Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Vol. 58, No. 142

Vefs To Hold 'Operation Americanism'

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SuzAnn Hull appears to be surrounded by the 38
other contestants in the Miss Florida contest. The
event was held in Sarasota last week to choose
Floridas representative to the Miss America Pa Pageant
geant Pageant in Atlantic City next fall. SuzAnn, a UF junior
and member of Tri-Delta sorority, entered the con contest

TEP Tops Frats
In Scholarship

Tau Epsilon Phi (TEP) fraternity
had the highest grade point average
among UFs 27 fraternities, the
Dean of Mens office announced last
week.
The TEPs had the highest grade
point average for the second tri-
James Brown
Here Nov. 18
For Frolics
Rhythm and blues singer James
Brown will entertain here for Fall
Frolics, November 18.
Brown, with many golden re records
cords records to his credit, will perform
in Florida Gym Saturday, starting
at 8:15 p.m.
* * j
Somebody goofed but it wasnt
us. Summer Frolics will be here at
UF Saturday, July 23, not next
Thursday, June 23, as was an announced
nounced announced in Fridays Gainesville
Sun.
Summer Frolics will feature the
Highwaymen, a popular folk sing singing
ing singing group and the Cyrkle (the
spelling is correct).
Tickets will go on sale early in
July, with all proceeds going to
Dollars for Scholars.

j)eJflortl>a Alligator

SHES SURROUNDED

mester, 2.57 G, and for the entire
school year with a 2.502. Delta Chi
won scholarship honors first tri trimester.
mester. trimester.
Beta Theta Pi finished second
for the year with a 2.431 average
and Pi Lambda Phi finished third
with a 2.412. Delta Chi was fourth
with a 2.403 average and Sigma
Phi Epsilon was fifth with a 2.383.
Anfong pledge classes, the TEPs
also took honors with a 2.437
average for the year. They had
the largest pledge class on campus
and initiated 52 men last trimes trimester.
ter. trimester. The pledges of Beta Theta
Pi finished second with a 2.296
average.
The all mens average for the
year was a 2.409 as compared
with 2.302 for all fraternity men.
The non-fraternity mens average
for the year was a 2.412.
Last years fraternity average
was a 2.223, with a slight im improvement
provement improvement this year, while the
all mens average dropped from
a 2.44 to a 2.41.
1
Carlson Refutes
Moors Column
SEE PAGE 10

test contest a ; Miss Gainesville. She didnt win but she did
finish as one of the ten semi-finalists. Miss UF,
Donna Berger, also entered the contest but failed to
make the runoff. The winner of the contest was
19-year-old Diane Colston, Miss Sarasota. (Photos
by A1 Satterwhite, St. Pete Times)

University of Florida

Parking Prob
By GENE NAIL
EDITOR
One of the most time-consuming pastimes of
several thousand UF personnel and students may
soon come to a screeching halt.
For a little while, anyway.
That early morning frantic search by commuters
for a place to put their wheels safe from the
campus police may be relieved if present planning
by Student Body President Buddy Jacobs is suc successful.
cessful. successful.
Since early April, Jacobs has been personally
unraveling the knotty problem of building a multi multilevel
level multilevel parking lot on UFs campus as a relief for
the critical parking place shortage.
Over 14,000 cars are officially registered for
parking on campus. Slightly over 4,500 places are
available. v
Thus results the daily cat and mouse problem of
circling the odd-shaped UP' blocks in search of a
suitable parking spot. c
Jacobs and Administrative Assistant Charles
Shepherd made a trip to Washington, 1). C., during
the past trimester's break to investigate the possi possibility
bility possibility of obtaining federal funds for the project.
State funds for any such project had been depleted
for the near future.
Jacobs found that under the Public Facilities Loan
Program of the Housing and Urban Development Law,
monies could be borrowed to construct a multi-level
lot on the UF campus.
The funds are not a grant, and do not match funds
with the state government. Whatever -UF required
would have to be repaid the federal government at
a four and one-half per cent interest rate. The loan
could be extended to cover a 40- year period.
At the annual meeting of the Southern Universities
Student Government Association (SUSGA) Jacobs dis discovered
covered discovered the University of Tennessee has applied for
funds under the Public Facilities Loan Program to
construct a multi-level parking garage.
(See PARKING, Page 9)

PREXY SAYS VIETNIKS
NEED TO BE REFUTED
By GENE NAIL
EDITOR
The UF Veterans Club is planning what it hopes will be the answer
to student protests against United States efforts in Viet Nam.
Bart Kimball, president of the 200-man organization, said he thinks
the time is long overdue for the arguments of the peace demonstrators
to be refuted.
The organization has reserved the Student Service Center for June
30 and July 1 for its Operation Americanism.
The purpose of the project is to offset the one-sided publicity the
public and the fighting men in Viet Nam have been getting from the
anti-Viet Nam demonstrators, Kimball said.
The club has sought printed information from the Freedom Founda Foundation
tion Foundation to hand out at the Service Center. The aid of UF faculty is being
enlisted to speak out for patriotism and the United States effort in
Viet Nam.
The UF Veterans Club was first formed last trimester to promote
the passage of the Cold War GI Bill. Since the bills passage, the club
has been devoting its efforts to implementing the new veterans aid
law on campus.
Kimball said the club will help service veterans obtain and complete
applications for the benefits, and will offer assistance to club members
when complications arise between the veteran students and the Veterans
Administration.
Membership in the club, presently standing at over 200, is limited
to veterans who are eligible for benefits under the Cold War GI Bill.
To qualify the veteran must have served on active duty over 180 days
and must have received an honorable discharge.
Kimball said the club activities are non-political, and its present presentplanned
planned presentplanned operation is designed to promote American citizens as
supporters of American fighting men in Asia.
Kimball, a journalism student, said the club has a potential campus
membership of about 600. In September, and the succeeding terms,
Kimball said, the number of veterans on campus will increase because
more veterans will be returning to school to take advantage of the
veteran benefits.
Kimball said a recent serious statement by comedian Bob Hope sums
up the purpose of the event: When only the anti-everything people are
heard, our troops, our friends, and our enemies cannot help but think
that everyone here thinks that way.

siprSHl
..And Elsewhere
UF isnt the only one with a parking problem.
Other universities throughout the nation also have
been tangling with the problem. Some have reached
similar solutions as those now being planned at UF.
Others have tackled the problem from a different
angle.
The University of lowa has sought to solve its
problem with a series of gradual actions to increase
the spaces available for commuters and campus
residents.
lowa City, home of the university, like Gainesville,
lacks adequate bus facilities for residents and stu students.
dents. students. /The university and city have levied a special
tax on -automobiles to discourage students from
bringing their cars to the university.
lowa charges an annual S4O tax to park on univer university
sity university lots. Students circumventing the tax soon find
the purchase of a $3 off-campus parking sticker at
little value. lowa City recently approved another
(See PARKING, Page 9)

