Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
mm r h^.
j||||
/. >.-'' "'# §K|g%&:.
m te ffIJS
hk /% lg/ ||
:P
Ml
l \ ..
''' < _
t
1| : : il >?v : a
> vv w
- jF^HH|^ppiH^R
of I /'
' /J ' .'.-j.rs &j£ y sLj*jxbgjo j * A*. it iv JM hv'*'S' >
THATS ENTERTAINMENT
Entertainment hits campus this week and next in many forms.
Tomorrow night the Highwaymen and the Cyrkle perform for
Summer Frolics, 8:15 p.m. in Florida Gym. Tickets will be on
sale at the door.
Next week Florida Players will present Papa Is All in Nor Norman
man Norman Hall. Tickets go on sale next Wednesday in the Florida Union
ticket office. (See story on page three.)
Tonight and Monday night, UFs music department is presenting
The Fantasticks in P. K. Yonge Auditorium. Curtain time is
8:15 p.m. and admission is free. (See review on page two.)

'
. |

CfjeJflorttm Alligator

I Vol. 58, No. 150

Lack Os Quorumeats
Bloc Seating Bill

By GENE NAIL
Alligator Editor
A special session of the Leg
Council called to consider the
controversial Fair Bloc Seating
Bill failed to achieve orbit
Wednesday night due to the lack
of a quorum.
The bill was originally intro introduced
duced introduced at the regular meeting of
the Leg Council on July 12. At
that time the Council voted to
send the bill to a special com committee
mittee committee to iron out its inequities
and return it to the Council in
time for passage this summer.
A quorum of 25 persons was
needed before the Council could
meet and consider legislation. Only
23 members were present.
Council President Fred Breeze
said only one excuse had been
turned in prior to the meeting.
Any other excuses for absences
would have to be considered as
emergencies.
Council leaders thought the lack
of quorum was attributable to the
bill's opponents desire not to vote
it down in the Council, but merely
refuse to meet to consider it.
Tom Carnes, minority leader
and introducer of the original bill,
said he thought it was somewhat
sorry" that some members did
not even show up and vote against
the bill.
Council President Breeze said,
Im real disappointed in all the
members who wouldnt attend the
meeting."
Following the roll call announce announcement
ment announcement of a lack of quorum, Breeze
announced another special meeting
for Thursday night to consider the
bill. (Due to deadlines we are un unable
able unable to print results of that meet meeting.)
ing.) meeting.)
Breeze said there was little
possibility of a Friday night meet meeting
ing meeting if the Thursday meeting failed
since there are already two meet meetings
ings meetings scheduled for next week.
The purpose of the extra meet meetings
ings meetings was the assure the required
two readings of the bill for passage
before the end of the summer term.
The absentees were not along
party lines but did consist of the
(See LACK, Page 8)

University of Florida

majority of the replacements
named for the summer.
Absent from the meeting were:
From Student Party: Robert
Bonanno, John Dodson,
Flowers, Jack Harkness, Pam
Johnson, Mike Monaghan, Susan
Overstreet, Bob Rhodes, A1 Sch Schlecter
lecter Schlecter and Dave Wilson.
From Decision Party: Fred
Baggett, Randy Kramer, Marcia
Mann, Barbara Taylor, Janet
Kimble, Robert Williams, John
Mann, Steve Beckett and Sandra
Kincaid.
Dave Wilson of Student Party was
the only of the absentees to turn in

Council Committee
Hits Gator Cutback
The Budget and Finance committee of Leg Council Tuesday passed
a report calling on the Council to direct the Board of Student Publi Publications
cations Publications to return portions of student fees allocated for The Alligator.
David Vosloh, chairman of the committee, said the action was taken
as the result of the recent cutback in Alligator publication from twice
weekly to weekly.
The cutback was made due to the small number of students on
campus and the small quantity of advertising that was being sold to
support The Alligator.
King White, newly-named director of student publications, made
the announcement last week, which resulted in the reduction to the
once-a-week Friday Alligator.
Vosloh hoped to place the motion on the floor of the special Leg
Council meeting Wednesday night, but a lack of quorum ended the
meeting after roll call.
Before any action is taker, on the matter, it must have the majority
approval of the Leg Council.
The next regularly scheduled meeting of the Council is planned for
this coming Tuesday night.
The text of the committees report, which was passed unanimously,
said:
Whereas, the amount of student fees budgeted and paid for summer
production of The Florida Alligator for 24 issues was $6430.00, and,
Whereas, the management of the Board of Student Publications
has taken action to publish only 20 issues this summer,
The Legislative Council of the University of Florida Student Body
does hereby direct the Board of Student Publications to return to the
student body treasurer by July 25, 1966, the sum of $1,071.64, based
on $267.91 per issue for four issues.
The Board of Student Publications charter, however, does not specify
how many issues The Alligator must publish each trimester. Accord According
ing According to BSP Chairman John Webb, it is up to the board to determine the
frequency and size of the paper.
When King White cut the paper down to one issue a week, he was
acting on behalf of the BSP, Webb said. The Legislative Council
could still cut The Alligators monies but their reasons would not be
valid.

July 22, 1966

an absentee slip prior to the meet meeting.
ing. meeting.
The majority of the summer
replacements from both parties
were absent from the meeting.
All eight Decision Party absentees
were summer replacements. Eight
of the 13 Student Party absentees
were also replacements.
The Fair Bloc Seating Commit Committee
tee Committee finished its revision of the bill
in three meetings between the July
12 Council meeting and the special
meeting called for Wednesday night
to consider the new bill
A



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 22, 1966

theatre notebook
By 808 MENAKER
Take a bunch of actors who cant sing and a group of singers
who cant act. (Neither group can dance.) Put them all together
and you come up with a paradox theyre delightful.
The show Im talking about is The Fantasticks which opened
last night in P. K. Yonge Auditorium.
Director Gerald Jones has succeeded in probably the most
ambitious production to hit campus this year. The Fantasticks
Involves singing and dancing throughout the entire production and
to my surprise, both were carried off well.
Heroine Joan Stout is excellent as a singer. She comes off well
as an actress, too, but she tends at times to confuse her lines with
her singing.
Darryl Worth, as the hero of this Romeo and Juliet with a
happy ending, was anything but heroic. His part is one which should
be carried off with verve and vigor. Instead he performs his part
as though it were an intolerable burden and he wishes he were
done with it.
Jim Moorhead, as El Gallo, the professional abductor and rapist,
does well with the plays most difficult role. As an actor, Moorhead
is an adequate singer, particularly in the shows biggest number,
Try to Remember. He wouldnt make it at the Met, but for The
Fantasticks, his voice is strong enough.
Denver Sherry and Chris Smith, cast as the two fathers who
build a wall to drive their children together, are excellent. I just
cant imagine two people more perfectly cast to their roles. To Together
gether Together with Moorhead, they perform the plays most entertaining
number, It Depends On What You Pay, with great vigor, if not
with a certain amount of finesse.
Jones has also done quite a job with the down-and-out Shake Shakespearean
spearean Shakespearean actor who cant remember his lines, and his Indian
companion, a professional dier. Bill Huey and Steve Conn more
than fill their roles as El Gallos hired henchmen, and provide
the play with the needed sight gags and slapstick. Conn is hilarious
as he reels around stage proclaiming, Watch me die. Their
execution of the Rape Ballet is one of the high points of the show.
Jim Mooty is adequate in his role as the Mute, a character who
is necessary to move props, hold up a wall and just be there. In
this function he performs the same tasks as would his traditional
counterpart on the Japanese stage. If he were a trifle slimmer, he
would have been more in line with the stereotype of his role.
As I said earlier, Jones has done well with what he has. The
lighting is not up to par, but I suspect that is due to the fact that
Jones just couldnt get the right equipment. The musical accom accompaniment
paniment accompaniment is good in spots, overbearing in others.
All told, the play is well worth seeing, especially at the price --
its free. See The Fantasticks tonight or Monday night in P. K.
Yonge Auditorium, 8:15 p.m., and you will see a delightful play,
delightfully done. r

