Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Vol. 58, No. 149

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B.
Claude Kirk, GOP gubernatorial candidate, meets Alligator Managing
Editor Steve Smith. Smith interviewed Kirk and the results appear
below.
Florida Can Be
No. 1 Says Kirk
By STEVE SMITH
Managing Editor
Republican gubernatorial nominee Claude Kirk made a whirlwind
visit to the UF campus yesterday and told students that his business businessmans
mans businessmans approach to state government can make Florida number one
in all endeavors.
Kirk, a successful business executive from Jacksonville and Palm
Beach, stopped in at a Board of Regents meeting in Tigert Hall and
visited briefly in the colleges of business administration and education.
He also came to The Alligator office for a brief interview and attended
a reception in Florida Unions Bryan Lounge.
Kirk followed his businessmans approach a political soft sell
-- to the election down the line. Im not in politics, he said. Im
running for a job in a $2 billion business.
This is a citizens government, and I just happen to be a citizen
who asks his fellow citizens to hire him to run the business.
Kirk refused to be labelled as a conservativeor liberal think thinker:
er: thinker: This is not a slogan business. You cant run a $2 billion business
with signboards.
On education, Kirk refused to go into specific plans, but said that he
has set a goal for Florida education: Somebody has to be number one,
and theres no reason why it shouldnt be Florida. In education as in
other areas, Kirk promised a long-run, not a short-run program,
one built on a business-like approach.
Kirk pointed out that Florida will soon pass New Jersey and become
the eighth state in population.
He stressed that his background as a businessman qualifies him
as the candidate closest to the people.
Im the only candidate in history whos been involved with every
Main Street in Florida, he said. I dont have to go to meetings to
find out what the problems are.
(See KIRK,Page 5)

KILL THE UMPIRE I!

Alligator catcher Mike Garcia puts the tag on an
SG Good Guy for the out. UF President J. Wayne
Reitz called him safe but the picture shows other otherwise.

fje Jflortba alligator

wise. otherwise. The Alligator Muckrakers were shouting
Kill the umpire but not too loud. After all, he is
president.

University of Florida

Fair Blot Seating Bill
Is Sent To Committee

By 808 MENAKER
Executive Editor
The Fair Bloc Seating bill, called
by some the most important bill to
come before Legislative Council in
several years, made its debut on
the council floor Tuesday night.
Decision Partys Tom Carnes
introduced the bill, which calls
for a strict rotation of four
equally divided blocs. The bill
also does away with all privileged
seating, with the exception of the
Gator Band and the card section.
An organization may receive
privileged seating for any or all
home games, provided that it is
recommended for such seating by
the president of the student body
and approved by a two-thirds vote
of Leg Council.
Student Body President Buddy
Jacobs appeared before Leg Coun Council
cil Council to support the bill.
Im sick of petty politics,
Jacobs said, referring to alleged
threats made to some council
..iembers, and picket outside tne
Florida Union and a poop sheet
thrown Monday night.
You better make sure youre
making your own decision, based
on your own individual feelings,
he charged the council. Youve
got a job to do. Stand tall.
After a prolonged debate, Stu-

Slogan Deadline
Is Approaching

The deadline for entries in the
1966 Homecoming Slogan Contest
is rapidly approaching.
Anthony Capitino, this years
chairman, reports that entries
must be submitted no later than
midnight July 17. Thus far more
than 600 entries have been re received
ceived received in the Blue Key office.
Some of these have come from
as far away as Maine and Penn Pennsylvania.
sylvania. Pennsylvania.
This years prizes include a
weekend in Jamaica via BWIA

W
iSiH
JACOBS
dent Partys Dave Vosloh moved
for a special committee to inves investigate
tigate investigate the bill, which was revised
by Carnes from the original.
His amendment, which also
called for a special Leg Council
meeting, was passed.
To become law, a bill must have
two readings. Without the special
meeting, this would not have been
possible.
Carnes, originator of the bill,
agreed with the amendment.

Sun jet as first prize. Other win winners
ners winners will receive a portable stereo
from Couchs and an all-transistor
radio from the College Inn. There
are many other prizes waiting for
the lucky winners.
All entries should be a short
phrase containing seven words or
less and follow a general Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming theme.
Entries should be either mailed
or brought by the Florida Blue Key
office on the third floor of the
Florida Union. Contest entry forms
are being made available in the
campus living areas for any last
minute ideas. These will be picked
up in time to meet the July 17
deadline.
GOPs Rubin
Wants Debate
The UF Young Republicans have
challenged the UF Young Demo Democrats
crats Democrats to a debate between their
respective candidates for Attorney
General.
Republican candidate Ellis
Rubin, speaking in Gainesville July
8, said he would like to debate Earl
Faircloth on campus anytime in
September or October.
The forty-one-year-old Rubin
spoke to the Alachua County Young
Republicans in Gainesville. He
asked that a campus debate be
scheduled so that he could tell the
students about the Republican ideo ideology.
logy. ideology.
I dont believe theyve had an
opportunity to hear it, Rubin said.

Friday, July 15, 1966

This is not the most perfect
bill/ he said. Im willing to ac accept
cept accept anything that will make it
better.
The biggest bombshell of the
night was never exploded.
Student Party majority leader
Eric Smith had an amendment
ready which would have done away
entirely with bloc seating. His bill,
named the Fair Seating Bill,
was written but never presented.
It said: Students will receive
tickets for each game on a first
come, first served basis. Proce Procedures
dures Procedures will be set by the football
seating committee to provide for
speedy distribution of tickets to
eliminate long waiting lines.
This bill shall not be construed
to preclude a standard seating
assignment for the Gator Band
and the smallest number necessary
for the card section.
Carnes bill will be brought up
for its first reading at the next Leg
Council meeting on Tuesday, July
26. A special meeting will be held
the following Thursday for the
second reading.
SG vice president Fred Breeze
is expected to announce the com committee
mittee committee which will be made up of
three members each from Student
and Decisipn Parties, within the
next few days.

The Story
Behind The
Bloc Bill
By ERNIE LITZ
And then none.
After nmich threatening, name namecalling
calling namecalling and overt pressure the UF
legislative council Tuesday night
sent to a special committee the
controversial fair bloc seating
bill.
But the committee will only
temporarily take the monkey off
the councils back because student
body president Buddy Jacobs and
vice president Fred Breeze have
vowed that they will see the final
version of the bill as fair as
possible and voted on this sum summer.
mer. summer.
The real story behind the bill,
however, reads like something out
of lan Fleming. The back-room
politicking on this bill was cer certainly
tainly certainly not Mickey Mouse, but more
like war games of the third ar armored
mored armored division.
The affair began when Decision
Party Blue Key member Drew
Haslitt contacted Decision Party
minority floor leader Tom Carnes
with the idea of proposing a fair
bloc seating bill alohg the lines of
the one originally proposed by
Augie Schildbach (Pres. Graham
Area) last year.
The idea was to initiate the bill
sponsored only by Decision Party
See LITZ, Page 5



Page 2

5, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 15, 1966

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FROLICS HEADLINERS
The Highwaymen and tlje Cyrkle will be here for Summer Frolics
'66. Dont miss it. /
N. CEN. FLORIDA'S LARGEST SELECTION
3W Hearing Is Believing
'SCOTCH BRAND MAGNETIC TAPES
RETAIL WHOLESALE INDUSTRIAL
AND GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTS
No Order Too Large Or Small
COUCHS {?&£??
Complere Selection Scotch
RECORDING TAPES
Th norm iHplw rit tot right to rt(Mato tfc* typornphleaJ Mm o i all atfvtrtlMmtnU tod
to raftaa at ton iMjr copy itlct tt ooldtrt aDjtcttobit.
MO POCmON GUARANTEED, Moat* dlrtd pootttoo will bo fl Wboorror poutblo.
Tbo rtortda AiUgotor will oat ooldtr td)tmtto of poymoot lor up tdvtrtlnt tnrolrUf typt.
liMblfl anon or omoaow Intuit mUm oottoo U gtrm to tbo Advtrttotof Ituxir wttblo
Tbo Elortdo ltt r 4 "- will oot boraapoMMotoraoro tbuaoo looorroet looorttoo of u odvorUooMoat
ocbodotod M rwn nwol boo. Nodou tor oorroettoa Moot bo |lroo botoro oast looorMoa.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR to tbo offldol otaOoot HiOO at tbo UMworwttjr at Florldo ood to
pMtobod IN Urnm wmUi ucapt Mriat mr, Jmo, and July wbto M to >AUAit ooml-wwobly. Owly
t abirtolr rwprwooot too affldoi optob* at tbolr ootboro. Tbo AiHsMer to ootorol u ooooad ctooo
OHM *1 too Uotood Motor Foot Offloo ot OotooorUlo.