Tuesday, June 21, 196*S



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 21, 1966

CtMpas
Hri /=p-
Briefs ~
NORMAN LECTURES TOMORROW
Dr. James W. Norman, dean emeritus of the UF College of
Education, will deliver the annual Norman Lecture at Norman
Hall Auditorium Wednesday, June 22, at 1:45 p.m.
Dr. Norman will speak on the significant points of John Deweys
philosophy of education.
This will mark the second time the retired professor will
present the lecture which is given annually in his honor. Norman
Hall, the building that houses the College of Education, is also
named in his honor.
GOIN SPEAKS ON DNA
Dr. Coleman J. Goin, UF professor of biological science, is
scheduled to deliver the presidential address at the 46th annual
meeting of the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpe Herpetologists
tologists Herpetologists when it convenes in Miami during the week of June 19.
As president of the Society, Dr. Goin will address his colleagues
on the subject, DNA in Relation to Amphibian Life History. His
talk will be given on Thursday evening, June 23, in the Carillon
Hotel in Miami Beach.
$36,000 COMMERCE GRANT
The University of Florida has received authorization for a
$36,000 grant from the U. S. Department of Commerce for pro programs
grams programs under the State Technical Services Act.
In making the announcement recently John W. Hoover, assistant
professor of engineering and University coordinator for the new
program, said the federal grant will be used with state matching
funds to establish specific programs making accumulated engi engineering,
neering, engineering, scientific and research data available to Florida business
and industry. It will fund programs for the remainder of 1966.
DATA PROCESSING MEETING
The UF chapter of the Association for Computer Machines will
hold its monthly meeting Tuesday, June 21, at 7:30 p.m. in room
1038 of the College of Architecture and Fine Arts building.
Careers and opportunities available in data processing will be
the topic. A movie on computer programming and a panel dis discussion
cussion discussion will be included on the program, which is open to the
public. Harry Kleinberg, chief engineer for the Radio Corporation
of America, will be on the panel.
UF GIVES 467 DEGREES
UF awarded 467 degrees at the end of Term 3-A, but the gradu graduates
ates graduates will have to wait until April to get their diplomas. Students
receiving degrees at the trimester break will join graduates from
trimesters ending in August and December of this year, and in
April of 1967, in the annual commencement convocation next April.
The list for 3-A includes 298 students who are candidates for
undergraduate degrees, 141 for Masters degrees and 28 for
Doctorates. The Colleges of Arts and Sciences (85), Education (67)
and Business Administration (49) accounted for the largest groups
of candidates.
( \
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Among the Big 4 in car rental. ECONO CAR is First
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ECONO CAN\
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to rrrtoi or ton away copy which U ooasldara objacttoMbl*.
*0 NOTION B GUARANTEED, though daalrad position will b* glvac whmr poMfbl*.
Th* Florida Alligator will not oonstdar ad)**tiMDta -at paymaot tor any athrarUMmaot involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or arroaaowa ia**rttoa l motto* to gfvan to Ik* Advarttolng Manager within
(1) om day aftor ad**rti**a>**t appaara.
Th* Florida Alligator win aot b* ranototo tor or* thaw o** laoonwet Iwrtlnn at an *dv*rtto*mat
ckatftoad to rwa **w*ral Unto*. Motto** to r oonwetto* aa*t b* glv*a Mm aast Irtton.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR to Ik* official *t*d**t a*wap*p*r at to* UMvaratty at Florida aad to
pdMtohad Ora Umm wMfcly notpl daring May, J*m, aad Jaly wtoa R to gtolltoil ml-watoly. Only
dttartato rM**to to* official oglatoM at thatr atokora. Th* Antffitor to natarid a* **oo*d cl cltolar
tolar cltolar to to* Utotod dtota* Fo*t on** at Gainarvllte.

Fla. Union Plans
Guatemala Trip

Tired of the academic grind 0
Looking for something different
and interesting? Got plans for Au August
gust August 15 through August 22?
Maybe the Florida Union Special
Projects Committee has the an answei.
swei. answei.
A seven day trip to Guatemala
has been arranged and is open to
anyone interested. Cost for this
week in Central America will be
525 which includes a-11 room,
board and transportation.
We have received many re requests
quests requests for this particular trip,
said a committee spokesman, and
have worked out what should be a
fascinating agenda.
The tour will leave Miami Inter International
national International Airport at 3 p.m. August
15 and arrive in Guatemala City at
6 p.m. The tour will return to Mi Miami
ami Miami at 1:15 p.m. August 22.
The days in between are fi 1 led
with bus trips to Antigua, visits
to primitive ruins, tours of coffee
plantations and inspection of scenic
volcanoes.
A day at the market place at
Chichicastengo is scheduled and
also a visit to Lake Atitlan which
has been called the most beautiful
lake in the world by photographers
for National Geographic Magazine.
Observation of colorful native
religious ceremonies and of native
artisans at work are also part of
the plans. c
A deposit of SSO is required
to reserve a place with this tour,

;"' '* I
! "Tk epitkce. Aplim.
j Hk IMi Iml j
: iutipid |
Bjj. Qomm JKmsh 1
IM MOH Ml Imiml j
TZ J -1 SDONIGANsH t
totwuL £ j
1123 W. Univ. Ave j

as spaces are limited.
Anyone who is interested may
visit Rm. 315 or call Ext. 2741
for further information.

AN INVITATION I
TO FACULTY MEMBERS I
The UF Veterans Club, a non-political student service I
organizations, invites members of the faculty to share with 1
us in the operation of the Student Service Booth (across 1
from the Hub) on June 30th and July Ist. The purposes of 1
this operation are to remind our friends and neighbors about 1
the significance of the 4th of July, and equally as important, I
to show that Americanism is still on the campus. 1
The small minority of anti-everythings has managed 1
to paint an untrue picture of how the majority of college 1
students and professors really feel about this great country 1
of ours. I
Most of us seldom have the opportunity to present the 1
positive picture of Americas efforts to improve not only 1
tlie lot of Americans, but also that of millions of other men, I
women and children in many, many nations. We believe that 1
it is time to put the Viet Nam issue back into the overall I
context of the things this nation stands for. 8
We are presenting our teachers with the opportunity now. I
Teams of 2 Gl-students and 2 faculty members will operate I
the booth in half-hour periods. Please contact Mr. Ed Cox, 1
F R G-9098, to schedule your time for OPERATION Ameri- I
canism Is Still On The Campus. I

XEROX COPIESi
1-19 Copies, 10£ea. 1
20 & Over, 9 Copies Made While You Wait 1
Service Available From 1
8 a.m. to 11 p.m. 1
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK I
QUIK-SAVE
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY av.- [



IsTUDHirDlsCOUNrjo'^n
A new summer rate is now in effect for all students!
I GAINESVILLE TO TAM'TA $9.60 I
I GAINESVILLE TO FT. MYERS SIB.OO
(All P ares Plus Tax) I
I TICKETS must be purchased over the counter at
I least two hours prior to departure time. I
FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION CALL : I
I Florida Air Taxi, Inc. 378-1966 I

CHICKEN mg i
ATJ DINNER nHC
Includes four pieces of golden brown, crisp |^HHh
and hot fried chicken and a heaping order
tasty french fried potatoes, all in a cute toy
f Red Barn box.
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IXiS-lIAS I GRILLED CHEESE 19c
_ loKW 6£tfL c I ONION RINGS 25c
S-JTiM, I FRENCH FRIES 15c
RED' BARN

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l\U ?? ( //cap /S/u>rts SjiAMP ( C.EA /.'- 0 6^*)
FREEWAY NATIONAL DISCOUNT STORE
1023 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.

Health Center Anrfex
Is Near Completion

Phase I of the new Human De Development
velopment Development Center at the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center is nearing
completion.
Scheduled for opening in De December,,
cember,, December,, the $1,200,000 structure

will be used for research and
training and is designed to ac accommodate
commodate accommodate 24 in-patients.
Patients to be involved are re retarded
tarded retarded children who will be treated
and observed in research headed
by Dr. Paul Adams.
'Hie building is the first part of
a three-structure development
center. The other two buildings,
yet to be built, will be used for
research in the area of develop developmental
mental developmental defects.
This totally new concept is based
on the theory that the regural di diseases,
seases, diseases, such as heart disease,
arthritis, anti cancer, are develop developmental
mental developmental defects, possibly prenatal
defects.
Studies will be made from the
time aspect to see how an indi individual
vidual individual develops a condition which
leads to eventual disease.
The center, when completed at
a total cost of six million dollars,
will be maintained by the State of
Florida, the University of Florida,
individual contributors, founda foundations
tions foundations and the National Institutes of
Health.

Campus Police Now Are Taking
Constitutional Law Course

Campus police officers current currently
ly currently are attending a course in Con Constitutional
stitutional Constitutional Law.
The course is being taught by
Fletcher Baldwin, professor at the
law school.
The officers attend one night a
week until July 4. From July 4
through July 16, the officers will
go to class four hours each night,
five days a week.

Tuesday, June 21, 1966. The Florida Alligator,

Gator Bands
Merge For
Spring Term
The Fighting Gator Band is de devoting
voting devoting its summer program to
entering students as well as veter veteran
an veteran members.
"Hie complete band program in includes
cludes includes marching, symphonic, con concert
cert concert and variety (stage) bands. In
the Spring Trimester, these are
merged to form Summer Band,
which specializes in light classical
and popular music.
Since the majority of bandsmen
are not music majors, the band
program is designed to take only
a fraction of the time most other
college bands require. This en enables
ables enables the bandsmen to pursue mu musical
sical musical interests without taxing their
study time. The band hasoneofthe
highest group averages among stu student
dent student organizations.
Students having previous musi musical
cal musical experience can enroll in the
course MSC 174 for one hour credit
with the permission of Director
Richard Bowles, room 140, Build Building
ing Building R, situated near the main cafe cafeteria.
teria. cafeteria.

Lt. V. K. Holliman said that the
course was instituted because of
recent decisions by the Supreme
Court. The courts decisions on
search and seizure, the right of an
arrested person to have counsel
and the right to remain silent
prompted the course.
Holliman said that all members
of the police department would at attend
tend attend the course.