I Plan Now To Insure Better Grades I
I Next Semester By Having Your Own 1
I TAPE RECORDER I
I Revere-lilallensak I
I "DIRECT FACTORY DEALER" I
I No Middleman's Profit I
I from I
99
I* I
I BUY 6 WAYS I
I /*/AI ipi |>r 608 N. Main St. I
I CL/Uvn O PH 376-7171 I
I GAINESVILLE'S ONLY COMPLETE STOCK OF I
I SCOTCH 3-M RECORDING TAPE & ACCESSORIES I
Th riorfcte Alligator rwesrvee the right to regulate the typographical too* of All adrertlsemsats And
to rrrtrt or tarn in; copy which It considers obfr'tloneMe
WO POSITION E GUARANTEED, though desired position will be Clrst whenever possible.
The Florlte Alligator will Dot consider Adjustments of payment for say advertisement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion imlaas notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after adsertlsement appears.
The riortte will ant be responsible tor mors than one Incorrect Insertion of an adrerOs-ment
scheduled to i m several times. Notices for correction must be (law before next Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR 1* the official studaot newspaper of the UMvaralty of Florida and U
flTa nTTT except dnrtnc May, June, and July when It la polished semi-weekly. Only
Utomis lijiraif lha official opinions of their aMhora. The AlU*alor la eMered as eeoond class
m M the Utfted States Poet Office at GaineerUle.

UF Offers Oriental Humanities

Despite Rudyard Kiplings ad admonition
monition admonition that East and West would
not meet this side of Gods judg judgment
ment judgment seat, UF has initiated a new
humanities course designed to pro promote
mote promote understanding of the Orient
through art, music, philosophy and
8 UF Seniors
To Receive Bars
Eight seniors are among the one
hundred and eight UF men present presently
ly presently undergoing their six weeks field
training in Army ROTC at Fort
Bragg, North Carolina. The eight
have completed their undergradu undergraduate
ate undergraduate studies and will be commis commissioned
sioned commissioned immediately upon termina termination
tion termination of summer camp on July 29,
1966. The Commanding General,
Vin Airborne Corps, will present
the bars.
The new lieutenants are: W. W.
Albury, W. B. Goeller, S. E. Katz,
B. C. Lewis, E. J. Peloquin, W. A.
Post, V. A. Rambo, and J. W. Wat-|
son, Jr. I
Union Offers Trip!
To St. Augustine I
Florida Union announces a se- I
cond opportunity for sightseeing I
and reduced reserved seats for the I
production of Cross and Sword in I
St. Augustine. I
An air-conditioned bus leaves I
the Union at 12 noon on Saturday,!
July 30th, returning at midnight!
the same evening. Included in the I
price of SB.OO is an hour of sight- I
seeing in the oldest city, entrance I
to Castillo de San Marcos, and a
reserved seat for the evening pro production
duction production of Cross and Sword.
Make your reservations in the
program office of Florida Union,
room 315, or call Univ. Ext. 2741.'

So
Youre Going
tiHi t Be a Bid
I f wjr* Senior
I WANT TO REMEMBER IT
I THE REST OF YOUR LIFE?
I THEN
I SPEND YOUR LAST YEAR AT UNIVERSITY GARDENS.
I a MEMORABLE experience.
I FURNISHED OR UNFURNISHED APARTMENTS. AIR CONDITIONED,
| CARPETED, LARGE POOL, PRIVATE PATIOS OR BALCONIES, STORAGE
I AREA.
I CONVENIENT TO EVERYTHING.
I INSURE THIS PLEASURE FOR YOURSELF NOW.

literature.
First offered last January as an
elective course in the University
College, Non-Western Humani Humanities
ties Humanities deals with cultural aspects
of China, Japan, Korea and South Southeast
east Southeast Asia.
Despite an apparent need for a
general course of this type, it took
years of constant effort on the part
of the Humanities Department to
win sufficient support to have it
included in the curriculum.
TTie University has had for some
time specialized Instruction in
other departments, dealing with
specific and limited areas of Asian
study. It is felt the new, more
general, course will generate
greater interest in Oriental
studies, thus providing
enrollment in the more specific
areas.
Dr. Irmgard Johnson, associate
professor of humanities, taught the
first class offered at the Univer University

I ROBBIE'S I
Best In Steaks^^^
I ,0k
I Meals, Q J
pT.V & BILLI
11718 W. University Ave.l
L^nTheGoldCoasiJ

sity University and defines the role of hu humanities
manities humanities courses as an effort to
engage the interest of students,
enlarge their philosophical per perspective
spective perspective and aesthetic appreciation
and promote sympathetic under understanding
standing understanding of cultures quite dis dissimilar
similar dissimilar to their own.
Class discussion centers on as assigned
signed assigned readings of novels, plays,
short stories, poems, philosophy
and the study of art reproductions.
Lecturers with specialized know knowledge
ledge knowledge of pertinent topics also speak
to the classes.
About a dozen films are viewed
during the course. One film pre presents
sents presents an entire Japanese Noh dra drama
ma drama a visual experience essential
to understanding the medium.
Dr. Johnson said she plans to
include musical ideas of Eastern
cultures in the upcoming school
year and will attempt to integrate
music with other aspects of the
course.



A
DELICIOUS
DUO!
BID BARNEY
The best
w Qm
ONION RINGS
crisp and L g
golden brown! j
RED
BARIT
2029 N.W. 13th STREET
&ATQff)|
IADS If
REACH I J
PEOPLE pfT

ji )t 3Hntoersttp fefjop
I; hurry only two weeks left j:
! v \> c K y S O MJ |
I ||
;! If LUCKY FOR YOU BECAUSE YOU !
I jsfl Plt gSf CAN GET QUAUTY CLOTHING '!
I* Ol I M AT LOWER PRICES .. LUCKY !|
i J [|j Igf FOR US BECAUSE WE NEED THE |!
; rl ALL IV ROOM FOR FALL MERCHANDISE i!
!; m 33 1/3% OFF l|| jWiCn r /!
;! m I SPORT & DRESS SHIRTS jkmKf I 1
*! I*l SUITS O l\ (Oxfords Dacron Cotton Batiste 1' m[/
I 1 1(1 BERMUDAS Id Pil Solids Herringbones Stripes) ** S I[
j 22 l/3% OFF <1 $3.50 each or 3 for SIO.OO V
!i uc kip ci 11TC X I (ASSORTED GROUP) I \ \ I
MENS SUITS r I $14.95 VALUE kil :
;! SPORT COATS 50% OFF 11 n S
I* j ~ WALKING SHORTS plaids & madras 1 ~/fq ![
*! I CORDUROY JEANS Slims \ J j
Ji \ \(Cotton Corduroy BrushedDenimf J I|
jj l, pntersag \\V J

Players To Present 'Papa Is All

Papa Is All," the next Florida Players production, will be
presented in Norman Hall Auditorium, July 27-30.
Tickets may be purchased at the Florida Union ticket office
and Norman Hall box office starting July 25.
Papa Is All is the story of a Pennsylvania Dutch mother,
daughter, and son who rebel against a tyrannical father.
This comedy Is done entirely in the Pennsylvania Dutch dialect.
Papa is all Is a colloquialism for Papa is dead!
Written by Patterson Greene, the play has been produced on
Broadway with great success.
Cast in the lead roles of Mama and Papa are Nancy Chaffin and
Bob Novogrosld. Mrs. Chaffin, a junior high speech and drama
teacher from .St. Petersburg, is working on her Master's degree
this summer in the Education Department.
Playing the burly tyrant of the family is Bob Novogroski, who
was known professionally as Bob Norris. He is past president and
director of the Gainesville Little Theatre.
The rebellious young brother and sister will be played by Bill,
Kugel and Sandl Evans. A senior in Business Administration, Bill
was stage manager for the last Players production. Entering
Florida in September, Miss Evans will start her graduate program
In Theatre.
Two more teachers in the cast are Marilyn Woods and Jim
Frazier. Both are here this summer to work on their Masters
degrees.
Dr. Donald A. Borchardt, who is directing the three act play,
will also be remembered for his successful direction of Cleram Clerambard
bard Clerambard last winter. Set designer is Ray Dage.

