Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Vol. 58 No. 142

V -r" Motion B olc \ \
\ \ £xanu \ 1
m aSSpHk WjHpP r Sl
m 4 /' 1
\ HO*" 1 \
V
~~ It Cant Be THAT Bad!
- ~ i

Inside Today's
Alligator
Theatre Notebook . p. 3
Litz Schooner Sails A Against
gainst Against SG Again ... p. 4
Letters on Gator, Litz,
Football p. 5
Homecoming Slogan Con Contest
test Contest p. 8
Andy Moor Column . p. 12

helflorii>a gUUgator

Steve Kanar, 4AS,
looks like cramming
for finals has gotten
him down.
Most UFers hope hopefully
fully hopefully wont take finals
the same * way Kanar
is doing For most,
finals mean the end

University of Florida

of school until Sep September.
tember. September. For some --
graduation, for others
-- the service.
Some lucky people,
around 1,800, will stay
at UF for the entire
summer. For those
taking classes on the

full weeks, finals
mean a three-day
break before classes
begin again next Mon Monday.
day. Monday. For those split splitting
ting splitting up their summer
into two seven-week
terms, finals mean no
respite from the aca-

Tuesday, June 14, 1966

demic world.
Finals begin Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday and end Friday.
Coincidental with fi finals,
nals, finals, The Alligator
will not publish Friday
but will resume pub publication
lication publication again next
Tuesday.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 14, 1966

Campus __
Mams
Briefs

PHARMACY COLLEGE GETS GRANT
UFs College of Pharmacy has received its first allocation of
$26,000 from the federal health professions scholarship program.
The four-year grant of $225,000 will be used by the college to
enable talented students from low-income families to pursue a
pharmaceutical education. It will become effective July 1.
The law, known as the Health Professions Education Assistance
Amendment of 1965, provides grants to accredited schools of
pharmacy, medicine, podiatry, osteopathy, dentistry and optome optometry
try optometry for student scholarships.
The UFs College of Medicine recently received a five year
grant under the act for $112,800.
PROF HONORED
Dr. Erich A. Farber, professor of mechanical engineering at
UF, has been selected by the American Society of Mechanical
Engineers as recipient of the annual Worcester Reed Warner
Medal.
The award, which was established in 1930, is given for an out outstanding
standing outstanding contribution to the permanent literature of engineering.
In order to qualify for consideration, such literature must not be
less than five years old and be recognized as a noteworthy con contribution
tribution contribution to the profession.
SCIENCE STUDENTS ARRIVE
Twenty-six high school juniors from 22 Florida schools arrived
here Sunday to attend the Science Summer Research Participation
Program for Secondary School Students which continues through
Aug. 5.
The students, chosen by their principals for superior per performance
formance performance in the science area, will attend classes three days a
week and have a chance to work directly with various research
professors in their fields of interest.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz welcomed the students at a special
meeting Monday morning at Broward Hall.
STARTIME B.Y.U. HERE
Dollars for Scholars will benefit when Startime B. Y. U.
comes to campus tomorrow. Sponsored by the UFs Deseret
Club, Startime B. Y. U. is a traveling variety show composed
of students of Brigham Young University in Utah. The show starts
at 8.T5 in University Auditorium. Tickets are still on sale at the
Florida Union ticket office.
~-. j .
See Whats New j
The Browse Shop I
REFLECTIONS ON ART.. .Susanne Longer I
TENANTS OF MOONBLOOM...Edward L. I
Wallant
ATLAS SHRUGGED Ayn Rand I
THE PSYCHOLOGY OF IMAGINATION I
Jean-Paul Sartre I
FIED I
FIELD STUD.Y IN AMERICAN GEOGRA- 1
PHY Robert S. Platt I
A MOVEABLE FEAST. ..Ernest Hemingway I
POLARIZED LlGHT..William A. Shurcliff I
HARDCOVER I
PAPA HEMINGWAY Hotchner
THIS IS THE GERMAN SHEPARD I
Goldbecker I
COMPUTER PROGRAMING Flores I
Store Hours 8:00 A.M .to 5:00 P. M. I
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 I
Campus Shop & Bookstore |
Tha Ptorlfe Alligator iwima tit* right to ragout* tha typographical tooa of all adrartlaainanU and
to ratlaa or tarn away copy which it oonaldara objactlooabla.
MO POSITION E GUARANTEED, though desired position will bo given whenever poaalbla.
Tha Florida Alligator will not oonatdar Adjustments o i paymont for any Advertisement Involving typo typographical
graphical typographical arroro or orroaaoua lnaarttoo nalaaa notlca la glvoa to tha Advertising Manager within
(1) oaa day after Advertisement appeara.
Tha Flo rite Alligator will not bo responsible for more than one Incorrect lneerdon as an advarttaamant
acbeduled to ran aavaral tines. Nodeae for eorracdoa Boot be given kffnrnssit Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR la tha official student aawapapar of tha tMMhrslty of Florida and la
pMlahod Ova tltrn weakly except daring May, Jana, and July when ft Is pMlahod semi-weakly. Only
Bii reprenont tha official opinions of their aothora. Tha ftltlgntnr la aatarad aa aacoad rlaaa
BaM at tha UMkad Stataa Post Offloa at Galnaavtlla.
h

V R t xt- 'WmSgS RjHw
SUMMER SWEETIE

With finals coming up, what better way to take
ones mind off school work than with a Summer
Sweetie. This Summer Sweetie isnt one wholl have
to worry too much about finals. Her name is Jo

Bryant, Wood
Are Cited
For Service
Lt. Col. James W. Bryant and
Capt. Billy B. Wood, instructors
assigned to Army ROTC at UF,
have been cited by Secretary of
the Army Stanley R. Resor for
meritprious service while on duty
at the University.
The officers were awarded the
Army Commendation Medal for
their outstanding contributions to
the success the Army ROTC has
achieved at the University during
the past three years.
For the past two years, Univer University
sity University of Florida Army ROTC grad graduates
uates graduates have ranked first among the
36 institutions inThird Army area.
This area encompasses the seven
southeastern states.
Lt. Col. Bryant has been trans transferred
ferred transferred to Ft. Monroe, Va.; Capt.
Wood will leavefor Korea shortly.

* < BMwy^^^yyyyyyyy^MMMyyMWykl
I Join Ik Crowd Tv Lirirf living j
AT UNIVERSITY GARDENS luxury living is not t
\ just an advertising slogan . its a reality. Swim I
ming pool, handball courts and picnic areas (complete
i unth BBQ grills) afford the perfect break in daily 1
activity. \
A A
No need to leave home for all these extras . you'll
\ find them at your doorstep in UNIVERSITY GARDENS. \
More than 18 beautifully landscaped acres (including j
a a lake) combine with the most contemporary design 4
to make UNIVERSITY GARDENS the luxury address t
1 in Gainesville.
Call
I 700 SW 16th AVE. 376-6720 j

/CARIBBEAN N f'
I i mediterranean f travel^
ROUND THE SERVICE
f{ AIR
> STEAMSHIP TICKETS.
/ INDEPENDENT Ct <
. ESCORTED TRAVEL
> AUTO RENTAL AND Ai
PURCHASE
(ft ff?x\ WO RLD
1U ] 77.) TRAVEL
SERVICE
_ _...... Phone
808 W. University Ave. 376-4641


Franklin and shes a member of Mensa, the society
for people with high I.Q.s. Somehow, pretty Jo
doesnt seem like a bookworm.



CAROLYN PLAZA
QUIK-SAVE
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
-r
r
SECRET 1.50 VALUE
Super Spray Deodorant ~ 97c
Cl i r I
ULTRA-BLUE 1
Hair Lightener J
& Creme Developer Combination
HI-LITER
Felt Tip Markers 70#*
FOR UNDERLINING ETC. V
Johnson & Johnson
LIST 1.00
BABY OIL 7
Great For Sun Tanning \Jm \
SCHICK
Injector Blades g £
i-
*' v
SCHICK HOT LATHER
Shave Cream ggJ
Economy Size Regular Or Menthol
5 MINUTE COLOR T
By Clairol 1.29
iMmwwwwj
CB Sg F]| NOW: TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE
R YOU...
QpY EH 1620 W. Univ. (Carolyn Plaza) and
xplres June 19, 1966 B 9W. Univ. (Downtown)
ty Rights Reserved M Gai nesvi I le 1 s LOWEST PRICE on Film
l wiT C T.rr,.Ja Developing -ONE-DAY SERVICE
Good Only @ QUIK-SAVE
QUIK-SAVE I C moLo|)
v n ryJ
Xarox Copies as Low as 8C Each!
HIGHEST QUALITY WORK j *" [J
i Mscown
Accoptabl* for Ttrm raptrs, Thtsts, Etc. 1
QUANTITY RIGHTS