Page 3



JIM MOORHEAD'S
thinking out loud
The news that the University of Florida
football team will play its 1967 home opener
away from home in Tampa may seem
like shocking news at first hip.
However, if one avoids pure grandstand
emotions and pauses to reflect a moment,
it all begins to make sense. The move to
Tampa, with its new 52,000-seat stadium,
is all part of a current trend.
A lot of very large brains, encased in very
large heads, run the sport of football today,
and they, in their wisdom, have seen the
handwriting on the wall and are staying one
step ahead of the even larger brains, albeit
encased in smaller heads, which call the
shots for the public in general.
The move to Tampa is a manifestation
of this countrys present predilection toward
shifting public affairs to where the people
are.
Gainesville has what? 50,000 people?
Greater Tampa has maybe six or eight
times that many. Plainly, if our football
team, as the representative of a state in institution,
stitution, institution, is to produce the greatest good
for the greatest number of people, it has
no business playing in Gainesville when
Tampa deserves 'it so much more. What
does fair apportionment mean if it doesnt
mean this?
With political control which is THE
control, make no mistake about that
shifting from northern, rural Florida to
southern, urban Florida, the scheduling
of a Gator opener in Tampa is an under understandable
standable understandable by-product and one which is a
credit to the foresight of those inimitable
thinkers who so cleverly conceived of the
idea so early.
The one or two traditional games sche scheduled
duled scheduled in Jacksonville served the purpose
when this was a pork-thinking state; but
now that we have progress, population,
politics, and profit uppermost in our minds,
now that we are finally coming out of the
(piney) woods, now that we realize that that
team plays best which plays before the
most (at $6 a head and up), we are finally finallymoving
moving finallymoving abreast of the times.
The next move, before the Supreme
Court does it for us, is to schedule two
or three more home games in Dade County
and nearby Broward, where perhaps one onethird
third onethird of the states population lives, in order
to award those fine people their rightful
share in Florida football fortunes.
The argument that Florida teams ougnt to
play half their games before the student body
they so lustily represent, although its put
forward as a correlative of home rule, is
just so much porkchop nonsense. Its hack hackneyed,
neyed, hackneyed, unfair and old-fashioned to suggest
that the Gators should localize their per performances
formances performances for a piddling 16,000 devotees
when theres several million others more
compactly located in other areas, their
mouths just watering and their billfolds just
bulging in anticipation of their well-de well-deserved
served well-deserved chance to see their boys in action.
If, in the interests of quaint benevolence,
the powers-that-be feel they must retain a
sop for resident UFers, let it be the Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming game which, of course, after a
few years could be set up on a rotating
basis in order to keep things from getting
overly humane.
In due time, perhaps absolute justice will
triumph and the University will be moved
en masse to Miami where it belongs -- and
perhaps even the state capitol along with it.

Alligator Editorial Page

EDITORIAL
what happened
to Jim Crow ?

2T2TJ hat happened to Jim Crow?
The long, lean, stooped Negro slowly
bent over the rows of rusty-brown cotton
stalks, plucking the white bolls from their
cups.
Just as slowly, he put the handfuls of
cotton in the dirty tar covered bag he
drudgingly pulled behind him.
An occasional prod from Mr. Boss Man
kept the old man and his workmates on the
move.
About ten years ago, this was more than
common in most parts of the Deep South.
The Negro, if not treated as inferior, was
treated like something less than an equal.
But this is changing.
For the last ten years, nothing has been
given more news coverage, or more atten attention
tion attention by national legislative liodies, raised
the irrie of more southern school officials
and restaurant owners than the Negros
march toward equal rights.
What most Negroes want is not power,
not the white mans riches, not that
illusionary thing called prestige.
What they want is self-respect. What they
want is to be recognized as individuals whose

Page 4

t, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 21, 1966

1
v~.~
Selective Service
fEfjtJfloriba SUigator
Executive Editor Bob Menaker
City Editor Yvette Cardozo
Sports Editor . Jeff Denkewalter
Photo Coordinator Mick Arroyo
Staff Writers Margo Cox, Norma Bell, Margie Green
Dick Dennis, Ernie Rehder, .John Barnum
Arlene Caplan, Judy Miller, Ernie Litz

opinion is as valuable as the next man s.
What they want is to feel they are part of
this great country called the United States.
The Negro shouldnt feel alone in his
struggle.
Other elements of society are seeking
those very same objectives. One of these
elements is the youth -- the university
studen.
Recent student activities have outrightly
challenged the authority and control within
the universities.
The students want more of a voice in how
the university and its activities are operated.
The old front of illusionary power resting
in what several Alligator articles have call called
ed called The Establishment, is crumbling.
Conservative elements always have,
and always will, control most groups and
organizations.
But they are only conservative in that they
seek to preserve that which they have: their
position their status quo.
What the university lacks is the transi transitional
tional transitional elements to bridge the gap between
those who want changes, and those who want
to preserve the status quo.
Whats happening to the Status Quo?

EDITOR
Gene Nail
MANAGING EDITOR
Steve Smith

MIKE GARCIA'S
Florida politics
Former Governor Leoy Collins lias
officially announced that he will be a can candidate
didate candidate for the seat of retiring Senator
George Smathers.
Collins has gone so far as to open a
campaign headquarters in Washington, D.C.
and go about making all the speeches and
appearances incumbent upon a candidate for
the office of United States Senator.
Collins, while a resident of Florida, has
spent much of the last six years living out
of the state. After stepping down as governor
in 1960 he was given a job with the National
Association of Broadcasters at a salary of
about $70,000 per year.
Following his stint with the Broadcasters
Association, Collins entered the public eye
again as the Presidents special assistant
on equal rights. It was during this time that
Collins marched along with Martin Luther
King on the Southern Leadership Conference
trek from Selma to Montgomery.
Now Collins has taken another job: Under Undersecretary
secretary Undersecretary of Commerce. (One would suppose
that Collins did such a good job that the
President saw the ex-Floridian was no
longer needed in Alabama and should return
to the Washington womb for some more
image building.)
It is interesting to note that Collins has
held three major positions in the last six
years and never has there been a bad word
said about him or his work. The newspapers,
who have always been friendly to Collins
have continued their hands off policy.
One could safely say that Leoy has en enjoyed
joyed enjoyed all the good things of political life:
unanimous newspaper support, plenty of
money and a tight organization. He has very
carefully prepared himself for the role of
elder statesman and humanitarian through
his work in Washington. Collins image is
that of the dignified liberal (undersecretary
of com merce in the Great Society), champion
of the oppressed (equal rights committee),
and friend of the people (via the nearsighted
newspapers).
However, it seems that the time has come
to question Mr. Collins who has hidden for
so long behind the cloak of the journalist and
the Great Seal of the Presidency.
The first question would be: What ever
happened to that fine Tallahassee-conser Tallahassee-conservative
vative Tallahassee-conservative breeding that Mr. Collins was always
so proud of (that is, when he campaigned
in North Florida)?
Second Question: Why was only ONE Ne Negro
gro Negro appointed to a policy-making position
during the liberal Collins administration?
Third Question: How has Mr. Collins
escaped being questioned by the press on
his opinions on the Taft-Hartley (14-b) bill,
the public accommodations clause of the
Civil Rights bill, the Cross-Florida Barge
Canal, or the administrations policy on
Viet Nam?
It is obvious that Mr. Collins would not
attempt to answer these questions as it
might lose him some favor with his sup supporters.
porters. supporters.
Collins has achieved what few politicians
can the perfect image. He is conserva conservative
tive conservative to the conservatives and liberal to the
liberals. Be is the Golden-Boy of the
Florida press.
However, it seems necessary at this time
in the light of his candidacy for the office
of United States Senator (a job you cant
quit every two years) that he should make
himself available to the people of Florida,
who have not seen him for the last six
years, and answer these and many more
questions.
It is time for the people of Florida to
have a good look at the man who may very
well become their next Senator. It is tim#
for the Golden-Boy to be put on the spot
by the newspapers.
Although Mr. Collins is surely a fine man
and an able leader it should not Come to pass
that he be elected on his glossy merits as
reported by an all too friendly press.
WILL THE REAL LEROY COLLINS
PLEASE STAND UP?