Oar Square Shooting
Keeps The Priee Os Tires
RIGHT!
Preferred Customer Discounts Given To
FACULTY, STAFF AND STUDENTS
We Will Save You Money And Make Your
HOLIDAY DRIVING WORRY-FREE
MOODY TIRE SERVICE
615 N. Main St. 372-3010
COMPLETE AUTOMOBILE SERVICING

H' 'J? K jnim
pPBJ|
I T 1
m& m
mgr g a
jK
v.*- I I B
'YES, PAPA
Yes, Papa, okay Papa. Thats what Bill Kugelseems to be saying
to Bob Novogroski as they prepare for the Florida Players production
of Papa Is All. As you may have guessed by now, Novogroski plays
Papa and Kugel plays his rebellious younger son, Jake.

Sharp Named Asst Dean

The appointment of Dr. Bert L.
Sharp, associate professor in UFs
College of Education, to the posi position
tion position of assistant dean of under undergraduate
graduate undergraduate counseling in the college,
was approved recently by the Board
of Regents.
Dr. Sharp has been a member of
the College of Education faculty
since 1963. He received his mas masters
ters masters of education degree at UF in
1953 and his doctor of education
degree here in 1960.
Before coming to Florida, he was
a member of the faculty at Auburn
University.
Personnel services, guidance,

See What's *
The Browse Shop
CROME YELLOW Aldous Huxley
PRIDE & PREJUDICE Jane Austen
STATISTICS MANUAL Edwin Crow
APPLIED MECHANICS FOR
ENGINEERS Charles Inglis
HOW TO BUILD A BETTER VOCABULARY...
... .Maxwell Nurnberg
THE ASTONISHED MUSE Revel Denney
THE MEASURE OF MAN..Joseph Wood Krutch
HARD COVER
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS MEALS IN
MINUTES
ELEMENTARY DIFFERENTIAL GEQMETY
O'Neill
QUANTUM MECHANICS Stenle
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00
Campus Shop & Bookstore

Friday, July 22, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

and counseling are Dr. Sharps
major areas of study. He has pub published
lished published several articles on these
subjects.
In his most recent research, Dr.
Sharp studied the press of student
characteristics and environment
and their relationships to students
who are passing and failing in high
school.
Dr. Sharp is a member of the
American Personnel and Guidance
Association, the American Psy Psychological
chological Psychological Association, the Amer American
ican American School Counselors Associa Association
tion Association and Phi Kappa Phi.

Page 3



Page 4

[, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 22, 1966

we can't back
out of Viet N am
*** welve lonely figures left the coastal camp as
xl' darkness made Itself king in a tiny country
called South Viet Nam.
Slung over their shoulders were rifles, grenades
and ana munition. Around their waists were more
ammo and more grenades.
Their boots weighed heavily with mud and water
as they made their way westward through the steam steaming
ing steaming dampness of the Viet Nam jungles, leaving the
safety of their home base.
They were on their own In the dark jungle. Their
lives and the success of their patrol was up to them themselves.
selves. themselves.
These lonely nighttime figures arent the only
American fighting men to take such high risks daily.
American pilots as they daily full-throttle their
mechanical birds over North Viet Nam take the
risk of being shot down over inland North Viet Nam.
This is one area where American forces can only
rarely rescue a grounded airman.
Since the beginning of the air war with the enemy
In the north, American forces have lost several hun hundred
dred hundred aircraft in enemy territory.
Fortunately, many of the pilots have been rescued
since the hit pilots were able to ground their birds
in the coastal waters off North Viet Nam. Here
copters could carry them safely back to home base.
Numerous American airmen could not reach the
safety of the gulf and have been captured by the
North Vietnamese. Their numbers are uncertain
since some of the missing pilots died in their air aircraft
craft aircraft while others sought the safety of parachuting
but were captured.
These airmen are prisoners of war (POWs). The
North Vietnamese has stated that these airmen are
war criminals and may be tried as such.
The question of the status of these men has long
puzzled international law jurists. Is a man a war
criminal if he is only following the orders of his
government? Or is he personally responsible and
accountable for his actions?
Following World War n, German Nazis were tried
and convicted as war criminals.
But the legal question of whether or not the Amer American
ican American airmen can be tried as war criminals is of
little consequence to the North Vietnamese.
Their primary concern is the American reaction.
In the past the North Vietnamese and the Viet
Cong have taken actions to further involve the Amer American
ican American forces in the Southeast Asian conflict. The
American retaliation not only rallies the support
of the Vietnamese communists, but also support
from other communist countries.
But in the past, the threat of retaliation has not
been great enough to deter the communists from
their action.
Maybe this time it will.
There was a time in American history when
the United States would threaten foreign govern governments
ments governments with all-out war over the disposition of one
American citizen.
We think the threat in this case should be real
that the American government should be ready and
willing to strongly retaliate for such atrocities by
North Viet Nam as the trying and killing of Amer American
ican American flyers.
The U. S. government has been warned by Chinese
experts that an invasion of North Viet Nam will
bring the Red Chinese into the war.
The United States government has faced this threat
since it entered the Viet Nam struggle in 1954.
We think it would be a mistake for the Vietnamese
communists to misinterpret the United States po position.
sition. position.
The government has committed itself to a military
victory in Viet Nam.
We cannot back out now.
The United States government should make its
official position known on the possible trials and
execution of American airmen.
And live up to that decision.
We can play a game of hold-the-line or we
can win the war in the most direct and efficient
manner.
Which will it be?

(gfo Cfje ;f lortba alligator
EDITOR MANAGING EDITOR
Gene Nail Steve Smith
Executive Editor Bob Menaker
City Editor Yvette Cardozo
Sports Editor Jeff Denkewalter
Photographers Nick Arroyo
Bob Ellison, Sam Johnston, Steve Kanar
Staff Writers Norman Brooks
Alan Burton, Dick Dennis, Mike Malaghan
Tyler Tucker, Bill McGraw
Columnists Mike Garcia
Bill Killeen, Ernie Litz
Andy Moor, Jim Moorhead