Highwaymen,Cyrkle Head
Summer Frolics Show

Saturday, July 23, at 8:30 p.m.
Florida Gym will seem more like
a Go-Go club than the home of
Florida basketball.
Summer Frolics 66 will beheld
there, featuring the Highwaymen
and the Cyrkle (formerly the Rhon Rhondells),
dells), Rhondells), providing a wide contrast of
musical styles.
The Highwaymen, which includes
two former UF students, Renny
Temple and Mose Henry, are well
known for their folk arrangements.
They hold the distinction of hitting
the jackpot with their very first
record, Michael, their arrange arrangement
ment arrangement of the old spiritual, which
sold over 1,000,000 records.
Between the four members of
the group, there is a total of 15
different musical instruments to
lend variety to their arrangements.
The Cyrkle is more of a rock
group with a folk beat mixed in.
Their first big record, Red Rub Rubber
ber Rubber Ball, has sold over 1,000,000
records at this time and is still
going strong.
The Cyrkle was originally the
Rhondells but they were persuaded
to change their name by Brian
Epstein, who also manages the
Wauburg Bus
Service To
Start Again
The Wauburg bus will be running
Saturday and Sunday.
Secretary of Athletics Gordon
Groland announced that a charge of
10 cents each way would be neces necessary
sary necessary to maintain the service.
The bus will stop at Jennings,
Rawlings, Murphree, and Tolbert
between 11 and 11:30. Between
11:30 and 12 it will stop at Dia Diamond,
mond, Diamond, Corry, Schucht and Flavet
in villages.
The bus will return each day
between 3 and 4 p.m.
The bus will make its stops at
the above places between 11 and
11:30 and will repeat the run at 12.

VOLKSWAGEN OF AMERICA, INC.
. | ~,, r ,,,. m|
Make sure you like it before you buy it.
You know how long Volkswagens last.

Like itornot, thatsa Volkswagen. With
all the beauty of the funny-looking one.
An air-cooled engine that can't boil
over or freeze and averages 28 miles per
gallon of gas. Which is pretty good for
a car that goes 84 miles per hour.
We not only put in a lot of what makes
the bug so nice. We also put in a lot of
what makes the bug so nice for so long.
Sweat.
The Volkswagen Fastback is made the
same way Volkswagens were made ten
years ago. Since most of them are still

Miller Brown
1030 East University Avenue Motors, Inc. w

Beatles.
Like the Highwaymen, they also
play a variety of instruments, but
stick mostly to guitars and drums.
This summer they were signed to
accompany the Beatles on their

GAINESVILLES NEWEST!
SUMMIT MtOUSE
APARTMENTS
iiw iin
One hundred, fully furnished,one and two bedroom apart apartments
ments apartments offering all of the outstanding features usually
found only in much higher priced rentals. ..
i -CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONING AND (\V)
A HEATING BY WESTINGHOUSE \^/
/ -BEAUTIFULLY LANDSCAPED POOL
AND PATIO AREA
l FREE, ON PREMISES PARKING
j -MASTER TV ANTENNA (CABLE
(J FACILITIES AVAILABLE)
COMPLETE LAUNDRY FACILITIES
. ECONOMICAL NATURAL GAS COOKING
(f AND WATER HEATING
GAINESVILLE GAS
l'MlSl **
1
CALL
| 376*0668
j NOW
1 i For
4&\' Information
I iv- i
Summit use

around, that couldn't be too bad.
It goes through 3,120 inspections. Noth Nothing
ing Nothing gets into the car that isnt perfect.
For a scratch on the door that only a
trained VW inspector could ever see,
we'll scratch the whole door.
We even take a lot of pains with what
you can see. The paint job involves 2
chemical baths, 3 sandings lone by hand)
and 4 coats of paint.
So first be sure you like the Fastback.
Then be sure to pick a color you can live
with a long time.

tour of the U. S.
Tickets for Summer Frolics are
$1.50 per person and can be pur purchased
chased purchased at the Florida Union ticket
office, Record Bar, Top Tunes and
B elk-Lindsey.



THE FANTASTICKS Is/ Are Coming

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THE CAST

Heres the entire cast of the Fantasticks. From left
are: Steve Conn, Jim Mooty (lying down), Jim Moorhead,

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MUSIC MAESTRO

v
Steve Conn, pianist Mildred Coger and musical
ber for the Fantasticks.

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SHALL WE DANCE?

Chris Smith, Denver Sherry and choreographer
Beth Lessurd practice one of the dance numbers

FORGET ABOUT ISO

Bill Huey, Chris Smith, Denver Sherry, Darryl Worth and
Joan Stout.

director Evelyn McGarrity work out a musical num-

for the Fantasticks.

Friday, July 15, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Edmund Rostand, the author of Cyrano de Ber Bergerac,
gerac, Bergerac, once wrote a play called Les Fantasti Fantastiques.
ques. Fantastiques.
In all his wildest dreams and most romantic
imaginations, Monsieur Rostand probably never
figured on his play being set to music and then
played on the off-Broadway musical stage and ul ultimately
timately ultimately on the boards of P. K. Yonge Auditorium.
But that is, indeed, the pinnacle The Fantasticks
has reached. First, Paris . then, New York .
and now . Gainesville.
And the best part about the Gainesville perfor performance
mance performance is that the audience wont have to endure a
bunch of perfect strangers making a spectacle of
themselves. Rather than having all those New York
rowdies down, the UF Music Department engaged
local talent instead.
Just look at all the familiar faces on this page!
Theres Stage Director Gerald Jones, well-known
Alligator photographer and collaborator on that evil
Charlatan humor magazine.
Theres Music Director Evelyn McGarrity of the
department faculty; Heroine Joan Stout, almost a
fixture in campus musical presentations of whatever
kind; the Mute, Jim Mooty, of Gainesville Little
Theatre fame; the Indian, Steve Conn, whos Student
Publications business manager; the Narrator, Jim
Moorhead, who writes that silly column for The
Alligator; the Actor, Bill Huey, editor of the Croco Crocodile;
dile; Crocodile; and theres Darryl Worth, Denver Sherry, and
Chris Smith -- the Hero and the Fathers, respec respectively
tively respectively who share considerable music credits
among them.
The UF presentation of The Fantasticks doesnt
promise to be as long as the New York run which
is now in its seventh year fora number of reasons.
For one thing, no one in the cast expects to be
around the UF that long, and for another, the show
is free so theres no money in it . and one
cannot live by ham alone. Thus, The Fantasticks
will play only next Thursday and Friday nights in
P. K. Yonge Auditorium, starting at 8:15, and once
more on Monday, July 25, when a special performance
will be given the participants of the Gatorland Band
Clinic.
The pictures here dont begin to reflect the colorful
costuming and lively staging The Fantasticks
promises to have, since they were shot a week-and week-anda-half
a-half week-anda-half before opening. But color and life there will be,
all to the accompaniment of a four-piece orchestra,
to give a lift out of the now-prevalent summertime
doldrums.
If youve been thinking of taking a trip abroad abroadwise,
wise, abroadwise, LSD-wise or otherwise save your money
and go see The Fantasticks instead.

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HARD WORK
Alligator columnist Jim Moorhead, Student Pub Publications
lications Publications business manager Steve Conn and Crocodile
Editor Bill Huey look kind of wistful. Perhaps its the
long hard hours of rehearsal and theyre longing to
relax. &,