theatre notebook
By ERNIE REHDER
The Florida Players recent production of Ladies in Retirement
might be considered an exercise in doing ones best in a difficult
situation. Playwrights Edward Percy and Reginald Denham created a
work in which the basic elements social drama, murder mystery,
and crime-and-punishment psychological conflict are not properly
integrated. It furthermore has little good repartee to enhance its
fluidity.
Ellen Creed, portrayed by Mrs. Bette Jo Edwardson, is the house housekeeper-lady
keeper-lady housekeeper-lady companion of the wealthy Leonora Fisk (Mrs. Mary King
Humphrey). Although the once fairly well-to-do Miss Creed has been
befriended and supported by Miss Fisk, the former feels an under undercurrent
current undercurrent of resentment toward her benefactor. Her bi.terness comes
to the surface when Miss Fisk quite understandably refuses to allow
Miss Creeds two retarded sisters to remain with them in her old
Thames estuary home. The daffy sisters, Louisa and Emily (Carol
Nurenberg and Carolyn Sadler), are almost a religion to Miss
Creed; and she murders in order to provide them with a home of their
own.
The first act ends with the tragic occurrence, and the remainder of
the play deals with the efforts of Miss Creeds criminal nephew Albert
Feather, portrayed by James Mooty, to discover his aunts crime, and
with the fear and remorse of Miss Creed.
The play tended to drag in the middle scenes because too much
space was allotted to Albert, who, with the complicity of the maid
Lucy Gilham (Sandra Shapiro), ferrets out Miss Creeds secret
which is no secret to the audience. Proper motivation is not always
present here. Why does Lucy let herself become involved in the
criminal machinations of her not-so-torrid boy friend? At one point
she tells him, your eyes mesmerize me, which Messrs. Percy
and Denham undoubtedly intended to be a cause rather than a non
sequitur.
A smattering of drawing room social drama a la Ibsen and Shaw
is used to provide ballast for the motivation of Miss Creeds actions.
The social polemic is too diffuse, though -- not strong enough to pro provide
vide provide a theme, yet too apparent when it serves no real purpose. Miss
Fisk is an investor and a Catholic, with a solid OLD home all of
which may render Miss Creeds actions more credible. On the other
hand, the retarded sisters are anti-Catholic and have little respect
for private property. Their views add little to create a social drama,
although they do provide a few laughs.
The theme of the servant who overthrows his (her) master is
present, although it fails to be developed due to the lack of any truly
sinister character. Albert is a bit too blase to be considered ominous.
The play is not really a murder mystery because there is no dark
secret to be unveiled by the audience. What remains then, is the anguish
of Miss Creed. Mrs. Edwardson gave a virtuoso performance and sur surmounted
mounted surmounted may obstacles inherent in a weakly constructed play. Her
stage presence was excellent, and her gestures, facial expressions,
and subtle changes in voice tone provided clues to Miss Creeds per personality,
sonality, personality, which would otherwise have remained a cipher in the hands
of a lesser actress.
Carol Nurenberg, as the flighty Louisa, added humor to a play
generally characterized by flat dialogue and telegraphed motivations.
Another compensating factor in the performance was the splendid
scenery for Miss Fisks home, which captured the flavor of late-
Victorian sobriety and must. 4
ON FATHERS DAY
LET HIM TRY... *lll
mm
'c- 1 9 new at Gina's . §&#?'(<#*
Li.r,' OF SIRLOIN or
ivntlMN ala Pizzaiola ||||iif^
i *'i r! H prta'o or side of speghetti, Italian
' ' :H ,f> S.Jrlic brccld
CA SQ
J||||
j y I iJySfrALIAN AMERICAN j&sj' f
1 CUISINE T A W
\ 0; \ 2204 SW 13th SI. a
M / \ PNONf WMm
<\m.

Tuesday, June 14, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

1, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 14, 1966

aboardihol
with Mr mo Lit/
It appears that this Schooner has been
passing through some rough waters of late,
but then there always are difficulties in
getting the truth to the people.
I put MY NAME onto what I write and stand
behind everything I say, with proof and evi evidence.
dence. evidence. The mysterious Mr. Name Withheld
who criticized me last week is an example
of the old propaganda technique of not deny denying
ing denying charges made, but merely throwing back
other charges to confuse things, rather than
clarify them and assert reality. I do not in intend
tend intend to otherwise comment on the cowardly,
unfounded and untrue allegations made
therein.
Perhaps some of our noble student leaders
will be so kind as to explain and answer some
of the following:
1. Why is it that in the" 1960-67 student
government budget the $3,000 appropriation
for Homecoming (put on by Florida Blue Key)
-pis not accounted for, as is every other appro appropriation
priation appropriation in the budget? Why was the same
thing true for the 1965-66 budget?
2. The power structure elite, which so
proudly bragged at their ability to get Benny
Cason fired, is now performing an interest interesting
ing interesting character assassination job on Honor
Court Chancellor Herb Schwartz. Perhaps
they would like to prove their slurs and in innuendos?
nuendos? innuendos? My only criticism so far is that
Schwartz and the other Blue Key-law school
boys, who spend so,much time talking about
student rights, did darn little to protect
student Benny Casons when they gave him a
surprise move to impeach him and gave him
ten minutes to prepare a defense. It was
analagous to Dr. deitz entering a regular
meeting of the Board of Regents and sudden suddenly
ly suddenly finding all of his political enemies in the
state there with a petition of trumped up
charges and then telling him he had five
minutes to disprove the charges and defend
himself. v
Also, wasnt it surprising how quickly the
spineless leaders backed off their self-praise
and bragging when the state press went to bat
for Cason and chastised Reitz. Perhaps we
can be given some truth about the operations
of the power elite that has for years made
suckers of die student body, and then bragged
about it?
3. Isnt it interesting diat SG fought (?)
for years for the placement of a wider variety
of vending machines in the dorms. Then when
Food Service Director Welborn resigned (he
had fought the vending machines, and for
somwhat interesting reasons), the UF Ad Administration
ministration Administration decided that it might be time
for the vending machines to be brought in.
Now we are hearing all sorts of platitudes
diat it was SG that did it .
4. .Speaking of Food Service, and die wide
variety of questionable operations of die
university in relation to it (brought out un under
der under the editorship of Benny Cason) what whatever
ever whatever happened to the investigation of Food
Service requested by Regents Chancellor J.
Broward Culpepper? What about it Dr. Reitz
and Buddy-Boo?
Notes around campii:
The real trouble with SG is that it refuses
to rock the boat by attempting to really rep represent
resent represent the students. Any representative
government that operates merely on winning
elections so appointment can be given out for
people to have majors and minors for
Florida Blue Key, makes no sense, and the
people in the existing system are proving it
. . Buddy-800 Jacobs asked me to join him
in student government, not vice versa; I said
election night that this years student govern government
ment government will more than ever have to try and
keep its promises and I intend to serve as
watchdog and keep my pledge to the students
who voted for me, probably more than the
promises of those elected will be kept.
Finally I quote the last line in the current
issue of Charlatan magazine (which also de depicts
picts depicts the latest in the nation-widecampaign
to Dump Dean Hale): And good night Buddy
Jacobs, whyever you are?

All la a tor Editorial Paae

EDITORIAL
BSP: Lack Os Leadership

iorida has a U. S h Su Supreme
preme Supreme Court to watch
over it. The UF doesn't.
But maybe we need one.
In the past several years
the court has put constant
pressure on the state's Pork-
Chop legislature to reappor reapportion
tion reapportion itself.
The UF's Board of Student
Publications is closely kin to
- the Florida Pork-Chop Legis Legislature.
lature. Legislature.
Who wants to vote them themselves
selves themselves out of a job?
Not our Pork-Choppers.
And not our publications
board.
But then, the UF doesn't
have a Supreme Court.
And we cannot have con confidence
fidence confidence in a governing board
which continually refuses to
acknowledge its problems and
actively seeks solutions.
At the March 29 electoral
meeting, the board followed
advice from UF President J.
Wayne Reitz to fire Alligator
editor BennjpCason.
After the board fired Cason,
it was aware of its need for
changes in operating proce procedures.
dures. procedures.
What did it do?
It waited until Dr Reitz
suggested due process" pro procedures.
cedures. procedures. Then the board

Survivor

quietly approved them.
The board was also aware
of the conflicts-of-interest on
the board at the same meet meeting.
ing. meeting.
What did it do?
It waited for proposals from
the president and the faculty
senate. These suggestions"
were approved by the board
within two months of the firing.
Before that date, the board
didn't seek or discuss any
other alternatives. Nor did it
show a willingness to accept
any others.
We think the board does
need reconstitution. In doing
this, two primary principles
should be adhered to: 1) it
should have a student major majority,
ity, majority, and 2) one member should
represent the publications --
one who is in touch with the
day-to-day problems of the
publications.
We think the BSP has failed
to show the qualities of lead leadv.
v. leadv.
ership it should have as the
governing body of all student
publications.
The board followed ad advice"
vice" advice" at the March 29 firing.
Then it followed advice" in
making procedural changes.
How long will this lack of
leadership last?
Not long, we hope!

Dr. Robert H|
Hutchins
It is time somebody spoke up for
the city. Its growth and predomi predominance
nance predominance are now universally lament lamented.
ed. lamented. They are the alleged causes of
crime, juvenile delinquency, air
pollution, alienation and irreligicn. v
The aim of planners and preachers
all over the world is to break up
the great cities. Man must be saved
from megalopolis.
Yet the great cities were the
birthplace of civilization: the cen centers
ters centers of intellectual life, the nur nurseries
series nurseries of politics, the homes of
the gods. When we think of ancient
Greece, we think of Athens, with
its windows open, as Pericles
boasted, to all the world; not of
Sparta, which was nothing but the
central fortress and market place
of a farming population.
The Athenians had little byway
of an educational system. Yet they
were the educators of the West.
They would have found our identi identification
fication identification of education with school schooling
ing schooling incomprehensible. They
thought the city educated the man.
And so it did. It does so still.
But we do not like the education
the modern city gives. This is why
the planners and preachers want
to break it up. This is why subur suburbia
bia suburbia has become the promised land
and the central city has been aban abandoned
doned abandoned to those unfortunates who
cannot escape from it.
Discussions in England about
forcing office buildings out of Lon London
don London have got nowhere because a
transactional society requires
concentration of those who are
involved in the transactions. The
British government has been .un .unwilling
willing .unwilling to take the risks to the
economy attendant on scattering
the decision makers of a trans transactional
actional transactional society.
In the United States 21 per cent
of the people live in the Boston-
New York-Washington region. This
is 1.8 per cent of the land of the
United States. It is actually a
smaller proportion than that; for
half the area is in woodland and
the woods are expanding.
The people in southeast England
and in the Boston-New York-Wash York-Washington
ington York-Washington region are living more and
more densely in spite of the in inhuman
human inhuman conditions that density in
our age brings with it. They make
life in megalopolis intolerable,
but they go there just the same.
These considerations suggest
that the thing to do with megalo megalopolis
polis megalopolis is not to break it up, but to
find out how to run it. When you
break up megalopolis what you get
are ghettos, like Scarsdale, N. Y.
San Marino, Calif.; Lake Forest,
111.; or the Levittowns. These
places tend to become like those
restricted real estate develop developments
ments developments in which all the houses
are in a price range that can be
met by only one economic class.
The problem of running mega megalopolis
lopolis megalopolis is a political problem, not
one*of environmental design. The
design has to follow the determi determination
nation determination of the political organization
of megalopolis and its relations
with the national government and
other governmental units.
By focusing attention on the po political
litical political problem we may discover
how to recapture some of the lost
glories of the great city.
(Copyright 1966, Los Angeles
Times)