Commercials are changing.
It used to be you knew when something was a commercial and
when it wasnt. Today its not so easy. Ad men are doing every everything
thing everything they can to disguise their pitch.
For example: Coca-Cola commercials are no longer simple
things. Now, a big rock n roll group starts to sing. They get half
way through their song before you know they are doing a com commercial.
mercial. commercial. By that time youre hooked.
You say theyre merely trying to make commercials a little
more pleasant, to hold your attention longer.
Well, youre wrong!
Its a plot a great big plot to commercialize everything in
the most devious manner. Theyre not content with subliminal
advertising anymore at least that was sneaky. Todays ad men
have become so bold as to taunt us right out in the open.
Pretty soon the Coke commercials will be a mere nothing,
mild in comparison to what Madison Avenue will spring on a
gullible public.
Imagine youre In Carnegie Hall. A hush settles over the crowd.
Leonard Bernstein strides masterfully to the podium. He raises
his baton, pauses for a moment and then faces the crowd and
begins his spiel for Vitalis. Keeps even a long haired conductors
hair in place, he says, without missing a single beat.
Bad you say? That would only be the beginning. I can see it now.
The great ballet dancer Rudolph Nureyev comes on stage and does
a few arabesques. Suddenly he winces In agony. He turns to the
audience and says, When Peter Pain strikes I use Ben Gay.
Robert Merrill, the great tenor, starts a stirring aria, waits
for the crowds complete attention, and makes a pitch for Lis Listerine.
terine. Listerine.
If you want to be obvious, how about Jayne Mansfield working
for the Playtex people or Mae West for Geritol?
It might even get to the point where our national heros wouldnt
be immune to the temptation of picking up some easy money
making a commercial.
Former President Eisenhower is in a massive library, seated
at an impressive desk, ready to make an important address to the
American people. The first words out of Ikes mouth are, I play
to win with Wilson.
Gus Grissom strides out, wearing his space suit, ready to
orbit. Imagine the impact when he opens the flap in back to expose
a pair of bright red underwear. I keep warm in BVDs, he says,
even in sub-zero outer space.
And how about FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover shilling for a tape
recorder firm? Hes been working with them for so many years
it would be a natural. He and Bobby Kennedy could even make it
a team affair, a la Huntley and Brinkley.
And now for the coup de gras. LBJ comes out to the White
House Rose Garden. He pulls on one of his beagles ears and says,
Ah keep mah dawgs healthy with Sargents Flea and Tick Spray.
The craze might even reach campus. Imagine listening to
WRUFs Crazy Wayne and His Tiigert Mountain Boys playing an
AAUP charity benefit (they need one, you know). On second
thought, that DOES seem a bit far-fetched.

JIM MOORHEAD'S
thinking
out loud W
Myths, it is observed, tend to multiply faster than
they can be exploded. Thus it is that we have so many
undetonated myths floating around. Let us give the
explosion rate an assist by lighting a fuse on the
following:
Truck drivers are the best drivers on the road
-- This is only partly true. They are the best drivers
on roads marked Truck Route Only. On an open
highway, they are the worst. They have few accidents
because the average driver stays the hell out of the
way so as not to get killed.
Truck drivers are thought to be good drivers be because
cause because of the ponderous size of the vehicles they
pilot. This is like saying house painters are the
worlds greatest artists because they use the worlds
biggest brushes.
This is not to completely discredit truck drivers.
They do share among them some of the worlds finest
truck stops where, so another myth goes, the best
food on the road is sold. I personally rate truck stop
meals one step behind Howard Johnsons (where I
will stop if all four tires blow out at 3 a.m. and its
the only place open) and one step ahead of the road
meals which we see those large black birds enjoying
just before they fly off to avoid our oncoming cars.
But, again, truck drivers have their finer points.
Some of them have done rather well for themselves
Elvis Presley, Rock Hudson, PhyUis DUler, to
name a few but as far as their driving goes .. :
well, would you give YOUR car keys to Jim my Hoffa?
Barbers are great conversationalists This
is true provided you want to talk about one of four
things: sports, politics, sex or molecular chemistry.
Re the latter topic, you will get only grunts from
your barber while you do all the talking, in which
case you may enjoy the conversation and you may
get a decent haircut . unless his views on mole molecular
cular molecular chemistry differ from yours.
The reason the myth has grown that barbers are
good general conversationalists is because in olden
days hair wak cut with scissors and a straight razor.
For the patron, a lengthy and congenial conversation
with his talkative barber was preferable to getting
his throat cut.
Nowadays, with electric clippers, patrons do not
have that fear although some enterprising barbers
have frayed their cords deliberately and subtly
threaten terse patrons with electrocution.
One exception to all this is a barber I once knew
in Crazy Horse, Idaho, who was a great conversa conversationalist,
tionalist, conversationalist, mixed a mean daquiri, did a wicked cha-cha
and cooked a terrific breakfast. She was also a great
little hair-cutter.
Five-foot-two, eyes-of-blue The foregoing
is popularly offered as the ideal for a romantic
partner, possibly even a mate. It is not to be blindly
accepted in toto, however.
Actually, girls, I know very few women who are
happily married to blue-eyed, 62-inch husbands.
Ava Gardner (6-3), for instance, was never very
happy with her first husband, Mickey Rooney (5-2).
She is now married to John Kenneth Galbraith (7-10),
he assists her greatly with her household budget,
and they are very happy.
Get that education . thats something nobody
can take away from you This is not so much
untrue as it is ridiculous. In truth, nobody wants
YOUR education.
Imagine the weird results if certain people went
around hijacking the education of others.
If Elizabeth Taylor had followed the educational
pursuits of Sister Kenny, for instance, she wouldve
been the worlds only five-times-married nun --
and would likely have tied the cause of infantile
paralysis to hyperactive hormones.
If Albert Schweitzer had pursued the learning
process of Robert Moses, he wouldve wound up
running the first aid station at the New York Worlds
Fair. And if WUt Chamberlain had filched the edu education
cation education of the eminent Luther Burbank, he wouldve
been historys only horticulturist who trimmed his
sequoias in his stocking feet.
The pen is mightier than the sword False.
This column was written with the business end of
a 3-1/2 pound saber and it pierced through 17
sheets of carbon paper and a half-inch thickness
of glass desk top.
So, watch those myths. They can mess you up in
the head if you take them literally.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
accepts all letters to the editor.
Due to space limitations, how however,
ever, however, we ask that letters not
exceed 350 words. ;



the stifling multiversity

Editor:
The multiversity is an insti institute
tute institute of ignorance as well as in intellect.
tellect. intellect. It faces the contradictory
task of producing technical know knowledge
ledge knowledge while preserving unquestion unquestioned
ed unquestioned loyalty to the organizational
system. Here the promises of the
rational progress of cybernation
meet the irrational reality of the
modern power structure. The
scientific knowledge of the univer university
sity university is not employed to improve
society but to decrease production
costs increase profits, improve
doomsday weapons, increase the
efficiency and scope of control
systems and decrease meaningful
employment, stated Larry D.
Spence in an article published in
Studies on the Left.
He continues, The influx of re research
search research funds to the multiversity
has corrupted the leading faculty
members, transforming them into
what Robert M. Hutchins has call called
ed called the academic jet set. They
are the idea men of the organiza organizational
tional organizational system, and the university
is their resting place betvteen
dizzying conferences with the
power elite.
He concludes, The new multi multiversity
versity multiversity is a factory that turns out
scientists, technicians and mana managers
gers managers to meet the demands of an
increasingly cybernated produce
tion system. At the same time it
rah rah
for blocs
Editor:
The noble leaders in Student
Government have risked their po political
litical political careers and jeopardized
their chances at the Key to assure
that four equally divided blocs are
given seating assignments for the
home games (rah, rah) on a strict
rotational basis. They are striving
to guarantee that there will be no
more privileged seating, except
that An organization may receive
privileged seating for any or all
home games, provided that it is
recommended for such seating by
the president of the student body
and approved by a two-thirds vote
of Leg Council. (The confusion
of those two statements Ill leave
for The Alligator to clear up.)
Meanwhile, the bad guys are
plotting in smoke-filled rooms,
no less to retain the old sys system
tem system of offering those delectable
and tantalizing political plums
(choice spots on a hard bench in
a hot stadium) to those they wish
to control. But their evil scheme
to blame the bills expected defeat
on Jacobs has been foiled, and now
everyone on campus knows the
true color of their black hearts
and the purity of those they tried
to dupe.
Citizens of Florida can take
heart, for this battle over the
most important bill to come before
Legislative Council in several
years indicates the caliber of the
future political leaders of the state.
And the post-graduate version of
this game of musical chairs will
undoubtedly further reveal an en encouraging
couraging encouraging trend toward respon responsible,
sible, responsible, mature politics.
Janna Steed
TWerl
Office Equipment
Have you been paying more
than $12.50 pius ribbon, to
have your Portable Type Typewriter
writer Typewriter cleaned, oiled and ad adjusted?
justed? adjusted? That has been our
price for 12 years. For Quality
Work at Reasonable Prices,
check with your Olympia
dealer.
604 N. MAIN ST.