Page 3



Page 4

l, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 15, 1966

EDITORIAL
Leg Council:
clean house
wo clasped hands sealed the deal.
requires no signature, no deposit, no threats. Be Because
cause Because a deal is a deal.
For years this fragile system has been used in the
operation of UFs Leg Council: the establishment and
operation of the Councils committees.
The Leg Council in the past has appointed numerous
committees to study legislation, conduct investiga investigations,
tions, investigations, revise rules and every other conceivable no notion.
tion. notion.
It has only one standing committee: the Rules and
Calendar. And its membership is explicitly outlined
in the Councils rules and procedures.
Other committees, formed by the Rules and Calen Calendar
dar Calendar Committee, or by the Council as a majority,
have no guaranteed structure or operating proce procedures.
dures. procedures.
The gentlemans agreement has sufficed in the
past to establish most of the Councils committees,
the Councils procedures and even its membership.
But this has not always proved to be in the best
interest of the Council or the student government.
The gentlemans agreement can allow the majority
leader to name all Leg Council committees %nd
constitute its membership. The agreement calls for
the majority leader to allow membership on the
committees in proportion to the party representation
in the Leg Council.
But, as was shown earlier this term, if the ma majority
jority majority leader wants, he can name all the members
of the committee from his own party.
There is a solution.
The number and type of permanent Leg Council
committees should be included in the Leg Coun Councils
cils Councils Rules and Procedures.
This would not handicap the majority leader in
his appointment prerogative, but only require by
rule that the committee is composed of membership
in proportion to each partys representation in the
Council.
Other changes are also in order for the Councils
procedures.
At present no provisions exist to encourage stu students
dents students to run for re-election to the Council.
Committee appointments on the national level of
government are based on length of representation
and the Congressmans experience.
Not only would this make use of the students
experience by encouraging re-election opportunities,
but it would also prevent summer replacements,
who are appointed by the SG president, from ad advancing
vancing advancing in or obtaining chairmanships on Leg Coun Council
cil Council committees over permanent Council members.
The procedures and policies of the Council often
discourage members from participating in their full
capacity.
We think the Leg Council should make an effort to
put its own house in order, to facilitate legislation.
This move should give Council members more
confidence in the body and encourage more parti participation
cipation participation within the Council, and maybe more interest
from outside the Council and the student government.
What the Council and student government have long
needed is more Interest and participation from out outside
side outside the groups.
Maybe a clean house will encourage visitors.
ljt.#lont>a alligator
EDITOR MANAGING EDITOR
Gene Nail Steve Smith
Executive Editor Eob Menaker
City Editor Yvette Cardozo
Sports Editor Jeff Denkewalter
Photographers Nick Arroyo
Bob Ellison, Sam Johnston, Steve Kanar
Staff Writers Norman Brooks
Alan Burton, Dick Dennis, Mike Malaghan
Tyler Tucker, Bill McGraw
Columnists Mike Garcia
Bill Killeen, Ernie Litz
Andy Moor, Jim Moorhead

f |By JMw i wW M
'MARCH ON, BROTHER, IT'S A FREE ROAD'
JIM
MOORHEAD'S
thinking out loud
People kept asking me Tuesday at that now-infamous Publications-
SG softball classic: Why dont you get in there and play, Moorhead?
Why dont you get in there and play?
So, I showed them why.
Actually, the fact that I went in to cover right field in the sixth
inning and then blew the game for the Muckrakers on Peeks line
drive cannot be pinned entirely on me. A large part of the blame rests
with Charles Schultz.
My sole formal training in the skill of diamond ball has come through
the medium of good ol* Charlie Brown and his Peanuts team. Am I to
be forever ostracized from Union basement society because I, in my
ignorance, thought that Peanuts-style was the way youre SUPPOSED
to play the game? If so, Im writing Schultz this very minute to tell
him hes not welcome around The Alligator offices either.
See if the Great Pumpkin comes to see you next year, Nail!
As for those of you who persist in charging that sabotage was my
motive ... all right . sigh ... I own up to it. And if you think
Tuesdays performance was something, just come to see The Fan Fantasticks
tasticks Fantasticks next Thursday or Friday night in P. K. Yonge Auditorium!
Ill make my ball game debacle look like Humpty Dumptys fall stacked
up next to Pearl Harbor!
My diabolical plan, compounded into several gruesome steps, is
already evilly formulating in my wicked mind.
For openers, the overture will never get off the ground. It will be
the shortest overture since Tchaikowksys 1811 -- superseded four
bars into its opening performance by his 1812. It will be so short, the
Minute Waltz will seem, by cbmparison, to be Ravels Bolero which
in English means song without end.
And it will be that short because spaghetti wet spaghetti will
have been substituted for the harp strings, macaroni will have been
put in place of the piano strings, vermicelli will have been strung on
the bass, and the kettle drums will have been stuffed with tomato paste
and mozarella cheese. On the opening crescendo, the drums will burst
and the entire orchestra will float away in a sea of Mama Moorheadini's
lasagna extravaganza 95 minutes ahead of the shows Venice Lagoon
scene.
This horrendous theme of subterfuge will be sustained throughout
the shows middle when, during the (heh, heh) Rape Ballet, I will
suddenly skewer the Heroine through her lovely middle like a five fivefoot-two
foot-two fivefoot-two shishkebab, daintily switch my alienated affections to the
Hero instead, seize him passionately by his chubby little hand and go
gamboling up the auditorium aisle, brazenly waving a lacy pink sign
which will proclaim Fire Island Or Bust.
I will then park myself in the lobby with a stopwatch to see how long
it will take for the Johns Committee to move in and declare the UF
campus under martial law.
For a closer, following the final curtain to this free-admission
show, the patrons will discover that turnstiles have been nefariously
erected at all the exits with a SSO toll demanded for escape into the
open air. Those refusing to pay will have to sit through an encore
performance.
Once this discovery has raced through the audience like wildfire,
the resultant explosion will be the sound of P. K. Yonge Auditorium
mushrooming into an infinity of apoplectic bombardment. It will be
the grandest finale since the Last Day of Pompeii.
There, Nail . you see what happens when you push a nice guy
too far?
And by the way, Readers . youd better come see the Thursday
performance of The Fantasticks. It appears there wont be one on
Friday.

ERNIE LITZ'S Qf)o 0f d the
\Ji schooner
This columnist has beenafrequent critic of Student
Body President Buddy Jacobs. The current Leg Coun Council-bloc
cil-bloc Council-bloc seating bill controversy has revealed a new
side of Jacobs, however.
The bill is one of the most daring attempts by stu student
dent student leaders to really do something for UF students.
And heading the list of those fighting FOR the stu students
dents students against a handful of greedy politicos is a bold
Jacobs himself.
While it may seem strange (it certainly feels
strange!) I must join ranks behind the SG president
and support him and his stand. I am proud to join
with him, Augie Schildbach, Charles Shepherd, Fred
Breeze and Gene Nail in working for this legislation.
With this type of leadership, if continued, maybe
student government wont really have to take No for
an answer.
The original strategy of Drew Haslitt & Co. to
propose the bill and have it fail (blaming Jacobs in
the process) was shrewdly analytical. Then we turned
the tables and had the opposition on the run.
What worries this columnist is that after the Leg
Council meeting, and after the bill was sent to a
special committee (see stories this issue) headed
by veep Breeze, everyone looked very happy (even
the opposition). The only way out for those against
the bill was to waylay it in committee. That way
they could prevent a vote on the bill itself.
Passage means an end to the political spoils
system of bloc seating (and privileged seating) and
defeat spells ill for student politicos in the fall and
spring elections when the record will be dragged out.
This columnist sees the only alternative left for
the opponents as either buying the bill in committee,
or gaining the votes necessary to beat the bill on
the floor. (Having privileged seating has priority
over what the student electorate desires.)
As it stands now President Jacobs and Vice Presi President
dent President Breeze (with the support of The Alligator, IFC
and Mens and Womens Interhall Councils) are ready
to use all means necessary and available to bring
the best bill possible to the floor and pass it --
even if it means calling Leg Council into special
session every night for the rest of the trimester.
The other alternative is to get the bill out, defeat
it and then blame it on Jacobs since it is his bill.
For this Jacobs opponents would have to join ranks
with some of his supporters (behind the scenes) and,
in effect, knife him in the back.
It has reached the point where students have closed
ranks to fight for their own best interests of the
student body (hard though may be to believe!).
And neither Florida Blue Key nor any other power
group can exert enough pressure to stop them.
On this occasion my hat is off to President Jacobs!
* *
Other notes around campii:
Why did Eric Smith oppose allowing the guests of
Buddy Jacobs to sit with Jacobs at the Leg Council
meeting? It couldnt be that Eric has even more
enemies than he has now? Smith has not only offended
the minority and majority parties but his own club
(Blue Key) regards him as a black sheep. One Key
informed me, He is like having a bull in a China
shop. He runs amok like someone powerful when all
he is really doing is being frenzied. And why is
Eric behind proposed legislation to end all bloc
seating?
... To Clyde Taylor a real Thank You for a
man with real integrity. He means what he says, and
keeps his promises. A completely atypical IFC prexy
he gets my nomination for truly being the outstanding
student leader for 1966!
. . Whatever happened to the investigation of
food service requested by Chancellor J. Broward
Culpepper to Dr. Reitz?
*-. Why is Mike Bowen getting so much oppo opposition
sition opposition and pressure in his efforts to ascertain the
truth about the Lyceum Council and its financial
operations?
... No Dr. Reitz, a strike is NOT any pitch that
the batter does not swing at. In any event, a sincere
thanks to Dr. Reitz, vice president Mautz and Dean
Adams for taking the time and trouble to umpire
the SG-Alligator softball fiasco. (Wait till next year 0
... Is Bob Harper really Maury Wills with an
ATO pin?
... To Wayne Rich and Jim Clark: see, where all
things are possible some may be predicted ... To
Mark Valenti: even a fish can flounder . and to
Bruce Rogow: how can a Prune play softball
anyway? ... Is it true that if Dave Vosloh were at
the original Constitutional Convention, he would have
amended the title of the Constitution? . Why is it
that John Darlson cant hit the curve ball in the
Student Government office? ... If there were any
more TEPs on the Muckrakers they could have held
a chapter meeting at shortstop. M. E. Menaker cer certainly
tainly certainly can pull them out of his you-know-what .
There is no truth to the rumor that photographers
shot pictures of this columnist running around the
bases at the softball game for a commercial for the
Alka-Seltzer people . George Anderson is a
proud addition to the SG offices (and the hot cor corner?)
ner?) corner?) .