Letters
|=j to the Editor: |^j|
Criticizes the Establisment
Editor:
I would like to take sharp issue with recent letter writers Mike
Dowling, a student, and Ralph Thompson, a marketing professor.
In his letter criticizing the newspaper, Mr. Dowling asks, What
has happened to The Alligator?
He cites the many campus problems covered by The Alligator
under the editorship of Benny Cason. Then he asks why most of these
problems have been ignored by the new editor, Gene Nail.
Well, first of all, Mr. Dowling should direct his fire not at Mr. Nail
but at The Establishment.
It was The Establishment after all, who joined forces to fire Mr.
Cason simply because he WAS covering vital campus issues and ob obviously
viously obviously hitting the aforementioned group with what hurts them the
most the truth.
The awesome display of power politics directed at Mr. Cason was
nothing less than a threat to the next editor that hed better stay off
The Establishments toes. So, if Mr. Nail has been more timid in his
editorial policy, dont blame him. Blame Reitz and Jacobs and Cul Culpepper
pepper Culpepper and John Webb and F lorida Blue Key, among others.
But I dont think Nail really has been timid. In fact, I believe he
has been hitting the BSP pretty hard with his editorial campaign for
reforms. In addition, he hired Yvette Cardozo one of the three
fired in the political power play by The Establishment -- as his city
editor
He allowed one column written by Cason to appear and would have
run another one, but the latter was censored by Webb and BSP mem member
ber member Dr. H. B. Clark. (Ive heard, by the way, that the censored Cason
column will appear in tomorrows Crocodile.)
He has continued news coverage of The Alligator firings, in the face
of opposition to this by The Establishment. The power structure would
love to forget the whole bloody mess.
He has been forthright and frank in his dealings with the BSP and
with Reitz and this, too, takes courage.
Finally, Mr. Nail lost his job because he has been as courageous
and truthful as indicated.
Nail, you see, was not re-elected to his position as editor of the
fall and winter trimester mainly because he couldnt be controlled
by The Establishment.
The reason he has been less outspoken than many would like is that
he is living under the daily threat and unspoken, indirect but
nevertheless powerful threat of being fired.
After all, Cason proved you cant tell too much of the truth too much
of the time.
As for Mr. Thompsons funny little letter, little needs to be said.
(It was intended as humor, wasnt it, Mr. Thompson?)
The thread of cynicism running through the professors letter is
one of the very things wrong with this university, which is slipping
in quality and becoming more undistinguished each year as top-grade
professors continue to leave. (University of North Carolina, Univer University
sity University of Texas and Duke University, on the other hand, are making
steady strides on a march to quality education which will eventually
put them among the nations elite. UF is moving backwards, instead,
and actually is losing status in all but a few academic areas. If this
regressive trend is not halted, we will indeed be nothing more than
another mediocre Southern university.)
But I digress.
Mr. Thompsons reference to Nails BSP proposal calling its
membership a tight little band of non-representatives -- is not
only absurd, but tragic.
Just whom does Mr. Thompson think the current Reitz-manipulated
BSP represent? It certainly, most definitely, does NOT represent the
students, the students interest, the facultys interest or the academic
community.
The current Webb Board does, however, represent -- and represents
strongly Reitz, Florida Blue Key and the rest of The Establishment.
How much more non-representative can one get?
For fear of repercussions, please sign me
Nero
Thermo-Jac Low-Downs
TJ Mode? Discovery I
Linda Watson solid or printed
Auburn, HI.
Â¥ Cotton Denim Canvas.
4 !* n l
> \ wmmmm L
Colors: natural,
V
(_ i ~~ blueberry, cranberry.
m Si' Shorts: $6-$7
. reffi
Slacks: $7-$8
*
Shirt: SB-$lO
> ... .< "V 0:
311-313 N.W. 13th STREET

Editor:
I am both a resident of the city
of Tampa and a student at the
University of Florida, and as such
I feel that I can shed some light
on a current issue r involving the
two.
'Schooner
is propelled
by hot air
Editor:
The Conscience of the Cam Campus,
pus, Campus, Ernie Litz, is to be con congratulated
gratulated congratulated for his forthright
unbiased reporting (See Aboard
the Schooner with Ernie Litz,
Alligator of June 7). Mr. Litz is
able to rise above the sting of
defeat at the polls and being the
gracious gentleman that he is
merely maligns his opponent
through his column. How can any anyone
one anyone dare believe that there could
be anything personal involved? It
is readily apparent that Ernie is
just giving us the facts.
Mr. Litz tells us that Mr. Ja Jacobs
cobs Jacobs is off playing movie star and
he is unable to contact Mr. Jacobs.
I would suggest that Ernie drop by
a Cabinet meeting once in a while
and maybe he will find Mr. Jacobs.
After all, Flrnie is the Secretary
of Off Campus Housing, I think.
It is hard to believe that good
old Ernie would even associate
with such a tainted group as Student
Government but maybe there is a
little hypocrisy in everyone. And
while on the subject of hypocrisy
and tainted groups it is rumored
(another area of Ernies exper expertise)
tise) expertise) that Mr. Litz has even sunk
so low as to seek membership in
that menace to society, the U. of
F.s Mafia, F lorida Blue Key. Os
course, maybe he wanted to get in
so he could get some more facts
to fill his column(?). After due con consideration,
sideration, consideration, one would have to con conclude
clude conclude that Ernies schooner is
either a sinking ship or one pro propelled
pelled propelled largely by hot air.
Bud Robison, 4LW
A
DELICIOUS
DUO!
BIG BAHUEY
The best
double decker A
anywhere! ! If
ONION RINGS
crisp and L g
golden brown! J
RED
BARN
2029 N.W. 13th STREET

Tampa not an inconvenience

I disagree with both Mr. Denke Denkewalter
walter Denkewalter of The Florida Alligator
and Mr. Halberstein of the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Sun in their criticisms of the
1968 UF Air Force Academy
game, which is now proposed to
be held in Tampas new stadium.
Mr. Denkewalter alleges that we
are losing home games. The sche schedule
dule schedule for the next three years as
published by The Alligator earlier
this year shows 5 home games
(Gainesville), 3 out-of-state games
and 2 games in Florida but not in
Gainesville, each season. This is
at least 50 per cent at home and
is as much as we can expect.
Mr. Denkewalter fails to realize
that no team can play even most
of its games at home and play the
teams that we do. Mr. Halberstein
seems to think that playing on
foreign soil makes us second secondclass.
class. secondclass. I sav that by playing most
of our games here we could not
play as many first-class teams
and would then be second-class.
Also, both writers fail to com-

rixUDENTDIsCOUNr^O^I
A new summer rate is now' in effect for all students! I
GAINESVILLE TO TAMPA $9.60
GAINESVILLE TO FT. MYERS SIB.OO I
I (All Fares Plus Tax) I
TICKETS must be purchased over the counter at I
I least two hours prior to departure time. I
I FOR COMP r.Ti INFORMATION CALL: I
I Florida Air Taxi, Inc. 378-1966 [
service department
mm.

Sometimes even a Pussycat
needs more than love.
The Volkswagen Karmann Ghia isn't like other
cars?
Its a Pussycat.
It drives around town looking like an expensive
sports car, but underneath is a Volkswagen engine.
So when theres trouble... the Volkswagen in
it comes out.
(If need be, we can replace the whole engine
in an hour and a half.)
But, in most cases, what seems to be a major
problem can be solved with a minor adjustment.
Or, genuine VW parts at VW prices.
Also, you won't have to wait weeks for some
part to be shipped in from parts unknown. Over
4,000 are right where we can put our hands on them.
That's the thing about a Pussycat.
It looks like it runs *5,000, but it actually runs
less than *2,500, and you probably won't really
appreciate it until it stops running.
The Volkswagen
KARMANN GHIA
MILLER-BROWN
MOTORS INC. Q 0
4222 NW 13th Street ZS a

Tuesday, June 14, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

ment on the date, September 21st.
Coacli Graves stated that under the
quarter system, most of the stu students
dents students will not be here. That leaves
us with the alumni, which Mr. Hal Halberstein
berstein Halberstein said can and will go many
places to see a game. Tampa is
closer to most of them anyway.
Finally, dear writers, just what
is wrong with Tampa? The Tampa
Bay area has many alumni from
the University, and has contributed
many athletes to the University as
have the illustrious cities of Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville and Miami, both of which
enjoy UF games occasionally.
Mac Dill Air Force Base at Tampa
is head of the Strike Command
and will contribute a large Air
Force constituency. If, then, the
states second largest city desires
Florida to inaugurate its new sta stadium
dium stadium and the Air Force approves
of the location, I cannot under understand
stand understand why the UF' should not gladly
accommodate such a request when
neither the students nor the alumni
would be greatly inconvenienced.
Don Caton, SEG