conducts basic research for in industry
dustry industry and the military, supplies
consultants and experts to federal
and state agencies and is often the
training ground for future cabinet
members and federal commission
chairmen. It must also supply a
steady stream of trained teachers
and professors to meet the re requirements
quirements requirements of the knowledge fac factory.
tory. factory.
This depersonalization of the
intellect is an expression of the
university in our technology. Many
people comment on it at the in intellectual
tellectual intellectual level, but students are
the real victims.
Is it any wonder that students
experience a sense of meaning meaninglessness,
lessness, meaninglessness, loneliness, being cutoff,
isolated from the whole system of
higher education? It is a kind of
face-in-the-crowd loneliness that
permeates our deteriorated aca academic
demic academic community.
Even at the University of Flor Florida
ida Florida students begin struggling for
identity in this vast, impersonal
educational and research factory
run by IBM cards, visited by re remote
mote remote professors subsidized by
federal funds and tyranized over
by fickle administrators, from the
day they arrive here.
As a student, you learn that it
doesnt make any difference who
you are as long as youre one of
the thousands of those IBM cards.
DO NOT FOLD, BEND OR STAP STAPLE!
LE! STAPLE! Its like sitting in front of a
motion picture highly imper impersonal
sonal impersonal one of any audience of
hundreds. Its important that you
are there but not important who
you are.
You learn that professors are
occupants of social roles or per performers
formers performers of functions. You will
come to learn that the professor
is expected to say and do what is
required by his role.
You are subjected to deadening
conformity, regimented by the pro productive
ductive productive process and you will accept
this as an inevitable truth. This is
what has been termed the New
Slavery. You will obey!
You will discover, as did Thomas
Hayden, a young man recently self selfremoved
removed selfremoved from graduate school,
that, to go to college involves a
partial surrender of the freedoms
of speech, press and assembly,
and often the freedom of privacy.
It means arbitrary hours for wo women
men women students and compulsory func functions
tions functions for both sexes. It means the
double jeopardy of receiving pun punishments
ishments punishments from the university for
crimes committed in and adjudi-

BDOLLAR8 DOLLAR DAYS'I
ON SUMMER MERCHANDISE [jl^J
Dresses, Sportswear,
Swimwear lffl
By TRACY, THERMO-JAC, KORET,
JPIJI LADY MANHATTAN, & Other Brand
m Names
Buy One At Reg. Price;
/V;/ Get Another Os WA
Equal Value For $1 P^T
I 'Npl
I LIMIT 2 PER CUSTOMER! 2/$1 25| ]H)
Jl % $1

cated by the city or state. It means
tolerating personal dossiers and
students who spy for the dean of
men or congressional investigating
committees. It means the super supervision
vision supervision and regulation 1 of privacy.
It means living under the threat
of punishment for conduct un unbecoming
becoming unbecoming a student, or inability
to adjust to the university
pattern.
And some of you will be forced
as I was to become a specialist
in alienation.
And you will have to ask your yourself:
self: yourself: Is it for this that we have
to sacrifice? Is this why we have
to fortify even the moon? Is this
why we have to spend more for an
Atlas missle than for all cancer
research? Is it the right to this
future that we are asked to defend
by our statesmen, pundits, editors
and even university presidents?
Joel M. Starkey, 3BA
Phi Kappa Phi
To Initiate Ninety
Next Week
Ninety seniors and graduate stu students
dents students will be initiated into the UF
chapter of Phi Kappa Phi national
scholastic honor society next week.
As a part of the initiation, all
new members will be required to
wear the societys pledge ribbon
on campus all next week.
The UF chapter of Phi Kappa Phi
elects its membership by colleges.
Eligibles have a minimum ofaB
average and are in the top ten per
cent of their graduating class.
Graduate students, to be eligible
must have undergraduate and grad graduate
uate graduate honor point averages of at
least 3.0 and 3.5 respectively in
addition to being in the top ten
per cent of those receiving the
particular graduate degree.
This trimester there are 46
eligible undergraduates and 44 eli eligible
gible eligible graduate students. The Col College
lege College of Arts and Sciences has the
largest number of initiates of any
single college with 23 undergradu undergraduates
ates undergraduates and 14 graduate students eli eligible
gible eligible for admission.
Phi Kappa Phi is unique in that
it recognizes scholarship in all
areas of academic endeavor. Each
year it awards scholarships to un unusually
usually unusually worthy students and has
established a loan program and a
fellowship program for first year
graduate students.

COLLEGEMASTER
The College Plan . .Deferred Premium
for the College Man Payments Until Earnings
. . No War Clause
t Tf p e lAas te L UFs REPRESENTATIVES I
C qU Dan Sapp Mel Ward
V 11 George Corl
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 376-1208

"""^^"GATNESVin^^NEWESl^^^^^|
wHBImV F nHUkMMw r __ *j % n
* * gpp 9
One hundred, fully furnished,one and two bedroom apart- I
ments offering all of the outstanding features usually I
found only in much higher priced rentals. 1
a -CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONING AND (W) {
A HEATING BY WESTINGHOUSE I
/ -BEAUTIFULLY LANDSCAPED POOL I
AND PATIO AREA
l FREE, ON PREMISES PARKING
-MASTER TV ANTENNA (CABLE
yl FACILITIES AVAILABLE) 1
COMPLETE LAUNDRY FACILITIES |
* ECONOMICAL NATURAL GAS COOKING
AND WATER HEATING 1
GAINESVILLE GAS I
] CALL
370f)0(38 I
0 NOW
1 ; For I
Information!
Summit JJouse
h
S
|
I
a I
j
A
V
<
*
'
alf You've Got Something for rent use I
I gator classifieds I

Friday, July 22, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



16 A TOR CLASSIFIEDS!

for sale
ATTENTION: Employees Uni University
versity University of Florida. We have 7
Flavet units left. Delivered to your
lot for SISOO cash. Midstate En Engineers,
gineers, Engineers, Inc. 378-2151, P.O. Box
14491, Univ. Station. (A-149-3t-c).
8' x 30 LUXOR TRAILER with
8 x 21' cabana. A/C, carpeted
living room, TV and antenna, new
20 gal. hot water heater, insur insurance
ance insurance premiums. 6-3211, ext. 5637,
or 6-0959 after 5:15. (A-149-3t-c).
8* x 30 A/C HOUSE TRAILER.
Can be seen at Lot F-6, Hill Crest
Park. Call 372-i627. (A-149-3 t-p).
TWO NEW AUTHENTIC VIETNA VIETNAMESE
MESE VIETNAMESE GOWNS. Black brocade,
white trousers. Sizes 12, 14. $lO
each. Call 372-4931. (A-149-2t-p).
SPECIAL FOR STUDENTS. Air
conditioners Admiral. Perfect
for Diamond, Corry and Schucht
Villages, apts. and trailers. All
sizes. Cost plus 10%. Sudden Ser Service
vice Service Fuel Oil Co., 907 SW 3rd St.,
Ph. 376-4404. (A-142-ts-c).
STUWART TRAILER, 8 x 38,
with 10 x 30 aluminum cabana,
fully A/C. 378-3504, or see at
Hickory Hill Trailer Park, Lot 35.
(A-150-ts-c).
FOR SALE: 35' x 8 2BR completely
furnished house trailer. New, A/C.
Archer Road Village. Call 378-
3369. (A-150-2t-p).
1965 HONDA CB 160, low mileage
and excellent condition. Flat track
and scrambling extras -- $450.00.
Call 376-9351 or see at Rm. 210,
East Hall. Tandy or Chip. (A (A---1
--1- (A---1 2t-p).
SACRIFICE: Bolex Bmm. zoom zoomreflex
reflex zoomreflex movie camera. Retail value
$374.00. Best offer. Call Jim, 372-
3178. (A-150-2t-c).
SUN TRANSISTOR TACH. Origi Origitially
tially Origitially $55. Will fit Chevys and
Chevelles. V-8 or 6. 6,000 RPM.
$35 or best offer. 466-3237. (A (A---150-lt-c).
--150-lt-c). (A---150-lt-c).
SIFTED DACHSHUNDS (reared in
nriched environment), 6 wks.old,
V.KC reg. with shots and wormed,
vlales, S6O; females, SSO. See Dr.
urkey, Norman Hall, or call 372-
'744. (A-150-It-c).
OMPLETE DINING ROOM SET,
60 (table, 6 chairs, china closet
nd buffet). Hollywood bed, sls.
ecord cabinet, sls. Fluorescent
imp, $4.50. Odds and ends. 376-
094. (A-150- t-c).