Thompson replies to
'Nero' on Board of Publications
Editor:
It is interesting that in replying to my recent letter regarding the
make-up of the Board of Student Publications, Nero can find nothing
more enlightening to say than to call me cynical, my letter funny
and my suggestion tragic and absurd.
May I answer with the usual rejoinder of those who are called cynical
by stating that, as I see myself, I am realistic, not cynical. The
occasion of my letter was an editorial in The Alligator recommending
that the structure of the BSP be changed to provide that the student
members be composed of the president of Blue Key, the editor of The
Alligator and certain elected officials of student government. In the
same issue as Neros letter appeared was another editorial again
suggesting that student publications have a member on the board.
Neither Mr. Nero or your editorial writer have taken issue with
my basic point which was and is that the student members of the
board should be true representatives of the student body and not people
with vested interests in publications or who represent the establish establishment
ment establishment called Student Government. I tried to point out that those for
whom publications are supposedly published and who pay involuntarily
a large part of the cost should be ideally the ones to be represented
and neither Mr. Nero or you, Mr. Editor, have offered any evidence
to deny its validity. So I ask you, since when is democracy tragic
and absurd?
You do not like the actions of the board. This is your privilege.
But even if your claim is correct that the members of the board were
manipulated by Dr. Reitz or Student Government this situation will
not be corrected, necessarily, by changing the structure, especially if
the change provides for more not less representation from vested
interests. I reiterate that the structure should provide for university universitywide
wide universitywide control, for two reasons. First, because in a free society those
for whom a product is produced should be the ones who determine its
form and content and, second, because legally the publisher is the Uni University
versity University of Florida and a publisher has to have ultimate authority and
responsibility. The only alternative is to publish off-campus and
assume the role of publisher as well, as I tried to point out.
In a free market, the consumers can exercise their freedom of
choice by purchasing or refraining from purchase. Student publications
are a public enterprise, the market is not free. Therefore, the con consumers
sumers consumers can exercise control only by direct representation on the
policy-making board.
My quarrel with the editorial-writers proposal and with Neros
rejoinder is not over the subject of editorial freedom. I, too, believe
the editor should be free to print news stories on controversial matters
and to state his opinions on the editorial page. But in the campus
community as elsewhere the maintenance of freedom rests with those
who benefit from it and we must trust in their good judgment to
elect or appoint board members who will insure a good campus news newspaper
paper newspaper and to not re-elect those who do not. Staff members of The
Alligator are not the only ones interested in maintaining editorial
freedom or quality publications. In fact, they are so personally in involved
volved involved in holding their jobs and airing their particular beliefs that
they are likely to lose sight of the needs of the community and can
hardly be considered disinterested in determining their own com competency.
petency. competency. Is this not so?
One final word, Mr. Nero mentioned the University of Texas being
an outstanding school. Not the least of its accomplishments is an
excellent daily newspaper. May I point out that it is published by the
journalism school. The faculty of that school backs the student editors
in their efforts to maintain free expression and by their advice and
counsel insure high standards of reporting and writing. Faculty mem members
bers members have tenure and enjoy academic freedom. By and large they are
strong believers in freedom of speech as evidenced by the activities
of the A.A.U.P. A move of student publications to the journalism
school at U. of F. might not be selling out, but rather gaining the
support of people even more dedicated to freedom than the average
student and who are in a much stronger position to stand up against
pressures from any source. Why dont you stop fighting the faculty
and join forces for the common good?
, Prof. Ralph B. Thompson
EDITORS NOTE: In its suggested reconstitution, The Alligator did
NOT recommend the editor of The Alligator as a board member, but
has consistently advocated a representative of the student publications
which includes The Seminole, The Alligator, and the new literary
magazine, Release.
The Daily Texan, published by the University of Texas, does NOT
have complete editorial freedom. The editor is elected by the student
body, not by a board. Campus-wide election of editors of The Alligator
was dropped as unsatisfactory several years ago.

OFFICE MACHINE REPAIRS
Have you been paying mere
than $12.50 plus ribbon, to
have your Portable Type Typewriter
writer Typewriter cleaned, oiled and ad adjusted?
justed? adjusted? That has been our
price for 12 years. For Quality
Work at Reasonable Prices,
check with your Olympia
dealer.
KISERS 604 N, Main St.
WONDERING IF YOUR
CASH WILL SURVIVE
THE MONTH????
&
V y v~ dt
PATRONIZE 'GATOR
ADVERTISERS FOR THE
BEST BUYS ANYWHERE I
4>jnA'

SALE of..
SOLIDS STRIPES
PRINTS PLAIDS
by Tracy, Lady Manhattan
Pcppertrce and Cos Cob.
s£99 v , $099
To $lO. To $7. w t
Shop Early While A Good Selection Lasts
yfi / / Phone
jSUw* 372 1581

Wauburg needs
sanitary facilitities
Editor:
With due thought to good taste
and the sensibility of others, I feel
compelled to state that:
On Sunday (June 12, 1966), to my
great displeasure and revulsion,
I witnessed, people wading through
filth to use broken and leaking
toilet facilities. To make matters
worse, nearly all of them were
barefoot.
No, this wasnt in one of Gaines Gainesvilles
villes Gainesvilles slums; although, it would do
justice to some of the-worst. In Instead,
stead, Instead, as you have probably already
guessed, it was at our own beloved
Camp Wauburg.
Before those responsible for this
disgraceful and dangerous situa situation
tion situation try to claim this was caused
by the recent rains I must state
that every time I have used these
facilities (only when compelled by
the greatest urgency; usually by
my children) I have found them
filthy, vile and with pools of water
on the floor. However, this time
was the worst.
I see that Student Government
has provided some much needed
new playground equipment and I
have read that there are plans for
new canoes and such. However ne necessary
cessary necessary and desirable any of the
planned additions are, construction
of permanent, clean, easily drained
restroom facilities should have the
greatest priority.
Michael T. Baird, 4EDF
send photographer
on moon assignment
Editor:
After evaluating Bob Ellisons
photography for this terms Alli Alligator,
gator, Alligator, I have decided that you are
wasting this boys talents. He
should not have to cover down-to down-toearth
earth down-toearth campus events. Bob Ellison
deserves a real scoop; another
exclusive photo-story of some
earth-shaking event like Selma.
In light of this countrys inten intensifying
sifying intensifying space efforts, may I suggest
an assignment to shoot the first
manned landing on the moon? Na Naturally,
turally, Naturally, to insure complete cover coverage,
age, coverage, IT WOULD BEHOOVE YOU
TO SEND 808 ELLISON TO THE
MOON AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.
An early departure would not only
allow him enough time to focus his
fish-eye on some new pedal won wonder;
der; wonder; it would also improve the
quality of The Florida Alligator
immensely.
W. Robert Gerber, 2UC
Gatop AOs Sell!
CALL UF EX: 2832
For Specialized Service


THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
accepts all letters to the editor.
Due to space limitations, how however,
ever, however, we ask that letters not
exceed 350 words. Typewritten
and double-spaced letters are
preferred and all must be sign signed.
ed. signed. Names will be withheld upon
request. Editors reserve the
right to select or reject letters
for publication.

Insure Better Grades In B Term By
Having Your Own
TAPE RECORDER
By
Revere-lUallensak
"DIRECT FACTORY DEALER"
No Middleman's Profit
from
'
' OA 95
\ 4 77
BUY 6 WAYS
ir*ux 608 N Main Sf SfvUULn
vUULn SfvUULn J PH 376-7171
GAINESVILLE'S ONLY COMPLETE STOCK OF
SCOTCH 3-M RECORDING TAPE & ACCESSORIES
See Whats New
The Browse Shop
A PATCH OF BLUE .... Elizabeth Kata
THE RED & THE BLACK.. .Maire Stendhal
THE AUTOCRAT OF THE BREAKFAST TABLE
Oliver W. Holmes
J ART STUDENTS ANATOMY
Edmund J Farris
LIFE AGAINST DEATH .. .Norman O Brown
AN AMERICAN DILEMMA. Gunnar Myrdal
FUNCTIONS OF A COMPLEX VARIABLE
Vol. I& II Howard Eves
CRC STANDARD MATHEMATICAL TABLES
CRC HANDBOOK OF CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS
LINEAR ALGEBRA Lang
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00
Campus Shop & Bookstore