Page 5



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale I
SPECIAL FOR STUDENTS. Air
conditioners -- Admiral. Perfect
for Diamond, Corry and Schucht
Villages, apts. and trailers. All
sizes. Sudden Service Fuel Oil
Co., 907 SW 3rd St., Ph. 376-4404.
(A- 142-ts-c).
1963 BSA, GSOcc. S6OO. Ph. 378-
2244 or 376-9723 or see at Styles
by Phil, Carolyn Plaza. (A-142-
ts-c).
SMITH AND WESSON 138 Special,
Combat Masterpiece. Adjustable
sights. $45. Call Jim, 372-6178.
(A- 141-ts-c).
WEIGHTS. 180 lb. set and bench.
Bar bells, dumb bells, head and
shoe weights. Call 376-/2046. (A (A-
- (A- 141-2 t-c).
AIR CONDITIONER, 16,000 BTU,
Fedders. Good condition. sllO.
STEREO, hifi turntable and speak speakers.
ers. speakers. Reasonable. Make an offer.
Ph. 372-6104. (A-141-st-c).
14 Lone Star FIBERGLASS FISH FISHING
ING FISHING BOAT, trailer, 10 hp motor.
Good condition. $350. Ph. 372-
6104. (A- 141-st-c).
TRAILER, 1964 Delux. 10x56.
3 BR, one furnished as study,
A/C, washer, large fenced yard,
pool privileges. s6Oll investment,
sacrifice $3950. Pinehurst Park,
372-7994. (A-141-3t-c).
1965 HONDA SUPER HAWK. A
real fire eater. $475. Cash. Call
Rex Rittgers, 5 to 8 p.m., 376-
4260. (A- 140-4 t-c).
45x8 CHAMPION TRAILER with
huge 35xl3 permanent cabana.
In good condition and priced to
sell at SIOSO. Will sell now or
hold till Fall. Lot 10, Glynwood
Trailer Park, Ph. 372-5374. (A (A---140-ts-c).
--140-ts-c). (A---140-ts-c).
LAFAYETTE STEREO SYSTEM,
2 large speakers, S9O or best
offer. Call Nancy, 376-5151. (A (A---140-3t-c).
--140-3t-c). (A---140-3t-c).
for rent
APT, A/C, free water, private
bedroom, one block from Mather Matherly,
ly, Matherly, available immediately. S3O/mo.
378-3523, ask for Bill Fernandez.
(B-142-lt-p).
LARGE MODERN IBR,CCB,A/C,
furnished duplex with garage.
Available immediately. Summer
rates, SB2 per mo. 3 blocks from
campus. Call 376-6086 or 378-
2274. (B- 142- lt-c).
GROUND FLOOR, 2 room furnish furnished;
ed; furnished; refrigerators -- no kitchens.
Two blocks from A/C Library and
Univ. P.O. Summer rates. 376-
6494. (B- 142-st-c).
ONE BR, furnished A/C apt. SBS
a mo. Available immediately. Call
376-5190. (B- 142- lt-nc).

£ the best of __ z o')
? T STAN & OLLIE! ,W2M
V <£>o>- V' x ~ £.. /90 MINUTES Ufa .tM
I W* V 7 OF HOWLS! f.i? ;

for rent
NOW RENTING FOR FALL. A/C
apts and house.-. Occupancy for 3
or 4 students, male or female.
Charlie Mayo, Town & Country
Realty, 376-4664. (B-140-ts-c).
4 ROOM APT. for quiet couple.
No pets. No children. Car space.
Available June 15th. Near campus.
Ph. 376-5043. (B-141-ts-c).
A/C 3 BR APT. Three blocks from
campus. S9O mo. Two room effi efficiency,
ciency, efficiency, S4O. Ph. 372-8840. (B- 141-
ts-c).
ROOMMATE WANTED B TERM.
Share expenses. A/C, 1 BR apt.
3 blocks from campus. Call 378-
4332. ~(B- 141-3 t-c).
SUB-LET APT. for 111-B. Pool,
A/C, reduced rates. Call 378-
4734 between 5 and 7 p.m. (B (B---141-2t-p).
--141-2t-p). (B---141-2t-p).
SPACIOUS ONE BEDROOM Danish
Modern Apt. Three blocks from
campus. $55 a mo. Ph. 2-8840.
(B-141-ts-c).
CLEAN DOWNSTAIRS APT. Sum Summer
mer Summer rates, S6O monthly; electri electricity,
city, electricity, water furnished. Also single
room, $25 monthly. 1614 NW 3rd
Place. Call 2-7366 or 2-2946. (B (B---141-2t-c).
--141-2t-c). (B---141-2t-c).
LARGE COOL DIVIDED ROOM,
12' x 22, private entrance and
shower, utilities and linens in included.
cluded. included. Ph. 372-3191 or 372-8903.,
(B-139-ts-c).
NEW MODERN APT. completely
furnished, A/C, swimming pool,
S9O. Call 372-3826. (B- 139-4 t-c).
TWO BEDROOM HOME, furnished.
Across from Holiday Inn. Available
B-term or Fall Tri. 372-6232.
(B-l 34-ts-c).
FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM APT.
available B-term or Fall Tri.
across from Ramada Inn. 372-
6232. (B-l 34-ts-c).
AVAILABLE for Sept. Ist. Duplex
for male students. S4O per student.
East apt. accommodate 4students.
West apt. accommodates 3 stu students.
dents. students. Only 500 ft. from Tigert
Hall. 1231 S. W. 3rd Ave. Call
Anna Hinson, 378-2559. (B (B---137-
--137-- (B---137- c).
A/C ONE BEDROOM furnished apt.
Good condition. One block from
campus. SBO mo. Call collect Key Keystone
stone Keystone Heights, 473-4135. (B-139-
st-c).
$35/MO. PLUS 1/2 UTILITIES.
Share 2 BR apt. with upper di division
vision division electrical engineering stu student.
dent. student. 376-8501, Bill Lagoni. Leave
word. (B- 1 39-st-c).
PRIVATE ROOM 3 blocks from
campus, S2O a mo. Ph. 372-8840.
(B-131-ts-c).
EF FICIENC Y APT. Furnished,
private bath, entrance, drive. $65.
Utilities furnished. 2225 NE 7th
St. Ph. 376-0595. (B-134-ts-c).

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 14, 1966

Page 6

for rent
ATTRACTIVE Modern room, A/C
Ideal for student who needs a quiet
pleasant place to study, 372-7883.
(B-138-tf-cj.
wanted
RIDE WANTED to Mobile-Pensa Mobile-Pensacola
cola Mobile-Pensacola area, Thursday or Friday.
Share expenses. Call R. Mum me,
372-3868 or ext. 2179. (C-142-
lt-p).
WANTED: Adventuresome riders
to Wyoming and surrounding
points. Share expenses and fun.
Contact Wendy: 378-1161 in the
p.m. (C- 142- lt-c).
NEED ROOMMATE to share
split-level A/C apt. for B-term,
3 blocks from campus. Call San
after 2 p.m. at 378-3627. (C-142-
2t-p).
PHARMACY STUDENT wants male
roommate to share A/C trailer.
S3O a mo. plus utilities. Call 378-
2774. (C-142-3t-c).
COED FOR HI-B term only,
to share A/C efficiency apt. 5
blocks from campus. $37.50 plus
utilities. Call 378-3351. (C-142-
lt-p).
MALE OR FEMALE, over 21, full
or part time. Apply Woody's be between
tween between 3-5 p.m., 3458 W. Univ.
Ave. (E-140-ts-c).
WANTED: Good lead guitarist to
work with local group. Contact
Ron Gause at 372-1576 or Leo Leonard
nard Leonard Ambrose at 372-9935. (C (C---140-3t-c).
--140-3t-c). (C---140-3t-c).
ONE MALE ROOMMATE needed
for B-term. A/C, two blocks from
Law School, furnished, ph. 372-
0854. (C-140-tf-nc).
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 BR apt. B-term. Own bed bedroom.
room. bedroom. A/C, S3B per mo. Call 378-
3132. Close to campus. (C-140-
st-p).
U§*"MALE
{ at j
3 W I
-y wfcDNEiDfrt
OJWEIMK
I IN IHE WORKd!
| A ft TODAY
I Every i
* incredible I
scene
is reel! |
[A*"*

| wanted
l
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
modern one bedroom duplex apt.
A/C, for B-term. Call 378-4893.
(C- 140-st-c).
RIDER WANTED FROM CHICAGO
to Gainesville. Leaving Sept. 1 or
2. Write David Weiss, 3001 S.
Parkway (Apt. 1902), Chicago
60616, Illinois. (C-140-3t-nc).
WANTED: Coed to room with 3
girls in Olympia Apts, for Fall
term. Call 6-8350 after 4:30 p.m.
(C-141-3t-c).
WANTED: Girl to share 1 3 of 2
BR apt. One block from campus
with A/C, $33 a mo. for B term
and/or Fall, Winter. Call 2-6229
after 6 p.m. (C-141-tf-nc).

FLORIDA STATE THEATRES
IfcJoW 2PM SPM BPM EgF]
000000000000000000000000000000000000 'Jf Y? V pi
I LdDY/K^J
Bob ElKe PWHis
}(op e -Sommer *DiM e r
'
l^ ooooo^pp, o ^ppp t oooooo 2^^^^mmmm^mmm^mmm:m
IMD^
'
HHTECHNICOLOrIdiMB
The outrider The loner- The lieutenant- The outcast bride- Her husband
AFRAID TO TURN THEIR BACKS ON EACH OTHER OTHERMYTMT^jDEggAGAI^^EINOIW|
MYTMT^jDEggAGAI^^EINOIW| OTHERMYTMT^jDEggAGAI^^EINOIW|
ft-*

1 fticm p
I LAsfTIMES TONITE'I
TWO COLOR HITS
I 2 SPY THRILLERS!! |
I "Spy With My Face" I
I Tony Jack |
Curtis Lemmons
Natalie Wood!
B t* ARTHUR ROSS Dwelled t*y BtAKfc I[>WARDS f 5 I
IttCHNICOLOH P&NAVISION FROM WARNER BROS m |
Gator Ads Just Kill Me!
-



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

wanted
ROOMMATE wanted immediately.
Coed to share apt. expenses thru
vugust. Rent $45 a mo. Ph. B-1304
or UF ext. 2731. (C- 137-ts-c).
APT. and female roommates
wanted for Fall Trimester. Call
376-2315. (C-137-st-c).