puWrfflnm
[ Box Office Opens 7:PM
Pi¥i-iNT>ii4TMpi Richard Proforms AT
i xPH~* Edward Small Presents
B 4 Hfte-Ele Soiraner-PhylljsDiller
* ) I COLOR by Oeluxe
T! UNITED ARTISTS my fair lady
* I II, I.
§* RICHARD BURTON
nf ihe spr Who came in
W&M FROM THE COID'

for sale
14 SPEED BOAT. 25 HP Johnson
all controls and trailer. $l5O.
Call 372-6018 after 5:30. (A-150-
lt-c).
HOUSE TRAILER with attractive
cabana. 2 BR, bath, den, dining
room, kitchen, and separate study.
Excellent condition. $895 cash or
terms may be arranged. See at Lot
C-25, Archer Road Village or call
376-2269 or 378-4368. (A-150-
lt-p).
1961 CUSHMAN SCOOTER. Needs
some work, S4O. Call 376-8316
after Sunday. (A-150-It- p).
8 x 33 TRAILER, $500.00. Fur Furnished
nished Furnished with A/C, new rug, drapes,
water heater. B-6, Archer Road
Village, 378-4198. (A-150-lt-p).
BOLEX Bmm Zoom Reflex P-1.
$374 retail; $195. Call 372-6178.
(A-148-ts-c).
for rent
ONE BR A/C APT. One block from
campus. SBS/mo. Call Keystone
Heights. 473-4135. (B-149-ts-c).
N.W 13H, ST.
FRIDAY and SATO^^^!
I Mgfflo
B wisjSP ' \ dSiI|HBHrAnHBw W JH
SOPBULOREN'MIIL NEWMAN I
MID NIVEN .gy I
L4DYJO I
C( I MF AS I ATI: AS !0:00 V
AND SEE ALL 3 FEATURES M
Uve MOTION PICTURE 1
WICK SOMECKiftIG CO I
OFFEND EVERYONE!! I
Tl\e Loved I
pmfmri

Page 6

5, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 22, 1966

for rent
LARGE 3 BR FURNISHED HOUSE:
four persons sl6s/mo. f 2 BR
furnished duplex: 3 persons
$ 125/mo. A/C. Quiet area. 12 mo.
lease. 3 blocks campus. 376-6494.
(B- 149-3 t-c).
NOW RENTING FOR FALL. A/C
APTS AND HOUSES. Occupancy
for 3 or 4 students, male or fe female.
male. female. CHARLIE MAYO, Owner.
Town & Country Realty. 376-4664.
(B-140-ts-c).
FURNISHED APTS, 3 blocks from
campus. Spacious 1 BR, Danish
Modern, S9O. 2 BR, A/C apt.,
slls. Lease required. Call 372-
8840. (B-150-2t-c).
2 ROOM UNITS, furnished. Re Refrigerators,
frigerators, Refrigerators, no kitchen, private
entrance, ground floor. Two blocks
from campus. Call 376-6494. (B (B---149-3t-c).
--149-3t-c). (B---149-3t-c).
j ywv
gWTEjjr
! 11*(N I
1 $
| sW e>Eart 11
mM\ AGeNTI
)in the whole
w !a I
,F_CoLoli worldl,
Jjpj SUrt.TUES 1
I Melina I
I IP Mercouri
AnEfif jSStL When Greek
|TDt Meets Greek, I
.mUm They Don't
l/trwtf 6 mm ope I
p 1M A Restaurant.*
iriAtip of wonfld
I WEIRP. WICKEPI
i
STRANGEST 1
| CANDID MOVIE OF ALL TIME!I
I H1WM1.,,,,.1
| PftnlETt
I (ITALIAN)
(Clr) |
Rome, April 7.
J Latest in Italian documentary documentaryfeature
feature documentaryfeature skein of the Mondo
Cane genre is one of the better
ones, rising head and shoulders
over the mass of exploitation items
which have drugged the market
in recent months. Elegant lensing,
rather than some of the cheap
pickup stuff used in many other
similar pix, gives it the flash of
class. And a witty, ironic com commentary
mentary commentary (in the Italian version
seen, at least; an English language
and French version are also ready!
add to films plus points. |
I I

for rent
LA FONTANA. sth floor apt. has
become available for Sept. Adja Adjacent
cent Adjacent to Univ. P.O. $l5O/mo. Call
376-7534. (B-150-lt-c).
FOR AUGUST ONLY. Two small
apts. and comfortable corner room
after August 4th. Across from
campus. Apply 321 SW 13th St.
(B-150-lt-c).
wanted
FALL TRIMESTER Coed as 4th
roommate French Quarter. Sen Senior
ior Senior or grad, student preferred.
$42.50/mo. plus 1/4 utilities. Call
372-6559 between 5 and 7:30 p.m.
(C-148- 3t-p).

FLORIDA STATE THEATRES
K I N Q
jrarngg 1:00-3:51 -6:42
I WALT DISNEY presents j|j
LT. ROBIN (MJSOIUI.&U
| DICK VAN DYKE- NANCY KWAN /gfe
WALT DISNEYS IRAd v."
* TECHNICOLOR*
DOWNTOWN
OjUUULI 1:03-3:42-6:21 -9:00
THEATRE
BIBECT fBDM ITS SESEHVED SEIT EW6AKWEIIIS!
fIBSI TIME Al POPIILM FBICES!
BATTLE OP
THE (BULGE
SUMIM
HENRY FONDA ROBERT SHAWIOB! RYAN DANA ANDREWS Pi ANGHI
BARBARA WIE george Montgomery ty haroin cues bronson hans Christian
BITCH WERNER PETRS JAMES MacARTHUR and TELLY SAVATAS TECHNICOLOR'

wanted |
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR Sept.,
Village Park Apts., own BR. Pre Prefer
fer Prefer upperclassman or working girl.
Inquire 378-1991. (C-149-2t-c).
ROOMMATE FALL TRIMESTER.
S4O mo. each. Utilities and M.S.
One BR, study, bath, 4 closets.
See at 918 SW Bth Lane. (C-148-
3t-p).
WANTED TO BUY: Small, used
air conditioner in good shape.
3,000 4,000 BTU. Call UF ext.
2832, Jim Moorhead. (C-149-
tf-nc).
MALE ROOMMATE to share 2 BR
A/C apt, in Village Park. Ph. 372-
1541; 1001 SW 16th Ave. Apt. 20.
(C-149-3t-p).



