception
terception interception of a note passed to the board by former Student Body Presi President
dent President Bruce Culpepper. Nail reported that the note said (UF President
J. Wayne) Reitz wanted the board to stop the discussion and vote.
Shortly after the note was passed to Board Chairman (Professor)
John Webb, motions were sought to close the meeting for a vote by
the Electoral Board.
Cason, a graduate student in education, had recently graduated from
the journalism school after receiving several awards for outstanding
journalism.
Cason said he thought he had received a raw deal from the board,
and that their proceedings were highly questionable.
The fired editor said he had received no notice by the board of their
intent to remove him from office, and had no time to prepare a defense
for the trumped-up charges.
Much of the testimony given by the organization leaders rested on the
complaint that each felt his or her organization had not received ade adequate
quate adequate coverage by The Alligator.
Cason said his removal would not go unquestioned, and that he would
seek support in the state newspapers for this violation of the freedom
of the press.
jMiwiiiiWMMMniimiiiimHHimiiiii 111111 11111 iiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimf
I Lost youp Contact? 8
I _gmr I
| tW"* W f |
& ' V S
I Qato At>s make contacts! |

Cason was fired one week before the end of
his term by the same board that hired him
in December.
From January to March, Cason had taken
several steps which to many are revolu revolutionary
tionary revolutionary on the UF campus. Not only did the
paper use its weight in the biannual student
elections, but pushed into the area of serv serving
ing serving as a check on the UF administration
and its procedures, and even the state
government.

Gator Gator
r A H ~ both Board members, bad beef ci f aa last
UpV President Am named previously to ibe post. C*/J "j
CAI I rn.-. This action does not Invol 11 iO* Q osoa I?
InPfe- Unitor election* tad, w ML Ediths' s peak M
f f f I mm " s til- Former editors B^^Hp
Wjf) Mm Bm a M / mester. His decls*,.., Id, was A l s' Moor and Yvett^R.
c M A I I § fmk Influenced In part by student lead- attacked the new edltorsH
t\* n/l M m " W m f clalms lhal organlza- A U*aor yesterday,
Named be* s^j/m
ssSS-S Ousted UF Editor Revd^M
Fired U. 0/ K tairorsif^H
A A e paper
nented.
a proud possession o
an impressive gift \ i A
a world-renowned watch *
a La Marquise, newest shape in
watch fashion; 14K white gold,
four flawless diamonds $l5O
b 14K gold, Florentined end-pieces,
facet-edged Starlight crystal i
slls
c 14K white gold, Florentined ?*
leaves, two full-cut diamonds, .jdpVJfc,
Starlight crystal $135
d Dainty tailored hexagonal watch djT flit
of 14K gold $92.50 M
e Lovely oval-shaped watch, gold- / j
fiMed $69.50 fid
f Florentine-finish 14K yellow gold
bracelet watch, jewel-like Star- /f/j
light faceted crystal $275 /Uj
Other Girard Perregaux watches from $47.50 /Mf/l
I J t&m Prices include
Robertson s
Jewelers
211 W. University Ave.
372-3676

Doing what Cason called stepping on
peoples toes, The Alligator news re reporters
porters reporters delved into the operation of the
Infirmary and Food Service and played in
the arena of state politics when the UF
faced the confrontation with the State Budget
Commission over three salary cuts for ad administrative
ministrative administrative personnel.
Like the UFs president, even Floridas

governor wasnt immune from attack by
The Alligator.
Gov. Haydon Burns was sharply criti criticized
cized criticized in The Alligator for his handling of
the budget dispute as well as for his efforts
to sell Florida voters on the S3OO-milii O n
road bond issue.
The following stories trace the events
after that March 29 on which Cason was
fired.



The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966,

Reitz Nullifies Board Action;
Names Dobson New Editor

March 31,1966 UF President
J. Wayne Reitz yesterday over overruled
ruled overruled the Board of Student Pub Publications'
lications' Publications' March 29 decision and
named Drex Dobson editor of The
Alligator.
After firing Alligator editor
Benny Cason at a special electoral
meeting March 29, the board named
then editorial director Andy Moor
to fill out the remainder of Cason's
term which was only one week.
Dobson was managing editor
prior to the Reitz decision. He is
a journalism senior.

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Page 7D

Reitz also reversed the decision
of the board to retain Andy Moor
and Yvette Cardozo as editor and
managing editor for the summer
term.
The petition presented the board
on March 29 called for Casons
removal and the reversal of the
elections for the summer editors,
ifhe motion to remove Cason was
approved, but the vote to reverse
the summer elections failed to re receive
ceive receive the necessary two-thirds
majority.
Student leaders who signed the

petition were: Lynn Wolly,Mortar
Board President; Herb Schwartz,
Honor Court Chancellor; Buddy
Jacobs, Student Body president;
Jane Kimbrell, Women Students
Association president; Bruce Cul Culpepper,
pepper, Culpepper, past Student Body presi president;
dent; president; Bruce Starling, Florida
Blue Key president; Clyde Taylor,
Inter Fraternity Council president;
Chip Block, Florida Blue Key
president-elect; Susan Bartley,
Panhellenic Council president; and
John Darlson, Student Body treas treasurer.
urer. treasurer.

In naming Dobson editor, in
effect, Reitz rejected Alligator
Editorial Director Andy Moor from
taking over the editorship. Moor
had been appointed by the Board
of Student Publications to fill Ca Casons
sons Casons unexpired term.
Reitz also directed the Board
to ask for additional applications
for the positions of editor and
managing editor of The Alligator
for the upcoming spring trimes trimester.
ter. trimester. Moor and Yvette Cardozo,
both Board members, had been
named previously to the post.
This action does not involve
the question of freedom of the
press, Dr. Reitz said. Rather,
it results from failure of Alli Alligator
gator Alligator leadership to exercise and
accept the responsibilities with
which they have been charged.
The fact that student leaders
in large numbers have expressed
great dissatisfaction over the man manner
ner manner in which The Alligator has
handled news and editorial mater materials
ials materials this trimester is ample tes testimony
timony testimony that the paper has not
represented the students, Dr.
Reitz said.
This broad expression of dis dissatisfaction
satisfaction dissatisfaction indicates the need to
have a student newspaper which
encourages differences in view viewpoint
point viewpoint but recognizes the obligation
of accurate news coverage and an
editorial policy which reflects the
best interest of the students and
the university community.
In announcing Dobsons appoint appointment,
ment, appointment, Dr. Reitz cited the new act acting
ing acting editor as a capable managing
editor, adding that he will give the
editors position the experience
and sound judgement it requires.
Moor and Miss Cardozo left The
Alligator offices after learning that
Dobson had been named acting edi editor.
tor. editor.
Several Alligator staffers walk walked
ed walked out of the editorial offices when
they learned of President Reitzs
decision.

0 University of Florida
Gainksvills. sisos
gmi or the pwssiosat March 30, 1966
r
Dear Professor Webb:
After giving much thought and study to the current situation
concerning the editorial leadership of the Alligator, I have concluded
that decisive action Bust be taken.
The problaa before us Is not a question of fraedoa of the press.
Esther, it Is the result of the failure of students responsible for the
publication of the Alligator to exercise and accept the responsibilities
with which they have been charged.
The fact that student leaders In large numbers have expressed
great dissatisfaction over the manner In which the Alligator has handled
news and editorial materials this trimester Is ample testimony that the
Alligator, a student newspaper, has not In fact represented the students.
This broad expression of dissatisfaction indicates the need to have a
student newspaper which encourages differences In viewpoint but recognises
the obligation of accurate news coverage and an editorial policy which
reflects the best Interests of the students and the University comminlty.
Therefore, as President, I have taken the following action:
first, I am directing the Board of Student Publications to reopen
the editorship and managing editorship for the summer trimester and to
Invite additional applications.
Second, I am naming, effective at once, Dr ex Dobson as acting editor
of the Alligator to complete this winter trimester. He In turn shall have
the authority to name the acting managing editor. Since Dr ex baa served as
4 very capable managing editor, 1 know he brings to the editor position the
experience and sound Judgment that la required.
Sincerely youre,
WayHe Belts
Preaidant
Professor John Webb
Chairman, Board of Student Publications
322 Btadlum
REITZ' LETTER
UF President Reitz letter which touched ofl numerous editorials
in state newspapers condemning and questioning him about the action
taken regarding the editors removal.

Pig# 4, THe Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Marcl. 30, 196 f
no eddy today 1
Today's editorial, written
earlier in the day by Editor Benny |
W Cason, had to be removed from I
the paper since he was fired last
as night in an Electoral Session of m
W the Board of Student Publications. M
V Because it uws 11 p.m. when
v the meeting adjourned, a new
editorial could not be written.
i \
U
CENSORSHIP?
The March 30 editorial column:
was censorship involved?



Page 8D

>, The Florida Alligator. Friday. July 29, 1966

- l l ir m M' MMHI
# ~
The Alligator Firings: The Results

Reitz Explains
Gator Decision

April 1, 1966 President J.
Wayne Reitz last night clarified
his statements concerning his
naming Drex Dobson acting Alli Alligator
gator Alligator editor Wednesday.
Dr. Reitz said he had no desire
to avoid controversial issues.
He feels there has not been a
balanced presentation of student
news in The Alligator this tri trimester.
mester. trimester. His decision, he said, was
influenced in part by student lead leaders
ers leaders claims that their organiza organizations
tions organizations have been slighted in news
coverage.
When asked why his action was
apparently so sudden, and only
TC||g
mi
five issues of The Alligator re remained
mained remained to be published, Reitz said
the situation was cumulative and
reached a point where action
was required.
I just did not believe since the
total situation had reached a crisis
stage, there was reason in continu continuing
ing continuing the editorial staff of the paper
at that time, Reitz commented.
The incident involving the Blue
Key tapping session last Friday
night was only a part of a total
pattern, Reitz said.
Reitz denied the Blue Key inci incident
dent incident was a catalyst for the action
which resulted in his naming Dob Dobson
son Dobson acting editor.
Combination of circumstances,
including those presented by stu student
dent student leaders was responsible for
my decisions, Reitz said. There
was no one incident involved in my
decision.
Reitz said absolutely no outside
pressure was imposed by anyone
in his decision in naming Dobson
and his call for opening the sum mer
trimester elections for Alligator
editor again.