1 LAST 'Lord Love A Duck" I
1 2400 HotHion* Romd Rt. M FR t-561 1 Cl n d
frOMORROW! DAY! A Thousand Clowns" I
W, NNER
j Q ACADEMY a* f
0 AWARDS! eV 1
I "BEST ACTRESS SSL I
mm l
, 57 JULIE CHRISTIE ADUITS
TXww"
a powerful and bold mobon picture
I- marirhvaduliv with adults... for adults! _I
Leslie Caron "The L-Shaped Room." I

soon a legend.
stevem g queen f|Py and never forgot how to hate 1 I
KARL MALDEN M BRIAN KEITH
ARTHUR KENNEDY SUZANNE PLESHETTE
CARPETBAGGER

help wanted
SECRETARY to head of AFROTC
Dept. Position classification: Sec Secretary
retary Secretary 11. Salary commensurate
with personal achievement level.
Shorthand and typing required,
Apply to Central Employment Cen Center,
ter, Center, Bldg. E, UF. An Equal Oppor Opportunity
tunity Opportunity Employer. (E-139-ts-c),

Tuesday, June 14, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

help wanted
RESPONSIBLE, PERMANENT po position
sition position for secretary-bookkeeper
with local construction company.
One girl office, 5 day wk. Salary
com mensurate with experience and
ability. Ph. 372-1487. (E-141-
-t-c).
IF YOU ARE PROFICIENT in
English and Spanish, type WPM,
contact Central Employment Cen Center,
ter, Center, Bldg. E, Campus. (E-142-
lt-c).
MALI DESK CLERK. Weekends
only. Average 35 lirs weekly. Work
Friday, Saturday & Sunday. Apply
2325 NW 13th St. (E-141-3t-c).
autos
RAMBLER STATION WAGON,
1960. 6 cyl. Most extras. Perfect
for student family. Good condition.
$475. Call 376-4404 days or 376-
4201 nights. (G-142-ts-c).
1963 PORSCHE. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. $2795. Will consider trade
on cheaper car or motorcycle.
372-7611. (G-140-ts-c).
1958 IMPALA CONVERTIBLE.
New top. Runs good. S3OO or make
offer. Call Tom, 376-6742. (G (G---1
--1- (G---1 3t-p).
1956 CHEVROLET Convertible.
Best offer. Good condition. 1318
NW 3rd Ave. Call 372-4787. (G (G---1
--1- (G---1
1962 THDNDERBIRD, white. Auto Automatic
matic Automatic transmission, power steer steering,
ing, steering, brakes, seats, R & H. Good
condition. Priced for quick sale.
Ph. 376-1798. Today. (G-141-
3t-c).
1966 VW. Factory camper. Just
like new condition. Sacrifice. Call
after 5:30, 372-2629. (G-141-2t (G-141-2tc).
c). (G-141-2tc).
£-
1964 VW. Sunroof, 20,000 miles.
Excellent condition. $1295. Call
ext. 2856 before 5 and 372-5758,
372-7268 after 5. (G- 141-3 t-c).

Page 7

real estate
BARGAIN! Westmoreland Estates.
Spacious bright 3 BR, 2bath home.
Exposed beams, electric kitchen,
screened porch. Beautiful trees,
walking distance to I.ittlewood.
A/C, CH, paved street, sewer.
$16,700. Call 372-0942 after 5.
(I- 139- 4t-c).
BLACK ACRES. Lovely 3 BR, 2
bath colonial ranch type. Fully
equipped kitchen, hardwood floors,
large closets and storage, screen
porch, patio, 4 yrs. old, paved
street. Leaving town. $22,000. 372-
8697. (I-139-ts-c).
AVAILABLE FOR OCCUPANCY
Sept. Ist, on lease basis, furnished
4 bedroom, 2 bath home. Between
NW 22nd and 23rd St. S2OO per
mo. Call Anna Hinson, 378-2559.
(I-137-ts-c).
3 BR, 1-1/2 bath, central heating,
screened porch, air conditioner.
Beautifully landscaped, Highland
Court Manor. Pool privileges. FHA
mortgage, SII,BBO. SB6 a mo. 372-
5207. (I-140-ts-c).
THIRTEEN THOUSAND or less
will buy nine room house near
University and Finley on Quiet
wooded deadend street, with three
bedrooms, one bath, fireplace,
hardwood floors at 304 N. W. 24th
St. Ph. 372-9795. (I-138-ts-c).
lost-found

LOST: K & E plastic slide rule
on Stadium Rd. in front of Eng.
Bldg. Reward. Call Dave at 376-
9637. (L-142-lt-p).
LOST: Portable typewriter, blue
leather case. Owner blind, ma machine
chine machine necessary lor course com completion.
pletion. completion. Reward. If found contact
Leah Russell, 2112 Jennings, 372-
6381. (L- 141-2 t-c).
LOST: Black frame glasses in
grey case. Reward. Tom Snavely.
Murphree A434. 372-9421. (L-141-
2t-c).
LOST: Ladys billfold at Camp
Wauburg Sat., June 4th. Keep
money, please return the papers
to Dorothy Harris. 115 NW 20th
Dr. 372-8153. (L-141-4t-c).

lost-found
LOST: Two mo. old male dog,
primarily beagle, black and white
with little brown on face. Weighs
10 lbs. No collar. Bill Bond, 378-
4383, 1823 NW sth Ave. (L-142-
2t-c).
services
" '
Table lamps, $1 and up. FAMILY
THRIFT STORK. 202 SE Ist Ave.
Ph. 370-9255. (M- 141-ts-c).
IN A HUR RY ? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios, 372-0300. (M (M---131-ts-c;.
--131-ts-c;. (M---131-ts-c;.
personal
Have you heard the rumor?
AMERICANISM is still on campus.
(J-142-lt-c).
VISIT GATOR GROOMER where
romance blooms. Next door to
Univ. P.O. Self-service and pro professional
fessional professional laundry and dry cleaning.
(J-131-ts-c).
| NEED ZIPPY |
I RESULTS? |
Xr f V
S' g. i
!v *- X
GATOR
I CLASSIFIEDS



Page 8

l, The Floiida All itor, Tuesday, June 14, 1966

Contest Here Again This Year

The UFs sixth annual contest
to select a slogan for Homecoming
Weekend opens Friday and will
continue through July 17.
First prize this year will be a
5-day Jamaician Trip for 2 via
BWIA Sunjet from Miami.
Second place prize recipient will
get vacation jaunts for two to Cape
Coral Estates and to Miami
Beachs Balmoral Hotel each
for three days, a SSO Gainesville
gift shopping certificate and two
Homecoming tickets.
A portable Zenith stereo phono phonograph
graph phonograph from Couchs of Gainesville
and $75 in gift certificates will go
to the third place slogan author,
while fourth spot earns a Bulova
Comet Transistor Radio from the
College Inn plus $75 in Gainesville
shopping merchandise.
At least 1500 slogan entries are
expected this year, topping the 1965
total when "Gators Cheer Flori-
BEST SELLERS
(Compiled by Publishers Weekly)
Fiction
VALLEY OF THE DOLLS: Jac Jacqueline
queline Jacqueline Susann
THE ADVENTURERS: Harold Rob Robbins
bins Robbins
THE SOURCE: James Michener
THE DOUBLE IMAGE: Helen Mac-
Innes
THE EMBEZZLER: Louis Auchin Auchincloss
closs Auchincloss
THOSE WHO LOVE: Irving Stone
TELL NO MAN: Adele Rogers St.
John
MENFREYA IN THE MORNING:
Victoria Holt
THE COMEDIANS: Graham Greene
UP THE DOWN STAIRCASE: Bel
Kaufman
Nonfiction
THE LAST BATTLE: Cornelius
Ryan
IN COLD BLOOD: Truman Capote
PAPA HEMINGWAY: A. E. Hotch Hotchner
ner Hotchner
THE PROUD TOWER: Barbara
Tuchman
GAMES PEOPLE PLAY: THE
PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN RE RELATIONSHIPS:
LATIONSHIPS: RELATIONSHIPS: Eric Berne
THE LAST HUNDRED DAYS: John
To land
UNSAFE AT ANY SPEED: Ralph
Nader
HUMAN SEXUAL RESPONSE: Wil William
liam William Howard Masters and Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia E. Johnson Jr.
HOW TO AVOID PROBATE: Nor Norman
man Norman F. Dacey
THE BIG SPENDERS: Lucius
Beebe
A THOUSAND DAYS: JOHN F.
KENNEDY IN THE WHITE
HOUSE: Arthur E. Schlesinger,
Jr.
THE LADY OF THE HOUSE: Sally
Stanford
XEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, 10? ea.
20 & Over, 9£
Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AVF.
S&ATgS^!
I REACH 1 J
M (people rT

das 400th Year was selected as
the winner.
Homecoming is scheduled Oct.
28-29 when the Florida Gators host
the Auburn Tigers in the football
climax to a festive program that
includes reunion gatherings, a pre pregame
game pregame barbecue, parade and Gator
Growl the larget student-pro student-produced
duced student-produced talent show in the country.
Entries must be limited to se seven
ven seven words, should have a general
Homecoming theme and be of con contemporary
temporary contemporary significance. Origin Originality

I SOME CHICKS I
I will I
1 -
a**..
HBR Ik wEBM ii * mm *
I : v % R i
I ' I I
I Aggravate Supplicate Captivate I
§lllll umiii
B gHHHgHHHHgHHHBHHBHHB I-
S 1 ||||||i v < If
liiBBV- § l Si I JB|ii|iik
HI JjHjn j|^BBBB
ill
Rliw* k-L3. t
WmSLM % y MKW wKm if
f .ipir M :; S
4 W ftTWBB. -><. ,Jr
I J
I 1 t' ; ; ( 5 : \I
I Vociferate Agitate Scintillate I
am ~
I (- For Dinner At I
I OvV at two locations i
Bmmtir I
I Corner of NW 13th St. & 16th Ave. I
I and 2310 SW 13th St. J

ality Originality and clarity are necessary.
Entries should be mailed or de delivered
livered delivered to: Homecoming Slogan
Contest, Florida Blue Key Office,
Florida Union, University of Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, Gainesville, to arrive by mid midnight
night midnight on July 17, 1966.
Winning titles in the contest for
the first four years were "Gators
Appear on the New Frontier,
"Gators Pace the Race in Space,
"F-uture Meets Past in Gators
Big Blast, and "Gators Prepare
a Collegiate Worlds Fair.