Tuesday, June 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
ONE FLOURESCENT LAMP
sl2; one pair shoe roller skates
(mens, size 8-1/2) slO. Call
372-6229 after 6 p.m. (A-143-
lt-nc).
10 HP OUTBOARD MOTOR. Re Recently
cently Recently overhauled. 6 gal. tank. Runs
well. SBO. Ph. 2-6104. (A-143-
st-c).
DINING TABLES, S4O up; lamps,
$3 up; upright piano, SBS; corner
cupboard, $10; work table, sl2;
desks, S3O; toychest, $4; sofa bed,
$75; chest-of-drawers, sls; book bookcases,
cases, bookcases, $lO up; bike stands, $2;
kitchen cupboards, $8 up; custom
drapes, $5; dinner plates, $ leach.
372-6421. (A-143-It-c).
BOOKCASE, sx3, $25. Large
study table newly finished, S2O.
Both excellent condition. 2901 NW
14th St., Apt. 6. 376-8153. (A (A---143-lt-p).
--143-lt-p). (A---143-lt-p).
SPECIAL FOR STUDENTS. Air
conditioners -- Admiral. Perfect
for Diamond, Corry and Schucht
Villages, apts. and trailers. All
sizes. Sudden Service Fuel Oil
Co., 907 SW 3rd St., Ph. 376-4404.
(A- 142-ts-c).
1963 BSA, 650 cc. S6OO. Ph. 378-
2244 or 376-9723 or see at Styles
by Phil, Carolyn Plaza. (A-142-
ts-c).
TRAILER, 1964 Deluxe. 10x56.
3 BR, one furnished as study,
A/C, washer, large fenced yard,
pool privileges. s6Oll investment,
sacrifice $3950. Pinehurst Park,
372-7994. (A-141-3t-c).
1965 HONDA SUPER HAWK. A
real fire eater. $475. Cash. Call
Rex Rittgers, 5 to 8 p.m., 376-
4260. (A- 140-4 c).
r
for rent
TWO BEDROOM HOME, furnished.
Across from Holidaylnn. Available
B-term or Fall Tri. 372-6232.
(B-134-ts-c).
FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM APT.
available B-term or Fall Tri. a across
cross across from Ramada Inn. 372-6232.
(B- 134-ts-c).
AVAILABLE for Sept. Ist. Duplex
'or male students. S4O per student.
East apt accommodates 4students.
West apt accommodates 3 students.
Dnly 500 ft. from TigertHall. 1231
1W 3rd Ave. Call Anna Hinson,
378-2559. (B- 137-ts-c).

'VimVIIIM UST DAY!
Julie Christie
MOO -**.*-" *4Oll "DARLING"
TOMORROW! oLeslie0 Leslie Caron
4- 4 ROOM"
JAMES
f 20th CENTURY-FOX AN ASSOCIATES AND ALDRICH COMPANY PRODUCTION J
THE FLIGHT
OF THE PHOENIX
rOT.OR RY DE

for rent
ROOM FOR RENT -- B term.
608 NW 13th St. Phone 372-0814.
Kitchen facilities. (B-143-2t-p).
FURNISHED ONE BR APT. A/C,
near Univ. Available from July Ist
for 2 persons. 1716 NW 3rd Ave.
(#6). s9l a mo. Call 376-1824. (B (B---143-lt-p).
--143-lt-p). (B---143-lt-p).
APT. WITH SUMMER RATES.
Choice apt. across from campus
for 2 people. A/C, no car needed.
Apply 321 SW 13th St. (B-143-
lt-c).
A/C, 2 BEDROOM, nicely furnish furnished
ed furnished apt., near school and bus line.
Ph. 372-7943. (B- 143-ts-c).
FURNISHED 5 ROOM HOUSE for
rent. Near campus. Suitable for
group of male students. Reason Reasonably
ably Reasonably priced. Call 376-3012 for
more information. (B-143-st-c).
4 ROOM APT.'for quiet couple.
No pets. No children. Car space.
Available June 15th. Near campus.
Ph. 376-5043. 1241 SW 4th Ave.
(B- 141-ts-c).
FURNISHED ONE BED BEDROOM
APT. Large room, nice and clean.
Near campus. Water furnished. $55
a mo. for B-term. Reliable person.
Ph. 376-8819. (B-143-lt-c).
GROUND FLOOR, 2 room furnish furnished;
ed; furnished; refrigerators no kitchens.
Two blocks from A/C Library and
Univ. P.O. Summer rates. 376-
6494. (B-142-st-c).
ONE BR, furnished A/C apt. SBS
a mo. Available immediately. Call
376-5190. (B- 142-lt-nc).
NOW RENTING FOR FALL. A/C
apts. and houses. Occupancy for 3
or 4 students, male or female.
Charlie Mayo, Town & Country
Realty, 376-4664. 4 ROOM APT. for quiet couple.
No pets. No children. Car space.
Available June 15th. Near campus.
Ph. 372-5043. (B- 141-ts-c).
A/C 3 BR APT. Three blocks from
campus. S9O mo. Two room effi efficiency,
ciency, efficiency, S4O. Ph. 372-8840. (B-141-
ts-c).
ROOMMATE WANTED B TERM.
Share expenses. A/C, 1 BR apt.
3 blocks from campus. Call 378-
4332. (B-141-3t-c).
LARGE COOL DIVIDED ROOM,
12 x 22, private entrance and
shower, utilities and linens in included.
cluded. included. Ph. 372-3191 or 372-8903.
(B-139-ts-c).

; The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 21, 1966

Page 6

for rent
$35/MO. PLUS 1/2 UTILITIES.
Share 2 BR apt. with upper divi division
sion division electrical engineering student.
376-8501. Bill Lagoni. Leave word.
(B- 139-St-cj.
PRIVATE ROOM 3 blocks from
campus, S2O a mo. Ph. 372-8840.
(B- 131-ts-c).
ATTRACTIVE modern room, A/C
and ideal for student who needs a
quiet pleasant place to study. 372-
7883. (B- 138-ts-c).
wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE, senior or
graduate student wanted to share
2 BR central house. 103 NW
24th St. Tri 3-B." Ph. 376-2129.
(C-143-lt-c).
ONE MALE ROOMMATE for li liter
ter liter m. New A/C apt. 1-1 2 miles
from campus. Rent for full term
SBO plus 1/2 utilities. Call 370-
9791. (C- 143-4 t-c).
STUDIOUS MATURE male room roommate
mate roommate wanted tor Colonial Manor
apt. in Sept. Call 378-2159. (C (C---1
--1- (C---1 t-c).
SEEKETH: BONGOS with natural
wood finish. Call 378-4818. 521
NW 30th Ave. (C- 143-2 t-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
immediately to share house in NW
section for B-term. Rent S3O per
mo. Call 372-6673. (C-143-st-p).
RIDER WANTED! Leave N.Y.C.,
August 20th. Arrive Gainesville,
August 22nd. Inquire at Florida
Union Information Desk. (C-143-
lt-p).

Last 3 Days!
!!: T7Tl3thStat23rdoad] STEVE McQUEEN
i;;| Telephone 378 2434 | gs 'NEVADA SM+TFT
| Starts FRIDAY
111 \ WHEN THEIR
i PATHS CROSS AND
DOUBLE-CROSS
screens most
KORY SOPHIA
I PECK TANLEY DDNEN LOREN
PRODUCTION
| ARABESQUE
TECHNICOLOR
PANAVISION*

I wanted j
MODERN ONE BR APT., A/C, 3
blocks from campus. SBS/mo.plus
utilities. Call Andy after 1 p.m.
378-3627. (C-143-2t-p).
NEED GOOD USED TV ANTENNA
and mast, say around S2O; Call
UF ext. 2832. Jim Moorhead. (C (C---143-2t-nc).
--143-2t-nc). (C---143-2t-nc).
NEED ROOMMATE to share
split-level A/C apt. for B-term,
3 blocks from campus. Call San
after 2 p.m. at 378-3627. (C-142-
2t-p).
PHARMACY STUDENT wants male
roommate to share A/C trailer.
S3O a mo. plus utilities. Call 378-
2774. (C- 142-3 t-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 BE apt. B-term. Own bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, A/C, S3B per mo. Call 378-
3132. Close to campus. (C-140-
st-p).
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
modern one bedroom duplex apt.
A/C, for B-term. Call 378-4893.
(C-140-st-c).
RIDER WANTED FROM CHICAGO
to Ginesville. Leaving Sept. 1 or
2. Write David Weiss, 3001 S.
Parkway (Apt. 1902), Chicago,
60616, Illinois. (C-140-3t-nc).
WANTED: Coed to room with 3
girls in Olympia Apts, for Fall
term. Call 6-8350 after 4:30 p.m.
(C- 1413 c).
WANTED: Girl to share 1/3 of 2
BR apt. One block from campus
with A/C, $33 a mo. for B term
and/or Fall, Winter. Call 2-6229
after 6 p.m. (C-141-tf-nc).
APT. and female roommate wanted
for Fall Trimester. Call 376-
2315. (C-137-st-c).

autos
1965 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE sports
car. Number one condition. Take
up payments. 1960 BELAIR Chevy.
Want S3OO. Contact after 5 ext
2156. Couk. (G-143-2t-c).
1963 VW. Sunroof. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Must sell, leaving country
$975. 378-2563. (G- 143-3 t-c).
1963 PORSCHE. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. $2795. Will consider trade
on cheaper car or motorcycle.
372-7611. (G-140-ts-c).
1962 THUNDERBIRD, white. Auto Automatic
matic Automatic transmission, power steer steering,
ing, steering, brakes, seats, R & H. Good
condition. Priced for quick sale.
Ph. 376-1798 Today. (G-141-
3t-c).
1964 VW. Sunroof. 20,000 miles.
Excellent condition. $1295. Call
ext. 2856 before 5 and 372-5758,
372-7268 after 5. (G-141-3t-c).
b&TTqsTs
8 T S
g REACH I fj
El PEOPLE fT
V-
B UNJV- 2332 j 9
iEnds WED
3-2:40-4:50-7:00-9:15
is 3 t
D LAUGHS J|
turel&Hmtys
augfng 20b
Plus At
:00-4:10-6:20-8:35
PEEDY GONZALES
versus
ROAD RUNNER
in the
lATTLE OF THE
DRAG RACERS
FORGIVE]
Our apologies for I
the hunk of junk i
titled SLAVE r
TRADE which V
played last week. 1
We was had. /
THURS*
\
Jean Paul Belmondo
Ursula Andress
t-n u%
(ocas Ur
iS EARS'
srcnreU



CLASSIFIEDS

Tuesday, June 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

real estate
BEST OFFER. 3 BR, 2 bath home.
Pool privileges. $13,500 home, 3
yr. equity. Total monthly payment
$93.84. 2703 NE 11th Terr. Ph.
372-5817. (I- 143-2 t-c).
NO QUALIFYING FOR LOAN.
Available August 15th. Just SSOO
and take over monthly payments.
3 BR, CCB, A/C. Come by 2410
NE 11th St. or call 378-1186 after
5 p.m. or on weekends. (1-143-
2t-p). ;
BLACK acres. Lovely 3 BR, 2
bath colonial ranch type. Fully
equipped kitchen, hardwood floors,
large closets and storage, screen
porch, patio, 4 yrs. old, paved
street. Leavingtown.s22,ooo. 372-
8697. (I-139-ts-c).
AVAILABLE FOR OCCUPANCY
Sept. Ist, on lease basis, furnished
4 bedroom, 2 bath home. Between
NW 22nd and 23rd St. S2OO per
mo. Call Anna Hinson, 378-2559.
(I- 137-ts-c).
THIRTEEN THOUSAND or less
will buy nine room house near
University and Finley on Quiet
wooded dead end street, with three
bedrooms, one bath, fireplace,
hardwood floors at 304 NW 24th
St. Ph. 372-9795. (I-138-ts-c).
FLORIDA STATE
THEATRES
c h w*
urn
ElKeSmnierLl![3J
Ph^Mer^
MR: i llfln' r yj
> tr / COLOR by DeLuxe
I r lib J UNITED ARTISTS
V J
V v /
- A
w f.
: :j
PA\A\ISIOY XViTMAMOIOtt |
DOWNTOWN
IffiiujCTiM
sl^

help wanted
MAID FOIL IRONING for small
family and cleaning a 2 BR apt.
Work from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each
Friday. No child care. Free lunch.
Good wages but good work expected
in return. Call 376-9969 after 5:30
p.m. (E-143-lt-nc).
GOOD INCOME. Part of full time
in selling the new line of Holiday
Magic Cosmetics. Call Mr. Croy
or Mrs. Gill, 378-1591. (E-143-
ts-c).
MALE DESK CLERK. Weekends
only. Average 35 hrs weekly. Work
Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Apply
2325 NW 13th St. (E-141-3t-c).
r 11
lost-found
LOST: Brown wallet lost in South Southwest
west Southwest Gainesville, Saturday. Gradu Graduate
ate Graduate student needs identification
papers, please return all iden identification
tification identification papers. Call 376-9979.
(L- 143-3 t-c).
LOST: Lady's billfold at Camp
Wauburg, Sat., June 4th. Keep
money, please return the papers
to Dorothy Harris. 115 NW 20th
Dr. 372-8153. (L- 141-4 t-c).
personal
FREE KITTENS --solid white long
haired males. Call 2-8603 after 5.
(J-143-lt-c).
HELP A POOR UNWED MOTHER
-- take one of her kittens. Black
and white, six weeks old. Call
2-9992. (J- 143-2 t-p).
VISIT GATOR GROOMER where
romance blooms. Next door to
Univ. P.O. Self-service and pro professional
fessional professional laundry and dry cleaning.
(J- 131-ts-c).
services
Table lamps, $1 and up. FAMILY
THRIFT STORE, 202 SE Ist Ave.
Ph. 376-9255. (M- 141-ts-c).
IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios. 372-0300. (M (M---131-ts-c).
--131-ts-c). (M---131-ts-c).
r lir
fLORIdA
AILIQAtOR
For Best Ad Results
UNIV. EX: 2832
r j, <
.- /

Page 7

vmr i ?
.Jg- *' . A §0
vs v
' t *V' 2
* ; -%Jb 0 *
. tv
a
Leadership
AN ADMIRABLE TRAIT, LEADERSHIP.
SOME HAVE IT, SOME DON'T. WE
HAVE, AT LEAST IN THE FIELD OF
SATISFYING OUR ADVERTISERS WITH
TANGIBLE RESULTS. WE'RE LEADERS
IN THIS FIELD BECAUSE OF OUR
READERSHIP, WHICH IS CONCENTRAT CONCENTRATED,
ED, CONCENTRATED, -SPECIALIZED, AND MORE AF AFFLUENT
FLUENT AFFLUENT THAN YOU MIGHT THINK.
WE GET SEEN BY THOUSANDS OF
PEOPLE EACH ISSUE, AND OUR ADS
GET READ, TOO.
The /
Florida
'. i
Alligator



THE MUSICAL SCENE

UF Offers Wide Variety Os Summer Music

Here Is a checklist of attractions
to be presented on the UF campus
by the Lyceum Council and the
Department of Music during the
Summer Term, Trimester ni-B.
The Lyceum Council has sche scheduled
duled scheduled two events. The Kaleidoscope
Players will present their produc production
tion production of Stephen Vincent Benets
John Browns Body, in Univer University
sity University Auditorium, Tuesday, June 28,
at 8:15. This is the dramatic adap adaptation
tation adaptation of Stephen Vincent Benets
epic poem, originally presented on
Broadway with Judith Anderson,
Raymond Massey, and Tyrone
Power. It is a highly dramatic and
theatrical work with a quality of
excitement unrivaled in many stan standard

"Orange

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 21, 1966

Page 8

Camnus Calendar

Tuesday Tuesday Evening Supper Club:
June 21 Presbyterian Student Center,
6:30 p.m. Non-denominational;
everyone single and over 21 in invited.
vited. invited. sl.
Adult Swimming Classes: 227 Fla.
Gym. Registration. Classes be begin
gin begin Wed., June 22, 12:10-12:45
p.m. Open to faculty, staff, stu students
dents students and families (over 15 years
of age) during B-term. Monday
thru Thursday.
Union Board: 215 FU, 4:45 p.m.
Leg Council: FU 208 and FU Aud.,
7:30 p.m.
Student Economy Committee: 210
FU, 4 p.m.
Wednesday Craft Shop Special Sessions: FU
June 22 Craft Shop, 7:30 p.m. No regis registration.
tration. registration. Silkscreening.
Humanities Council: 215 FU, 1:30
p.m.

General Notices

LECTURE-DISCUSSION SERIES: Faculty
members, graduate students and others inter interested
ested interested in a study of Theology of the Modern
World, are invited to attend a series of lec lecture-discussions
ture-discussions lecture-discussions on theologians and selected
works. The program for June 23 at 8 p.m. will
be on Martin Luthers Here I Stand. The
discussion will be led by Dr. George Wenius
at the Methodist Student Center.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN DATA PRO PROCESSING:
CESSING: PROCESSING: The University of Florida Chapter of
the Association for Computing Machinery will

CASH LOANS yy- MONEY
AVAILABLE ot ,^ V VAr Tir M AVAILABLE
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dard standard plays. John Browns Body
tells its story from the points of
view of two soldiers, one northern
and one southern. The families,
romances and backgrounds are
woven into the action of the play.
The Kaleidoscope Players were
organized as a regional touring
company in 1959. They have played
a number of times at UF, always
with signal success.
The Dutton Percussion Trio will
present a concert Tuesday, July
12, at 8:15 in University Auditor Auditorium.
ium. Auditorium. The Trio is made up of James
Dutton, chairman of the percussion
department of the American Con Conservatory
servatory Conservatory of Music; Harold Jones,
an exciting young jazz drummer;

and Carole a pretty and
talented performer on the vibra vibraphone.
phone. vibraphone. Using nearly 50 different
percussion instruments, the Trio
presents music which has the e emotion
motion emotion of jazz, the intimacy of
chamber music, the excitement of
native rhythms,and,seemingly,
the scope of a symphony. Their
programs include works by Bach,
Satie, Kabalevsky and and jazz,
show tunes and novelties.
For both of the above Lyceum
Council presentations, the regular
prices will prevail. UF students
obtain tickets on I.D. cards; gen general
eral general public, $2.00; faculty, staff,
school students and children,
SI.OO. There will be no advanced

and

blue bulletin

Florida Speological Society: 212
FU, 7 p.m.
J. W. Norman Lecture Committee:
Norman Hall Aud., 1:45 p.m.
Professor and Dean Emeritus
J. W. Norman will present lec lecture.
ture. lecture.
Secretary of Married Student Af Affairs:
fairs: Affairs: 118 FU, 5:30 p.m.
Thursday Christian Science Organization:
June 23 FU Aud., 5:15 p.m.
FU Fine Arts: Plaza of the Ameri Americas
cas Americas (in case of rain Univ. Aud.)
8 p.m. Warner, Porter & War Warner,
ner, Warner, Folk Trio; Free. Free
watermelon & cokes also.
Florida Players: Production meet meeting,
ing, meeting, Norman Hall Aud., 7 p.m.
Next production Papa Is
All, everyone invited.
Others MENSA: Daily, reserved section,
west wing, Main Cafeteria, 11:15

meet tonight (June 21) at 7:30 p.m. in 103-B,
College of Architecture and Fine Arts. The topic
will be Career Opportunities in Data Process Processing,
ing, Processing, and the program will include a movie and
a panel discussion. Panelists will be Malcolm
R. Dixon Jr., resident manager of IBM Corpor Corporation
ation Corporation here; Harry Kelinberg, chief engineer,
RCA Corporation; C. R. Koffman, manager,
Electronic Systems Division, The Prudential
Insurance Company; and Dr. R. G. Selfridge,
director, University Computing Center. Moder Moderator
ator Moderator will be Heinz Dinter, ACM chapter presi president.
dent. president. All interested persons are invited.

ticket sales for these perfor performances.
mances. performances. Tickets will be available
at the door.
The University Summer Band,
with Richard Bowles conducting,
will present two more concerts
on the Plaza of the Americas at
the twilight hour 6:45 p.m.
on Wednesday, July 6, and Wed Wednesday,
nesday, Wednesday, July 20.
A unique outdoor concert is the
twilight concert which climaxes
the Annual Gatorland Summer
Music Clinic. This will be held
Saturday, July 30, at 6:45 p.m.,
on the Plaza of the Americas. In
the event of inclement weather,
this concert will be presented in
University Auditorium.

ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE,
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE', CAMPUS

to 1:30 p.m. Students and faculty
invited.
FU Trip to St. Augustine: Saturday,
July 9. Leave 12 noon; tour the
city and see Cross and Sword;
for reservations call ext. 2741.
SB.OO.
FU Trip to Guatemala: Aug. 15
Aug. 22. $255.00 per person. For
information come by or call 315
FU, ext. 2741.
Craft Shop Special Sessions: Mon Monday,
day, Monday, June 27,2:30p.m., FU Craft
Shop. No registration * Ena Enameling.
meling. Enameling.
Graduate School: GRE Application
Deadline Date: Deadline date for
receipt of application by Educa Educational
tional Educational Testing Service, Prince Princeton,
ton, Princeton, N. J., is June 24. GRE will
be held on Sat., July 9, in Walker
Aud. Pick up GRE booklets in
235 Tigert.

SUMMER ARTS FILM SERIES: The Student
Chapter of the American Institute of Architects
is presenting a series of art films, to be shown
at 8 p.m. Thursdays in 105-B College of Archi Architecture
tecture Architecture and Fine Arts. The film for June 29 will
be Frank Lloyd Wright Wisdom Series.
FACULTY CLUB MEMBERS: Luncheons are
served at the Faculty Club, overlooking the golf
course, from 12 noon until 1:30 p.m. every day.
For reservations for one of the five private
dining rooms (at no cost), call Ext. 2561. Thurs Thursday
day Thursday night buffet suppers are served 6-7:30 p.m.

The department of music annual
summer musical presentation this
year brings to the campus the de delightfully
lightfully delightfully entertaining show, The
Fantasticks, which has pleased
audiences not only in a number of
productions in New York* but in
hundreds of presentations over the
country. Evelyn McGarrity is the
musical director. Two presenta presentations
tions presentations are scheduled Thursday
and Friday, July 21 and 22 at
8:15 in P. K. Yonge Auditorium.
For this event, UF students obtain
tickets on their I.D. cards. All
non-student tickets are $2.00 with
the proceeds going to the benefit
of the University of Florida Music
Performance Scholarship fund.



nro^agnj

nual tax of S6O on all cars using
y streets for night parking.
Still another measure will be
gd this fall at lowa. The univer univery
y univery will ban freshman cars from
iversity parking lots during the
urs of 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
What the students probably will
} The Daily lowan the univer univerys
ys univerys student newspaper -- has
eculated, will be to park on city
eets during the day. Then the
idents will move their cars to
( university lots at night to avoid
:h the universitys and the citys
rking tax.
The University of Minnesota at
nneapolis-St. Paul is faced with

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parking 11,000 cars in only 4,000
parking places.
To solve their problem, an ad hoc
com mittee was established, to study
the problem and make recommen recommendations.
dations. recommendations.
Several proposals were offered
which will go into operation at the
university campus this fall.
The proposals are:
Give parking priority to car
pools cars with more than three
passengers on university lots.
Provide free off-campus bus
service from city lots to encourage
commuters to leave cars off
campus.
Start charging parking fees
for parking on the universitys
parking lots.

L From Page 1

Jacobs wrote the University of
Tennessee to obtain information
on the program.
The garage would cost the UF
from $1.5 to $3 million depending
on size ranging from a 500 to
1000 car capacity.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz
has said he is aware of the critical
parking place shortage and
approves investigating ways of ob obtaining
taining obtaining funds for the multi-level
parking garage.
Other alternatives are not being
overlooked.
The possibility of a private de developer
veloper developer built off-campus facilities
is also being investigated. Such a
program, if highly successful,
could possibly lead to a parking
ban on autos in certain areas of
campus.
All the marbles arent being put
into one bag.
Recently, two more parking lots
have been opened on campus to help
alleviate the shortage. The lots are
located in the former orange grove

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and in the open lot beside the
Student Service Center.
Jacobs said he also would like
to have special disposition made
of parking fines to maintain the
present parking lots' utility.
Parking fines are now returned
to a general fund of SG monies.
Legislative Council approval of
the plan is pending.
Jacobs plan is not the first talk
of providing multi-level parking
for UF.
Defeated Student Body presiden presidential
tial presidential candidate Ernie Litz proposed
such parking in his platform.
At the time, Litz said if elected
he would seek funds for UF under
Title IV of the Higher Education
Facilities Act.
Two possibilities have been dis discussed
cussed discussed to repay the government
loan, Jacobs said.
A general tax could be levied
against automobile users on cam campus.
pus. campus.
Fees could be charged for the
use of the facility and these would
be used to repay the 40-year loan.

Tuesday, June 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Florida Union
Sponsors Free
Show Thurs
Warner, Porter and Warner,
winners of the 1966 Jackie Glea Gleason
son Gleason Talent Search, and newest
folk-style singing group to break
into the big-time, will appear at
the University of Florida on June
23 under the sponsorship of the
Florida Union Board of Managers
and Fine Arts Committee.
The place is the Plaza of the
Americas, the time 8:00 p.m. and
best news of all, the concert is
free, the cokes are free, according
to Skip Berg, Director of the FU
Board and chairman of the event.
The groups first appearance
on the Jackie Gleason show re resulted
sulted resulted in a tremendous ovation
requesting an encore, and a brand
new contract with New Yorks
William Morris Agency, who built
such attractions as Dionne War Warwick
wick Warwick and The Lettermen.
Almost all the material for the
group is composed by Tom Porter
and includes the sentimental
Streetvendor Song, the wry hu humor
mor humor of The Jean LaFitte Hotel,
the modern lll Sing Another Song
and Ill Go, and his own version
of rock and roll.
Warner, Porter and Warner
prove that all contemporary folk
groups do not have to sound alike.
Their music is new, their sound
is their own, and they have won
high praise for the expertise of
their musical background. After
having swept the southeast, they
are moving up to national pro prominence.
minence. prominence.

Page 9



', The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 21, 1966

Page 10

Carlson Raps Column

By DICK DENNIS
ALLIGATOR SPORTS WRITER
Last Tuesday Alligator guest
columnist Andy Moor wrote that
UFs Assistant Sports Publicity
Director, Larry Woods, was fired
because he objected to the possible
hiring of Perry Moore.
Some people thought Moore, Ad Administrative
ministrative Administrative Assistant to Ray
Graves, was the next UF basket basketball
ball basketball coach.
Publicity Director Norm Carl Carlson,
son, Carlson, in an interview Friday, denied
this was why Woods was dismissed.
There are nine or ten reasons
Woods was fired, he explained.
Any of them was enough for his
dismissal. None had anything to do
with Perry Moore.
Moor stated Woods learned
Carlson had written a mimeo mimeographed
graphed mimeographed news release about
Moores appointment.
Carlson emphasized, There
was no release written on Moore.
Moore was not going to get the job.
Columnist Moor said Woods
called Gainesville Sun Sports Edi Editor
tor Editor Joe Halberstein. Halberstein
allegedly called TODAY Sports
Editor Buddy Martin. Martin then
put the cage appointment story
from Woods on the AP wire.
This drew enough public concern
Reeves Inks
Gator Pact
David Reeves, who hurled his
Americus, Georgia prep team to
three consecutive state titles has
signed a baseball grant with UF.
Reeves was 13-0 this year and
in the recent state title competition
(Class A) against North Clayton,
he pitched lx)th wins in the best besttwo-of-three
two-of-three besttwo-of-three series. He fanned 22
men in 14 innings.
We are pleased David is coming
to UF, said Gator head baseball
coach Dave Fuller. I think hes
the most outstanding high school
pitcher in the South, and really
cant remember us ever having a
pitcher with a better fast ball. Hes
a tremendous prospect.
Reeves was a selection to play
in the annual Georgia high school
all-star baseball game.
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to delay the confirmation, Moor
added.
Carlson countered, Halber Halberstein
stein Halberstein and Martin both called me
and apologized. They told me what
Moor wrote about them was not
true.
Moors column contained sever several
al several errors-in-fact, according to
Carlson. Carlson feels Moor over overlooked
looked overlooked one of journalisms basic
rules.
I dont want to give the im impression

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pression impression Im arguing with Andy
Moor; Im not accusing him of
being a liar. But, Moor did not
check the facts.
Certainly his intentions were
good, because he thought he was
righting a wrong. Yet, he didnt
check his information with me,
Halberstein, Martin or Dan Murr.
Murr, Florida Times Union re reporter,
porter, reporter, was told by Woods that Roy
Skinner, Vandy cage coach, was
sure to be Sloans replacement.

GATOR
' 0£ NTS I
AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL J|
ig I
vL CAFETERIA I



TYLER
TUCKER
ALLIGATOR SPORTS COLUMNIST

The Longest Mile
The soft asphalt melted under the needle-like spikes of his
track shoes. As he leaned over to stretch the tense muscles
in his back, the distance runner felt a faint gust of dry, hot wind
rake across his face.
The grandstands were spotted with spectators, men and women
looking on between sips of soft drinks. The heat of the sun drove
them behind visors, shades and parasols.
The onlookers waited for a champion.
Runners moved into the starting blocks for the long run, the
toughest run the mile. Four times around the oval ribbon of
asphalt a distance that seems an endless reaching for the
finish line.
He went down on his knees and felt the heat of the tarry surface
burn his flesh. Cupping his hands, pressing his thumbs between
his knees and the narrow white line before him, the distance runner
took one last deep breath and listened for the loud voice of the
starter.
On your mark . . Every muscle in the runner's legs grew
tense in anticipation.
Get set. He rose from his cramped position with his legs
straight and his head pointing dead ahead.
Go ... The tall lean runner bolted forth at the explosion of
the cartridge of the starters gun.
He could see the other runners out of the corner of his eye as
he strided smoothly between the two white lines which mapped
his long oval course.
The distance runner raced on, watching his competitors closely,
trying to pace himself on the long torturous run. As he passed the
first curve, he felt like an impala sprinting the open fields. He
felt good. But ... he thought ... the beginning pretty easy; it is
the distance that is hard.
He went into the next stretch, unleashing a burst of speed that
would time the smoothness of his stride. The runner dashed
ahead of all but two of the other runners.
Next Turn
The next turn went quickly and he passed the quarter-mile mark
with ease. He was overcome with a surge of strength. In the next
turn he raced by another runner and took the inside lane at the
heels of the leader.
He was beginning to tire. He could feel the heat of his body build building
ing building up into what would become a blazing furnace, heat that would
send a choking dryness up his throat. Sweat broke out, draining
his armpits, drenching his chest with water that sent chills down
his back when he made the far turn into the face of a resisting
breeze.
At the halfway point, he could still see the flashing spikes on
the hatels of the leader glaring into his eyes like mirrors reflect reflecting
ing reflecting sunlight. He had to overtake the leader... he thought. He had
to win.
Run, run, run, he told himself.
He was tiring. He could sense the added weight on his shoulders
-- the weight that seems to increase the closer a distance runner
gets to the finish line. His lungs were heaving long painful breaths;
his heart beat wildly and sent a pounding noise into his ears.
The last stretch.
RUN, RUN, RUN, MOVE, MOVE, MOVE .
The finish line was just ahead. He poured it on all the speed,
energy, and effort he could call forth. He raced in a mad frenzy
to the white threat ahead. He forgot everything but that small
thread and the runner at his side coughing and gasping for air.
Both flashed past the finish line, heads plunged forward past
the narrow white stripe.
His race was run. He had run the longest mile.

UF Golfers
In Tourney
National Amateur champion Bob
Murphy leads a four-man UF golf
delegation into the NCAA Champ Championship
ionship Championship June 22-25 in Palo Alto,
California.
Murphy, Wally Armstrong,
Lloyd Watts and David Oakley will
be Coach Buster Bishop's entry in into
to into the tournament.
AGNES'
v
Operators
MADELEINE LANCASTER
CHERYLON QUINCEY
16 NW 13th St.
Across From Campus
Phone 6-9922

DI iW
I
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%
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UF Cagers To Travel South

By PETER LANGLEY
Ole! The Gator basketball team
is making final plans for its July
trip to South America.
The team will leave July 12 un under
der under new head coach Tommy Bart Bartlett
lett Bartlett for a tour of five and perhaps
six Latin American countries.
The countries to be visited are
Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay,
Peru, and perhaps Panama. The
trip will last a month with the team
returning Aug. 12.
Norm Carlson, sports
director, said that the team expects
to play between 22 and 24 games
during the month.
Making the trip will be 10 play players,
ers, players, two coaches and a trainer.
The list of who will go is not yed
complete, but Carlson said that]
Bartlett has decided on six players
for sure.
They are: Gary Keller, Jeffl
Ramsey, Gary McElroy, Dave Mil Miller,
ler, Miller, Andy Owens, and Neal Walk.
Harry Winkler will make the trip
if he does ndt have a track conflict.
Bartlett has not decided which'
of his assistants to take along as
the second coach, but Brady Great Greathouse,
house, Greathouse, assistant trainer, has been
chosen to go along as the teams
trainer.
The schedule has not yet been
received from the Person to Per Person
son Person Sports Committee which or organized
ganized organized the trip and invited the
Gator team to make it this summer.
The organization, centered in
San Francisco, has been carrying
out the trips as a good will mission
for some years. This is the first
time the Gators have been invited.
The opposition for the team will
be provided by club teams from
the Various countries. These club
teams are amateur clubs, but they
play year round and are equivalent
to the United States professional
teams.
The teams will play internation international
al international rules which are quite different
from the rules the Gators are used
to.
Perry Moore, assistant to the
director of athletics, played under
international rules while in the
armed services. He outlined some
of the major differences.
They (international rules) use
a leather ball which is quite differ different
ent different from our rubber ones, said
Moore. The foul lanes are larger
than those in the United States and
this hinders the tall boys. There is
a 30-second time limit in which a
team has to shoot, and there is no
half-court line.

The Gators are going to take
leather and rubber balls and give
their opponents a choice. The dif difference
ference difference is going to make the Gators
work hard, said Moore.

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Tuesday, June 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

The trip will be valuable to Bart Bartlett
lett Bartlett because he is new and It will
be his only chance to see the Gators
in action before Oct. 15, when they
can begin practice under NCAA

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 21, 1966

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