jJl gpfc 111 \ f$ \ m f
~. Hr ,7S-SRg .... -flHv ,5?- *IBH : V^H
IF :SHBh ~ Hr iB
fr R jfl
BSP: DEALT ALLIGATOR SHAKEUP

Ex-Editors
Speak Out
Former editors Benny Cason,
Andy Moor and Yvette Cardozo
attacked the new editorship of The
Alligator yesterday, claiming in inaccuracies
accuracies inaccuracies and suppression of let letters
ters letters to the editor in their behalf.
The three dismissed editors,
who received statewide newspaper
attention yesterday also said they
plan to appeal their removal.
Miss Cardozo asked students to
compare the fact that this is
getting statewide coverage with
what they are being fed in The
Alligator.
She criticized the fact that no
letters to the editor were printed
yesterday on the controversy, al although
though although she said he had seen
copies of about 20 letters to the
editor in our favor. Were still
waiting to see some of them in
The Alligator, she said.
Moor said the three former
editors were going to see an at attorney
torney attorney today to get advice ap appealing
pealing appealing their dismissal.
They continued to attack the
procedure by which they were re removed.
moved. removed.
Cason saying that he was ter terribly
ribly terribly disappointed in President
J. Wayne Reitz as a person, and
Miss Cardozo saying that we can
refute any of those seven points
of the petition -- or we could, if
we were given the chance before
Reitz.
There is still the fact, said
Miss Cardozo, that that so-call so-called
ed so-called petition at least the copy we
saw was not signed. Also the
fact that a few of the girls who
were in there to testify against
us (at the Tuesday meeting of the
Board of Student Publications) did
not even know what they were in
there for.
They seemed very surprised
to find out* the reason that they
were asked to talk that we were
going to be fired.
Statewide coverage of the affair,
said Cason, has already had some
effect and its going to have a lot
more.
My aim in pressing an appeal
is correcting injustice, he said.
We are going about this in a
dignified and principled manner,
Cason said, because we feel that
there is a great deal involved.

I Student Leaders Speak I
if April 1, 1966 I
II Editor: 1
11 The Florida Alligator is one of many student activities on the II
1; campus of the UF. As such, it is financed and operated by students If
If and should be responsive to their needs, interests and views. ||
j Student leaders on the campus have been increasingly concerned II
j; with inconsistent news coverage and lack of objectivity. We pe- II
I titioned President J. Wayne Reitz to remove the then current If
I Alligator leadership, including the current editor and the managing If
II editor for the summer Alligator. Our purpose was to seek re- If
I sponsible, comprehensive coverage of all campus activities. If
1? Dr. Reitz, in response to this plea from the elected leaders of If
1 the student body and student organizations throughout the campus, II
1 dealt with this completely internal University matter. As President If
j of the University, Dr. Reitz is responsible for all student activi- If
|| ties, and, therefore, acted under his authority as delegated by the ||
j Board of Regents and as set forth in the Charter of the Board of |f
I] Student Publications. I
j! We initiated and now support this action wholeheartedly. 1
I (Signed) I
j Buddy Jacobs, President of the Student Body ||
I Fred Breeze, Vice President of the Student Body 1
I Herb Schwartz, Chancellor, Honor Court ||
I John Darlson, Treasurer, Student Body |f
| Jane Kimbrell, Presidents W.S.A. ||
I Irene Minkoff, President, Womens Inter-Hall |f
I Chip Block, President, Florida Blue Key ||
| Bruce Starling, Past President, Florida Blue Key ||
Bruce Culpepper, Past President, Student Body |
f Bob Imholte, President, Mens Inter-Hall ||
Bud Robison, President, John Marshall Bar Association ||
Larry Tyree, President, Fla. Union Board of Student Activities ||
| Bill Slippy, President, Benton Engineering Council ||
[ Ron LaFace, Past President, Florida Blue Key |f
| Dennis McGillicuddy, Past Editor-in-Chief of the Law Review |l
Joel Sachs, Past Chancellor, Honor Court |l
Jake Dyal, Past Chancellor, Honor Court | j
Rutledge R. Liles, President, Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity ||
Dan Carlton, Chairman, Mayors Council ||
Charles Maloy, Past President, Inter-Fraternity Council |
David West, Past Editor, Florida Alligator ||
Beth Kraselsky, Editor of the Seminole II
Nel Laughon, Editor-elect of the Seminole ||
Harry Meshaw, Attorney General, Honor Court |f


SDS Calls For 'Teach- In
To Protest Alligator Firings

April 6, 1966 The Students
for a Democratic Society spon sponsored
sored sponsored a protest meeting Monday
night and called for a Teach In
Wednesday in behalf of removed
Alligator editors Benny Cason,
Andy Moor and Yvette Cardozo --
but none of the three former edi editors
tors editors showed up.
Tom Sharpless presided over the
75 students who attended the meet meeting
ing meeting in McCarty Auditorium. Pro Proceedings
ceedings Proceedings were something in the
nature of a New England Town
Meeting with all discussion coming
from the floor.
Talk centered around means of
protest against President J. Wayne
Reitzs control of student publica publications,
tions, publications, although the number of other

topics brought up indicated a very
wide range of disagreement within
the SDS concerning other goals.
Among the ideas which were
presented by various students for
expressing a protest against Dr.
Reitz were a petition, a teach-in,
demonstrations, picketing and the
publication of an off-campus news newspaper.
paper. newspaper. In the end a teach-in was
called for Wednesday afternoon at
the Plaza of the Americas, the
independent newspaper was post postponed
poned postponed for further planning and a
collection was taken.
i
The highlights of the affair were
several speeches by Alan Levin
and an appearance by Mike Malag Malaghan.
han. Malaghan.
The former issued a plea for
action in the model of Mario Savio,
while the latter offered defense
of the actions taken by the Board
of Student Publications and Dr.
Reitz.
Levin first arose to answer
several students who said the
protest against "press control
should disassociate itself from the
Freedom Forum image and from
such controversies as' Viet Nam
and civil rights. Levin said the
only people "more dangerous
than the administration are those
who profess to be liberals, but
shy away from those who are
willing to take real action.
If Benny Cason, the day after
he was fired, had been convinced

VP Announces
Leg Council
Investigation
April 6, 1966 Student Body
Vice President Fred Breeze said
yesterday that he will appoint a
special investigating com mittee of
the Leg Council to make a matter
of public record all the facts in the
recent removal of Alligator edi editors.
tors. editors.
Breeze said he had spoken with
Majority Leader Sam Block and
Minority Leader Gary Goodrich
and received a favorable reaction
to the plan for the council during
the summer trimester.
The committees specific re responsibilities,
sponsibilities, responsibilities, Breeze said, will
be to:
1. Hear testimony on the pro proceedings
ceedings proceedings of the March 29, 1966
meeting of the Board of Student
Publications impeachment of Al Alligator
ligator Alligator Editor Benny Cason.
2. Seek evidence on both sides
pertaining to proof of the charges
against Cason.
3. Investigate the events sur surrounding
rounding surrounding the removal of Alligator
Editors Andy Moor and Yvette
Cardozo.
4. Hear grievances on Alliga Alligator
tor Alligator operations, policies and func functions
tions functions in order to seek legislation
related to Alligator responsibil responsibilities
ities responsibilities and Alligator autonomy,
I am determined to see this
investigation conducted as effec effectively
tively effectively as possible and in a dig dignified,
nified, dignified, objective manner, Breeze
said.

of this, said Levin, the system
of presidential control might be
changed now. Levin said results
could be obtained if more students
would "stand on the line for direct
action.
"Youve got to go back to the
dorms and convince people they
have to demonstrate, he said.
Malaghan walked in in the middle
of the meeting and immediately
was given a chance to defend the
Board and Dr. Reitz. He said there
are three issues at stake: Freedom
of speech, which he said is not in
danger; due process, which was
violated by the way in which the
Board of Publications and the
President conducted their pro proceedings;
ceedings; proceedings; and administrative fi finesse,
nesse, finesse, which he said had been
very poor.
Malaghan spoke and then fielded
questions regarding the details of
The Alligator shakeup for about a
half-hour. Several SDS members
then suggested that he relinquish
the floor so that action could be
taken.
Was Academic Freedom
Involved In The Firings ?
See Pages 9 and 10 for
related stories.



Academic Freedom: Factor Fantasy

What is this ambiguous term
academic freedom?
With it, professors are rela relatively
tively relatively free to conduct classes as
they wish and express opinions in
or out of the classroom without
fear of retaliation.
Without it, professors can con constantly
stantly constantly be under the fear that they
Has academic freedom been violated?
This question is no stranger to college campuses
and certainly has not made itself absent from UF
grounds.
Last year while Ed Richer fought the administration
on a background of petitionannies, another struggle
waged with Tigert Hall in a far quieter atmosphere.
The widely publicized details of Richers fight in involved
volved involved mainly one man Richer. The other struggle
quietly blanketed first a full department and then
spread to implicate the entire UF.
Richer fought for tenture an agreement between
faculty member and administration ensuring the pro professor
fessor professor his job until retirement.
And Richer lost.
At the center of the other struggle was a now nowdeparted
departed nowdeparted philosophy professor, Dr. Farhang Zabeeh.
Zabeeh also fought for his tenure. But unlike
Richer, who publicly stated his refusal to work for
a doctorate degree (one of the three criteria for
tenure), Zabeeh appeared to fulfill tenure require requirements.
ments. requirements.
These requirements include publishing, excellence
in teaching and service to the academic community.
Zabeeh found himself denied tenure after helping
oust his departments chairman. Zabeeh and the rest
of the philosophy department had felt the chairman,
Dr. George Bartlett, could not handle the job.
They presented a list of incidents to back them themselves
selves themselves up and eventually Bartlett did resign from
the chairman post. But somewhere along the way,
Zabeeh became identified as ringleader of the
ousting group.
One of Bartletts final actions before resigning
was to deny Zabeeh his tenure.
Against the recommendations so Zabeehs fellow
faculty members and even his dean, the UF Per Personnel
sonnel Personnel Board upheld this tenure denial.
But Zabeeh, with a long list of publications and
honors, appeared to more than adequately fulfill the
job at least, so thought the AAUP who launched
an investigation of Zabeehs case.
The results of this investigation by the American
Association of University Professors has yet to be
made public. Meanwhile, Zabeeh now teaches at
Roosevelt University of Chieago with a promotion
in rank and a 25 per cent salary increase.
But there have been several other instances inUF
history where faculty rights appeared to be at stake.
There were the 17 professors who resigned from
the UF after Charley Johns held his motel hearings
during the 19505.
Johns was out to rid Florida schools of communists
and homosexuals. Several UF professors suddenly
found themselves with police escorts directly from
the classroom to Johnsprivate motel room hearings.
These professors did not know that without a formal
arrest warrant, the police had no authority to take
them.
The next time Johns put in an appearance at the UF,
the AAUP met him with a special committee de designed'specifically
signed'specifically designed'specifically to inform professors and students
of their rights.
Another academic freedom situation involved a
Board of Control regulation that no faculty member
could participate actively in politics. One professor,
T. Brooks Jones of the law school, wound up jobless
for his efforts to buck the system.
The regulation was eventually altered and today
several UF professors sit in city level positions.
But faculty members are still restricted from
politics higher than the county level.
Just before Zabeehs case came to public light,
there was the question of Ed Richers teaching
contract.
Richer claimed he was dismissed by the UF be because
cause because of his civil rights activities and his stand
against compulsory ROTC. The Universitys argu argument
ment argument pointed to Richers refusal to work toward a
doctorate degree.
But the hinge to Richers case, ex-UF Vice
President Harry Philpott, now lives in Alabama as
president of Auburn University. It was Philpott,
says Richer, who suggested against rehiring
Richer because of the civil rights activities and
anti-ROTC attitude.
The local side of Richers chapter in UF business
closed once and for all during early March. The
local AAUP lacks resources, says its president,
to journey up to Auburn for a long talk with Philpott.
But the AAUP did get in its one last word.
Clifton K. Yearly, who headed the AAUP executive