1 111 llffi fN
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y>

Claude Kirk meets with officers of UFs Students
for Kirk. From left are: vice chairmen Fred Bag Bagget
get Bagget and Steve Toothaker, chairman Ken Rast, former

From Page 1

They dont have to be controlled
by government. Kirk dwelt on
the encroachment of centralized
government in the state. He said
the issue of whether government
will be the master or the servant
of the people is the philosophical
fight in Florida today.
Kirks campaign, he said, will
include no sloganism or charac character
ter character assassination. He is going to
publish white papers in order orderly
ly orderly fashion over the next few
months, to tell the voters in clear,
concise, detailed plans what he
will do as governor.
Admitting the obvious, Kirk did
not understate the fact that we are
the underdog. And the underdog underdogneeds
needs underdogneeds money. But, Kirk said, If
I didnt feel I could win, I wouldnt
have filed.
The Republican brushed aside
Highs advantage of a well-entren well-entrenched
ched well-entrenched and confident organization.
There is only one candidate I
worry about and his name is Kirk.
The Kirk team will be success successful
ful successful all over Florida, he predicted.
On the UF campus Kirk said he is
producing a competitive, getting
grass roots support.
He called on every student to
get involved with the Kirk team,
but also said If you dont get
involved with Kirk, get involved
somehow -- this is the business
of democracy.
Kirk, a young candidate himself,
felt a need for government to be
more involved with young leaders,
so we can create a government in
a more positive way to turn over
to them.
XEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, 10? ea.
20 & Over, 9?
Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS \ WEEK
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1620 WEST UNIVERSITY -WE
WONDERING IF YOUR
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THE MONTH???? ''
J i
PATRONIZE 'GATOR
ADVERTISERS FOR THE
BEST BUYS ANYWHEREI

KIRK MEETS SUPPORTERS

KIRK

He hit the same, theme at a Jay Jaycees
cees Jaycees luncheon following his visit
to the campus. Young men are
the leaders of today -- not to tomorrow,
morrow, tomorrow, he said.
Kirk also told the Jayeeesthat,
population-wise, Florida is in
the big ten now lets start act acting
ing acting like were in the big ten.
The occasion of Kirks visit to
the campus, he said, was recog recognition
nition recognition of the newly announced
Students for Kirk group, as well
as yesterdays Board of Regents
meeting.
Ken Rast has been named Stu Students
dents Students for Kirk chairman. Rast,
3LW, is from Leesburg. Other
leaders in the Kirk student or organization
ganization organization are Steve Toothaker,
3LW from Winter Park,- vice
chairman; Fred Baggett, 3AS
from Fort Walton Beach, vice
chairman; and Bill McCollum,
3LW from Brooksville, public
relations coordinator.
Students for Kirk will work di directly
rectly directly under the candidates state
organization, through the county
headquarters.
Kirks businessmans cam campaign

*
Act Now
or
UNIVERSITY
700 s.w. 16th A ve. /Inr/tsuc
376-6720 yUIUCnS

chairman Chuck Wilson and public relations chair chairman
man chairman Bill McCollum.

paign campaign is backed up by a story of
phenomenal success in insurance
and investments. He came out of
the Korean War, a Marine veter veteran,
an, veteran, with nothing more than S4OB
and a wife and two children.
He took a job doing what ap apparently
parently apparently is one of his real loves,
and at which he is an expert --
selling. After a stretch at selling
building supplies and insurance,
he joined with two other men
and founded the firm which be became
came became American Heritage Life
Insurance Company.
American Heritage was char chartered
tered chartered in 1956, and today has $32
million in assets and S7OO million
worth of insurance in 45 states.
After American Heritage was
well on its feet, Kirk bought into
a partnership with the New York
investment firm of Hayden, Stone,
Inc.
He left these two firms to go into
politics full time and ran unsuc unsuccessfully
cessfully unsuccessfully against Spessard Holland
for the Senate in 1964. Holland de defeated
feated defeated Kirk by a vote of 997,585
to 562,212.
After this campaign he formed
Kirk Investment Company, which
now has offices in Jacksonville,
Palm Beach and New York.

Litz Hits
Blue Key Blitz

The game plan was to have the bill
defeated by the council, blaming it
on Student Party and President
Jacobs. Then it would be an elec election
tion election issue this fall.
But vice president Breeze and
administrative assistant to the
Student Body President Charles
Shepherd decided to turn tin .aides.
They contacted this writer and to together
gether together it was decided to beat the
opposition at their own game.
The bill was to be passed.
First Student Body President
Jacobs called in Carnes and asked
whether the bill was partisan. Ja Jacobs
cobs Jacobs really put the screws on and
it became obvious what was up.
At this point all the factions drew
together and decided that the time
was now.
Jacobs came out for the bill.
Now it must be explained that it
took a certain amount of guts and
courage for Jacobs to do this. The
bill in effect eliminates privileged
seating (including that of Florida
Blue Key) as well as providing an
equitable rotation system whereby
all groups get guaranteed one game
of excellent football seating per
season. By doing this it removes
from political pressure bloc seat seating.
ing. seating. In the past certain powerful
student politicians (such as Jim
Crabtree) in Blue Key had used
football seating as a political plum
to entice and control fraternities
during political elections. /}
The ball began to roll.
This writer contacted Inter Interfraternity
fraternity Interfraternity Council president Clyde
Taylor about the bill.
Now, Taylor is one of those rare
individuals that like to keep their
promises AFTER elected. When
running for IFC president he
pledged* himself to work for a fair
bloc seating system. This bill of offered
fered offered him that opportunity, and he
accepted it. Taylors premise is
quite logical: simply that by re removing
moving removing bloc seating from politics
it would help the fraternities from
fighting and squabbling among
themselves, and free them to spend
more time on other important
Greek problems.
Declaring for the bill were the

See Whet s New H 1
The Browse Shop I
THE HABBIT J. R. R. Tolkien I
THE FOUNTAINHEAD A y n Rand I
EYELESS IN GOYA Aldous Huxley I
METHODS AND MATERIALS OF PAINTING I
VOL I & II Charles Eastlake I
ELEMENTARY NUCLEAR THEORY .Hans Bethe I
THE INTERPRETATION OF BREAMS I
Sigmund Freud 1
HARD COVER I
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS I
LUNCHES AND BRUNCHES I
BETTER HOMES NEW COOK BOOK I
STANDARD HANDBOOK FOR SECRETARIES I
Hutchinson I
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. tc 5:00P.M. I
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to i2:00 i
i'i> fw fe' vV to .* v V 5
1 ^

Friday, July 15, I'JGC, The Florida Alligator

Frow Poqt 1

president of Men's Interhall Coun Council,
cil, Council, and Irene Minkoff, president of
Womens Interhall Council, the two
largest dormitory groups on cam campus.
pus. campus. This is a formidable array of
support, but could they deliver the
votes?
The forces of the opposition in
the meantime were not idle. Mem Members
bers Members of the leg council were called
and offered appointments to the
various student political groups
(i.e., Orientation, Florida Union
Board for Student Activities,
Homecoming, etc.), as well as
other subtle pressures, like if
you keep on working for this bill
you'll never be able to get into
Blue Key.
Working all through the week weekend
end weekend the leadership for the bill
spoke to council members. Having
no pressure group or political
goodies to proffer they could only
argue the merits of the bill.
Twenty minutes before the meet meeting
ing meeting Blue Key members attempted
some last minute power politics.
First Blue Key members Eric-
Smith and Student Party majority
leader (and ehieftan sent to pre prevent
vent prevent Jacobs legislation from up upsetting
setting upsetting the Establishment)
announced that they would attempt
to purge council member Mike
Bowen (a strong proponent of the
bill who is also member of the
controversial Lyceum Council and
Alligator investigating commit committees).
tees). committees). When Jacobs, Shepherd,
Breeze and six other members of
the council stated their intention
to back Bowen, sheerly as an in individual
dividual individual member of the council,
the opposition saw the handwriting
on the wall.
The bill was sent by the council
to a committee to be appointed by
vice president Breeze. The oppo opposition
sition opposition force were somewhat com comforted
forted comforted by the fact that the bill was
not voted on, but this is only be because
cause because certain minor technicalities
remain to be ironed out.
The bill cannot be aruged against
except by those who wish to main maintain
tain maintain the current spoils system
and status quo.
And then there were none.