COLLEGEMASTER
The College Plan ...Full Accidents and
. i 11 \ir Disability Benefits
for the College Man 7
- ...Family Plan Rider
, Available For Wife 8k
Children
UFs REPRESENTATIVES
T Dan Sapp Mel Ward
V l George Corl
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 376-1208



H TONIGHTS
THE NIGHT
H'he Philadelphia Orchestra per pertonight
tonight pertonight in Florida Gym, un uns
s uns uM the baton of guest conductor
ftfjift iis law Skrowaczewski.
Rotary & Printing
m CALCULATORS
SPECIAL
Manual Monroe $95.
KISERS
iCWfice Equipment
H 604 N. MAIN ST.

I ROBBIE'S I
Best In Steaks^^^
Ky'.' Hi
VI e i c h e si
WTrV& BILLIARD23H|
7lB W. University Ave.i
l^Oi^Th^Gol^Coast^J

rOrange
lampus Calendar

A
,|v PLEASE TURN IN ALL ITEMS FOR CAMPUS CALENDAR TO THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS OFFICE, FLA. UNION

ftsday MENSA: 11:15 1:15, reserved
|H>e 14 section, west wing, Main Case-
Wm teria. Students and faculty in-
H vited.
IB Childrens Arts and Crafts Class Class
Class es: 9:00 a.m., register in FU
Craft Shop, room 120. Age 0-9,
8 sessions for SB.OO. Instructors
H -- S. Baker and 'S. Ohanian.
Student Economy Committee: 210
FU, 4-6 p.m. >
Wrestling Club: South end of Fla.
Gym., 4:30 6 p.m.
I Union Board: 215 FU, 4:45 p.m.
Tuesday Evening Supper Club:
Presbyterian Student Center,
6:30 p.m. Non-denominational,
everyone single and over 21 in in
in vited. SI.OO.
Ceramics Class: Begins today,
7:30 9:30 p.m. 8 sessions --
I $5.00. Register in FU Craft Shop
I Room 120 or call ext. 2951. In-
K structor Olive Briggs.
I Engineering Dames: Perry House,
I 8:00 p.m. Dress casual --Sarah
Coventry Party.
I Lyceum Council Presents: The
I Philadelphia Symphony Orches-
I tra. Fla. Gym, 8:15 p.m. Stan-
I islawSkrowaczewski conducting.
I Tickets will be on sale at door
I for students s2; all others --
I $3.
Ivednesday MENSA: 11:15 1:15, reserved
pune'ls section, west wing, Main Cafe Cafe[
[ Cafe[ teria. Students and faculty in-
I vited.
1 Secretary of Married Student As-
S' fairs: 118 FU. 5:30-7:30 p.m.

* PAYDAY SHORT TERM
* BUDGET MONTHLY
.* $75 3O-DAY
Cost: $2.25 Interest
IFR 6-5333

CXlrfcc
I T'Vl i'v

4-H Club Banquet: Main Gym
Floor, 6:30 p.m.
Florida Speological Society: 212
FU, 7 pm.
Startime 8.Y.U., The Brigham
Young University traveling var variety
iety variety show, sponsored by the De Deseret
seret Deseret Club and The Church of
Jesus Christ of L. D. S., Univ.
Aud., 8:15 p.m., admission
SI.OO. Tickets on sale at door.
Gator Sailing Club: FU 123, 7:30
p.m. Lecture bv Dave Posey,
national windmill champion:
Positions of the Sail.
Thursday MENSA: 11:15 1:15, reserved
June 15 section, west wing, Main Cafe Cafeteria.
teria. Cafeteria. Students and faculty in invited.
vited. invited.
Christian Science Organization;
FU Aud., 5:15 p.m.
Friday MENSA: 11:15 1:15, reserved
June 17 section, west wing, Main Cafe Cafeteria.
teria. Cafeteria. Students and faculty in invited.
vited. invited.
Graduate School: GRE Application
Deadline Date; Deadline date for
receipt of application by Edu Educational
cational Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, N. J., is June 24.
GRE will be held on Sat., July
9, in Walker Aud. Pick up GRE
booklets in 235 Tigert.
Saturday Movie: MSB Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.,
June 18 Breakfast at Tiffanys.
Monday MENSA: 11:15 1:15, reserved
June 20 section, west wing, Main Case-

MONEY AVAILABLE
$25 S6OO
MARION FINANCE CO.

By Reid Poole, Chairman
Department of-Music
The Philadelphia Orchestra,
sponsored by UF student govern governntent
ntent governntent through its Lyceum Council,
will perform in Florida Gym to tonight
night tonight at 8:15. Guest Conductor
Stanislaw Skrowaczewski will con conduct
duct conduct Brahms Second Symphony;
the Richard Strauss tone poem,
Don Juan; the Medias Medi Meditation
tation Meditation and Dance of Vengeance
by the American composer, Sam Samuel
uel Samuel Barber; and the overture Le
Corsaire, by Berlioz.
Tickets are $2 for UF students
d $3 for non-UF students. Tick Tickis
is Tickis are on sale at the Florida Union
[Box Office, the Record Bar, and
[Belk-Lindseys in the Shopping
Center. Tickets will also be avail available
able available at the Florida Gymnasium
Box Office tonight.

and

BLUE BULLETIN

The Philadelphia Orchestra con concert
cert concert is a great event for our com community
munity community by any criterion. This con concert
cert concert deserves the support of all
members of our city and sur surrounding
rounding surrounding communities.
From its first concert on No November
vember November 16, 1900, the Philadelphia
Orchestra has been one of the
worlds leading artistic institu institutions.
tions. institutions. Harold C. Schonberg, chief
music critic of The New York
Times, recently wrote . . one
could leave the hall in admiration
for the greatest virtuoso orchestra
active today, and probably the
greatest virtuoso of all time.
The Orchestra has friends every everywhere
where everywhere who share the critics en enthusiasm.
thusiasm. enthusiasm. As one fan wrote after
a nationwide telecast, I cant
imagine heaven without the Phila Philadelphia
delphia Philadelphia Orchestra.

ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE,
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE, CAMPUS

teria. Students and faculty in invited.
vited. invited.
Graduate Council Meeting: 235 Ti Ti'p'gert,
'p'gert, Ti'p'gert, 1:30 p.m.
Craft Shop Special Sessions: Wed Wednesday,
nesday, Wednesday, June 22, 7:30 p.m. Silk
Screening, FU Craft Shop, no
registration.
Trip to Guatemala: Aug. 15-22.
$255.00 per person. For more
information, come by orca!l3ls
ext. 2741. Also sign up at
Fla. Union Trip to St. Augustine:
Sat., July 9. Leave 12 noon, tour
the city and see Cross and
Sword. SB.OO. For reservations
call ext. 2741. For information
go to 315 FU.
FU Box Office: Tuesday and Wed Wednesday,
nesday, Wednesday, noon 4:30p.m. Tickets
are available for the Phila Philadelphia
delphia Philadelphia Orchestra and Startime
B.Y.U.
Adult Swim Classes: Open to fa faculty,
culty, faculty, staff, students and
families (over 15 years of age),
for non-swimmers, swimmers
and senior life saving during
B term. Registration in Room
227 Florida Gym -- June 16-
24, 1966. Classes start Wednes Wednesday,
day, Wednesday, June 22 at 12:10 p.m.-
12:45 p.m. Monday thru Thurs Thursday.
day. Thursday. i

Tuesday, June 14, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

General Notices
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN DATA PRO PROCESSING:
CESSING: PROCESSING: The University of Florida Chapter of
the Association for Computing Machinery will
meet Tuesday, June 21, at 7:30 p.m. in 103-B,
College of Arc-hitecture and Fine Arts. Topic
will be Career Opportunities in Data Pro Processing,
cessing, Processing, and the program will include a movie
and a panel discussion. Panelists will be Mal Malcolm
colm Malcolm R. Dixon Jr., resident manager of IBM
Corporation; Harry Kelinberg, chief engineer,
RCA Corporation; C. R. Koffman, manager,
Electronic Systems Division, The Prudential
Insurance Company; and Dr. R. G. Sellridge,
director, University Computing Center. Moder Moderator
ator Moderator will be Heinz Dinter, ACM chapter presi-
dent. Interested persons are invited.
LECTURE-DISCUSSION SERIES: Faculty
members, graduate students and other persons
interested in a study of Theology of the Modern
World, are invited to attend a summer lecture lecturediscussion
discussion lecturediscussion series on theologians and selected
works. The program for June 23 will be on
Martin Luthers Here I Stand, led by Dr.
George Wenius at the Methodist-Student Center
at 8 p.m.
SUMMER ART FILMS SERIES: The Student
Chapter of the American Institute of Architects
is presenting a series of art films. On June 15
the film will be Taliesin East and Taliesin
West. A donation of 25 cents will be asked for
non-members. Films will be shown at 8 p.m.
in Room 105-B, College of Architecture and
Fine Arts. The public is invited.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
JUNE 10: HUBER, HUNT & NICHOLS, INC.
-- CE. CHARLESTON NAVAL SHIPYARD --
NE, EE, ChE, ME.

The-Orchestra is probably the
worlds most traveled symphonic
organization. In addition to exten extensive
sive extensive annual touring throughout the
United States, including seven
transcontinental tours, it has play played
ed played the role of musical ambassador
to Europe on three different oc occasions.
casions. occasions. In 1949, Eugene Ormandy
and the Orchestra toured Great
Britain, and in 1955 and 1958, all
of Europe including Russia.
Wherever the Orchestra went
on these triumphant tours abroad,
it played to crowds of enthusiastic
listeners. The reception accorded
the Orchestra in Russia made mus musical
ical musical history; in each city tumul tumultuous
tuous tumultuous ovations followed every per performance.
formance. performance. The Philadelphians
made their first appearance in La Latin
tin Latin America this spring, during
the course of a five-week, 15,000
mile concert tour.

* VACATION I
* TRAVEL EXPENSE I
* SIOO 3 Monthly I
Payments of $35 I
222 W. UNIVERSITY |

Page 9



Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 14, 1966

Alma gave Florida a start last
week, kicking off the hurricane
season by smashing into Mara Marathan,
than, Marathan, St.
hassee. Shu missed Gainesville

MiMBWI I l*m
A/ fAHftK
/ff
Pfiotos Py
v vi\ \ "%.
x
v y >..
X-- -:
tJ%'.''OTgpf
/* ,fl# \ x
BBB UBS iHH! fyiSJI s X : ""
Bp. : y 1 B |f ;
Mr*k /\ JH
WET AND WINDY
Wind and water lash the cam (ms in lavish
amounts as Hurricane "Alma does her best
to make life a bit damp for UFers.

UF Is Host
UF is host this summer from
June 6-17 to 40 persons in a two
week National Leadership De Development
velopment Development Institute in Technical
Education. The Institute, one of
five in the United States operated
in cooperation with Ohio State
University, is under the direction
of Dr. E. L. Kurth of the College
of Education.
The participants coming from
24 states will be studying in depth
the role of the technician in to tomorrows
morrows tomorrows society and the type of
education necessary to properly
prepare people to enter technical
occupations.

I /f) /. framklms
I / (jmfK' 'Bourn Bolltgf Shop*
{/ / / ] OTAllrywtD 101
I i / In The Village Square
I Summer Collection Acro TiZmZt'* south
I Os STORE HOURS:
I ** i c 9:30-6:00 Daily
Dotted Swiss 24 0 isw 13th st.
I Blendaire
I Batiste *.
I Shorty Gowns U^U
I And Robes *O/
Coordinated Scuffs

Alma Misses UF

SPECIAL! MONDAY & TUESDAY ONLY!
Req. sl.lO Box Dinner
COMPLETE DINNER IN-^^^
CLUDES: 3 pieces of £ VfMKBb
Chicken, French Fries,
Slaw or Gravy and y*7gE&
NO SUBSTITUTIONS.
col. san^_ rs available at tv:.?;'
Kentiwkij fried
214 N.W. 13th St. 207 N.E. 16th Are.
Phone 376-6472 Phone 378-2959
I PORTABLE STEREO I
I AT ITS BEST I
I WHEN IT'S A I
2&UBI
I I
The MOHERNAIRE Model MPS9OW-1 1
COUCHS IS All American Made I
NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDAS 6 Speakers 1
LARGEST EXCLUSIVE 32 Watts 1
ZENITH DEALER. 2->G Cant Scratch I
Tone Arm 8
Hand Crafted 8
CHI irHX 608 N. Main I
Vl I %7 Ph. 376-7171
a?"* 1
1227 West University Avenue
PROUDLY ANNOUNCES
THE OPENING OF ITS NEW OUTLET
JUST AROUND THE CORNER FROM
THE UNIVERSITY. I
Representing The-Finest In I
Classical &, Electric Guitars I
And Amps I
I MARTIN GOYA .GUILD FENDER I
I AMPEGS .VEGA EPIPHONE & BANJOS ETC. I
I Featuring The Best I
I In Band Instruments I
I SELMER KING LABLANC VITO I
I BUESCHER LUDWIG SLINGERLAND I
I We also carry a complete line of I
I accessories for all instruments I
I Stop In And Browse Around I
I EMIL KROCHMAL I
MANAGER |

deluded by heavy rains and high
winds.
Here is the UF campus as it
looked as Almas fringes grazed
us.



ip'
Dennis
New cage coach Tommy Bartlett should pro.,. t<. be a pleasant
Bjdition to the UF athletic program.
Bartlett owns a 189-G1 record as head coach in high school and
Bollege, and possesses a winning personality as well.
At first glance, the stocky, 5-9 Georgian with a blond, ci ewcut
Heminds one more of a football coach. Indeed, Bartlett went to Ten-
Hessee on a football scholarship.
It is only after you talk to the genial ex-Tennessee aide that you
ealize his first love is basketball. Bartlett was in the midst of a
Busy week when I saw him, and he had just finished taping a TV
Biterview.
H The former SEC tennis champion took a genuine interest in my
Buestions, and spoke confidently about his new jot).
B You dont actually apply for a collegiate coaching job. I just told
Beople (newspapermen and friends in Florida) I was interested and
hey talked to Ray Graves and the screening committee. The com-
Bnittee was interested, and I sent them my credentials.
Bartlett retained Jim McCachren from Norm Sloans staff, but was
Already committed to Dick Davis, coach at King College, Tennessee,
his other assistant coach. Davis replaces freshman coach Brooks
lenderson.
Ive known Dick Davis for 18 years. Last year, when I was offered
the coaching job at Georgia, I made a committment to him as my
assistant. (Bartlett turned the position down.)
I TOUGH THING TO DO
I told Brooks I was committed to Davis. Its one of the tough
things you have to do. But its the perrogative of the coach to hire
who he chooses; he takes his assistants with him.
First on the new coachs agenda is the teams trip to South Amer America
ica America in July. The Gators will play 21 or 22 games in six countries
in 30 days. International rules will apply. A team must shoot within
3O seconds, and the foul lane is wider.
The wider lane will give our big men an opportunity to work on
ways to get underneath the basket, and improve agility and timing.
Having seen the UF cagers only from the other side of the fence,
Bartlett welcomes the trip as an opportunity to get to know the play play
play ers personalities and abilities.
There are 14 boys who want to go, Bartlett commented. Seven
Her eight of them are virtually assured of places. At least two fresh fresh
fresh men, Andy Owens and Neal Walk, will make the trio. The other boys
Hwill be in competition to fill out the nine or ten man unit.
Recruiting was one of Bartletts main duties at Tennessee. He
credits Sloan with doing a good job in this department.
Progress has been made on all levels of basketball throughout
the state. The caliber of Floridas high school players has improved
I by leaps and bounds. This is one of the best states to go into to re re
re cruit.
I Nucleus of Florida Boys
I The team will have a nucleus of Florida boys. Were going to
I keep all the good players in the state. The program is going to con-
I tinue to move ahead.
I Characteristically, the rugged 38-year-old pulls no punches with
I his predictions. He feels the Gators can go all the way.
Sure, I create pressure saying well jW'iju; hut you cant win any-
I thing without being under pressure. The players who come out on
top are the ones with talent, ability, and can play under pressure.
I I think next years team is willing to accept the challenge.
I At Tennessee, Bartlett coached numerous big men, so he will be
I familiar with the Gators situation. He leans toward disciplined
I basketball.
The purpose of our game will be to take advantage of our strong
I points and our opponents weaknesses. Well use the game plan
I necessary to win. The way it looks now, on the surface, we wont
I shoot unless the big men are set up (6-9 Gary Keller, 6-10 Jeff
I Ramsey, or 6-11 Neal Walk). We plan to use our height to good ad-
I vantage. Well take fast-break opportunities but they dont come
I often.
I Last year, the Gators went with a 1-3-1 on offense. Bartlett in-
I tends to start out the same way.
I Skip Higley is a good guard, one of the finest point men in the
I Conference. But we have several players who can do the job at the
I other guard post--two freshmen (Boyd Welsch, Kurt Feazel, a couple
I of varsity members (Mike Rollyson, Ed Mahoney) and Harry Dunn
I (junior college transfer).

Series Shortened
CHICAGO (UPI) The 1882
World Series was halted after two
games with Chicago of the National
League and Cincinnati of the Amer American
ican American League tied with one victory
apiece because of a disagreement
between the league presidents.

70 ALL STUDENTS u |
Iffltyfj AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL T|
I 'V CAFETERIA I

Rifles Finish Sixth In NRA

By TYLER TUCKER
ALLIGATOR SPORTS WRITER
The Florida Rifles, lF Army
ROTC rifle team, has finished
sixth in a field of 215 in the Na National
tional National Rifle Associations 1966
competition.

The Florida Alligatori

Tuesday, June 14, 1966

UF has signed 10 more track
stars to scholarship grants, bring bringing
ing bringing the total to 13 thus far, coach
Jimmy Carnes announced today.
All but one will be freshmen in
September. Eligible for varsity
competition will be junior college
transfer Don Hale of Miami-Dade,
state junior college champion in
both the 880 and the mile this year.
Hale ran the 880 in 1:53.9 and
the mile in 4:20, third fastest
junior college time in this event
in the nation.
Joining freshman signees David
Blumer of Lake Worth, Barry
Handberg of Tallahassee Florida
High and Ronnie Jourdan of Pen Pensacola
sacola Pensacola are the following signees:
Jimmy Friedrick, Atlanta,
Georgia, mile and two mile; Mike
Flanagan, Jacksonville Forrest
High, pole vault; John Heishman,
Carlisle, Pa., javelin, shot put and
discus; Jim Chapman, Winter Park
High, discus; Jim DeVenney, Fort
Lauderdale Stranahan, high and
North All-Stars
Announced
One of the biggest all-star
groups in recent history will
represent the North in the annual
prep basketball classic, Aug. 6,
in Florida Gym.
Carey McDonald, executive sec secretary
retary secretary of the Florida Athletic
Coaches Association, announced a
10-man squad which is headed by
Tommy Bowen and Tony Staples,
members of State Class AA
champion Pensacola Senior.
Russell Porterfield, who guided
Macclenny to the State Class B
crown and a 30-0 season, will
coach the North team.
Complete North team with
coaches in parenthesis:
Tommy Bowen, 6-2, Pensacola
Senior (Marvin Beck), Bobby Car Caron,
on, Caron, 5-7, Jacksonville Paxon,(Dan Paxon,(Danny
ny Paxon,(Danny Bridges), Larry Holt, 6-4, Or Orlando
lando Orlando Oak Ridge (Bobby Rainey),
Danny Hawkins, 6-4, Jacksonville
Forrest (Jim Watson), Tommy
Lawrence 6-1, New Smyrna Beach
(Richard Layer).
Also David Macomber, 6-9, Port
St. Joe (Bobby Brown), Gary Porch,
6-3, Quincy (Donald Myers), Tom
Purvis, 6-6, Ocala (John Rogers),
Tony Staples, 6-2, Pensacola Sen Senior
ior Senior (Marvin Beck) and Tommy Wil Wilson,
son, Wilson, 6-7, Orlando Edgewater (Jim
Cinnamon).

Scores for the ranking were
based on sectional results. Cum Cumulative
ulative Cumulative scores were compile.! from
the top four riflemen on each team
and then scaled withothei section sectional
al sectional scores to derive the national
ranking.

SPORTS

low hurdles, broad jump; Jim York,
Fort Lauderdale Stranahan, high
jump; Mike Gorham, Tampa Cham Chamberlain,
berlain, Chamberlain, shot put; Ric Linville,
Hendersonville, N. C., sprinter;
and Jake Schickel, Jacksonville
Wolfson High, 440 and 880.
Gorham is the AA state shot put
champion (57-5) and Heishman is
the Pennsylvania javelin champion
with a throw of 217-0 this year.

I THE
I GEORGETOWN APARTMENTS
1 1624 NW 16th Avenue
I DESIGNED FOR QUIET LIVING
1 Large, Luxurious Two-Bedroom
I And Three-Bedroom Two-Bath Apartments
1 Catering to Faculty and Graduate Students
I NOW RENTING FOR AUGUST OCCUPANCY
I CONTACT MR. MAYO
I TOWN & COUNTRY REALTY
I 825 NW 13th Street FR 64664
YOU CAN RE-TIRE ON
MAIN STREET FOR AS LITTLE
AS $5 PER MONTH

NEVER UNDERSOLD
QUALITY NEVER COMPROMISED
MOODY TIRE SERVICE
615 N. Main St. V
Gainesville, Florida 372-3010
ALIGNMENT BRAKES MUFFLERS
AIR CONDITIONING MOTOR TUNE UP SHOCK ABSORBERS
BATTERIES WHEEL BALANCES
fFHATit!enJome~
(improvements Loans
I A New Service Now Available To Qualified Members
I Interest Rate 3/4 Os 1% Per Month On Unpaid Balance
I Life Insurance Included On Eligible Members
I Maximum $2,500 for 5 years
I Choose Your Payment Plan
I CASH Average Monthly Payments
I You Get 24 mos. 36 mos. 48 mos. 60 mos.
I $ 250 11.43
I $ 500 22.85 15.90 12.45 10.38
I SIOOO 45.69 31.80 24.89 20.76
$2500 114.22 79.50 62.22 51.90
Temporary Stations
LOAN DEPT. 11 FRAZIER HALL
CASHIER POLICE STATION
BOOKKEEPING DEPT. EXT. 2376
Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union^p
r

The UF Rifle Team fired a round
of lUB6 on conventional and inter international
national international targets in its sectional
meet in Miami. International tar targets
gets targets have much smaller bulls bullseye>
eye> bullseye> anti target area than the
conventional size.
The University of West Vir Virginia,
ginia, Virginia, which oliers scholarships
in ruler'., won the overall com competition.
petition. competition. it: the ROTC category,
the Rifles were second, twenty twentyeight
eight twentyeight points behind the Citadel.
In its scheduled competition, the
UF rifle team had a record of
2.2-2, losing to the Citadel in
Charleston, S. C., and dropping
the Inter-State meet in Miami to
FSU.
The sectional scores were shot
by Toby Muir, team captain, Jim
Waugh, Bob Moeller, and Lee
Young. Muir also won individual
honors in the sectional meet with
a round of 289, four points shy of
the best national score of 293.

Page 11



Page 12

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 14, 19GG

ANDY |y||^ Qr f 1
GUEST COLUMNIST fm ~*M
Larry Woods was fired a week ago as Assistant Sports Pub Publicity
licity Publicity Director in UFs Athletic Department.
And it seems as though nobody save a few friends and news newsmen
men newsmen cares.
Inquiries have been made by some members of the state press
as to why the 30-year-old UF graduate was canned, and almost
as many answers have been given as questions have been asked.
One story goes that Woods and Dan Murrof the Florida Times-
Union invented a story that Roy Skinner, head coach at Vander Vanderbilt,
bilt, Vanderbilt, was a shoo-in for the UF basketball coachs job, vacated
less than a month ago by Norman Sloan. Another has it that
Woods gave the Tommy Bartlett story to the state press before
it had actually been confirmed.
From here, it appears that neither of these answers is the
right one.
The real reason Woods was fired was because he leaked, and
with good reason, the story that concessions head Perry Moore
was to become head basketball coach.
On the Saturday after Sloan resigned, Woods learned that
Moore was to get the job. Publicity Director Norm Carlson had
a mimeographed news release already written, ready to go the
minute Moores appointment was confirmed.
Concerned over the impending events, Woods decided to tell
Gainesville Sun Sports Editor Joe Halberstein what was going
on in hopes that he could do something about it.
Halberstein wasnt really sure what to do with this bombshell,
so he called TODAY Sports Editor Buddy Martin, a close friend
and former associate, in Cocoa to tell him about it.
Confirmation of the appointment of Moore was to come Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday by the Athletic Board, so Martin and Halberstein tried
to come up with an idea which would at least postpone this action
and allow more candidates to be interviewed.
After a long discussion Martin decided to run the story in
Wednesdays edition of TODAY, putting it out on the AP wire
late Tuesday night. Martin hoped the story might draw enough
public interest to have the confirmation postponed.
Sure enough, it worked.
Many influential people didnt like the idea of Moore, a man
with no previous head-coaching experience and the man behind
UFs infamous 25-cent game Cokes, getting the job. And they
let the right people know about it.
Consequently, Moore didnt get the position and Florida was
saved from what could have been the biggest travesty in the
states basketball history.
And, because he bucked the Establishment, because he had the
courage to attempt to light an obvious wrong, Larry Woods was
fired.
Woods will move to Cocoa in approximately 10 days to take
a job with TODAY as a reporter. So someone obviously has
confidence in his ability and integrity.
But the whole incident shouldnt come as a complete shock to
the University community.
Its just another example of what happens to someone who
bucks the Establishment at the University of Florida.
I SAL E I
I THIS WEEK ONLY I
I THE COMPLETE A&M CATALOGUE I
I OF OUTSTANDING ALBUMS I
I Reg. 3.98 Reg. 4.98 I
$2 33 $144
I MONO STEREO I
I TIJUANA BRASS # BAJ MAR IMB \ BAND I
WE FIVE CHRIS MONT? / I
GEORGE McCURN I

/ .
H-K M ITS ELEMENTARY "^" he os Student-Minded Businessmen
ADVERTISE IN THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

I HELP DAD HELAX I
1 IJL ON HIS DAY 1
1 iJ Ilf WITH A BIFT FROM (
EE D . i \ North Floridas Largest Sporting Goods Headquaters 3
f|sh|ng I
\ I \j RODS &, REELS |
I DQO Ml W TACKLE BOXES |
I lai LURES & |
I \)J Ji mOv/ accessories|
1 M GOLF TENNIS WATER SPORTS 1
Wf L 1 bags balls masks
1 carts shirts snorkles s
§| I .shoes ski belts §
I .umbrellas diving lungs 5
1 jackets f
l JIMMIE HUGHES
a Broil a steak m =
5- 1C minutes using only CDADTIMP i
newspapers for fuel. I 11* \J wUUL/j 1
= V (no charcoal required) s
7 ONE BLOCK EAST OF CAMPUS 1113 W. UNIVERSITY
Complete Line Os Sporting Accessories
HURRY THEY ARE GOING FAST!
;! Continuing Our Huge Pre-Inventory I|S| '
I m\
?Ifnr TAit 4lflr>nl SPor sh/rtsONsport shirts ;r s 5
.JtUK JfH-U COTTON KNIT r> 00 BUTTON DOWN 5-oo ;I
;I REMEMBER DAD Q ;I
j ON HIS DAY NOW 2.50 NOW 3.5 ;
! SLACKS ;j
: SPORT SHIRTS r "" r dacron & cotton dacron 5.00 i
* OA A ftt & COTTON Cft '
S NOW O.UU NOW IV.7J NOW L.J U ;j
j SLACKS SHOES l 4 SHOES u.oo \
;! MADRAS i: 011 PENNY LOAFERS 'flue PHI-BATES valut ;!
now 9.95 now 9.95 FLOAI Ngw 9.95 j
!| JfOl' CljE Ugii BUFFALO T i|
a )e Unitwsitp IMjop
1620 W. University Ave.
IN CAROLYN PLAZA }