can lose their position at any time
as a result of a comment or series
of comments which may be or tend
to be in disagreement with the
powers-that-be.
Do we have it here at the UF, or
is it an illusion gleamed from per persuasion
suasion persuasion to agree?
investigating subcommittee, fired criticism at the
administrations entire handling of Richers case.
The administration, he said, was in large mea measure
sure measure the author of its own woes in the case of Mr.
Richer.
Yearly charged that the case had been bungled
from the beginning until Richer became a cause
celebre inside and outside the academic community.
The refusal to renew Richers contract should have
been a routine administrative function, he continued.
Instead, it created a furor feeding on lack of in information,
formation, information, misinformation, conflict and confusion.
* *
These, the spectacular cases known to the public
through newspaper headlines, are joined by a more
subtle pressure, say some UF professors.
The state of academic freedom is largely ac accounted
counted accounted for not by dramatic events but by the cumu cumulative
lative cumulative impact of day to day events, says Ernest
Jones, law professor and past head of the Faculty
Senate Committee.
Journalism professor H. G. Davis says, I would
fear a situation where a professor has to amend his
lectures to conform to administrative views.
And is there such a situation at the UF? Some
professors think so.
Those below in rank are constantly ingratiating
themselves, said Jones. They are censoring
themselves to fit those above.
When a new dean asks, Will the faculty support
me? he doesnt mean, Will they support the college
set-up? He means, Will they subordinate them themselves
selves themselves to me? said Jones.
But with the UF, there is a problem.
As local AAUP President Fletcher Baldwin put it,
The only violations you can sink your teeth into
are the obvious ones and the UF administration
is not so stupid as to openly violate academic free freedom.
dom. freedom.
As a result, continued Baldwin, We have been
relatively ineffective in combatting subtle violations
of academic freedom.
But what happens if the AAUP does prove a definite
violation of academic freedom?
What happens if the verdict in Farhang Zabeehs
case comes out against the UF?
A case like Zabeehs could provide the UF with an
entrance key to an exclusive but not very popular
fraternity. This fraternity goes by the name
AAUP Blacklist, and the depledging procedure
would consist of a hearty mealof theUFs own words.
Academic freedom, according to the Faculty Hand Handbook,
book, Handbook, includes the right of the faculty member to
pursue, acquire and disseminate knowledge freely.
If the AAUP decides Zabeehs right to this free freedom
dom freedom was violated, and that he was unjustly denied
tenure, the UF would have
to eat its words and
offer Zabeeh his tenure.
Zabeeh, now comfor-
TT table in his new job at
Roosevelt University,
, jL would not have to return
to the UF. But the offer
B of tenure from the UF
Wm would have to be made.
What does membership
in the black list club mean
for
The Alligator asked one
HHHHH member of the AAUP,
mmmmarn Professor Stanley Laugh Laughlin,
lin, Laughlin, head of the state corri corrimittee
mittee corrimittee of Academic
Rights.
No, it does
I inevitable collapse of the
h' I institution, said I.aurhlin.
,wm But it would mean cen-
Z-AButn sure by an organization
totaling 80,000 educators across the U.S. for a
university ranked as 26th largest in the nation.
It would mean added difficulty in recruiting qua qualified
lified qualified personnel -for an institution whose attraction
is already tarnished by an under par salary level.
And it would mean added difficulty in getting
grants in a state whose school budget problems
have already made headlines with disaccredited high
schools and politically manipulated funds.

Four Top History
Profs To Leave
Feb. 28, 1966 With four internationally-renowned historians so
far scheduled to leave UF this year, where does it leave this Univer Universitys
sitys Universitys Department of History from the standpoint of academic quality
and effectiveness?
Dismally low, according to one of the four Professors C. K.
Yearley, Frank Haber, Rembert Patrick and David Dowd in an
exclusive anonymous interview with The Alligator late last week.
In fact, the departing academicians said, UFs history department,
once considered by many second only to chemistry as UFs strongest,
will descend to the level of a third or fourth-rate department.
History will be left with two full-time teachers and researchers qua qualified
lified qualified to direct doctoral research, he said.
And, the professor told The Alligator, not one of the resigning four
wanted to leave the Gainesville campus; working conditions simply
became intolerable.
The trimester system accounts for part of this situation, he said, in
that it dissipates one-third of a professors research time, and inflicts
financial loss by preventing him from teaching at other universities
during the summer.
None of the four profs has a grievance with UFs move toward
year-round operation. But their anonymous spokesman contends that

the administration milks! the
present faculty and leaves senior
members no time for research
(their primary concern), when
year-round operation should entail
the hiring of more faculty and
assistants for the conducting of
classes.
The existing situation repre represents
sents represents a dilution of professional
quality, he said, adding that the
swiich to the trimester system was
financed by prospective faculty
salaries.
Each of the departing profs has
been offered a higher salary, a
promise of more time (usually

three months a year) for research, and research grants by his future
employer. According to the spokesman for the four, not one of them
was approached by the UF administration In any effort to discuss
grievances or possibly preventing departure.
He said one was called in for counsel only after he had already
accepted a new position, and another was not appeased because
the University did not feel he had published enough professional papers.
These decisions were subjective and arbitrary, he said. There is
only one standard of competence: professional. The administration has
allowed personalities and personal eccentricities to transcend it.
The current attrition in history is not a freak occurrence. In the past
three years, eight senior professors have exited for greener pastures.
At that time, the Latin American history section was considered
by experts to be one of the top in the nation. Besides a superior staff,
it held an extensive document collection and was advantageously lo located
cated located in close proximity to its area of study.
Then, when Professor Donald Wooster informed the administration
of an attractive offer from another school and received little encourage encouragement
ment encouragement to remain here, his subsequent departure influenced the decision
of two other Latin American history profs to submit their resignations
before a year was out.
Another case in point: Dr. Jack Harrison, former department chair chairman
man chairman and professor in Far Eastern history. He, too, left because of
dissatisfaction with Tigert Hall.
The administration fails to realize the significance of this loss and
the vital nature of the crisis it perpetrates, The Alligators anonymous
spokesman said. The men at the top seem to feel that even though
history goes, as long as the majority of the other departments are in intact
tact intact the situation is stable.
He pointed out that the situation is far from rosy in other areas,
however, and listed the College of Business Administration and Arts
& Sciences as in trouble from a personnel standpoint.
When widespread resignations among top-ranking professors occur,
he said, federal and other types of grants dissolve. When high standards
can no longer be met, better graduate students stay away because the
best men have left, and the entire graduate program is jeopardized
because it cannot function without the qualified men needed to run it.
Resignations quickly precipitate a morale problem, he added. Pro Professors
fessors Professors often choose a university or college because of the caliber men
they will be associated with. Those already on a faculty have been
known to make a rush for the exit when a high-ranking colleague began
packing his bags.
At this time, a majority of professors feel that their professional
environment is being flushed down the drain, he said.
The men at the top nevertheless remain impervious to the signi significant
ficant significant consequences resulting from the loss of their top men. He
added that administrators are so concerned with budgetary matters,
anyway, that they have little time for vital issues.
There are those who subscribe to the concept of warm bodies,
he said. Their concern is primarily to equip a classroom with a body
that will stand in front and go through the motions of teaching.
These are the people whose morality allows them to believe that
anyone is replaceable and expendable. These are the people who believe
that the prim ary function of a university is to cater to a mass education.
It is they who want to man the classrooms with warm bodies, excluding
considerations of quality and professional competence.
The University, he said, will realize one thing that it costs money
to lose top men. Since UF offers no fringe benefits, sabbaticals, re retirement
tirement retirement programs or research money for summer work, he said,
replacement salaries will have to be high enough to offset the lack of
these features, and perhaps higher in order to secure personnel whose
credentials are equivalent to those they replace.

The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966,

Crisis
In The
History
Department

Page 9D



Page 10D

! The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

Four Top History
Profs To Leave UF
March 1, 1966 -- Charges of the responsibility for the resignation
of four UF history professors have centered around UF Vice President
for Academic Affairs Robert B. Mautz.
Yesterdays Alligator editorial asked Mautz for an explanation of the
policies in regard to the resignations.
When contacted for an answer, Mautz said, If the professors feel
the way they talk, I regret it extremely. I view as very serious the loss
in the History Department and I am very sorry that these eminent
historians are leaving.
Mautz went on to explain that what had happened was a combination
of unfortunate circumstances which coincided with a year in which
we did not have a lot of raise money. Mautz also said the academic
profession was extremely fluid. Professors, in effect, come and go.
The vice president said he be- BBBBL?' 4
came aware of a possible loss in BKrW ;< Hr
the History Department last No- f jfpC
vember and that he immediately IB tm
tried to forestall the loss through f^B|
conferences and consultation with imm VB l
a number of people including Ralph Ifir
E. Page, dean of the College of la *> >MT f"
Arts and Sciences. He said that he BSP %
talked to Dr. Page concerning tak-
ing of s'teps by tlie department
which w'ould induce members to BBy
remain at UF. He refused further I|B|,
comment on what the'-a* steps were. h B
Mautz stated further that he was B||y
conscious of the possibility of J|||j||
the loss all along, but that a
loss is apt to strike at any time Bk HH
because of the fluid academic
When he became aware that the BB
four were going to resign, Mautz MAUTZ
immediately tried to persuade two of them into staying. The other two,
he said, had already accepted positions elsewhere.
Yesterdays Alligator quoted its anonymous informant as saying,
The men at the top nevertheless remain impervious to the significant
consequences resulting from the loss of their top men.
Mautz denied this and said no intelligent man could be impervious
to the consequences this involves. I hope they are not referring to me,
for I count all these people as my friends.
Mautz also said that this was a two way street. While the UF is
losing some top men, it has also been able to attract some. He cited
as examples Dr. John B. Pickard and Aubrey Williams of the English
Department. Mautz maintained that Dr. Thomas Hanna will have as assembled
sembled assembled an outstanding philosophy department by September.
The vice president said, in effect, that the reason for the resigna resignations
tions resignations should be made by the professors themselves and not him.
Dr. Yearly Writes

Editor:
I want to make the following
observations in connection with
recent series of Alligator articles:
1. Contrary to reports in The
Alligator, as The Alligator ac acknowledges,
knowledges, acknowledges, 1 have not yet decided
to resign from the University of
Florida. When I do, my superiors
and the proper authorities will be
the first to be notified.
2. Contrary to implications in
The Alligator, as The Alligator
acknowledges, in making my com comments
ments comments on the History Department
situation and the general educa educational
tional educational situation within the Univer University
sity University and the State of Florida, I tried
to make it quite clear that I was
speaking for myself alone and not
as spokesman for any group. The
Profs Speak
March 2, 19GG -- Three history
professors who have announced
theyre leaving the UF this year
told The Alligator Tuesday that
no one in the department was
authorized to speak for them.
Drs. Patrick, Dowd and Haber
indicated the reasons they are
leaving -- mainly because of higher
salaries elsewhere and the politi political
cal political interference currently existing
in Florida universities.
The also said the blame for
university troubles should be
placed not on the UF Administra Administration
tion Administration but on the state government.
Patrick specifically complained
about the budgetary setup,
whereby the state cabinet sitting
as the Budget Commission has
the power to slash salaries and
make other changes after decisions
have already been made on the
university level.

estimate of the situation remains a
matter of conviction with me, but
1 was speaking for myselt alone.
It was unfortunate that The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator prose suggested 1 was a
spokesman.
3. At no time, as The Alligator
acknowledges, was I attempting to
deal in personalities. It is unfor unfortunate
tunate unfortunate that this seemed at times
in the articles to be the case. I
completely disavow am Alligator
editorial comments pertaining to
any personalities. 1 was talking
about conditions, circumstances
and systems which unless correct corrected
ed corrected or modified, would remain much
the same regardless of the men
who operate within or under them.
4. Contrary to the report of The
Alligator, as The Alligator ac
knowledges, 1 made it clear that I
had been called in by the adminis administration
tration administration and asked about the causes
of my dissatisfaction, at which time
l explained at great length to both
Dean Mautz and President Reitz
the cause of my concern. 'Diose
causes of concern remain.
a. I stand by the opinions ex expressed
pressed expressed concerning the grim pros
pects and the institutional
disabilities that weigh upon Flor Florida
ida Florida education and upon the Univer University
sity University of Florida. There are risks
to be run in publicly discussing
unfortunate conditions. There are
those who feel the profession is
better served by not mentioning
them. I respect this viewpoint;
under certain circumstances, I
would be prepared to honor it in
practice. At the present time, be because
cause because I will very likelv remain at
the University of Florida, I feel a
frank discussion, whatever the
risks run, is the wisest course to
pursue.
Sincerely
C. K. Yearley

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I 1 I I COMPOSITION BOOKS 811



UF Infirmary Changes Hands

Nov. 16, 1965 -- Medical Center
Provost Samuel P. Martin today
assumed administrative responsi responsibility
bility responsibility for the UF Infirmary.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz
made the announcement Monday
afternoon.
Officially, the administration of
the Infirmary (Department of Stu Student
dent Student Health Services) has been
changed from the Dean of the Col College
lege College of Physical Education and


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Health to the Provost of the J.
Hillis Miller Health Center.
The change was made on the re recommendation
commendation recommendation of Dean D. K.
Stanley of the College of Physical
Education, who has been respon responsible
sible responsible for the Infirmary for almost
20 years.
Stanley was chairman of a
special committee which recently
completed a study of the Infirmary
and its services. The study lasted
for several months.

Stanley requested that he be re relieved
lieved relieved of the administrative res responsibilities
ponsibilities responsibilities of the Infirmary so he
could spend more time on his other
duties as Dean of the College of
Physical Education. He would also
be able to more fully devote his
time to the teaching of interns.
At a meeting of Infirmary em employes
ployes employes Monday night, Stanley ex explained
plained explained the main reasons for the
change.

The College (of Physical Edu Education)
cation) Education) has grown so fast acade academically
mically academically and there is a shortage
of teachers. I decided to take this
opportunity to go back to teaching,
Stanley said.
Teaching is my first love, he
said.
Stanley said his greatest fear in
giving up the administrative posi position
tion position was that the Infirmary would
not be left in good hands. But he
said lie was confident that it would
be in good hands under Dr. Martins
supervision.
Stanley told the employees that
the change came only after con conferences
ferences conferences with Pres. Reitz and Dr.
Mai tin.
Martin said there is no need for
radical changes in the Student
Health Services.
In explaining his philosophies of
administration, Dr. Martin said he
believes in being a low-pressure
administrator. He said he be believes
lieves believes one studies, one looks and
one grows in an administrative
position.
The Infirmary will not be under
control of the Health Center, Mar Mar
- Mar tin said, but will be under him per personally.
sonally. personally. He will be directly res responsible
ponsible responsible to President Reitz.
In the future there are going
to be increasing needs and com complexities,
plexities, complexities, but I have no fear that
the Infirmary staff can meet any
need brought before them, Martin
said.
Our first mission will be and
must always be the welfare of the
students, he said.
Reitz pointed out that such a
transfer is part of the normal
evolution to an administrative of office
fice office in the Health Center. A similar
change was made when the physical
therapy program was transferred
a few years ago.

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The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966,

In accepting the recommendation
of the change as suggested by Stan Stanley,
ley, Stanley, Reitz cited him in a letter for
the splendid manner in which you
have assumed the overall res responsibility
ponsibility responsibility for the Student Health
Services for almost 20 years."
Under your guidance and direc direction,
tion, direction, the Student Health Service has
moved form a very modest oper operation
ation operation to one in which we are giving
health services on a par with other
major institutions in tlu? country.
IB 1 -JP ..
Martin
You can indeed take justifiable
pride in your achievements, Reitz
said.
The Student Health Service is
run as an.auxiliary. In carrying out
its program of services to the
students, the Infirmary can operate
only with funds allocated from stu student
dent student fees.
In addition to announcing the
cahnge, President Reitz also
named an administrative commit committee
tee committee which will act as an advisory

Page 11D



Page 12D

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

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4

The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966,

Page 13D



Page 14D

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

War In South
Final Appreciation
Rally Set Tonight

Feb. 14, 1966 -- Operation
Appreciation winds up tonight
with a final student rally at Uni University
versity University Auditorium at 6:45.
On hand at the rally will be the
four lieutenants who recently re returned
turned returned from Viet Nam and who
have been the student bodys guests
over the weekend.
All students have been urged to
pack the auditorium to show ap appreciation
preciation appreciation and show a true image
of the university student, accord according
ing according to Student Body President
Bruce Culpepper.
Everything has been going
great since their arrival, Cul Culpepper
pepper Culpepper said. They (the two mem members
bers members of the Green Beret unit and
two members of the 82nd Airborne
Division) have met and talked with
over 2,000 students, who have given
a warmer reception that ever
thought possible.
The soldiers are:
Ist Lt. William R. Hill, who
fought in Viet Nam as a Green
Beret and is now a member of the
82nd Airborne; 2nd Lt. Ken Carey,
24, who wears the Green Beret
along with a Purple Heart; 2nd Lt.
Edward W. Spinaio, 28, also a
member of the Special Forces and
a winner of the Bronze Star, and
Ist Lt. Orville Hengren, 23, a
member of the 82nd Airborne who
holds the Air Medal.
Culpepper said the lieutenants
have been aware of the anti-Viet
Nam involvement demonstrations

Four Vets Ask Support
For Aisian Conflict
Feb. 15 Four Viet Nam veterans stood before UF students last
night and asked their support for the war.
The soldiers, all recently returned from Viet Nam, have been guests
of UF over the weekend and spoke before a rally in the University
Auditorium last night which was attended by a near-full house.
Before they left, they received 100 pints of blood taken from the
arms of fraternity men.
Lt. Ed Spinaio, who gave an emotion-packed talk before the crowd,
presented the student body with a Viet Cong flag he captured. The
red and yellow flag was captured by Spinaio during a battle in which
he won the Bronze Star. He brought it to the university and showed
no intentions of parting with it.
For the reception you, at the University, have given me, I would
like to present this flag, Spinaio said.
The four soldiers took with them plaques from Florida Blue Key
Leadership Fraternity, which were presented by FBK President
Bruce Starling.
Lts. Bill Hill, Ken Carey, Orville Hengren along with Spinaio told
of their appreciation to the UF and of the war in Viet Nam.
Lt. Hill urged Americans to send food, clothing, and medical
supplies to the Vietnamese. This is something you can do in support
of your troops, he told the audience.
If you could see a three year old child in the cold mountains with without
out without any clothes, it touches your heart. By sending supplies Hill said
Americans would show theyre a people with a heart, not just military
from the United States.
We have a mission in Viet Nam, he added. It is to suppress
the advancement of Communism in Southeast Asia. Were there
physically because we were asked by the Vietnamese government.
Were there morally because its morally right. We believe in freedom
and democracy as away of life. The Vietnamese have expressed
this feeling too, he said.
Lt. Hengren told the crowd, Operation Appreciation is about the
greatest thing you could have done to show your appreciation for
what we are doing in Viet Nam.
Lt. Carey said the Army calls the people who dont get the word,
or arent informed, the ten percent.
The 16 protestors here, compared with the 16,000 students at
the University of Florida, would fit well within the 10 percent group,
he said.
With this statement, the audience rose to a thundering standing
ovation and several persons wearing white shirts, arm bands,
and black pants left their positions at the auditorium doors and
stairways.
I could take off my uniform and sit among you, Lt. Carey con continued.
tinued. continued. And if I knew the things I know now about our committments
in Viet Nam and the situations, I would fully support the U. 5., Lt.
Spinaio told the audience.
I leave you with one thought, Lets win in Viet Nam.
Following the rally they attended the UF-Mississippi State basket basketball
ball basketball game where they were presented and received a sustained ovation.

going on this weekend in Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville.
Hill said the reception they have
been receiving has been deeply
appreciated.
Whether it is outside a restaur restaurant
ant restaurant at 2 a.m. or when picking up
a date at her living area, people
have come up to us thanking us
and asking questions about the
war. Its just been unbelievable,
Hill said.
About 300 people were on hand
at the airport when the plane car carrying
rying carrying the Gls was to arrive. How However,
ever, However, due to a delayed flight out
of Atlanta, they did not arrive un until
til until two hours later.
On arrival, representatives
from three major networks were
on hand, along with about 15 mem members
bers members of the working press.
After their arrival, the soldiers
were whisked to their complimen complimentary
tary complimentary rooms at the Ramada Inn in
donated cars by University Chev Chevrolet.
rolet. Chevrolet.
That night they separated and
dined at the Alpha Delta Pi, Delta
Gamma, Alpha Omicron Pi and
Sigma Kappa sorority houses prior
to a night of partying at frater fraternities
nities fraternities with UF coeds as dates. The
UF Interhall Council was host that
evening.
Saturday they were given a tour
of Silver Springs, including a look
at Ross Allens Reptile Institute.

Viet Nam Reels UF
SG Launches Blood Drive
Supporting Viet Nam Policy

Nov. 4, 1966 -- The UF Student
Government voiced strong support
for the United States policy in Viet
Nam yesterday when SG President
Bruce Culpepper announced a UF
blood drive to U. S. soldiers in
Viet Nam.
Project 1966, a blood drive de designed
signed designed to get at least 1966 pints
of blood from UF students, has
already received statewide pub publicity
licity publicity and Culpepper plans to ask
other colleges across the United
States to join with the UF in sup support
port support of American policy.
We feel the majority of th
students supjKirt Americas posi position
tion position in Viet Nam. There is a need
to show this strength and this sup support
port support which has been questioned by
small, dissident, but vociferous
groups, Culpepper said.
Delta Sigma Phi fraternity start started
ed started the initial program of symboli symbolically
cally symbolically giving blood for the United
States.
We decided to adopt this as a
project for our university. We want

Veteran Group Organizes

Feb. 2, 1966 More than 1000
students will be affected by the GI
Bill now being considered by Con Congress,
gress, Congress, stated Bart Kim nail, pre president
sident president of UFs Veterans Committee
for the GI Bill.
Kimball, an Air Force veteran
and UF sophomore, was elected
president of the organization at
its first meeting, held last Thurs Thursday
day Thursday night.
In addition to the veterans at attending
tending attending the UF, Kimball stated,
There are approximately 7,000
veterans living in the Gainesville
area who will be affected by this
legislation.
It is our belief that most of
these veterans are deeply con concerned
cerned concerned about the new GI Bill, and
are seeking an organization such
as the one we have formed to pro provide
vide provide an outlet for their feelings on
this subject.
When asked to whom the new GI
Bill was aimed, Kimball referred
to the statement made by Con Congressman
gressman Congressman Dante B. Fascell, rep representative
resentative representative from the 4th District.
Fascell states the bill is aimed
at the young man that had to in interrupt
terrupt interrupt his education to serve
his country in the armed forces.
Kimball elaborated on the aims
of the GI Bill. Basically it will
mean groceries on the table and
new clothes for the kids to married
veterans. To the single veteran it
will mean he can cut down on his
off campus job and hit the books
harder than he has been able with
the job.
The VCGIB, said Kimball,
will work toward the goal of
acquainting the veteran with the
details, pointing out the benefits
and deficiencies of the bill pre presently
sently presently being proposed. Kimball
was quick to point out that there
was more than one version of the
GI Bill before Congress and that
its each individuals choice as to
the version and the manner in which
he informs his congressman of his
choice Qf the best bill. The VCGIB
is merely a clearing house for in information
formation information concerning the GIBill.
The VCGIB is planning to esta establish
blish establish a booth at the entrance to the
main library to solicit names of
other veterans interested in this
bill.

wm
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CULPEPPER
to show the nation and the world
that the vast majority of UF stu students
dents students are 100 per cent behind
America.

Kimball suggested all those in interested
terested interested in this bill should write
their congressman seeking his
support of one of the versions
of this bill.
The VCGIB president plans to
continue with a UF veterans club
after Congress acts on the bill.
He indicated the club would be of
a service nature, seeking to help
the veteran returning to university
life.
Kimball said, The purpose of
this committee is to organize the
veterans attending the UF and the
veterans in the Gainesville area.
Our goal is to inform the Florida
delegation in Congress of our de desire
sire desire for the passage of the new GI
Bill.

GI Bill Students
Will Up Support
Enrollment VN Policy

May 15, 1966 More than
100,000 residents are presently
considered eligible for financial
aid under the recently-passed
Veterans Readjustment Benefits
Act of 1966. An estimated 12,900
of these veterans will be enrolled
in universities within the state
during 1966, with the cost of direct
benefits amounting to $8,200,000.
Approximately 1,000 UF students
may be eligible to receive these
benefits.
A veteran is defined in the new
GI Bill as anyone who has had
more than 180 days of active duty
and has received an honorable dis discharge
charge discharge after January 31, 1955, or
who has been discharged with less
than 180 days of service because
of a service-incurred injury.
The new bill provides SIOO per
month for single veterans, $125
for married veterans, and $l5O for
veterans will one or more children.
The UF Veterans Club, now in the
process of forming a permanent
and functioning campus organiza organization,
tion, organization, is presently working to
streamline all of the necessary
procedures for filing for any of the
benefits of the new GI Bill.

We are asking SG represen representatives,
tatives, representatives, each UF student to con confront
front confront himself and realize that such
a positive constructive affirmation
of our beliefs would be respected
all over the world, Culpepper
explained.
This is a very small, but effec effective
tive effective show of appreciation to our
country for the opportunities that
we have as Americans and as stu students.
dents. students.
Mike Malaghan, secretary of the
interior, will be in charge of Pro Project
ject Project 1966.
Malaghan explained that the bulk
of the blood will be handled through
the American Red Cross.
The Red Cross has no facilities
in Gainesville, but they are sending
mobile units from Savannah, Ga.,
and Daytona Beach to Gainesville
on at least three different dates
in November. Congressman Billy
Matthews handled this part of the
project.

Kimball opened the floor to sug suggestions
gestions suggestions on how they might work
effectively for the bills passage.
Suggestions accepted were: a pub publicity
licity publicity chairman is to be appointed
to prepare news releases concern concerning
ing concerning the formation of the group and
their goals; individual members
are to contact other veterans at
UF that did not attend; letters are
to be written to the veterans con congressmen
gressmen congressmen asking their support for
the GI Bill; support is sought from
the local chapter of the American
Legion; and an invitation is to be
rendered to Rep. Bill Matthews to
speak to the committee at the next
meeting.
The next scheduled meeting will
be held February 11 at 7:00p.m. in
the Florida Union.

Dec. 3, 1965 While draft card
burners, human torches and others
have demonstrated in opposition to
the U. S. policy in Viet Nam, other
concerned college-age people have
organized to support our policy.
A National Student Committee
for the Defense of Viet Nam has
been formed by college Young Re Republicans
publicans Republicans and Young Democrats.
This organization is circulating
a petition to demonstrate that stu students
dents students are behind our soldiers in
Viet Nam. At UF the petition is
being circulated by the Young Re Republican
publican Republican Club.
UF has not had as much time as
other universities. Many states are
so well organized that their gover governors
nors governors have given their all-out sup support,
port, support, urging students who care to
have their numbers counted.
The petition states that The
National Student Committee for the
Defense of Viet Nam, being con concerned
cerned concerned with the growing opposition
movements among students against
U. S. foreign policy in Viet Nam,
proposes the following resolution:
We believe that the war in Viet
Nam is part of a general Commu Communist
nist Communist effort to dominate all of South Southeast
east Southeast Asia.



iFood Head Quits; Blames Business Office

H Jan. 26,1966 Within a month,
Be UF will have to hunt up a new
Wood Service director as Gay Wel WeljHirn,
jHirn, WeljHirn, present director, has made
|Be decision to leave the UF oper-
Bion.
II According to Welborns attor-
By, Wayne Carlisle, it appears
Mere was conflict between Welborn
1
H Wmm
B"
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,!v J
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Bid the UF business office as to
low Food Service should be oper oper||
|| oper|| Welborn, himself, refused com-
Bent to The Alligator last night.
have to talk to my lawyer,
He said.
fc I According to attorney Carlisle,
Helborn does not yet know where
will go when he leaves the UF.
But hes definitely going to
at the end of another month,
Harlisle said.
I One friction spot, said Carlisle,
glgpcused around Welborns desire
|||o have Food Service control ALL
dispensing on campus.
I Presently, vending machines are
by a private concern,
Vending Machine, Inc.
According to Carlisle, Welborn
thought Food Service should be
centrally controlled that the
vending machines should be ap approved
proved approved by his department rather
than being run by a private con concern.
cern. concern.
Another problem, said Carlisle,
Mkntered around the cost of serving
to the faculty club.
I Carlisle also said, Several
Welborn told me he had a
pig delivered to the home
a faculty member at no cost.
I He felt Food Service should
carried its own weight,
said.

USED a a^U
AUTO & TRUCK C
PSSISALVAGE, INC. I
M FREE TELETYPE PHONE SERVICE THRUOUT FLA. & GA. js|
I ; MARSHALL WRIGHT, Manager
m Ye R RV. K C E E R 378-1542 OUTSELL M
1 avSe 1
| LOCATED 5 MILES NORTH OF GAINESVILLE ON O.S. 441 j I


UF Food Service-
Uncharged Meals

March 7, 1966 -- Food Service
landed back in the negative spot spotlight
light spotlight with a recent revealing of
uncharged meals courtesy of
the UF Business Office.
Four meals were served at
no charge during a five-day
period last month. These meals
went to feed various groups which
were guests of the UF Business
Office.
But the Business Office did NOT
foot the bill, as the invoices show.
The money for this food came
directly from student pockets,
charges ex-UF Food Service Di Director
rector Director Gay Welborn.
Food Service is self-supporting,
he explained. It runs on profits of
food sold to students.
Therefore, if Food Service has
to serve a meal free, the students
pay directly for it, said the ex exdirector.
director. exdirector.
The invoices cover the five day
period from Feb. 7 through 11.
Two of these free services Wel Welborn
born Welborn feels went to feed the Florida
Board of Regents.
The first was a snack ordered
for the morning of Feb. 10 at
Tigert Hall. The second, also dated
Feb. 10, was served at 12:15 p.m.
in the Walnut Room of the Hub. At
the bottom of the invoice is a note
reading Very (underlined three
times) special group.
The Regents had visited the UF
during this time and held a formal
meeting on campus on Friday,
Feb. 11.
All the invoices were ordered
directly by UF Business Manager
William Elmore and all are mark marked
ed marked no charge or not to be
billed. The groups ranged from
six to 20 persons.
Food Service, when asked about
the invoices, replied, Any com comment
ment comment on this should come out of
the Business Office.
Attempts at contacting Business
Manager Elmore, however, were
fruitless as Elmore was out of
town.
Theres nothing wrong with
serving the meals, said Welborn
of the free service.
What he objects to is the fact

that Food Service had to pick up
the tab.
These were guest of the Bus Business
iness Business Office or President Reitz,
he said.
And who did Welborn feel should
have paid?
The Business Office, he re replied.
plied. replied. They have a budget like
everybody else.
Welborn estimated the amount of
money involved over the five day
period at an SBO to S9O minimum.
But he had no idea how often
this goes on over a long period of
time. During the time he was Food
Service Director, he said they
averaged at least one a month.
The only other possible source
of Food Service support, said Wel Welborn,
born, Welborn, is the special Restricted
fund which now holds about SBO,OOO.
Welborn said the Business Office
had kept a tight rein on this money
when he was director. The purpose
of this fund, said Welborn, is to
supply extra funds for replacement
of equipment and improvements.
We didnt have access to it
without a Business Office OK,
said Welborn.
As to the ease with which he got
requested funds, Welborn said,l
just didnt get the money.
He cited his attempts over the
six year period he was director
to get the Coed Club in Broward
Hall remodeled.
Some years I wrote four of five
letters about it I have copies
of the letters, he said.
Now, however, Welborn says
Food Service has a freer hand
with the funds.
Welborn also said he had asked
repeatedly for meetings with El
more and Ellis Jones (former
Business Manager). He added that
such meetings were rare.
Jones visited the Main Case
teria once during the entire six
years. Elmore came twice, he
said.
Welborn was director of Food
Service for six years. His job was
terminated Jan. 21, because of
a conflict between Welborn and
the Business Office as to how Food
Service should be operated.

ATIRIM# RISIRVATIOM
... =*
No.. .f OtpolMtiont pA nn.. ; fkfc IQ^
Arrangementi By: S*fvic:_
Address: Time:
MENU CUy^ L
A PP* H ** V Phona:
=
(ft Ua Tax:
Rental Charges:
Vegetables: Ov, j Flowers:
Head Table l |) l h
Reservation Mode By:
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p-n'fiL&L*
A guaranteed number must be given not later Delay of 15 minutes or more will necessitate
than noon of the preceding day. on extra charge.
ONE EXAMPLE ...
March 7 This is reproduction of a copy of an order from the
UF Business Office to Food Service for a meal. Ex-Food Service
Director Gay Welborn says this has been a common occurrence
for quite a while, and he says UF students are paying directly for
it.
Servomation Gets
UF Food Contract

July 1, 19GG -- When you chomp chomped
ed chomped into that dorm or Campus Club
toast this morning, you probably
didn't notice anything out of the or ordinary.
dinary. ordinary.
But while the food is still the
same, the management is not.
As of today, food service on the
UF campus switches from univer university
sity university to private control.
Earlier this week it was an announced
nounced announced that Servomation Corp.
of New York had been selected
from the field of bidders for the
vear-long renewable contract,
hood service until now has been
handled by the university .tself.
The company will run all uni university
versity university food services except the
P. K. Yonge and J. Hillis Miller
Health Center cafeterias.
Servomation also supplies Flor Florida
ida Florida Atlantic University in Boca
Raton.
According to Tom Wells, UF
Assistant Business Manager, the

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The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966,

current food prices will remain
the same.
A.M. Rutledge, who was acting
director of the hood Service De Department,
partment, Department, agreed paying that there
probably would not be any big
changes made during the first few
w eeks until the new company has a
chance to evaluate the situation.
The new contract does not cover
vending machine operations which
now handle most of the food, drink
and cigarette machines on campus.
Automatic Vending, Inc. now holds
a three year contract on the
machines.
Wells said purchases for Ser Servomation
vomation Servomation will come from the local
market and a meeting between the
company staff and the local mer merchants
chants merchants will take place within the
next few days.
He also said all F ood Service
personnel would be given a chance
to become employees of the new
firm.

Page 15D



Page 16D

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

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In Review
The 1965-66 Gator sports year has come and
gone, leaving behind memories of victory and
defeat, success and failure, fulfillment and
frustration.
On the following pages, Alligator sports edi editor
tor editor Jeff Denkewalter and staff writers Alan
Burton, Tyler Tucker and Dick Dennis will try
to recapture a few of the more memorable
moments of the past sports year via words
and pictures.
Due to space limitations, it was decided best
to review the already well-publicized football
season byway of photographs only.
Let us present to you then, one year in the
vast heritage of Gator athletics.
Pigskin Recap
The passing of Steve Spurrier (photo one),
the glue-fingered receiving of Charlie Casey
(photo two), and a tough defense (exemplified
by linebacker Jack Card, number one jersey,
in photo three) contributed to a good, if not
great, Gator football season.
These three pictures were taken at the UF-
Mississippi game last season at Oxford. After
four quarters of bruising football the score scoreboard
board scoreboard read Florida 17, Mississippi 0. Many
observers called this game the high point of
the Gator gridiron season.
v. X;
Bull Gator
£ Ray Graves, head football coach and athletic
£ director of UF, led his gridiron Gators to a 7-3 £
£ season mark last year and a berth in the Sugar £
£ Bowl. UF also won the overall sports title in the
£ Southeastern Conference for the third consecutive £
£ year. £



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Gator fullback John Feiber (top picture) seems to wear a smile of
achievement on his face as he bulls over for a touchdown against
North Carolina State. The outmanned Wolfpack went down to defeat
before a Florida Field Homecoming crowd.
Defensive naiioacK Alien i ram men (.Dottom photo) registers pain
on his face as he stops Missouri halfback Charlie Brown in the Sugar
Bowl game on New Years Day. The Gators suffered a loss at the
hands of Missouri.
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The Florida Alligator

Page 17D



Page 18D

', The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

As the Gators prepared for their
first game of the season, basket basketball
ball basketball fans tried to figure out what
kind of a team the Gators would be.
Gone from last years squad, the
best in Gator history, were All-
SEC Brooks Henderson, sharp sharpshooting
shooting sharpshooting Tom Baxley, and big Dick
Tomilson.
Yet Floridas two big men under
the board, Gary Keller and Jeff
Ramsey, were back plus Skip Hig Higley,
ley, Higley, a fine ball handler and play playmaker.
maker. playmaker.
What kind of season was it?
What surprises and disappoint disappointments
ments disappointments were there?
The Orange and Blue lifted the
lid to the 1965-66 season with a
home victory over a scrappy but
out-manned Jacksonville U. team.
The Gators built up a 38-26 half halftime
time halftime lead they never gave up as
they coasted to an 80-59 win. Gary
Keller was high man, canning 17
points. David Miller, an unheralded
sophomore, showed that he was to
play an important role for the
Gators as he collected 11 rebounds
while playing only part-time.
A Miami home court jinx was
broken as the Gators whipped the
Hurricanes 77-66. Keller and Mil Miller
ler Miller were again the big men as they
hit for 30 points and 16 points
respectively.
Florida Coach Norm Sloan called
it sloppy, FSU coach Bud Ken Kennedy
nedy Kennedy called it rough, and the
Gator fans called it victory as
the Gators beat the Seminoles for
their third straight. Four Gators
hit in double figures in the roughly
played game that included several
mild skirmishes. Keller had 21,
Ramsey had 1% Miller had 13, and
team captain Paul Morton collected
11 points.
North Carolina stopped the Ga Gators
tors Gators bid for four straight with a
66-59 win on the winners court.
The Tar Heel win avenged a loss
suffered to the Gators in Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville a year earlier. The Gators
led at half time 31-30, but it was
all Carolina in the second stanza.
Keller and Morton had 11 points
each to pace the Gators.
On The Coast
The Washington Huskies were
the Gators next foe for two games
out on the coast. Gary Keller once
again led the Gators to victory as
he bagged 24 points in a 66-60
win in the first game. The Gators
led most of the way but had to go
into a freeze with four minutes
remaining as the Huskies narrow narrowed
ed narrowed the Gators lead to 58-57.
The next night the Gators show showed
ed showed the strain of playing three games
in five nights as Washington ran
them off the floor with their fast
break. At halftime the Gators did
manage to hold a 31-30 lead, but
the lead didnt last long as the
fresh Huskies pulled away. Keller
hit 20 points to top Gator scorers.
Hie Gator Bowl Tournament was
the next stop for the Orange and
Blue. In the opening round the
Gatord defeated nationally ranked
DePaul 76-24. Sophomore Harry
Winkler hit a jump shot to put the
Gators ahead 34-32 and the Gators
never trailed again. Keller was
once again the big man as he bag bagged
ged bagged 15 points.
Pennsylvania State ended Gator
championship dreams with a 54-52
cliffhanger victory. Winkler had a
chance to tie the game with ten
seconds left, but his long jump shot
bounced off the rim. Keller con continued
tinued continued his fine early season form
with 16 points.
Alabama was the Gators sixth
victim as the team finally returned
to cozy Florida Gym to open con conference
ference conference play. Mike Rollyson and
Gary McElroy hit clutch free
throws to overcome a Bama 10
point lead and give the Gators a
56-53 win. Higley was high man
with 12.

UF Basketball A

Coach Sloan made some offen offensive
sive offensive changes for the Kentucky
game but it didnt prove to
be very successful. The Wildcats
raced to a 40-28 intermission lead,
then coasted to a 78-64 victory.
Kentucky shot 55.5 per cent in the
first half while the Gators could
only manage 25.5 per cent. The
Gator defense fixed on Cat aces
Louie Dam pier and Pat Riley only
to have sophomore Thad Jaracz
collect 26 points.
New Offense
The Gators unleashed a new of offensive
fensive offensive attack against Miami as
Miller with 23 points and Winkler
with 19 points led the way to an
easy 111-66 trouncing.
Mississippi became the Gators
eighth victim in 12 outings as the
Gators overcame Ole Miss slow slowdown
down slowdown tactics for a 79-49 runaway.
Five Gators hit in double figures,
led by Winklers 17 points.
Tallahassee was the next stop
as the Gators defeated the Semi Seminoles
noles Seminoles 74-65, thanks to the brilli brilliant
ant brilliant play of McElroy and Miller,
who twice brought the Gators from
behind.
Before a regional T.V.audience,
the Gators whipped the Georgia
Bulldogs 65-52, mainly on the
strength of a 51-26 edge in re rebounding
bounding rebounding and Kellers 21 points.
At Auburn, the Gators moved
into third place in the conference
by nipping the Tigers 68-64 on
Kellers clutch shooting. Keller
wound up big man again with 22
points.
Mississippi proved to be a
breather as the Gators routed the
Rebels 96-61 for their 6th straight
win.
Carrying an 11-4 record to Miss.
State, the Gators were shocked by
the spirited Bulldogs, 76-68. The
Gators had a 28-26 field goal edge
but lost the game on the foul line.
Miller and Ramsey each hit for 16
points while Keller was held to two
points.
Tennessee proved to be poor host
as they handed the Gators a 76-47
pasting. The Orange and Blue com committed
mitted committed 16 floor mistakes and com committed
mitted committed various floor violations.
After the game Coach Sloan said,

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This is the worst game a UF team
has played since Ive been here.
Keller and McElroy each had 11
points.
Kentucky made it three road
losses in a row for the Gators as
they ran off with an 85-75 triumph
before 12,000 Wildcat rooters. The
Gators did manage to out rebound
the Cats 66-49 a most unusual
feat against a Kentucky squad. Jeff
Ramsey led the Gator efforts with
17 points, x
The Gators finally came home
to face Auburn only to suffer their
fourth loss in a row 86-66. All-
SEC Lee DeFore hit a phenomenal
15 of 18 floor shots that proved
too much for the road-weary
Orange and Blue. The loss lowered
the Gators conference record to
5-5 and 12-8 overall.
Mississippi State came to town
and nearly made it five losses for
the Gators. The Gators led 43-25
at the half, but the Bulldogs quickly
closed the gap to 59-51. State came
as close as three points four times
but could get no closer. Morton had
15 and Keller collected 13 points.
Vanderbilt had to hit 55.6 per
cent of their shots to take an 89-86
victory from the Gators. The Com Commodores
modores Commodores hit 9 of 10 shots to open
the second half which put the game
out of reach for the hustling Gators.
Morton had his best game as a Ga Gator,
tor, Gator, collecting 25 points while
Keller had 26 points. Vandy star
Keith Thomas said that the Gators
were the best rebounding team he
had faced all year and that Keller
was one of the best he played a against
gainst against ever.
The highlight of the season came
when the Gators trimmed Tennes Tennessee
see Tennessee 67-63 to avenge an earlier
humiliation by the Vols. The score
was tied nine times in the last 9
minutes before Keller hit for a
basket that gave the Gators the
lead for good. Keller was high man
with 20 points and hauled down 20
clutch rebounds.
Next season the Orange and Blue
could take all the marbles as eight
of ten men from this years squad
return. Neal Walk, 23.8 average,
Andy Owens, 19.1 average, and
Kurt Feazel, 18.7 average, are up
from last years freshman team
which had a fantastic season, 17-1.
It should be an exciting year!

I F^% ;
VHi; ..^i
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Hopping Harry
Harry Winkler, Gator cage guard, goes up high in the air to tap in
a teammates shot in a game last season. Also a track star, Winkler
will return to next years basketball team.



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The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966,

Page 19-D



Page 20D

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

Baseball-Winning Season

Prior to the 1966 season, Dave
Fuller had been coaching baseball
in Gatorland for 19 seasons l7
of which were winning campaigns.
This years team gave Coach
Fuller his 18th winning season as
the Gators compiled a fine 23-12
overall record.
The Gators outhit Florida
Southern 13-4, but dropped an
opening game to the Mocs 5-4 as
a result of an error in the bottom
of the 12th.
Miami made it two losses in a
row as the Gators were lashed by
the Hurricanes, 10-5. However,
the next day the Gators came back
to take a double header from the
Canes to even their record at 2-2.
Rufus Frazier and Tom Shannon
each hit home runs as the Gators
took the first game 4-3. In the
second contest, the Gators had to
pull it out with five runs in the
last inning on the strength of four
walks, an error, a wild pitch and
Fraziers triple.
In a return engagement, Florida
Southern dropped a 3-1 game to
the Gators as Kelly Prior threw
a fine three-hitter.
The Orange and Blue made it
five in a row as they bombed
Rollins 8-1 and then squeezed
by them 9-8.
Vanderbilt then came to Gator Gatorlard
lard Gatorlard to open up the SEC play. It
was a series the Com modores
would like to forget as the Gators
stomped them 5-0 and 16-0. Be Besides
sides Besides being held scoreless by Dan
Griffin and Adrian Zabala, Vandy
could manage only five hits while
whiffing 17 times in the two game
series.
A 5-2 win over Georgia made it
eight in a row. Two key double
plays behind Gator pitcher Ray
Rollyson gave the Gators the win.
Georgia ended the streak the fol following
lowing following day by taking a 4-1 contest.
Errors proved to be decisive as
the Georgians pushed across three
unearned runs in the third inning
on two Gator miscues.
The Gators literally threw an another
other another game away to the visiting
Yale Bulldogs, 10-4, before re regrouping
grouping regrouping for a 4-1 win.
The Gators next traveled to
Auburn where they saw their SEC
chances go down the drain as they
dropped two to the Tigers, 10-5
and 4-1.
A Trouncing
William and Mary was the victim
as the Gators snapped out of their
listless playing by trouncing the
hapless Indians 14-1 and 17-2.
The Gators went into a brief
relapse as they were crushed by
Georgia 13-2. However, the next
day the Gators came back to score
a seasons high of 21 runs en route
to a 21-7 pasting of the Bulldogs.
Four homers were produced by the
Gators, two by Bruce Moore.
Auburn got a little of its own
medicine as the Gators wolloped
the Tigers 12-4 and 8-2 at Perry
Field to raise their seasons re record
cord record to 14-7 and 6-4 in conference
play. Kelly Prior and Ray Rollyson
each picked up a win while Skip
Lujack, Frazier and Moore each
swung hot bats against the Tigers.
Furman proved no match for the
Gators, dropping a 6-3 game. Mi Miami
ami Miami then came to Perry Field and
split the series, winning the first
game 7-5 in eleven innings and
dropping the second 3-1 as Prior
handcuffed the Canes on four hits.
The Gators then hit the road for
a do or die series against Kentucky
and league-leading Tennessee. As
has been the case in recent sea seasons,
sons, seasons, the Gators were rained out of
one game at each school and thus
lost a chance for the championship.
The Gators did win both the games
they did play stopping the Cats
9-5 and the Vols 2-0. Fourteen
Gators were fanned by Tennessee
pitching, but Prior proVeti tougher
for the Vols as he yielded only

four safeties. Prior got all the
support he needed when Dan Cush Cushman
man Cushman singled home Moore in the
third inning.
Vs. FSU
FSU was the next foe in what was
to be the biggest home series of
the year. FSU appeared to have
too much class for the Gators as
they captured the first game 16-4
with the aid of 11 walks issued by
Gator pitchers. The second game
was a complete reversal as the
Orange and Blue shut the Semi Seminoles
noles Seminoles out 1-0 .. the only shutout
against the Seminoles all year.
Prior, the ace of the staff, was the
winning pitcher, giving up only five

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hits to the hard hitting Indians.
David Hodges brought Prior in
from third with a sacrifice fly for
the only run in the game.
In a return engagement at Talla Tallahassee,
hassee, Tallahassee, the Gators were held
scoreless by the Seminoles as the
Tribe took two, 1-0 and 4-0.
The Gators finished out the sea sear
r sear
son by taking two from a strong
Rollins nine, 14-3 and 5-2, ending
Tars hopes for a NCAA bid, and
taking two out of three from Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville winning 6-2 and 4-2 while
losing the last game of the season,
4-3.
y
There were many bright spots
during the season for the Gators
which lend hope to our SEC chances
for next year.

iHit i; jfKisl
BT SRR B7 KJk
Ray Rollyson



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Interview With
Tommy Bartlett

(EDITORS NOTE: The following is a column written by Alligator
staffer Dick Dennis concerning his interview with Gator head basket basketball
ball basketball coach Tommy Bartlett. In June of this year, Bartlett replaced
Norm Sloan as cage coach. Sloan took the basketball reins at N. C.
State. Bartlett is a former assistant at Tennessee.)
New cage coach Tommy Bartlett should prove to be a pleasant
addition to the UF athletic program.
Bartlett owns a 189-61 record as head coach in high school and
college, and possesses a winning personality as well.
At first glance, the stocky, 5-9 Georgian with a blond crewcut
reminds one more of a football coach. Indeed, Bartlett went to Ten Tennessee
nessee Tennessee on a football scholarship.
It is only after you talk to the genial ex-Tennessee aide that you
realize his first love is basketball. Bartlett was in the midst of a
busy week when I saw him, and he had just finished taping a TV in interview.
terview. interview.
The former SEC tennis champion took a genuine interest in my
questions, and spoke confidently about his new job.
You dont actually apply for a collegiate coaching job. I just told
people (newspapermen and friends in Florida) I was interested and
they talked to Ray Graves and the screening committee. The com committee
mittee committee was interested, and I sent them my credentials.
Bartlett retained Jim McCachren from Norm Sloans staff, but was
already committed to Dick Davis, coach at King College, Tennessee,
as his other assistant coach. Davis replaces freshman coach Brooks
Henderson.
Ive known Dick Davis for 18 years. Last year, when I was offered
the coaching job at Georgia, I made a committment to him as my
assistant. (Bartlett turned the position down.)
Tough Thing To Do
I told Brooks I was committed to Davis. Its one of the tough
things you have to do. But its the perrogative of the coach to hire
who he chooses; he takes his assistants with him.
First on the new coachs agenda is the teams trip to South Amer America
ica America in July. International rules will apply. A team must shoot within
30 seconds, and the foul lane is wider.
The wider lane will give our big men an opportunity to work on
ways to get underneath the basket, and improve agility and timing.
Having seen the UF cagers only from the other side of the fence,
Bartlett welcomes the trip as an opportunity to get to know the play players
ers players personalities and abilities.
There are 14 boys who want to go, Bartlett commented. Seven
or eight of them are virtually assured of places. At least two fresh freshmen,
men, freshmen, Andy Owens and Neal Walk, will make the trip. The other boys
will be in competition to fill out the nine or ten man unit.
Recruiting was one of Bartletts main duties at Tennessee. He
credits Sloan with doing a good job in this department.
Progress has been made on all levels of basketball throughout
the state. The caliber of Floridas high school players has improved
by leaps and bounds. This is one of the best states to go into to re recruit.
cruit. recruit.
Nucleus Os Florida Boys
The team will have a nucleus of Florida boys. Were going to
keep all the good players in the state. The program is going to con continue
tinue continue to move ahead.
Characteristically, the rugged 38-year-old pulls no punches with
his predictions. He feels the Gators can go all the way.
Sure, I create pressure saying well win; but you cant win any anything
thing anything without being under pressure. The players who come out on
top are the ones with talent, ability, and can play under pressure.
I think next years team is willing to accept the challenge.
At Tennessee, Bartlett coached numerous big men, so he will be
familiar with the Gators situation. He leans toward disciplined
basketball.
The purpose of our game will be to take advantage of our strong
points and our opponents weaknesses. Well use the game plan
necessary to win. The way it looks now, on the surface, we wont
shoot unless the big men are set up (6-9 Gary Keller, 6-10 Jeff
Ramsey, or 6-11 Neal Walk). We plan to use our height to good ad advantage.
vantage. advantage. Well take fast-break opportunities but they dont come
often.
Last year, the Gators went with a 1-3-1 on offense. Bartlett in intends
tends intends to start out the same way. 1
Skip Higley is a good guard, one of the finest point men in the
Conference. But we have several players who can do the job at the
other guard post -two freshmen (Boyd Welsch, Kurt Feazel), a
couple of varsity members (Mike Kollyson, Ed Mahoney), and Harry
Dunn (junior college transfer).
..

The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966,

Page 21D



Page 22D

), The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

Golfers Go Undefeated

Year alter year, coach Buster
Bishop has developed fine Gator
golf teams and outstanding golfers
who have gone on to make it big
in the pro circuit men, the likes
of Doug Sanders and Frank Beard.
The 1966 golf team was no ex exception
ception exception as the Gators were un undefeated
defeated undefeated in dual play, 9-0-1.
Jacksonville Naval Air Station,
FSU, Stetson, Rollins, U. of South
Florida, Alabama, Auburn, Geor Georgia,
gia, Georgia, and Georgia Tech all fell to
the Gator linksmen with only a tie
with FSU marring an otherwise
perfect record.
In tournament play the Gators
again fared well as the team
finished 4th place or better in
five tournaments.
The linksmen started tourna tournament
ment tournament play with the Florida Inter Intercollegiate
collegiate Intercollegiate at Cape Coral, taking
second place.
National Amateur champ Bob
Murphy finished first and Neal
Armstrong placed second in the

Trackmen Sport 4-1 Mark

The Gator cindermen closed out
the 1966 track season with a 4-1
dual meet record and a fourth
place finish in the Southeastern
Conference track and field cham championships.
pionships. championships.
Under thirty-year-old coach Jim
Carnes, the Gators traveled to New
York, Chattanooga, Auburn, and
Miami. While defeating Duke, FSU,
Miami, and national power South Southern
ern Southern Illinois in dual meets, the
Orange and Blue lost only to Au Auburn.
burn. Auburn.
We are still building, Carnes

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: 'V ?
Neal Armstrong
Miami Invitational as the Gators
took the team championship by 35
strokes over second place Ohio
State. The Gators had a team
score of 1145 which broke the
record they set last year, 1157.
The Orange and Blue captured
their second tournament in a row
at the Cape Coral Invitational.
Again Bob Murphy took first place
while the Gators topped second
place LSU by 11 strokes.
Again at Cape Coral, the Gators
didnt have it this time as they

said. Tennessee will have to con contend
tend contend with us in the near future.
UF was fourth in the SEC outdoor
track and field championships,
62-1/2 points behind champion
Tennessee.
The Gators strength in 1966
was in the field events. Jim Kelly,
Tampa junior, placed fourth in the
broad jump in the SEC, jumping
22 11-1/2. In the high jump,
Bradenton senior Jim Richeson
won the conference title with a
leap of 6 4.
Scott Hager, junior from Ormond

placed 4th in the Southern Inter Intercollegiate
collegiate Intercollegiate behind LSU, Georgia
and FSU.
The Gators concluded regular
season tournament play with a
third place finish in the SEC
championship held at Baton Rouge.
LSU and Georgia finished one-two
with the Gators a distant third.
Murphy placed a disappointing
seventh.
Last season the team was ranked
4th in the country on the strength
of their 4th place finish in the
NCAA tournament at Knoxville.
This year the Gators were again
invited to the tournament to be held
at Stanford University.
The future looks bright for the
linksmen as the freshman team
posted a 7-0 record. Murphy will
not be back but just about everyone
else will.
Under the tutorship of Coach
Bishop, the Gators should enjoy
another fine season in 67.

Beach, finished fourth in the SEC
pole vault, clearing the bar at
14 6, and crossed the wire third
in the 440 hurdles with a time of
52 seconds.
Weight man Harry Winkler, bas basketball
ketball basketball guard and AAU decathlon
runnerup, placed in three of the
field events in the SEC meet in
Athens, Ga. Winkler was second
in the shot put with a distance of
51 6-1/2 and was fourth in the
javelin with a throw of 205 3.
The West Palm Beach junior won
the discus with a taping of 154 feet.

- *1
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.-,' mmemm,
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HHI jHBHK '^Hv' : RE
Bob Murphy
Winner of the NCAA golf championship and the National Amateur,
Gator linksman Bob Murphy has turned the national spotlight on UF.
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The smoothest of leathers add their
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\ < _________

The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966,

Netters Flash ;
Then Fade Fast

The 1966 UF tennis team lost its
early season momentum and fin finished
ished finished fifth in the SEC. The netters
blanked five of their first eight
opponents, but dropped six of their
last ten matches.
The Gators played an expanded
32-game schedule, 14 games more
than were played by last seasons
9-9 team.

Rick Chace, number one singles
player, was 24-3. Chace, a Mait Maitland
land Maitland junior, was eliminated in the
semi-finals of the SEC tournament
at Athens, Ga.
Number two singles player, Ron
Fick, junior from Westbrook,
Maine, was 15-16 in singles com competition.
petition. competition. Behind Fick, the co-cap co-captain
tain co-captain with Chace and the teams'only
senior was Steve Gardner. G' rd rdner,
ner, rdner, from Plant City, won 18
matches while dropping 14.
Number four singles player Bill
Perrin, Hollywood junior, was last
seasons top performer with a re record
cord record of 13-5. This season Perrin
posted a 21-11 reocrd. Russ Burr,
Miami junior, played the number
five singles slot, compiling an even
12-12 record. Number six singles
player, Bill Belote, Jacksonville
junior, had a 14-12 log.
The Gator freshman netters gave
Coach Bill Potter reason to anti anticipate
cipate anticipate next season. Paced byArmi
Neely, National Junior champion,
the Baby Gators coasted to an 18-1
record, losing to the Davis Island
Tennis Club, 5-4.
Neely had a record of 18-1 as
the number one singles player.
Number two singles player, Jamie
Pressly from West Palm Beach,
was undefeated with a record of
19-0.
Steve Beeland from Clearwater,
14-0 in singles competition, com combined
bined combined with Neely to win the SEC
Freshman Doubles championship.
Mermen Sink
Via Jinxs
Before the season started,
swimming coach Bill Harlan had
expectations of a great season for
the Gator tankers. All-American
Tom Dioguardi, Blanchard Tual
and Charlie King headed up a squad
that, on paper, looked like one of
the strongest Gator swim teams in
history.
Unfortunately, the great season
never materialized as the Gators
sank to a 708 dual meet record
the first losing season since 1951
for Coach Harlan.
From the beginning of the sea season,
son, season, mishaps seemed to hit the
team at every crucial moment.
Freestyler Charlie Putwain de developed
veloped developed back trouble, Ray White Whitehouse,
house, Whitehouse, last years captain, came
down with mononucleosis, Dio Dioguardi
guardi Dioguardi was out much of the season
for scholastic reasons, and Tual,
undefeated as a backstroker his
sophomore, sprained his ankle.
The highlight of the season came
in the SEC meet which the Gators
captured for the 11th straight year.
The Orange and Blue finished 80
points better than second place
Alabama. Three Gators turned in
outstanding performances. Dio Dioguardi
guardi Dioguardi set a new meet record of
:47.2 in the 100 yard freestyle
while at the same time tying his
own conference record in the 50
yard freestyle at :21.5. Tual and
King were also double winners;
Tual taking firsts in the 100 and
200 yard backstroke, and King
capturing the 200 yard breast breaststroke
stroke breaststroke and 200 yard individual
medley.
Though Dioguardi was out much
of the season, he was named to the
All-American squad for the second
year in a row. He will also cap captain
tain captain the team next season.
Next years team again looks
great on paper -a seasoned
core of veterans return plus some
prospects from this years un undefeated
defeated undefeated freshman team. If the
Gators can avoid the evil hex that
followed them this year, the 1966-
67 season will prove very inter interesting.
esting. interesting.

Page 23D



Page 24D

), The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 29, 1966

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