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 15, 1966

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ENTHUSIASTIC CROWD ~"~
The crowd isnt very big, but they are enthusiastic. Here, the Alligator business staff
takes time out from its pressing business to attend the game. It was the least they could
have done.

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NAIL TOSSES
Alligator Editor Gene Nail (in
the first picture of himself to ap appear
pear appear in his own newspaper) gets
ready to pitch it in. Nail denied
rumors that he once pitched for
the House of David baseball tpam.

ITS USELESS TO ARGUE

What do you mean he partially interfered? protests
Alligator shortstop Norman Brooks (in black sweatshirt).
Thats like saying youre partially pregnant. Needless to
say, The Alligator never wins any protests. This one was

raa^.lii ** **'
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SAFE BUT SORE
Alligator Executive Editor Bob Menaker slams into SG Administrative
Assistant George Anderson at the hot corner. He was safe, but sore.
After the game they exchanged hot water bottles, heating pads and linament,
and went home to collapse.

Photos By:
Nick Arroyo

no exception. From left to right in the rhubarb are Marty
Lurie, Brooks, Gene Nail, Steve Conn, Buddy Jacobs Dean
Adams and Pres. Reitz.

Alligator, SI
Game I
v
A
jt

r Everybody thought the action
and National Leaguers squared
wrong.
The real action took place ol
Muckrakers and the Student I
off in UFs version of a tong war!
It was a real comedy of errors.!
were scored and 14 of them we!
the protagonists from making mo!
and couldnt bend over any further!
Alligator Ace Gene Nail baffle!
batter came to the plate. TheSG!
but the Muckrakers came rig!
It was a close one, right do
underdogs waged a valiant war I
government and his cohorts.
We all know who REALLY wonl
once said, Nobody honors a prow
final score: SG 9, Gator 8.
\ |
\



E Put All-Star
o Shame

\
in St. Louis where the American
for the All-Star game. They were
Perry Field, where the Alligator
ivernment Good Guys squared
was the only game where 15 runs
jnearned. The only thing that kept
irror.s was because they were sore
he Good Guys until their first
ces jumped on Gene for six runs,
hack and soon the score was tied,
he wire. Undaunted, the Alligator
tainst the Fu Manchu of student
3ut then again, as an ancient sage
in a million years. By the way,
/
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'YER FADDERS MOUSTACHE

Aw, yerfadders moustache. It seem seemed
ed seemed like that was what Bob Menaker was
saying to Dr. Reitz. Actually it-s only

V KENRO KID TAKES A TUMBLE

f o
darkroom ace Jim Kenro Kid Neff legs
wit out for an infield hit as Tom Carnes makes a futile

ill Hb >^. #
ON THE NOSE

Charlatan Editor and sometimes Alligator columnist Bill
Killeen hits it on the nose as Dr. Reitz and SG Secretary of
Athletics Gordon Lefty Groland look on. Killeen went

wishful thinking. Besides, how can you
play ball without arguing with the umpire?

W
TED TAKES A TUMBLE
Tennessee Ted Litz takes a tumble while chasing
the ball. Litz denied rumors after the game that Alka-
Seltzer had offered him and his stomach a long-term
contract to make commercials.

effort. Calling the play is UFs Vice President for
Academic Affairs Robert Mautz.

four-for-four, which goes to show that even jaded old men
sometimes have a good day.

Friday, July 15, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

...Mm*
IN GOOD FUN?
Oh, it was all in guou fun, says Gator Editor
Gene Nail to SG Prexy Buddy Jacobs, as Minority
Leader Tom Carnes looks on. What Nail really said
was Wait until you see Fridays paper.

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| for sale
ATTENTION: Employees Uni University
versity University of Florida. We have 7
Flavet units left. Delivered to your
lot for SISOO cash. Midstate En Engineers,
gineers, Engineers, Inc. 378-2151, P.O. Box
14491, Univ. Station. (A-149-3t-c).
8 x 30 LUXOR TRAILER with
8 x 21 cabana. A/C, carpeted
living room, TV and antenna, new
20 gal. hot water heater, insur insurance
ance insurance premiums. 6-3211, ext. 5637,
or 6-0959 after 5:15. (A- 149-3 t-c).
8 x 30 A/C HOUSE TRAILER.
Can be seen at Lot F-6, Hill Crest
Park. Call 372- .627. (A-149-3t-p).
TWO NEW AUTHENTIC VIETNA VIETNAMESE
MESE VIETNAMESE GOWNS. Black brocade,
white trousers. Sizes 12, 14. $lO
each. Call 372-4931. (A- 149-2 t-p).
11 FIBERGLASS SAILBOAT,
dacron main sail and jib, trailer,
one yr. old. Excellent. $350. Ph.
376-4449. (A-149-lt-p).
TWO HOLLYWOOD BEDS, $35;
Studio couch, S3O; Complete living
room set, $75; Flexible metal desk
lamp, $6; Brown metal shelves,
$9; Walnut wall cabinet, $4; Power
mower, hose and rake, sll. 376-
9094. (A-149-lt-c).
2 BR, 8 x 50 MOBILE HOME with
10 x 20 aluminum patio awning.
Step-up front kitchen full equipped
with wall oven. New wall to wall
carpeting. Only 3 mins, from cam campus
pus campus on Archer Rd. with yr.round
pool privileges. Total price $2,000.
Down payment can be arranged.
Monthly payment SBO including lot
space. Call 372-5135. (A-149-
lt-c).
US. DIVERS AQUA LUNG. Full
size regulator overhauled by man manufacturer
ufacturer manufacturer since last used. S6O.
Ph. 378-4447. (A-149-lt-c).
M-l CARBINE, semi-automatic.
Almost new. (Universalstock)s7s.
1957 VW. Good running condition,
S2OO. Contact Teddy Garcia, 128
NW 3rd Ave. Ph. 372-6097. (A (A---149-lt-p).
--149-lt-p). (A---149-lt-p).
BOLEX Bmm Zoom Reflex P-1.
$374 retail; $195. Call 372-6178.
(A- 148-ts-c).
1957 MOBILE HOME, Bx34, 2 BR.
Completely furnished, good condi condition,
tion, condition, Glynwood Trailer Park, lot
#l7. Call 376-9138. (A- 148-2 t-c).
SPECIAL FOR STUDENTS. Air
conditioners Admiral. Perfect
for Diamond, Corrv and Schucht
Villages, apt. and trailers. All
sizes. Sudden Service Fuel Oil
Co., 907 SW 3rd St., Ph. 376-4404.
(A- 142-ts-c).
FOR SALE: 1964 Allstate Motor
Scooter. 1600 miles. Asking S3OO
or best reasonable offer. Call 378-
4341. (A- 145-4 t-c).
for rent
TRIPLEX APT. furnished to sublet
at loss. SSO rent during August.
723 SE sth Ave. Call Eric, Univ.
6-3261, ext. 2171. (B-148-2t-c).
g Peter Sellers Sue Lyons \
i Shelley Winters James Masonl
l"L6Lvrft" I
% Plus Dave Clark Five
Wed.-Sat. f
2nd Best Secret J
Agent
STOUT

j ]
! for rent
{ :
ONE BR A/C APT. One block from
campus. SBS/mo. Call Keystone
Heights. 473-4135. (B-149-ts-c).
2 ROOM UNITS, furnished. Re Refrigerators,
frigerators, Refrigerators, no kitchen, private
entrance, ground floor. Two blocks
from campus. Call 376-6494. (B (B---149-3t-c).
--149-3t-c). (B---149-3t-c).
LARGE 3 BR FURNISHED HOUSE:
four persons sl6s/mo. 2 BR
furnished duplex: 3 persons
$125/mo. A/C. Quiet area. 12 mo.
lease. 3 blocks campus. 376-6494.
(B-149-3t-c).
NICE EFFICIENCY APT. Utilities
furnished, entrances quiet. 311 NW
15th Terr. Ph. 376-2072. (B-149-
1 t-c).
COMFORTABLE AND CONVENI CONVENIENT
ENT CONVENIENT A/C APT. for two. Across
from University with reasonable
summer rates until Sept. 1. Apply
321 SW 13th St. (B-149-lt-c).
2 BR APT. Duplex -- Inex.
Available July 16th thru August
27th. Girls or couple. Call Pete
Kohler, 372-9425. (B-149 Itp).
MODERN A/C, furnished 3 BR,
1 bath CCB house. Sliding glass
doors to patio, built-in oven and
stove, carport, storage. $l6O, or
$l5O on lease. Available now. 3831
NW 16th Place. 376-0894. (B-147-
ts-c).
NOW RENTING FOR FALL. A/C
APTS AND HOUSES. Occupancy
for 3 or 4 students, male or fe female.
male. female. CHARLIE MAYO, Owner.
Town & Country Realty. 376-4664.
(B- 140-ts-c).
3 BR MOBILE HOME, A/C, large
living room, will furnish to suit.
sllO per mo. Ph. 376-9038. (B (B---145-st-c).
--145-st-c). (B---145-st-c).
wanted
ROOMMATE FALL TRIMESTER.
S4O mo. each. Utilities and M.S.
One BR, study, bath, 4 closets.
See at 918 SW Bth Lane. (C-148-
3t-p).
FALL TRIMESTER Coed as 4th
roommate -- French Quarter. Sen Senior
ior Senior or grad, student preferred.
$42.50/mo. plus 1/4 utilities. Call
372-6559 between 5 and 7:30 p.m.
(C-148-3t-p).
WANTED 2 roommates for Sept.
Fontana Apts. $l4O per trimester.
Call Howard Weise, rm. 460, 372-
9435. (C- 148-2 t-p).
2 ROOMMATES wanted for Sept.
SSO a mo. each. Olympia Apts.
Call 372-8173. (C-146-4t-c).
MALE WANTED to share furnished
A/C house beginning Aug. Ist. Own
bedroom downstairs with private
bath. Two blocks campus. $75
monthly. Ph. 376-8644 or 378-
4641. (C-149-ts-c).
WANTED TO BUY: Small, used
air conditioner in good shape.
3,000 4,000 BTU. Call UF ext.
2832, Jim Moorhead. (C-149-
tf-nc
MALE ROOMMATE to share 2 BR
A/C apt, in Village Park. Ph. 372-
1541; 1001 SW 16th Ave. Apt. 20.
(C- 149-3 t-p).

SPECTACULAR I FA ,SJ TASTIC! IS

Page 8

5, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 15, 1966

wanted
L 1
ROOMY WANTED. Girls only.
Private bedroom and economical.
Ph. 376-3261, ext. 2333. (C-149-
lt-c).
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR Sept.,
Village Park Apts., own BR. Pre Prefer
fer Prefer upperclassman or working girl, i
Inquire 378-1991. (C-149-2t-c). J
f
autos
1965-1/2 TR 4-A British racing
green, wire wheels, mahogany
dashboard. Only 11 mos. old.
Leather interior. Asking $2050,
but will consider trade for Volks Volkswagen.
wagen. Volkswagen. Call Gordon at 376-1345.
(G-146-tf-nc).
1961 RENAULT DAUPHINE. Top
mechanical condition. 38 mi./gal.
Radio, new tires. $350. Call 8-3651
or Univ. ext. 2309 or 2876. Ask
for Joe. (G-149-2t-p).
1958 VOLKSWAGEN. Runs well.
Make an offer. Call 372-5132.
(G-149-lt-c).
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1960 ALFA ROMEO convertible.
Good tires (2 spares), white/blue
stripes, engine completely re reworked.
worked. reworked. Twin Weber down-draught
carburetors. A real sharp sports
car. $795. 376-4271. (G-149- 2t-p).

DAIRY TWIST
Just Across University Ave. From Campus.
NOW UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
SPECIAL GETAQUAINTED OFFER
TODAY JULY 15 ONLY
Free
REGULAR SIZE COLD DRINK
WITH THE PURCHASE OF OUR I
BIG BUBGEB,
1706 W. University Ave.
TOMORROW AT 1 j
9:40 PM IJSt I
RUN TO THIS HIT COMEDY
g N.W. 13th St. at 23rd Road I Tu ;
** * b*. 8 **X-*X*X-* B i B*** t
* ;|"*** w * **m'*m**§* B
* f w" w** ** * # ** . B w* 4 y^m
' B w * X *B . B B.
**** B *# B** * * * * B* * * * * **
"""Tjuu e an dre ws diIHV AN ui/Ht 1111
M/edtte&dcufS^
/m WALK, DONT RUn\
/ # CARY GRANT I
1 SAMANTHA JIM I
* EGGAR HUTTON|
I§t panavisiOn* fl
V 2^^^S||P
| IBjil

autos
1962 AH SPRITE. Excellent shape,
with brand new top, tonneau, roll
bar and tires. Also Honda 305 Super
Hawk and Omega DII Enlarger. Call
Bob at 376-2320 or call 376-4995
and leave message. (G-147-tf-nc).



VATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AINISVILIE i

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[STMANCOLOR UNITED ARTISTS/
BbCoToFFICE OPENS 7PM
COMING
IMY fair lady-

prancre and

Campus Calendar
; Friday Hillel: Hillel Foundation, 16 N.W.
1 July 15 18th Street, 7:30 p.m. Friday
I night services. Newcomers are
especially invited. Refresh-
I ments following services.
|| Jennings Social: Jennings Hall, j
I 8 p.m. Primitives will play;
fl everyone invited. Free refresh refresh:f§
:f§ refresh:f§ ments.
ij Movie: Baptist Student Center, 7:15
p.m. The Hustlers, starring
Paul Newman, Jackie Gleason,
Piper Laurie. Free discussion
will follow for those who wish
to stay.
-v University Retreat, Catholic Stu Student
dent Student Center: Catholic Student
Center, 7:30 p.m. 10:00 p.m.,
Friday, July 15; and 9:00 a.m.-
, 1:45 p.m., Saturday, July 16.
University retreat by Fr. Pavid
Knight, S.J. The Hustlers will
be shown Saturday, followed by
a frank discussion. Everyone is
t§ welcome.

I payday short term
I BUDGET MONTHLY
| $75 3O-DAY
I Cost: $2.25 Interest
|r 6-5333

I real estate I
$ 124/mo. includes tax, ins. West Westmoreland
moreland Westmoreland Estates. Spacious bright
3 BR, 2 bath home. Exposed beams,
electric kitchen, beautiful trees,
walking distance Littlewood. A/C,
CH, paved street, sewer. SIOOO
down, part by second mortgage.
Call 372-0942. See at 910 NW 40th
Dr. (l-148-ts-c).
Jtmm truwijjp j Jam
Steve mqueen
KARL MALDEN-BRIAN KEITH
ARTHUR KENNEDY SI
no SUZANNE PLEHHETTEr F ; \
'ALSO SHOWN AT 10^2^^.
Wfpfllmrl

MONEY AVAILABLE
$25 S6OO
MARION FINANCE CO.

Friday, July 15, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

autos
1959 STUDEBAKER. 6 cyl., auto automatic
matic automatic transmission, four new tires.
Good condition. $175. 376-9791
after 6 p.m. (G-149-lt-c).
personal
REWARD -- Info, leading to return
of black and white 1964 Yamaha
250 cc. Taken from A.F.A. area on
June 29th. Write K. Shearlock,
2307 SW 16th PI. (J-149-2t-p).
ATTENTION STUDENTS. The
Crocodile has suspended publi publication
cation publication for the remainder of the
summer. See you in the Fall.
Bill Huey, Editor. (J-149-lt-c).
PERSONAL: IMPEACH THE UM UMPIRE!
PIRE! UMPIRE! (J-149-It- nc).
THE HUSTLER starring Paul New Newman,
man, Newman, Jackie Gleason and Piper
Laurie will be shown in cinema cinemascope
scope cinemascope at the Baptist Student Cen Center
ter Center on July 15 at 7:15 p.m. Ad Admission
mission Admission free. Discussion will fol follow
low follow for those who wish to stay.
(J- 148-2 t-c).

m mrm ITS ELEMENTARY :
fl The Most Student-Minded Businessmen
ADVERTISE IN THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

The Bent Card Coffee House Pre Presents:
sents: Presents: The Art of Modern Dance
by Beth Lessard; Artful tones of
Doug and Laurie; Slides and lec lecture
ture lecture on the Freedom Democratic
Party; The Earthy sounds of the
Old Timey Green Grass City
Kickers.
Saturday Arts & Sciences Dames: Lake
July 16 Wauburg, 11:00 a.m. Picnic for
Arts & Sciences Dames and their
families. Bring your own food.
Movie: MSB Auditorium, 7& 9p.m.
Requiem for a Heavyweight.
Newman Club: Catholic Student
Center, 5:00 p.m. Spaghetti din dinner,
ner, dinner, 75£ per person. A record
hop will follow.
Bent Card Coffee House Presents:
Fine voice of Sandals; Fresh
new sound of Len and Lyn;
Old Timey Green Grass City
Kickers are back again; Hyp Hypnotic
notic Hypnotic beat of the Congo drums
featuring Mike Powell.
Sunday Music Department Recital: MSB
July 17 Aud., 4:00 p.m. Sally Mowery,
flutist.

BLUE BULLETIN

Page 9

personal
VISIT where
romance blooms. Next door to
Univ. P.O. Self-service and pro professional
fessional professional laundry and dry cleaning.
(J-131-tf-cL
lost-found
LOST: Pair of dark framed pre prescription
scription prescription glasses in vicinity of
SW 4th Ave. near Univ. Call Neal,
Hotel Thomas. Reward. (L-149-
2t~c).
SIOO REWARD for information
leading to the recovery of MARK,
a black and tan German Shepherd.
Male, friendly, large. Left eye
completely gray and unmistakably
blind. Wearing chain collar when
last seen at Florida Field July 4th.
Ph. 376-4456. (L-149- lt-p).
LOST: Self-winding Hamilton wrist
watch, silver case. Speidel band,
at LakeWauburg, July 4th. Reward.
Contact Danny Gray, 378-4052.
(L-148-2t-p).
I 71
services j
IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios. 372-0300. (M (M---131-ts-c).
--131-ts-c). (M---131-ts-c).

ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE,
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE

Duplicate Bridge: 215 FU, 1:30
p.m. UF students, faculty and
\ staff only.
General Notices
FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS: The
Foreign Language Examination in Spanish and
all functional examinations will be held at 10
a.m. Saturday, July 16, in Room 18, Anderson
Hall.
RELIGIOUS DISCUSSIONS: Jesus and Myth Mythology'*
ology'* Mythology'* by Rudolph Bultman will be the topic at
8 p.m. Thursday, July 21, at the Methodist
Student Center. Robert Scarborough will lead
the discussion. All interested persons are in invited
vited invited to attend.
SUMMER ARTS FILMS: Toulouse-Lautrec
will be the subject of the film to be shown at
8 p.m. Wednesay, July 20, in Room 105-B of
the College of Architecture and Fine. Arts. 'Hie
series is sponsored by the Student Chapter of
AIA. Non-members will be asked to contribute
25 cents to help cover costs.

services
Table lamps, $1 and up. FAMILY
THRIFT STORE. 202 SE Ist Ave.
Ph. 376-9255. (M-141-ts-c).
help wanted
TWO COLLEGE GRADS not satis satisfied
fied satisfied with less than SIO,OOO a yr.,
age 21-30, married preferred,
military obligation complete, sell
CIP to seniors and grad students
on deferred payment plan. Two men
selected will receive extensive
home office training. Contact Roy
Girod, Manager, American General
Life Insurance Co., 201 Security
Bldg. Ph. 376-8527. (E- 148-4 t-c).
MALE TALKERS WANTED. Men
between the ages of 30-89 will be
paid $2 for a maximum of 15 min.
to record their voices. Those men
interested should call for an ap appointment
pointment appointment from Mrs. Paulus at
376-3261, ext. 2039 or make an
appointment at the Com muni cations
Sciences Lab on campus, Bldg. L,
rm. 202. (E-148-3t-c).
GOOD INCOME. Part or full time
in selling the new line of Holiday
Magic Cosmetics. Call Mr. Croy
or Mrs. Gill. 378-1591. (E-143-
ts-c).

* VACATION
* TRAVEL EXPENSE
* SIOO 3 Monthly
Payments of $35
22 2 W. UNIVERSITY



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 15, 1966

Page 10

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Wrm * IWB wd ~m wW
NEW LAW REVIEW EDITORS
New Law Review staff, from left: Don Stobs, nell and Pat Brown, symposiums editor. Except for
Editor-in-Chief Charles Intriago, Marty Rockwell. Intriago and Brown, the others all hold the title of
Second row: Steve Powell, Bill Haddad. Third row: executive editor.
Vic Canras, Tom Cardwell, Kin Cannon, Greg Pres-

SG To Offer Help Sessions
For UC r C Courses In Fall

Free tutoring sessions for C
courses in American Institutions,
logic, and biology will be offered
by student government beginning
in the fall.
The tutoring classes will be con conducted
ducted conducted for departments which do
not already sponsor their own re review
view review sessions.

The Alligator Fills
In The Background

SGs department of academic
affairs, is conducting the sessions,
which will begin the second week
of the fall trimester. Teachers
will be studenis who have made
As in the courses they instruct,
and who have a high average over overall.
all. overall.
Classes, according to academic
affairs undersecretary Mickey


mpus Federal
I Credit Union fwMp Mp;!
bidg. j HSv BEm
M RAD| o road Mi > rw U
us E*t. 2973 ISfL i|IU ftff n rfMy MBBBfm
i,WKV *PAfto NI ZE" V AT OR V?R TISER S' ''

Dansby, will last one hour a day
on weekdays. For biology an hour
and a half may be offered.
Dansby asked for applications
from students who are interested
in teaching the sessions. Each
teacher will be on the work workstudy
study workstudy program and must meet
all requirements for this program.
RistiFs
Office Equipment
Have you been paying more
than $12.50 pius ribbon, to
have your Portable Type Typewriter
writer Typewriter cleaned, oiled and ad adjusted?
justed? adjusted? That has been our
price for 12 years. For Quality
Work at Reasonable Prices,
check with your Olympia
dealer.
604 N. MAIN ST.

The requirements for work workstudy
study workstudy jobs, said Dansby, have been
loosened up recently and the jobs
are easier to obtain now than pre previously.
viously. previously. At present there are six
jobs open at two dollars an hour.
Dansby asked that interested
students contact the SG offices in
the Florida Union.

e mbersttp IHjop j
|| v c y ****** |
&&!.<£ I
S Ts 5% S I ci LUCKY FOR YOU BECAUSE YOU
;. Iv !$ f£3 CAN GET QUALITY CLOTHING
i| MU' n AT LOWER PRICES .. LUCKY [
J I ll FOR US BECAUSE WE NEED THE J
I ALL l ROOM FOR FALL MERCHANDISE a
| | SWIMWEAR ft COMING IN.
:i Jflen P;
! SKIRTS y i if
! il suits | I f I ;
! LM BERMUDAS II Y \ I M ALL SWIMWEAR l
!; 4A 33-1/3% OFF /y \ 9 I 33-1/3% OFF U |
'! J,] A I SHOES 11 I \
|i y Ilf J (ASSORTED GROUP) \1 1 \
if** II *II $14.95 VALUE \\ \\
|i j / 50% OFF \\ \ J
! I I SPORT & DRESS SHIRTS l \
i I I (Oxfords Dacron Cotton Batiste \ i \
i ls I Solids Herringbones Stripes) \ f \
J /1 / $3.50 each or 3 for SIO.OO \ 1 a
[ WALKING SHORTS
1 CORDUROY JEANS slims \ | J
J Ibw^WFi i CUTOFFS Denim & Corduroy I I
1 \ SURFER JACKETS j
,J l \ PONDEROSA SHIRTS J j j
ij I Vcotton Corduroy Brushed Denimy / \
ji Sljup \ 33-1/3% off^^/ y j t
;! 1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. \. **' / j
i| IN CAROLYN PLAZA

I STUDENT DISCOUNT 40%
I FLY FLORIDA AIR TAXI
I GAINESVILLE TO TAMPA $ 9.60
I GAINESVILLE TO FORT MYERS SIB.OO
I (All Fares Plus Tax)
I This new summer rate is now in effect. Tickets
1 must be purchased over the counter at Gaines-
Iville Municipal Airport at least two hours prior Os O IOUU
|to departure time. For complete information
ROBBIES I
Best In Steaks
1718 W. University Ave.l
Lost youp Contact? %
Cjatop Ads make Contacts!



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ALL EARS
Gator cagers are all ears as head coach Tommy Bartlett explains
one of the finer points of the game. Bartlett stated that he prefers a
deliberate attack to the fast-break type of play.

Hager Second In Decathlon

I Phil Mulkey, a 34-year-old
I Birmingham, Alabama, school
teacher, won his second, straight
championship in the U. S. Track
and Field Federation Decathlon
Saturday as he amassed 7,153
points at the UF track.
Mulkey took firsts in the broad
jump and shot put to nose out
Gator Scott Hager. Hager collect collected
ed collected 6,944 points on the strength of
firsts in the 400-meter dash and
. the 100-meter high hurdles.
Placing third in the meet was
SPORTS
NOTES
Armi Neely and Jamie Pressly,
Gator freshman tennis stars, have
both been selected to the United
States Junior Davis Cup team.
This team is composed of eight
to 10 of the nations top young
players and plays in top summer
tournaments. The first four tour tourney
ney tourney stops for the pair will be
Chattanooga, Cincinnati,lndiana Cincinnati,lndianapolis
polis Cincinnati,lndianapolis and Milwaukee.
Neely and Pressly recently won
the freshman division of the
Eastern Intercollegiate at Col Colgate
gate Colgate University. The pair won the
doubles crown and Neely took the
singles championship.
Army ROTC
Gives Blood
The U. S. Army ROTC detach detachment
ment detachment helped a lady in distress
this week.
The detachment, under the com command
mand command of Col. Arlo W. Mitchell,
gave blood to help fill out the
account of the late Dr.' Helicio
Martins, professor of Spanish and
Portuguese here at UF.
The blood, 11 pints, was needed
to square accounts so Mrs. Mar Martins
tins Martins would not have to pay for the
difference.
The Department of Foreign Lan Languages
guages Languages had previously appealed for
blood in a letter to The Alligator.

Don Ellis of the University of
Oklahoma with 6,563. He was
followed by another Gator, John
Morton.
Morton, who will be a sopho sophomore
more sophomore here next year after sitting
out a year of competition as a
transfer student, racked up 6,550
points.
Other Gator entrants who took

No War Clause
' : C p Je M asie L Deferred Premium Payments
I [ Until Your Earnings In-
I Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. crease
I THE COLLEGE PLA Y
, UFs REPRESENTATIVES
E for
THE COLLEGE MAS Dan Sapp Mel Ward
l George Corl

ftcpA' ls c min 9
are Comin9
WELL ANYWAY, GAINESVILLE IS WELCOMING
IN A BIG WAY
| r W J r LORE XOTO T
_ . All lZi mM Featuring The Famous Hit Songs
Buy The Original Cast Album Os "Jlfc/ I
The Smash Off-Broadway Hit At Aa f/i kXif rA f TDY T
RECORD BAR For Only: TRY TO
$3.98 Monauraleg. $4.98 t.Sl.Tnkk REMEMBER
HARVEY SCHMIDT
& $4.98 Stereo Reg. $5.98 wordbaker &
JULIAN STEIN
see The UF summer Music Dept. kenneth oheach 'SOON ITS
D Q. 1c; n m lulv 21- WILLIAM LARSEN HUGH THOMAS
rroaucnon, O. I J p.III JKJIy *- 22, At P.K. Yonge Auditorium. EDwirreTEiN Jl GONNA RAIN I
FREE SHELDON HAHON DOROTHY GLIM 0)

Cagers Leave
Gville For
Latin Tour
The sound of bouncing basket basketballs
balls basketballs filled Florida Gym last week
as the Gator cage team prepared
for a summer goodwill tour of
Central and South America.
Ten UF basketball team mem members
bers members will leave Gainesville
Thursday to begin the two-week
tour.
Head cage coach Tommy Bart Bartlett
lett Bartlett and trainer Brady Greathouse
udll accompany the b 'opsters.
In an interview recently Bartlett
made a few comments.
"I feel ihat this goodwill trip
will allow me to become acquaint acquainted
ed acquainted with the playing personnel
whom Ill be working with next
season, said Bartlett. "After
the tour is over I will have a
pretty good idea of whom I can
count on.
The tour, sponsored by the
People to People Sports Com Committee,
mittee, Committee, has scheduled basketball
games for the Gators in Panama
and Venezuela.
Players making the trip are Ed
Mahoney, Andy Owens, Gary Kel Keller,
ler, Keller, Dave Miller, Harry Winkler,
Boyd Welsch, Jeff Ramsey, Neal
Walk, Gary McElroy and Skip
Higley.

other firsts were Peter Skafte in
the javelin and Charles Goodyear
in the 1500-meter run.
Hager, who will be a senior at
UF* next fall, could have over overtaken
taken overtaken Mulkey with a better show showing
ing showing in the discus and shot put.
After the meet, Mulkey stated
his intention to return next July
to defend his crown.

If r
H Bp i^SH^MM||9fi||
:
STRATEGY SESSION
Head basketball coach Tommy Bartlett (far right) confers with
assistants Jim McCachren (left) and Dick Davis (center) at a practice
session in Florida Gym earlier this week. McCachren and Davis will
remain in Gainesville during the coming tour to continue recruiting
for next years freshman team.
IGATOR CLAS i~EDSj
C (< <*>. a
S Student
\ Publications /,# \ |
{ "V-lilO t
!
TJ K
| FULL-TIME STAFFS ft
. EMPLOYMENT I Vlllll I
1! MINIMUM ft m
5 TYPING % _ M.
VTo Head/
IlVe i
| Classified Ad De|>t. |
OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS J
CALL: Donna Clyatt-, Univ. Ex:, 2832 ~
a.
D wanted* wanted* wanted* wanted* wanted* wanted*

Friday, July 15, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 15, 1966

Ackell Named Dental College Dean

UF President J. Wayne Reitz
yesterday announced selection of
Dr. Edmund Ferris Ackell, 40, a
nationally known dental educator
and consultant on the building of
dental schools, as dean of the
Universitys new College of Den Dentistry.
tistry. Dentistry.
The appointment of Dr. Ackell
followed Board of Regents approval
at the meeting here.
Dr. Ackell, a doctor of medicine
and dental medicine, is now asso associate
ciate associate dean of the School of Dentistry
at Western Reserve University,
Cleveland, Ohio.
The choice thus activates the last
originally planned unit of the Uni Universitys
versitys Universitys J. Hillis Miller Health
Center, and places into motion the
administrative organization of the
state of Floridas first dental
school.
A College of Dentistry for Flor Florida
ida Florida students was conceived in 1949
and recommended by the 1953
Medical Center Study as a major
unit of the Health Center complex.
The 1957 Legislature authorized
the school, the 1963 session appro appropriated
priated appropriated preliminary funds and the
1965 Legislature appropriated
minimal funds for firm planning
jfl
*+ A -0
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PlPf If
J dreaming I
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j then stop! I
1 Here's a once in a lifetime 1
I opportunity for adventure and I
I challenge. I
I A civilian career with the 1
Army Recreation or Library I
Program in Europe or the Far I
I ast 1
I If you are single, a U.S. citi- I
zen and have a degree in B
I Recreation 0 1
I Social Science J|||| |
Arts and Crafts ?l||pJ I
I Dramatics or T^ ; |
I Library Science p 1
I WRITE FOR A BROCHURE I j
SPECIAL SERVICES SECTION I
IRCB I
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY I
WASHINGTON. D. C. 20315 I

of the school as an integral part
of the Health Center.
The state of Florida has been
contracting dental education for
-tUS
its students for some years under
a plan of the Southern Regional
Educational Board which places
students at six schools in the South:
Emory University, University of

I some chicks |
I will I
I i % II I
818 HBPr I n 1
If! |b|L
Aggravate Supplicate Captivate I
'jKf |ii Ijy.
Vociferate Agitate Scintillate I
For Dinner At I
at two locations lair
Corner of NW 13th St. & 16th Ave. I
and 2310 SW 13th St. B

Louisville, Loyola, Medical
College of Virginia, Meharry
Medical College and the University
of Maryland. At the present time
over 200 Florida men annually re receive
ceive receive their dental education outside
the state.
The appointment of Dr. Ackell
is an extremelyMortunate one for
the University of Florida," Dr.
Reitz said. Dr. Ackell is emi eminently
nently eminently qualified to assume leader leadership
ship leadership of the state of Floridas first
College of Dentistry. He has per performed
formed performed with exceptional ability in
the planning and building on dental
programs as a consultant on na national
tional national committees and as a member
of the faculty at Western Reserve

University. He is fundamentally in interested
terested interested in education and in de devising
vising devising programs of dental
education which would develop
dentists of the highest caliber.
Health Center Provost Samuel
P. Martin said of the appointment:
Dr. Ackells broad experience in
medical and dental education qua qualifies
lifies qualifies him to design a new and
exciting program for Florida stu students.
dents. students. It is rare to find this breadth
of experience. He brings us ex exceptional
ceptional exceptional clinical experience and
sensitivity to the problems of pa patient
tient patient care. His assistance to the
federal government in the area of
dental education adds to his talents
as a promising administrator for

the Health Centers dental
college.
Dr. Ackell, an oral surgeon, is
a diplomate of the American Board
of Oral Surgery and a member of
the Review Committee established
to administer Congressional Bill
HR-12, and the Aid to Education
Act of the 88th Congress.
Dr. Ackell has been at Western
Reserve since 1957. He has served
its dental school as associate pro professor
fessor professor and as chairman of the De Department
partment Department of Oral and Maxillo-
Facial Surgery, as associate dean
and chief of dental services in the
universitys hospitals and a mem member
ber member of the building and planning
committee of Western Reserve.