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

wanted
HAVE FUN IN A/C by the sea.
Need two riders to Atlantic City,
or Philadelphia, August 10th. S3O.
Call 466-3237. (C-150-lt-c).
NEED A FOURTH RESPONSIBLE
MALE roommate to share a 2BR
French Quarter apt. for Sept. 378-
4717. (C-150-lt-c).
REWARD!
SIOO.OO
For Information Leading To
The Recovery Os MARK, A
Large, Black & Tan German
Shepherd Male That Strayed
From FLORIDA FIELD July
4th. Left Eye Is Completely
Gray & Unmistakably Blind.
Joe Stanley, Apt. 403,Lake 403,Lakeshore
shore 403,Lakeshore Towers. Ph. 376-4456

TO ALL STUDENTS U
\W%if AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL T
if
I 'V CAFETERIA
I 1212 N. MAIN ST.J4_ mJn^ron^Campu^
Mm grant mmm ersaM
f JMHTTM To 1

wanted
LOOKING FOR APT. to share with
three other girls in Village Park
area or near campus. Call 372-
8441 or 376-3211, ext. 5346. (C (C---150-lt-c).
--150-lt-c). (C---150-lt-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted for
fall trimester to share modern
1 BR A/C apt. across street from
Ramada Inn. 372-6235. (C-150-
lt-p).
' " ' 1 1
NEED ROOM WITH FAMILY near
P. K. Yonge for 4 wks. in Sept,
before internship. Call Jeanie,
372-6381, rm. 1125. Leave mes message.
sage. message. (C- 150- lt-p).
Gator Ads Just Kill Me!

Friday, July 22, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

help wanted
TEACHERS WANTED, Southwest,
entire West and Alaska. Salaries
$5400 up Free registration.
Southwest Teachers Agency, 1303
Central Ave., NE, Albuquerque,
New Mexico. (E-131-7t-p).
LIFE GUARDS AND GATE MEN
to work at Camp Wauburg. Start
to work immediately. Call Mr.
Scott, 466-3171. (E-150-2t-c).
HALFTIME STUDENT beginning
fall term. Excellent salary. Must
be able to work 30 hours per week.
Ph. 376-8314 after 5 p.m. (E- 150-
2t-nc).
TWO COLLEGE GRADS not satis satisfied
fied satisfied with less than SIO,OOO a yr.,
age 21-30, married preferred,
military obligation complete, sell
CIP to seniors and grad students
on deferred payment plan. Two men
selected will receive extensive
home office training. Contact Roy
Girod, Manager, American General
Life Insurance Co., 201 Security
Bldg. Ph. 376-8527. (E- 148-4 t-c).
MALE TALKERS WANTED. Men
between the ages of 30-89 will be
paid $2 for a maximum of 15 min.
to record their voices. Those men
interested should call for an ap appointment
pointment appointment from Mrs. Paulus at
376-3261, ext. 2039 or make an
appointment at the Com munications
Sciences Lab on campus, Bldg. L,
rm. 2Q2. (E-148-3t-c).
GOOD INCOME. Part or full time
in selling the new line of Holiday
Magic Cosmetics. Call Mr. Croy
or Mrs. Gill. 378-1591. (E-143-
ts-c).
I
autos
1962 AH SPRITE. Excellent shape,
with brand new top, tonneau, roll
bar and tires. Also Honda 305 Super
Hawk and Omega DII Enlarger. Call
Bob at 376-2320 or call 376-4995
and leave message. (G-147-tf-nc).

r|
i^jjM
* See your Credit Union
GainafvilU, Fla., A
_ FIDO T RADIO ROAD
Campu* F.d.ral 0 0
Cradit Union

Page 7

r
autos
EXCELLENT 1960 VW. Sunroof,
radio. Leaving country, will sell
at best offer. 1614 NW 4th St.
Ph. 376-4258. (G-150-lt-c).
1960 ALFA ROMEO convertible.
Good tires (2 spares), white/blue
stripes, engine completely re reworked.
worked. reworked. Twin Weber down-draught
carburetors. A real sharp sports
car. $795. 376-4271. (G-149-2t-p).
1965-1/2 TR 4-A British racing
green, wire wheels, mahogany
dashboard. Only 11 mos. old.
Leather interior. Asking $2050,
but will consider trade for Volks Volkswagen.
wagen. Volkswagen. Call Gordon at 376-1345.
(G-146tf-nc).
1961 RENAULT DAUPHINE. Top
mechanical condition. 38 mi./gal.
Radio, new tires. s3so* Call 8-3651
or IJniv. ext. 2309 or 2876. Ask
for Joe. (G-149 2tp).
1963 CORVAIR MONZA SPYDER,
convertible, new tires, new paint,
4-speed, lots of gauges. Asking
$1250. Call 8-2742 after 2 p.m.
(G- 150- 2t c).
1955 FORD. 4-door, radio and
heater, good tires. slls. 1311 NE
17th Ave. after 5 p.m. (G-150-
lt-c).
MGB 64, excellent condition,
new top and tires, must sell, grad
student leaving. See between 5-7
p.m. any day. 2026 W. Univ. Ave.,
Apt. 12. (G-150-lt-c).
1953 PLYMOUTH. One owner,
81,000 miles. Good mechanical
condition. $75. Contact 376-3211.
(G-150-lt-c).
1961 CHEVY IMPALA, Factory
A/C, V-8, R & H, automatictrans.
and power steering. Call 378-1017.
(G-150-lt-p).
1963 FORD FAIRLANE 500, 4 door,
V-8, R & H, AT, clean, low mile mileage.
age. mileage. $950. Call Carole at Univ. Ext.
2767 or 376-8105 after 5 p.m. (G (G---150-lt-p).
--150-lt-p). (G---150-lt-p).

autos
1965 MGB, 13,000 miles. Wire
wheels, R & H, leather upholstery.
SI9OO. Will consider trade. Call
378-3239. (G-150-lt-p).
real estate
2 BR furnished A/C house. Ideal
for student family. One mile west
of city limits. Call 372-5511 after
6 or weekends. (I- 150-2 t-c).
| lost-found
LOST: Pair of dark framed pre prescription
scription prescription glasses in vicinity of
SW 4th Ave. near Univ. Call Neal,
Hotel Thomas. Reward. (L-149-
2t-c).
REWARD lnfo, leading to return
of black and white 1964 Yamaha
250 cc. Taken from A.F.A. area on
June 29th. Write K. Shearlock,
2307 SW 16th PI. (J- 149-2 t-p).
LOST: Gray rimmed prescription
glasses in black case, near Archi Architecture
tecture Architecture and Fine Arts Building. If
found call 376-4953 after 6 p.m.
REWARD. (L-150-lt-p).
personal
TRAVEL FUN: Tour New England
Playground of the Nation. Port Portland
land Portland Old Orchard Beach, Maine,
Conway, N. H., New York. Around
Aug. 10-31. Share expenses. Con Contact
tact Contact Dan Gray. 378-4052. (J-150-
lt-p).
JOE: Think I lost jade ring in your
Sprite on Saturday after the GRE.
Please contact Mimi, 372-9419.
(L-150-lt-c).
$ REWARD $ for information or
return of purse and contents, lost
in Village Park area. J. Gail Guynn,
378-1991, or 372-5048. (J-150-
lt-c).
VISIT GATOR GROOMER where
romance blooms. Next door to
Univ. P.O. Self-service and pro professional
fessional professional laundry and dry cleaning.
(J-131-ts-c).
services
IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios. 372-0300. (M (M---131-ts-c).
--131-ts-c). (M---131-ts-c).
Table lamps, $1 and up. FAMILY
THRIFT STORE. 202 SE Ist Ave.
Ph. 376-9255. (M- 141-ts-c).
WONDERING IF YOUR
CASH WILL SURVIVE
THE MONTH????
SI
PATRONIZE GATOR
ADVERTISERS FOR THE
BEST BUYS ANYWHERE I



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 22, 1966

The major alteration of the bill
by the committee was a change
from one drawing and guaranteed
rotation to a drawing prior to each
game.
Opponents of the original bill
surmised that too much bloc blocjumping
jumping blocjumping would take place when
the position of the blocs in the
stands was known prior to the time
students turned*, in their activity
cards to the group with which they
wanted to sit.
The altered bill would require
the drawing be made after the size
of each bloc had been determined
as a result of students already

ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE,
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE, CAMPUS
urange ani blue bulletin
Campus Calendar

Friday U. S. Navy: 123 FU, 8:30 a.m.-
July 22 5:00 p.m. Testing.
The Fantasticks: P, K. YongeAud.,
8:15 p.m.
FU Street Dance: South side of FU,
8 p.m. Wrong Numbers will
play.
Bent Card Coffee House Presents:
9:15 p.m. The coolest sound in
jazz ever to hit the UF, The Gary
Sadler Trio; the mellow harmony
of Doug and Laurie; the wild rhy rhythm
thm rhythm of Mike Powell and his Congo
drum; the original Travel Agency
Folk Rock Quartet.
Saturday Summer Frolics: Fla. Gym, Bp.m.
July 23 The Highwaymen and The Cyrkle.
Movie: Fall of the House of Ush Usher,
er, Usher, MSB Aud., 7 & 9 p.m.
Bent Card Coffee House Presents:
Post Frolics folk funfest. Tiny
Tim Thompson on guitar and
banjo; Sally Sandals Frazer
and her exquisite voice and gui guitar
tar guitar style; Doug and Laurie, the
pied pipers of folk music; The
Old Timey Green Grass City
Kickers.
Sunday Duplicate Bridge: 215 FU, 1:30 p.m.
July 24 Students, faculty and staff only.
Liberal Forum: Johnson Lounge,
7:30 p.m.
Monday Student Economy Committee
July 25 (Treasurers): 210 FU, 4 .p.m. .
Tuesday Leg Council: 208 FU and FU Aufr,
July 26 7:30 p.m.
Union Board: 215 FU, 4:45 p.m,'
Tuesday Evening Supper Club:
Presbyterian Student Center,
6:30 p.m. Non-denominational.
Everyone single and V' r 21 in-
vited. SI.OO. %
ACCENT: 123 FU, 4:15 ^m.
College of Education Lecture:
Norman Hall Aud., Vo p.m.
George Spache, You Can Read
Better.
Summer Symphony Orchestra:
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Robert Schieber, conductor.

ICASH LOANS MONEY
I AVAILABLE VACATION AVAILABLE
I $25 to S6OO VACATION Up to S6OO
I PAYDAY-SHORT TERMS II J? FOR YOUR SECOND CAR
1 376-5333 /ViQrion rinance Lo. 222W.u n ivw$nyAv>.

Lack Os Quorum Beats Bill

LONG ON RETURNS --GATOR ADS

having turned in their seating re requests.
quests. requests.
The new bill also specifies the
area in which the bloc would be
seated. The area consists of the
entire south side of the East Stands
starting from the 50-yard line and
filling in towards the end zone.
Carnes, who introduced the orig original
inal original bill said he still thought his
original bill was the fairer of the
two since it insured that all blocs
would be rotated during the season
and every bloc would run the range
of the best to the poorest seats.
Under the new bill, it is possible
for a bloc to receive seats on the

fro* Poflt 1

fifty or in the end section at
every home game.
A provision of the new bill pre prevents
vents prevents a bloc from sitting in a
designated priority area on the
50-yard line more than once during
the season.
The Fair Bloc Seating Bill was
introduced to replace the present
system of bloc allocation which is
in the hands of the student body
president. The guidelines of the
presidents seating committee
have NOT been publicized.
Student Body President Buddy
Jacobs, who supported the original
bill with only minor alterations,

Wednesday Secretary of Married Students As-
July 27 fairs: 118 FU, 5:30 p.m.
Florida Speological Society: 212
FU, 7 p.m.
Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity: 116
FU, 7:30 p.m.
Florida Players: Norman Hall Aud.
7:30 p.m. Papa Is* All.
Fine Arts Films: 105-B AFA,
8 p.m. Art and Motion.
Thursday Christian .Science Organization:
July 28 FU Aud., 5:15 p.m.
Theology of the Modern World Lec Lecture-Discussion
ture-Discussion Lecture-Discussion Series: Episco Episcopal
pal Episcopal Student Center, 8 p.m. T. W.
Herbert will speak on Hamilton
& Altizers Radical Theology.
Fine Arts Films: 165-B AFA, 4:15
p.m. Art and Motion.
Florida Players: NoYmap Hall AudC
7:30 p.m. Papa Is All.*
Recital: University Aud.,.B:isp.-m.
Elizabeth Francis, pianist.
4
* V*
,N V 1 .
> % *' 1
*
- v 'V. *
-Others 'ft^NSAf reserved section,
/ > west wing, Maift Cafeteria, 11:15
< 1:15 fe.nru Students and faculty
> V Florida Players Ticket Sales: FU
v C Box.Office, noon-4:30jj.m., Mon:
thru Fri.; Norman Hall, 5:30-
* Curtain Time, Wed. th#u Fri;
and 3 p.m.-Curtain Time,Satur Time,Saturx
x Time,Saturx day. Monday, July 25-Saturday,
July 30.
FU Trip to St. Augustine: Saturday,
July 30. Leave FU at 12 noon,
*. return 12 midnight. SB.OO. Make
payment in 315 FU, or send
check payable to FU to 315 FU.
For more information, call ext.
2741.
FU Trip to Guatemala: Aug. 15
Aug. 22. $255.00 per person. For
more information come by or
call 315 FU, ext. 2741. Also sign
up at 315 FU.

has stated that he will insure fair
bloc seating this football season
whether or not the Council is able
to agree on one of the present bills.

STUDENT DISCOUNT 40i|
FLY FLORIDA AIR TAXI I
GAINESVILLE TO TAMPA $ 9.60 I
GAINESVILLE TO FORT MYERS SIB.OO I
(All Fares Plus Tax) I
This new summer rate is now in effect. Tickets I
must be purchased over the counter at Gaines- IflCPl
ville Municipal Airport at least two hours prior O # OIvOOB
to departure time. For complete information 1

General Notices
TO STUDENTS:
GRADUATE ASSISTANTS HIPS: The Computing
Centei* offers in mathematics,
statistics, engineering and other related sciences
opportunities as graduate assistants in computer
programming. Interested persons should contact
the Computing Center.
S N
STUDENT WANTED: Part-time drawing. Con Contact
tact Contact Dr. M>. L. Muga, 406-B, Nuclear Science
Building, Ext. 2398.
;


* GENBRAL NOTICES:
. . A
* COMPUTErTsP!UTDOSVN: During the period
of-Aug. 15 Sept. 16, the Commuting Center will
bg making preparations for the installation of the
rjew System/360. For one week during this time
(dates to be apnounced), the 709 computer will
not be available for processing. Please arrange
work schedules accordingly.
*
FILM SERIES: The Student Chapter of the
American Institute of Architects will present
Art and Motion at 8 p.m., July 27, in Room
105-B, Architecture and Fine Arts. Non-mem Non-members
bers Non-members will be charged 25 cents.
RELIGIOUS DISCUSSION: T. Walter Herbert
Jr. will lead the discussion of Hamilton and Al Altizers
tizers Altizers Radical Theology at 8 p.m., Thursday,
July 28, at the Episcopal Student Center.
ACM MEETING: Heinz Dinter, president of
the local chapter of the Association for Com Computing
puting Computing Machinery, will speak at the associations
monthly meeting July 26, at 7:30 p.m., in Room
103-B, Architecture and Fine Arts. His topic
will be The World of Travel Information Sys Systems
tems Systems Curse or Blessing.

XEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, 10£ ea.
20 & Over, 9£
Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS \ WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE