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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Quarter: Time For Education

(EDITORS NOTE: In this first of a two
part series, Miss Green examines the most
tangible side of the new quarter system
class changes. Friday she will explain
changes in registration, counseling and fi finals.)
nals.) finals.)
By MARGIE GREEN
ALLIGATOR STAFF WRITER
Think of it -- registration without long
lines in Tigert Hall and Florida Gym.
Elimination of registration lines is just
one of the changes the quarter system will
bring to UF. The other changes will occur
in: examination procedures, curriculum,
counseling, graduation and tuition.
At the present time the plans are ten tentative,
tative, tentative, said Dr. Franklin A. Doty, dean
of University College.
There will be four quarters per year

Vol. 58, No. 140

Highwaymen
Here July 23
For Frolics
Dollars for Scholars will
benefit July 23 when student
government presents Summer
Frolics.
The Highwaymen, a popular
folksinging group which in includes
cludes includes two former UF stu students,
dents, students, will be featured. The
other attraction will be the
Cyrkle, a rock group, whose
latest record, Red Rubber
Ball, has climbed to the top
of the charts in recent weeks.
Frolics chairman George
Anderson hopes that having
two such diverse groups will
give something for everyone
enabling SG to make a pro profit
fit profit on behalf of Dollars for
Scholars.
Tickets will go on sale early
next month.

f)E Iflortba Alligator

under the new system. Each of the quar quarters
ters quarters will be 10 weeks Jong and it will take
three quarters to complete an academic,
year.
What this is doing is using the time
available more effectively, said Robert
Mautz, vice president for academic affairs.
The quarter is stretching the current
trimester academic year from 27 weeks
to 30 weeks. This will allow more class
time for the courses. For example, hu humanities
manities humanities will be extended to three terms
instead of the present two terms.
There is always more to learn and
this slows down the pace somewhat, said
Doty. You need time for education.
Extending courses to three terms will
cut their credit value.
Credits under the quarter are worth

FORMER TENNESSEE AIDE
- -
Bartlett New Cage Coach

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
SPORTS EDITOR
p
UF is a great school in a great
state, and I feel we have the talent
here to give the university a great
basketball team.
With those confident words,
Tommy Bartlett, former assistant
cage coach at the University of
Tennessee, accepted th.e positiob of
U F head basketball coach Saturday.
The announcement of Bartletts
decision ended many weeks of
speculation concerning who would
replace former coach Norm Sloan.
Sloan resigned from his UF post
last month to head the basketball
program at North Carolina State,
his alma mater.
Reportedly over 100 coaches had
applied for the Gator coaching pos position.
ition. position. Ten were interviewed by UF
Athletic Director Ray Graves and
the screening committee.
Names mentiones in prominent
contention for the job were Roy
Skinner, Vanderbilt head coach;
Bill Lynn, Auburn head coach; Guy
Strong, Kentucky Wesleyan head
coach; Bobby Knight, Army head
coach; Marvin Beck, Pensacola
High School head coach; Hugh
Durham, FSU assistant coach;
Chuck Daley, Duke assistant coach
and Glenn Wilkes, Stetson head
coach.
Coach Bartletts familiarity
with the Southeastern Conference
--its teams, its recruiting pra practice
ctice practice and his excellent coaching
record convinced us that we have
made a wise choice, said Graves
following the official announce announcement.
ment. announcement. We are confident that he.
will continue the building of the
great basketball program that
Coach Sloan started.
A native of Homerville, Ga.,
Bartlett was a four-sport letter letterman
man letterman at Knoxville High in Tenn Tennessee.
essee. Tennessee. He starred in football,
basketball, track, and tennis.
Attending the University of
Tennessee on a combination foot football
ball football basketball scholarship,
Bartlett was forced to refraim
from the former after a knee
injury. He competed in basket basketball,
ball, basketball, earning All-SEC honors
and tennis during his collegiate
competing days.
Bartlett began his basketball
coaching career in 1952 at Maury
High School in Dandridge, Tenn.,
and then later at Lenoir City,
Tenn., High. At both schools he

University of Florida

compiled tremendous won-lost re records.
cords. records.
Breaking into the college
coaching ranks, Bartlett had stays
as head coach at Carson-Newman
College and the University of
Chattapboga before becoming the
freshtnan basketball coach at
Tennessee in 1962. In 1964 he was
promoted to assistant coach under
head mentor Ray Mears.
At Chattanooga, Bartlett per performed
formed performed perhaps his greatest
coaching feat. Chattanooga hadnt
had a winning season in 30 years
and had lost all of its games for
the past two seasons when
Bartlett assumed the head coach
position.
He started off on the right foot,
leading the Mocassins to four
straight winning seasons and in
1961 took his team to the NCAA

' "v | -- v ; / *
K. / ii iiJM > iiiiiitU| ; m
: "> $M iaSFm
9 HP, #p
Photo by Boh Ellison
THE WELCOME HAND

I f Athletic Director Ray Graves extends a wel welcome
come welcome hand to new Gator basketball Coach Tommy
Bartlett. The handshake symbolized Bartletts ac acceptance

two-thirds of a trimester credit. In order
to get the equivalent of six trimester cre credits
dits credits it will be necessary to take nine quar quarter
ter quarter hours.
Some of the quarter classes will be given
more credit than they currently get. For
example, some course credits will be five
hours one term and four credits the next
term.
Class attendance requirements will be
determined by how many credits the
course is worth. Classes for a five credit
course will be held five times per week.
I am concerned with the amount of
courses the freshmen will have to take
to get the normal term requirements,
said Mautz.
I am working with the faculty and deans
to be sure freshmen will not have to take

College Division playoffs with a
17-6 record which included a vic victory
tory victory over SEC member Missis Mississippi.
sippi. Mississippi. L
t
Bar|lett said he would stress
defense and fundamentals, the
same as he did at Tennessee.
Bartlett coached the Vols defen defensively.
sively. defensively. They finished number two
in the country in that department.
Ill adjust the system to the
talent, not the talent to the sys system,
tem, system, he said. This is not a
team which will be starting from
scratch. Florida has good men re returning
turning returning and an excellent freshman
team coming up.
Bartlett mentioned the Gators
lack of depth at the guard position
but said he was confident somebody
would come along.

over four courses per quarter.
The normal credit load to be carried on
the quarter will be fifteen hours.
Because there are three terms to an
academic year,, there will be two breaks
after Christmas. As it currently stands,
the fall quarter will begin on Sept. 25,
and examinations will be from Dec. 11-18.
Winter term will begin on Jan. 18, and
Spring term will begin on April 1. The
term will be out in the middle of June.
Classes will be 50 minutes long with
fifteen minute breaks in between. First
period will begin at 8 a.m. and tenth period
will end at 6:35 p.m. Evening sessions will
be three periods long, beginning at 7:10
p.m. and ending at 10 p.m. For evening
classes there will be only 10 minutes be between
tween between classes.

ceptance acceptance of the job. Because the job is appointive,
there is no formal contract. Bartlett comes to UF
from the University of Tennessee.

Tuesday, June 7, 1966

Im very happy to accept the
coaching position at UF, said
Bartlett Saturday. Im looking
forward to a good season next year.
Bartlett will have the rare op opportunity
portunity opportunity of seeing the 1966-67
edition of the Gators in action
before the season starts when the
Gators make a tour of South A America
merica America next month.
The tour, given official approval
by the State Department, will
enable Bartlett to arrange his
sophomores with returning letter lettermen
men lettermen to come up with the best com combination.
bination. combination. In effect, he will have the
equivalent of a full season of
coaching the Gators before they
officially take the court in late
November.
Bartlett officially started work
Monday as Gator head basketball
coach.



, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 7, 1966

Page 2

Cuapas
Ns
Briefs

PHARMACY DEAN CITED
Dean Perry A. Foote of UFs College of Pharmacy has been
chosen to receive a special recognition award from the Florida
State Pharmaceutical Association.
The plaque, first of its kind to be presented by the association
since its beginning in 1887, is in appreciation for his outstanding
services to pharmacy and pharmacists in the state of Florida.
Dr. Foote has been with the College of Pharmacy |gice 1928
as professor until 1939, director of the School of Pharmacy from
1939 to 1949, and dean of the college since 1949. More than 1,000
of the states 3,500 practicing pharmacists have studied under
Dr. Foote at the University.
Dr. Foote also received a citation in April from the American
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy in appreciation of his meri meritorious
torious meritorious service while president of the association in 1962-63.
It was the first time a past president of the association has been
cited for his service.
CHEERLEADING CLINIC
The 12th annual Cheerleading Clinic will be conducted at UFs
P. K. Yonge Laboratory School, June 10-12.
Approximately 600 participants from high schools throughout
Florida are expected to take part in this years activities, which
will be led by national cheerleading consultants. Dean of Student
Affairs Lester Hale will give instruction in voice control.
P. K. Yonge School Director J. B. Hodges will deliver the
welcoming address at 7:30 p.m. on June 10 in the school audi auditorium.
torium. auditorium. Dean Kimball Wiles of the Universitys College of Edu Education
cation Education will speak on The Responsibilities of Cheerleading at
7:30 p.m., June 11, at the same location.
N Coordinator for the clinic will be Pearline Yeatts.
MUSIC CONFERENCE
The final phase of UFs clinic-credit-conference for 24
music teachers throughout the state is scheduled June 10-11
on campus.
During the two days, participants, who have been working on
carefully supervised research projects, will present their indi individual
vidual individual results. The teachers receive course credit for successful
completion of the work. Activities began last January in Tampa
and all participants have attended at least eight regional clinics
in the interim period.
The teachers are working on courses covering the areas of
music in the elementary school, vocal music in the secondary
school, orchestra music in the public school and band music in
the public school.
Major emphasis of the two-day session will be The Revolution
in Teaching Resources: Its Impact on Music Education.
RELIGIOUS ART
An exhibition of more than 40 prints depicting religious art
went on display Monday, June 6, at UFs Department of Art
Teaching Gallery.
The exhibit, to run through June 29, is sponsored by the Ferdi Ferdinand
nand Ferdinand Roten Galleries of Baltimore.
Examples will range from woodcuts taken from early religious
books to modern lithographs and etchings by contemporary mas masters.
ters. masters. Many of the woodcuts are by anonymous artists but several
works on display will be by the renowned 15th century German
artist Albrecht Durer.
Among the various contemporary artists involved with religious
themes, the most outstanding productions have come from the
hands of Marc Chagall and George Rouault. Items from Chagalls
series on the Old Testament and Rouaults Passion of Christ
will be shown.
The Teaching Gallery is open to the public on weekdays from
9 a.m. until noon and from 1:30 5 p.m. It is qlosed each Satur Saturday
day Saturday and Sunday.
S VAR LIEN HONORED
Dr. Oscar Svarlien, professor of political science at the UF,
Thursday, June 2, was awarded Norways Knights Cross, First
Class, of the Royal Order of Saint Olav.
The honor, presented by A. A. Wolking as representative ol the
Royal Norwegian Vice Consulate in Jacksonville, recognized Dr.
Svarliens contributions in the field of international law as a na native
tive native son of Norway, where he was born in 1906.
The award was presented at a luncheon attended by University
President J. Wayne Reitz and about 25 colleagues, friends and
Dr. Svarliens family.
Dr. Svarlien is a recognized expert on international law and
has published numerous scholarly works on the subject and is the
author of a popular textbook regarding the field. He has been on
the UF faculty since 1946.
Tfco rtorm AiMf nmTM tho right to iwcMaM tho typographical tom at all adYortUamaaU and
to ruin or tan owojr copy which It oomldora objocttoooblo.
MO NOTION GUARANTEED, though Oaalrad poatttoo will bo glTwo Wbamror pooolblo.
Tho Florida Alligator will not eomldor ad] not moots at paymaat tor any adrortloonioot involving typo typognpMcal
gnpMcal typognpMcal orrors or orromom lamMm aalma aotteo U gtvm to tha Advartloiog Manager within
(I) oao day altar advartlaontoat iipatri.
Tha Florida Alligator win hot bo iwapoaaMa lor mere than am Income* taaortton of an advartlaamoat
ochadtfad to ran aavaral times. Notlem lor oorraattaa moot bo gtvm hadara want lamrtloa.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR la tha official atadaat aawopapar of hfea UMvaralty at Florida and la
pMMhad Ova Ham weakly rneapt dart* May, Jaaa, aad Jaly when II la pffillahod semi-weakly. Only
odMfMM roproeewt tha official eplatoao of their aathera. Tha AffiffMor la e*ered as second dam
IMdOor at Me UaOad Matos Post Offioa at Oalmavllls.

HOLY SUPERMAN!!
Publications Head Named

By 808 MENAKER
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
Student Publications will soon
have a new boss, and, appropriately
enough his name is King -- King
D. White that is.
After two months of searching
for a man to fill the newly created
. A
position of Director of Student Pub Publications,
lications, Publications, the BSP chose White, a
former UF student. In this position,
White will also serve as editorial
advisor to student publications.
White, 38, edited many small
weekly newspapers in the South,
and has worked for 'the Atlanta
Constitution. He presently is em employed
ployed employed as an executive by Storter
Printing Company of Gainesville.
According to BSP Executive Sec Secretary
retary Secretary Gary -Burke, White will be
senior to all full-time student pub publications
lications publications staffers and is expected
to provide active editorial advice
for all student publications.
Burke, credited with building
Alligator advertising to its pre present
sent present SIOO, 000-plus level, has sub submitted
mitted submitted his resignation effective in
August. In his present position
Burke fulfills two jobs: BSP exe executive
cutive executive secretary and publications
business manager.
The board has also selected a
full time business manager for
student publications.
Forbes Elected
Chairman Os
Mayors Council
John Forbes, 3LW, has been
elected chairman of the Mayors
Council which represents all mar married
ried married students through the govern government
ment government structures of Diamond, Fla Flavet
vet Flavet HI, Corry andSchucht Villages.
The Mayors Council is com composed
posed composed of the mayors of the married
villages, mayors appointees, and
past village mayors. Forbes is a
former mayor of Diamond Village.
Others elected with Forbes are
Dave Veal, 6EG, executive secre secretary;
tary; secretary; Leon Polhill, 4AS, treasurer
and Jennings Brown, 4BA, ser sergeant-at-arms.
geant-at-arms. sergeant-at-arms. The officers
will serve for one year.
The council works closely with
the Presidents Advisory Commit Committee
tee Committee on Married Students Affairs,
which is headed by Dan Meserve,
cabinet secretary of married stu students
dents students affairs. Among the projects
Forbes says he expects the
Mayors Council to complete this
year are buses to J. J. Finley
elementary school and formation
of a boy scout troop.
The married students organiza organization
tion organization also usually handles the card
section during football season.

TIRE BARGAINS June 7-11
Were liquidating eur entire stock
of FIRESTONE tires,
as low os dealer billing cost less 25%
ABOUT 200 TQ SELL
MOODY TIRE SERVICE
615 N. MAIN ST. PH. 372-3010
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICING
ALIGNMENT BATTERIES MUFFLERS
AIR CONDITIONING MOTOR TUNING SHOCK ABSORBERS
BRAKES SAFETY CHECKS WHEEL BALANCING

Brenten Myking, a retired Ma Marine
rine Marine colonel, will manage adver advertising
tising advertising and revenues. He received
his B.A. from UFs College of
Business Administration. He is
married and has five children.
Both these men came highly
recommended, Burke said. I

TO ALL STUDENTS
I W&fi AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL J
W
'V CAFETERIA
See Whats Now ta
The Browse Shop
FAREWELL TO ARMS Ernest Hemingway
THE REPRIEVE....... Jean Paul Sartre
THE KING MtJST DIE Mary Renault
V
THE BROKEN WINGS Kahili Gibran
WHAT IS EXISTENTIALISM?....WiIIiam Barrett
PREGNANCY, BIRTH & ABORTION
Paul Gebhard
REMAKING OF A CULTURE.... Theodore Bramold
HARDCOVER
BIRDS OF THE WORLD Austine
HISTORY OF BURLESQUE Sobel
KENNEDY. .Sorenson
- "ore Hours 8:00 A.M. to 5:0 0 P.M.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00
I Campus Shop & Bookstore

feel they will do a fine job and will
keep student publications up to its
present high standard.
White, whose position as publi publications
cations publications director has been tagged
Superman will begin work on
June 15. Myking is expected to
start July 1.



ACROSS FROM UNIVERSITY CITY IANK SAVE I
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MONDAY THROUGH \ I
SATURDAY 7 30 Al O\A I
Monday hrough Saturday L $F
flr /' %s
PRELLL r £q'
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The Film
Notebook

There is little necessity to praise a movie such as My Fair
Lady. I even recommend it to Mr. Name Withheld. By now
everyone knows the story or has heard the record at least once.
This will undoubtedly be the top musical for a long time to come.
The excellence (.theres that word again) of Messers Lerner and
Loewe shows through almost every scene. The direction of Mister
Cukor is also outstanding. The scenery in the Ascot and ballroom
scenes again makes me agree with the Academy. Personally, I
prefer Ascot with its brilliant whites and blacks. Practically
everything that this movie has to offer is done exceptionally well.
Prevalent throughout the movie is the existence of the strong
class consciousness in England. Such phrases as judge me* and
middle class morality and scenes showing women suffragettes
are continually brought before us.
The soft spot in my heart (another cliche) goes to Alfie Doolittle
(Stanley Holloway) and Mrs. Washbourne (Mrs. Pearce); lie, be because
cause because he is so content with his station in life; she, because of her
being the epitome ol an average proper English lady. Her facial
expressions really get to me. (Good heavens! Slang!)
This movie runs the entire gamut of emotions, except perhaps
hate. The audiences general reaction was a pleasant one. If
youre a romanticist, bring a couple of Kleenex for the ending.
I would say the picture is a bit long for restless children and
recommend (theres that word again) the shows that children attend
be avoided by adults.
The photography doesnt need my approval; it is terrific! The
1 larger General Van Fleet room has better picture quality. I
found the General Gaines rooms picture a bit fuzzy and in some
scenes the whites are too bright. I mentioned this to the manage management
ment management and they may have corrected it by the time tills review app appears
ears appears in print.
The music, under the direction of Andre Previn, is tops. The
best songs in my opinion are The Rain in Spain and I Could
Have Danced All Night.
The main theme, a persons speech affecting his class position
or vice versa, is well brought out. It would be best if one could see
this movie in conjunction with reading Pygmalion and perhaps
some of Shaws other works, but I dont think these are necessary
to enjoy the movie.
1, recommend this movie to almost everyone, even Freedom
people, although thay may find it difficult to sit in a room named
after a general. Due to an error in translation, someone on the
Alligator staff thought I rate on the four star basis. 1 really rate
on five stars: overall acting, direction, photography, music, and
general appeal. I rate this movie ***-1/2.
ALWAYS BE ON TIME
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Tuesday, June 7,106 G, The Florida Alligator,

by Reuben Ellis

Page 3



1, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 7, 1966

Page 4

alligator
EDITORIALS
Numerous universities have
tried and. developed systems
of student evaluations of profes professors.
sors. professors.
The evaluations have been both
praised and damned from both stu students
dents students and professors.
One opinion holds that students
don't have the proficiency to eval evaluate
uate evaluate a professor.
Also, the student evaluation
could be detrimental since the
evaulation would often be limited
to a single class and subject. Many
students would not recognize
a professor's overall contribution
to the university.
But the evaluation has its bene benefits,
fits, benefits, too.
Most often it is given credit for
helping students size-up" a pro professor
fessor professor before taking one of his
classes. This could (rightly or
wrongly) pressure professors to
change their teaching techniques
if suddenly no students were re registering
gistering registering for their classes.
We think most professors are
willing to accept constructive crit criticism
icism criticism of their teaching methods.
After all, it is the student who
stands in a position to offer crit criticism.
icism. criticism.
Even the less-observant student
-- in the course of a few years at
college -- naturally begins to eval evaluate
uate evaluate each professor's teaching
techniques.
With the proper guidelines, we
feel that a professor evaluation
program would be of much benefit
to the university.
Proper guidelines include:
Evaluations should represent
the combined opinions of a speci specified
fied specified number of students.
Evaluations should represent
all phases of classroom participa participation
tion participation -- discussion, tests, quality
and importance of lectures, atten attendance,
dance, attendance, etc.
We think such a program at the
UF would prove pro fit able to
faculty, students and the university
as a whole.

He Alligator
Editor Managing; Editor
Gene Nail Steve Smith
Executive Editor ...... Bob Menaker
City Editor Yvette Car 10/.o
Sports Editor Jeff Denkewaiter
Photographers Nick Arroyo
Sam Johnston, Steve Kanar
Staff Writers Norma Bell, Carl Brown
Alan Burton, Arlene Caplan, Dick Deni.is
Eileen Dworkin, Margie Green, Marti
Kalishnikoff, Kathie Keim, Judy Miilyr
Steve Scott, Allen Soden, Tyler Tucker

Dr. Robert
Hutchins
he attempt to make the University of California an issue
VtU in the California primary campaign cannot be dismissed
as a case of demagogic flatulence, the effort of desperate men
to make the headlines. 7 ..
It has to be taken seriously because it reflects and tends to
confirm popular misconceptions of universities in general and
of the University of California in particular.
Ronald Reagan, running for the Republican nomination for
governor, solemnly urges the people to pay heed to the report
of a legislative committee indicting the Berkeley campus as a
nest of Communists and sexual deviates.
Mayor Sam Yorty of Los Angeles, running for the Democratic
nomination for governor, says any trouble with the students at
Berkeley is the fault of his opponent, Gov. Edmund G. Brown.
Yorty sums up his view of university organization and manage management
ment management by saying of Brown, He could crack down on these kooky
kids any time he wanted just by ordering the regents to do it.
The legislative committee upon which Reagan relies has been
a standing joke for years. Its attack upon Berkeley can only have
the effect of uniting the faculty, regents and students behind the
administration of Clark Kerr, president of the university.
This will be a good thing, but the committee deserves no thanks
for it.
The University of California at Berkeley is one of the great
universities of the world. It has many problems, among which is
getting itself into comprehensible condition. But the least of its
worries is the quality of its 27,000 students. Those from Cali California
fornia California are selected from the ablest high school graduates in the
state.
In any group so large there are doubtless a few Communists
and sexual deviates. There is no law depriving such people of
the good thqt education might do them. To suggest that the presi president
dent president of the university should spend his time ferreting out these
individuals and visiting his wrath upon them is preposterous.
Yortys reasoning is as simple as it is faulty. In disregard of
the Constitution of California, he sees the governor, who is ex exofficio
officio exofficio chairman of the Board of Regents, as the boss of that body.
In disregard of all sound principles of university operation, he
sees the Board of Regents as the boss of the university.
According to Yorty, Brown should tell the regents what to do.
This, as Yorty must know, would violate the Constitution. Accord According
ing According to Yorty, the regents should take student discipline out of the
hands of those to whom it is properly entrusted, the faculty.
It is hard to write a surer prescription for academic disaster
than this: let the governor run the Board of Regents and the
Board of Regents run the university. This would mean, in effect,
that the governor would be the boss of the university. The consti constitutional
tutional constitutional provisions regarding the University of California.were
framed precisely to avoid this catastrophe. They were designed
to keep the university out of politics.
The duty of the faculty is to formulate the purposes and pro programs
grams programs of the university. The duty of the regents is to interpret
and defend them. The recognition and discharge of these obliga obligations
tions obligations is ultimately the only protection against political blather blatherskitery.
skitery. blatherskitery.
(Copyright 1966, The Los Angeles Times)

aboard the
'\l
with^i^iie z
. ;
The big question in student government on the
infamous third floor of the Florida Union of late is:
Whatever became of Buddy Jacobs? The erstwhile
student body prexy hasnt been seen by a living soul
on the third floor in three weeks.
The answer given to those seeking his whereabouts
is that hes working on the alumni film with Mrs.
Phil Silvers. I think thats wonderful. Buddy succeed succeeded
ed succeeded Bruce Culpepper, the Bronko Nagursni of student
government, and now hes SGs Cary Grant.
Its really too bad, you know, because several im important
portant important decisions have had to be made and no one
could find the president to make them. I know of at
least half a dozen major requests of Jacobs in the
last TWO MONTHS that noble leeader has failed to
even return a comment on. He has also failed in that
capacity of carrying out requests of policy decisions
and charges to the administration . after all,
student government doesnt have to take NO for an
answer -- it just doesnt ask the question .
=*>
v *
Alligator Editor Gene Nail has come up with
several justifiable criticisms of the current arrange arrangement
ment arrangement of the Board of Student Publications. It is true
that what the Board needs most of all is a complete
change not only in its format, but in its membership.
Nails proposals are all quite sound except for
who he wishes to have be the student representatives
to the Board. His plan would have a student majority
of the Board (it is now a faculty-administration
majority) by placing the following students on the
Board: President of the student chapter of Sigma
Delta Chi, Vice President of the student body, Presi President
dent President of Florida Blue Key. The fourth student shall
be appointed by the then-present members of the
Board upon recommendations of the new editors of
the §tudent publications, and the Board would have
to be bound by the editors recommendations.
The recommendation of adding the president of
SDX is perhaps one of the most astute and intelligent
ideas, in reference to that Board, that I have ever
heard. This is balanced by the fact that Nail would
also include in membership the president of FBK.
It is in the latter that I would lodge my most serious
objection.
Putting the Blue Key president on the Publications
Board would be tantamount to having put Haydon
Burns on the editorial staff of the St. Pete Times
during this past Democratic campaign for governor.
It is further analogous to appointing Bobby Baker,
Billy Sol Estes, Mayor Richard Daley, Sen. Thomas
Dod and Haydon Burns to a special governmental
conflict-of-interest investigating committee. That is
like asking Satan to guard the Pearly Gates for St.
Peter.
One could readily be assured that the FBK presi president
dent president would be an almost automatic vote for the
forces of the administration.
The other members of the Board would be quite
fair and representative of the student body, generally
speaking. The whole Nail Plan, as I see it, other
than the granting of another pseudo-student vote, is
quite sound and should be placed into operation.
* * V,
Notes around campii:
. . What personable, effervescent official in
Tigert Hall is upset over the scheduled Fall Frolics
presentation . and Frolics just having missed
getting The Rolling Stones, and now topped it! .
the Homecoming political plums have been passed
out by Blue Key the past few weeks and several
politicos discovered that some of their comrades in
arms 'welched on certain commitments and theyve
gotten the shaft on promised appointments for rising
stars in thpir Greek houses it seems you cant
trust-anyone any more in student politics . ru rumors
mors rumors heard hither, thither and yon are that a certain
group of responsible students has come up with a
fair football seating plan and certain vested interests
on the third floor are desperately trying to block the
growing movement . and the student body trea treasurers
surers treasurers office has compiled the 1966-67 budget in a
booklet form. This columnist strongly recommends
that every student who can, stop by the treasurers
office and see just where his money is going. Most
students dont take the time but then they dont
know where their dough is going, either ... do you
care?



§| mimmmmje iff 6 T
£ W *** ill
f MV FRIEUPS' MV MOTH£6 i v f?*f- 1
L*f?t\. CAU- Me rM ) CALLS Me iffilK Feuouj (f^Tvc N SS

doesnt like
BSP proposals
Editor:
It is more than slightly possible that the organization of the
Board of Student Publications needs to be changed in light of the
recent controversy concerning it and its actions. However, the
recommendation of The Alligator, made editorially on May 31,
is not the reorganization called for by the situation.
f
No member of the proposed board, save Vice President of the
Student Body, is directly responsible to the student body. Indeed,
the Alligator proposal would change from second hand to first
hand the influences to which the student body objected in the
first place.
In order not merely to be in negation, but to offer constructive
criticism, the following proposal is given.
The Board of Student Publications will be composed as follows:
Three faculty members. One appointed by the university president;
one member of the faculty of the School of Journalism and Com Communications,
munications, Communications, and one member' from the rest of the faculty (both
selected by the entire faculty of the University). At least four
students elected from the student body. The editor of each student
publication as advisory but non-voting member.
A board chosen on this order will serve the purpose of good
journalism and be Representative of the university community
as a whole.
Edward M. Sweet, 4AS
Box 44
Lake Geneva, Florida

f ROBBIES
Best In
Q B^Jandwiches
1718 W. University Ave.
'On The Gold Coast 1
NOTICE I
GATOR ADS
_

Letters To The Editor

i
Gators
second
best
Editor:
Perhaps Alan Burton meant to
say that the (hiiversity of Florida
is one of the top three academic
schools in the SEC rather than in
the South; but what has been de decided
cided decided by Tulanes dropping out of
the Conference is that Florida may
now rank second academically
for has not Mr. Burton forgotten
the mighty Commodores of
Vanderbilt University?
Byron Kolitz (Vandy 65), 7AS


SALE on SWIMSUITS
One-Piece, Two-Piece, Or Bikinis
& ' --
NOW ONLY $8.99514.99
Sportswear Reduced!
1/3l/2 OFF REG. PRICE
Shorts, Slacks, Skirts, And Blouses
. -.. _' .. .. .. .t
*
to
l ...',-
ALL SALES FINAL!

fit AUTr' SHCPPL SPECIALITY SHOPPE
311 AND 111 N V\ D'h STRUT

PLEASE 1
Limit Letters To The
Editor To 250 Words
And Make Sure
They're Signed. We
Will Omit Names

At Writer's Request.

FHA Title I Home
Improvements Loans
A New Service Now Available To Qualified Members
Interest Rate 3/4 Os 1% Per Month On Unpaid Balance
Life Insurance Included On Eligible Members
Maximum $2,500 for 5 years
Choose Your Payment Plan
CASH Average Monthly Payments
You Get 24 mos. 36 mos. 48 mos. 60 mos.
$ 250 11.43
$ 500 22.85 15.90 12.45 10.38
SIOOO 45.69 31.80 24.89 20.76
$2500 114.22 79.50 62.22 51.90
Gainesville Florida Campus Federal Credit Union

Tuesday, June 7, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Rotary & Printing
CALCULATORS
SPECIAL
Small Manual Monroe $95.
KISERS
Office Equipment
604 N. MAIN ST.

Page 5



IGATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
COLUMBIA STEREO with detach detachable
able detachable speakers, S7O. Call Dick after
6 p.m., 378-3449. Before 6 p.m.,
372-3050. (A-139-2t-c).
FEDDERS AIR CONDITIONER,
10,000 BTU, 220 volt. Good con condition,
dition, condition, $75. Call 376-0729. (A (A---1
--1- (A---1
1964, 10x46 2 BR TRAILER with
washing machine, storage shed.
S2OO equity, assume payments of
$56.91 per mo. 372-0384. (A-140-
2t-c).
26 DUNLET BIKE. Two yrs. old
in good condition with generator
and light. Call W. L. Woody, 372-
9144. (A-140-It-p).
7 WEEK OLD Siamese Kittens.
Call 372-7513 after 5 p.m. S2O
each. (A-140-lt-p).
LAFAYETTE STEREO SYSTEM,
2 large speakers, S9O or best
offer. Call Nancy, 376-5151. (A (A---1
--1- (A---1 3t-c).
AIR CONDITIONER, 7,500 BTU.
Easy to install. SSO. Rug 9xl2,
$7.50. Call 372-7611. (A-140-tf (A-140-tfc).
c). (A-140-tfc).
1965 HONDA SUPER HAWK. A
real fire eater. $475. Cash. Call
Rex Rittgers, 5 to 8 p.m., 376-
4260. (A- 140-4 t-c). \
ONE WHEEL TRAILER WITH
HITCH. $75. Call 378-4068 after
6. (A- 140-2 c).
45x8 CHAMPION TRAILER with
huge 35xl3 permanent cabana.
In good condition and priced to
sell at SIOSO. Will sell now or
hold till Fall. Lot 10, Glynwood
Trailer Park, Ph. 372-5374. (A (A---140-ts-c).
--140-ts-c). (A---140-ts-c).
SACRIFICE 1965 YAMAHA. Like
new, low mileage, $290. Also .38
Special Smith & Wesson, SSO.
Leica M 3,50 mm Summcrom, $175.
'Jim, 372-6178. (A- 139-ts-c).
000-GAAH. sl2 buys genuine ear
splitting motor driven horn for
12 volt car. Harvey, 376-3211, ext.
5130, cubicle 116. Leave message.
(A 140- lt-c).
for apts and
trailers. All sizes -- cost plus
10%. Sudden Service Fuel Oil Co.,
authorized Admiral dealer. 907
SW 3rd St. Ph. 376-4404. (A-131-
ts-c).
ARIEL 650-40 HP Motorcycle. New
tag, tires, paint, chrome, etc.
Mechanically sound. Personal rea reasons
sons reasons force sale. $650 invested,
asking $525. 376-1429. (A-137-
st-p).
fcl ' lll^
NEW AIR CONDITIONERS. Un Unredeemed
redeemed Unredeemed layaway, never install installed,
ed, installed, for balance due only. Sudden
Service Fuel Oil Co., 907 SW 3rd
St. 376-4404. (A-l 31-ts-c).

LAST TODAY the >- 3 5 {SRVTIfk
LOVED ONE 1|
hikes hmoii vs umt tov imk I
/ HUMPHREY BOGART LAUREN I
BACALL I
IN WILLIAM FAULKNER'S SCREENPLAY
\ .jpl BIG SLEEP" J

| for rent
NOW RENTING FOR FALL. A/C
apts and houses. Occupancy for 3
or 4 students, male or female.
Charlie Mayo, Town & Country
Realty, 376-4664. (B-140-ts-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
modern one bedroom duplex apt.
A/C, for B-term. Call 378-4893.
(C- 140-st-c).
APT. and female roommates
wanted for Fall Trimester. Call
376-2315. (C-137-st-c).
WANTED: Good lead guitarist to
work with local group. Contact
Ron Gause at 372-1576 or Leo Leonard
nard Leonard Ambrose at 372-9935. (C (C---140-3t-c).
--140-3t-c). (C---140-3t-c).
ONE MALE ROOMMATE needed
for B-term. A/C, two blocks from
Law School, furnished, ph. 372-
0854. (C-140-tf-nc).
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 BR apt. B-term. Own bed bedroom.
room. bedroom. A/C, S3B per mo. Call 378-
3132. Close to campus. (C-140-
st-p).
WANTED: 2 roommates, Fall Tri.,
La Fontana, new high rise, A/C,
$35 per mo. Ph. 372-9435. Howard
or Ray. (C-140-lt-p).
WANT TO RENT Hi-Fi or Stereo
thru August. Contact Sue at 378-
4989. (C-140-2t-c).
RIDER WANTED FROM CHICAGO
to Gainesville. Leaving Sept. 1 or
2. Write David Weiss, 3001. S.
Parkway (Apt. 1902), Chicago
60616, Illinois. (C-140-3t-nc).
LARGE COOL DIVIDED ROOM,
12 x 22, private entrance and
shower, utilities and linens in included.
cluded. included. Ph. 372-3191 or 372-8903.
(B-139-ts-c).
NEW MODERN APT. completely
furnished, A/C, swimming pool,
S9O. Call 372-3826. (B-139-4t-c).
ONE BR APT. to sublet. A/C, 3
blocks from campus. Special offer
on June rent. Call 376-3513. (B (B---139-2t-c);
--139-2t-c); (B---139-2t-c);
A/C ONE BEDROOM furnished apt.
Good condition. One block from
campus. SBO mo. Call collect Key Keystone
stone Keystone Heights, 473-4135. (B-139-
st-c).
$ 35/MO. PLUS 1/2 UTILITIES.
Share 2 BR apt. with upper di division
vision division electrical engineering stu student.
dent. student. 376-8501, Bill Lagoni. Leave
word. (B-139-st-c).
NEW ONE AND TWO bedroom fur furnished
nished furnished A/C apts with pool. One
bedroom S9O and $95. Two bed bedroom
room bedroom $125. Near UF & Medical
Center. 372-9569. (B-131-ts-c).

Page 6

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 7,

: ]
for rent
_j
AVAILABLE for Sept. Ist. Duplex
for male students. S4O per student.
East apt. accommodate 4students.
West apt. accommodates 3 stu students.
dents. students. Only 500 ft. from Tigert
Hall. 1231 S. W. 3rd Ave. Call
Anna Hinson, 378-2559. (B (B---137-ts-c).
--137-ts-c). (B---137-ts-c).
EFFICIENCY APT. Furnished,
private bath, entrance, drive. $65.
Utilities furnished. 2225 NE 7th
St. Ph. 376-0595. (B-l 34-ts-c).
TWO BEDROOM HOME, furnished.
Across from Holiday Inn. Available
B-.term or Fall Tri. 372-6232.
(B-134-ts-c).
FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM APT.
available B-term or Fall Tri.
across from Ramada Inn. 372-
6232. (B-l 34-ts-c).
LARGE DIVIDED ROOM, 12x22,
private entrance and shower, utili utilities
ties utilities and linens included. Ph. 372-
3191 or 372-8903. (B-133-ts-c).
FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM APT.
Large room, nice and clean. Near
campus. Water furnished. $62.50
a mo. Reliable person. Ph. 376-
8819. (B-137-4t-c).
PRIVATE ROOM 3 blocks from
campus, S2O a mo. Ph. 372-8840.
(B-l 31-ts-c).
- t ;
ATTRACTIVE Modern room, A/C
Ideal for student who needs a quiet
pleasant s place to study, 372-7883.
(B-138-ts-c).
wanted
MALE COUNSELOR JOBS Camp
Mt. Lake, Hendersonville, N. C.
Experience not necessary. $175-
$225 plus room and board. June
20th August 22nd. Contact in
Gainesville, Matt Schneider, 376-
9271 or write Mr. T. I. Robertson,
1414 Felch Ave., Jacksonville, Fla.
(C-139-2t-c).
WANTED: Beautician. Full or part
time. Ph. 378-4520. (C-136-st-p).
MALE ROOMMATE to live in
Village Park B-term. A/C, pool,
all extras, S4O monthly. 1/2 June
free. 372-7348. (C-139-2t-p).
FEMALE ROOMMATE, senior or
graduate student, wanted to share
2 BR, central A/C house. 103 NW
24th St. Tri 3-B only or Tri 3-B
and school yr. 1966-67. Ph. 376-
2129 after 5. (C-139-2t-c).
WHITE HOUSEWIFE desires one
day or 1/2 day work. Cook, iron,
clean. Call 372-5269 after 5. (C (C---138
--138- (C---138 c).

! wanted |
ROOMMATE wanted immediately.
Coed to share apt. expenses thru
August. Rent $45 a mo. Ph. 8-1304
or UF ext. 2731. (C-137-ts-c).
WANTED: Floor model stereo; gas
or electric stove; player piano.
Call 372-5269. (C-137-4t-c).
WANTED: To share truck for
moving to Kansas last of June.
Ph. 372-0317. (C-137-4t-c).
help wanted
MALE OR FEMALE, over 21, full
or part time. Apply Woodys be between
tween between r-3-y.
Ave. (E-140-ts-c).
STUDENT WIVES, COEDS -- in interested
terested interested in making S3O-S4O a wk.
in your spare time? Phone 372-
4028 between 7-10 p.m., Wed. or
Thurs. Openings limited. (E-140-
lt-c).

HITS
THIS ,
MOTION PICTURE AXELRODS Y| 2
. IS AN ACT OF V_ JA\
PURE AGGRESSION Ufcjjjfwjl /;45
Don't You Believe It 11 ; 48
! PLUS 7:50 ...1.
A ACADEMY ss<
f : -Harris
W BEST ACTOR
fljj- MARTIN BALSAM
Last Time Tonite
"A PATCH OF BLUE"
"THE TRUTH ABOUT ~
SPRING" in color Next Week
IWW!1 LAST 3 DAYS
puuuul Elvis In "FRANKIE & JOHNNY
I Tw'raSSyl | n Color 1:00-3:20-5:20-7:30-9:30
fSr V xfetv^J
LLOYD BRIDGES SHIRLEY EATON BRIAN KELLY DAVID McCALLUM

help wanted
SECRETARY to head of AFROTC
Dept. Position classification: Sec Secretary
retary Secretary 11. Salary commensurate
. with personal achievement level.
Shorthand and typing required.
Apply to Central Employment Cen Center,
ter, Center, Bldg. E, UF. An Equal Oppor Opportunity
tunity Opportunity Employer. (E-139-ts-c).
I Tonite Thru Wed. 1
I PAUL NEWMAN As I
I HARPER I
1633 Squadron!
"SPY WITH MY FACE M I
I "TO TRAP A SPY" I



CLASSIFIEDS

Tuesday, June 7, 1966, The Florida Alligator,


real estate
I
ONLY USED by cool blonde to
drive to school. Great second car.
1961 powder blue 4-dQor SIMCA.
Excellent mileage, almost new
tires, clean, pure and virtuous.
$350. Call her husband after 6
p.m. 372-6772. (G- 140-2 t-c).
1963 PORSCHE. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. $2795. Will consider trade
on cheaper car or motorcycle.
372-7611. (G-140-ts-c).
*5
1958 IMPALA CONVERTIBLE.
New top. Runs good. S3OO or'make
offer. Call Tom, 376-6742. (G (G---1
--1- (G---1 3t-p).
1958 DODGE SEDAN. Good car.
$l5O or best offer. Student must
sell immediately. 2-6381, ask for
Judy. Rm. 2328. (G- 139-ts-c).
1959 STUDEBAKER LARK. New
tires, new brakes, 22 mpg, new
starter, new remanufactured en engine.
gine. engine. Call 372-6261 after 6 p.m.
(G- 139-3 t-c).
1959 TR-3. Good paint, tires, in interior.
terior. interior. $750. 932 SW 16th Ave.
372-6583. Also Lucas flamethrow flamethrowers.,
ers., flamethrowers., S2O. Pair Corvair radio, sls.
(G-139-2t-c).
1965 BARRACUDA, 273 V-8.
4-speed transmission, excellent
condition. Best offer accepted.
Call 376-9038. (G-133-ts-c).
1965 RED MUSTANG CONV. V-8,
4-speed. Call 378-1973 after 5 p.m.
(G-137-st-c).
real estate
______________
AVAILABLE FOR OCCUPANCY
Sept. Ist, on lease basis, furnished
4 bedroom, 2 bath home. Between
NW 22nd and 23rd St. S2OO per
mo. Call Anna Hinson, 378-2559.
(I-137-ts-c).
' l**
3 BR, 1-1/2 bath, central heating,
screened porch, air conditioner.
Beautifully landscaped, Highland
Court Manor. Pool privileges. FHA
mortgage, SII,BBO. SB6 a mo. 372-
5207. (I-140-ts-c).
. OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOCOOOOOOOOOOCf o
C H
THEATRE^?
mm ill jrjiiamj §
O000(j000000000u0000000000c010000c'c'
2 PM SPM 8 PM
NOW EVERYONE CAN SEE
THE MOST LOVERLY
MOTION PICTURE OF ALL TIME!
Winner of 8 li
Academy W #
Awards W
including f y nmr
Best Picture.
Iffiy HEPBURN-REX HARRISON B"
c' roooooooooooooooooooqooqcoooooooco
THEATRE
Goo60000oooo0ocooo0ooooonc>o v ,r > f > 1
1:33-3:03-5:14
iJ
dKPfIHP
TECHNICOLOR

autos
BARGAIN! Westmoreland Estates.
Spacious bright 3 BR, 2 bath home.
Exposed beams, electric kitchen,
screened porch. Beautiful trees,
walking distance to Littlewood.
A/C, CH, paved street, sewer.
$16,700. Call 372-0942 after 5.
(I-139-4t-c).
BLACK ACRES. Lovely 3 BR, 2
bath colonial ranch type. Fully
equipped kitchen, hardwood floors,
large closets and storage, screen
porch, patio, 4 yrs. old, paved
street. Leaving town. $22,000. 372-
8697. (1139-ts-c).
LOW DOWN PAYMENT to married
student or staff. Three bedroom,
1 bath. $13,200, shady fenced back backyard.
yard. backyard. Near campus, golf, pool. 121
NW 25th St. 376-8565.(1-131-tf-c).
THIRTEEN THOUSAND or less
will buy nine room house near
University and Finley on Quiet
wooded deadend street, with three
bedrooms, one bath, fireplace,
hardwood floors at 304 N. W. 24th
St. Ph. 372-9795. (I-138-ts-c).
r- 1 1
personal
THEOLOGY OF THE MODERN
WORLD. Lecture-Discussion Ser Series.
ies. Series. Thursday evening, 8 p.m. This
summer series is open to faculty
members, graduate students and
other members of the community
who are interested in a study of
the following theologians and se selected
lected selected works. June 9th: Etienne
Gilson: The Spirit of Medieval
Philosophy. Father Michael Gan Gannon.
non. Gannon. Place: Catholic Student Cen Center.
ter. Center. (J-140-lt-c).
VISIT GATOR GROOMER where
romance blooms. Next door to
Univ. P.O. Self-service and pro professional
fessional professional laundry and dry cleaning.
(J-l 31-ts-c).
services
*
IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios, 372-0300. (M (M---131-ts-c).
--131-ts-c). (M---131-ts-c).
Grand Opening. Everything half
price. FAMILY THRIFT STORE.
Renovated furniture. 202 SE Ist
Ave. Ph. 376-9255. (M- 137-ts-c).
WILL KEEP CHILDREN in my
home 5 days a week and week weekends.
ends. weekends. No age limit. Good refer references.
ences. references. Reasonable rates. 376-
5012. (M-140- 2t-c).
RUBYS ALTERATIONS. 1238 SW
3rd Ave. 376-8506. (M-132-ltf-c).
issssssssssssssssssss^
li£^l
v i/v
|
g GATOR) £
£ ADVERTISERS £
$ FOR THE g
51 BEST BUYS! £
rssssssssssssssssssssr.

Page 7

- >
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/ '
\ * *"*** ~**"V "gy **
*1 k?~ : .: *-Jt
- 4k. Hfjn* m
.V- mZ* /
£ **"Z, | y
*
Leadership
* 9
AN ADMIRABLE TRAIT, LEADERSHIP.
SOME HAVE IT, SOME DON'T. WE
HAVE, AT LEAST IN THE FIELD OF
SATISFYING OUR ADVERTISERS WITH
TANGIBLE RESULTS. WE'RE LEADERS
IN THIS FIELD BECAUSE ,OF OUR
READERSHIP, WHICH IS CONCENTRAT CONCENTRATED,
ED, CONCENTRATED, SPECIALIZED, AND MORE AF AFFLUENT
FLUENT AFFLUENT THAN YOU MIGHT THINK.
WE GET SEEN B'Y THOUSANDS OF
PEOPLE EACH ISSUE, AND OUR ADS
GET READ, TOO.
The
Florida

Alligator

A
* \



i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 7, 1966

Page 8

ISS WAUBURG
Miss Camp Wauburg, Linda Good, poses with
runnersup Linda Spencer (left) and Babs Bloom.

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GLUB

Wauburg Playday... What


Maybe they came because it was
free o
Maybe they came because it was
something to do on a hot summer
day.
Maybe they came to ogle the
pretty girls, but whatever com compelled
pelled compelled approximately 2,500 UF
students and faculty to come to
Wauburg Playday they had a
blast.
If they came, they saw some of
UFs loveliest coeds compete for
the Miss Camp Wauburg title.
They also saw a ski show, a sky
diving act, canoe jousts, a three threelegged
legged threelegged race -- well, you just name
it.
Wauburg Playday sounds like
a trite name but if you were
there you had a blast and you pro probably
bably probably made a mental note not to
miss it next year.


Alligator Photos
By Nick Arroyo

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Nick Arroyo managed to catch this breath-taking shot of the crowd at Playday a panorama of people at play.

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A DEAD HEAT
These UFers made a mad dash for the finish line in this
three-legged race, but they must have practiced too hard. They
ran dead heats twice before someone finally won. After running
such a race twice, the name dead heat would seem quite
apropos.

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Tuesday, June 7, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

i

Page 9



Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 7, 1966

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Cast members (from left) Carolyn Sadler, Sandy Shapiro, Jim Mooty
* and Carol Nurenberg apply grease-paint as Florida Players prepare
for Ladies in Retirement.
, j

Purkey Gets
Federal Aid
For Project
Dr. William W. Purkey of the UFs
College of Education has beer
awarded a U.S. Office of Educatior
grant of $9,577 for continuing
research on able, but underachieving
high school students.
The research An In Independent
dependent Independent Study Project for Gifted
Underachievers, investigates lack
of progress from the students point
of view. It provides Him with a series
of independent study experiences
which, according to Dr. Purkey,
"teach him more about himself and
his abilities. .to show him that he
really counts and that he is capable of
responsible independence and ac accomplishment.
complishment. accomplishment.
The project follows three guide guidelines:
lines: guidelines: keeps threat to a minimum
(there are no grades or time limits
and all materials are kept in con confidence),
fidence), confidence), provides maximumrespect
for the student (the project tries
to enhance the students positive
views of himself as a student) and
encourages the student to feel in involved
volved involved by dealing with pressing pro problems
blems problems as barriers to learning.
XEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, 10? ea.
20 & Over, 9?
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Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p-m.
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Players Prepare

Photos
fcy
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A bit of 19th century England will come alive June 8-11 when UFs
Florida Players present Ladies in Retirement, a play written by
English authors Edward Percy and Reginald Denham.
The play is a psychological melodrama dealing with a housekeeper
attempting to make a home for her two sisters whose minds are not
fully developed. The housekeeper must murder her actress-employer
to provide this home.
Five university students and two local housewifes will play the parts.
The maid will be played by junior Sandra Shapiro. The actress will be
portrayed by Mrs. Mary King Humphrey; the housekeeper will be played
by Mrs. Betty Jo Edwardson. The only male in the cast will be junior
Jim Mooty, the housekeepers nephew.
The two sisters will be played by sophomore Carol Nurenberg and
junior Carolyn Sadler. The part of the nun will be portrayed by junior
Barbara Schwartz.
Dr. Donald R. Henry, who directs this production, will be remem remembered
bered remembered for The Knight ofthe Burning Pestle, She Stoops to Conquer
and last summers Rain.
Curtain time for the June 8 and June 9 performances in Norman Hall
Auditorium will be 7:30 p.m. Performances on June 10 and June 11
will begin at 8 p.m.
Admission to students with University identification cards is free.
General public admission is 85 cents and high school student tickets
cost 55 cents. Ticket purchases began Monday at the Norman Hall
box office.
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Fuzzy Humphrey adjusts a lighting fixture so
everything will be just right for Ladies in Retire Retirement.
ment. Retirement.

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campus Calendar
PLEASE TURN IN ALL ITEMS FOR CAMPUS CALENDAR TO THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS OFFICE, FLA. UNION

I Tuesday Legislative Council: Last meeting
I June 7 of term 3A. Caucuses at 7:00
r p.m. Student 204 FU, Deci Decii
i Decii sion 2OB FU.
Student Economy Committee: 210
FU. 4-6 p.m.
Karate Club: South end of Fla.
Gym. 5-7 p.m.
Union Board: 215 FU, 4:45 p.m.
Tuesday Evening Supper Club:
Presbyterian Student Center,
6:30 p.m.
Everyone single and over 21 in invited.
vited. invited. SI.OO.
University Symphony Orchestra:
Edward Troupin, conductor.
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Wrestling Club: South end of Fla.
Gym, 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday Sec. of Married Student Affairs:
June 8 123 FU, 5:30-7 p.m.
Florida Players: Ladies in Re Retirement;
tirement; Retirement; Norman Hall Aud.,
7:30 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society: 212
FU, 7 p.m.
Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity: 116
FU, 7:30 p.m.
Childrens Ceramic Classes: FU
Craft Shop, 9:00 a.m. Register
at FU Craft Shop. Ages 8-11.
8 sessions sB. Instructor:
Sally Baker.
Twilight Summer Band Concert:
Robert Foster, conductor. Plaza
of the Americas, 6:45 p.m.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellow-
ship: 4th Floor, Main Library
(at top of stairs), 5:10 p.m.
Prayer Meeting.
Craft Shop Special Sessions:
Block Printing, FU Craft*
Shop, 7:30 p.m. No registration.
t
General Notices
LECTURE-DISCUSSION SERIES: Theology
of the Modern World is the topic of a series
of weekly lectures-discussions open to faculty
members, graduate students and other members
of the community who are interested in a study
of theologians and selected works. The first
of the lecture-discussion series will be The
Spirit of Medieval Philosophy, on Thursday,
June 9. at 8 D.m. at the Catholic Student Center.

I CASH
I AVAILABLE
I $25 to S6OO
I PAYDAYSHORT TERMS
|376-5333

BLUE BULLETIN

Arts & Science Dames: Pool Party
at Pinehurst Trailer Park. Mrs.
Pat Srpith, 2484.
Phi Alpha Theta: 324 FU, 7-11 p.m.
Thursday Florida Players: Ladies in Re-
June 9 tirement; Norman Hall Aud.,
7:30 p.m.
Christian Science Organization:
FU Aud., 5:15 p.m.
Karate Club: South end of Fla.
Gym, 5-7 p.m.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellow Fellowship:
ship: Fellowship: 4th Floor, Main Library
(at top of stairs), 5:10 p.m.
Prayer Meeting.
Wrestling Club: South end of Fla.
Gym, 4:30 p.m.
Forestry Club: Austin Cary For Forest,
est, Forest, 6:30 p.m. Director Gray will
speak. Movie on fishing will also
be shown.
Others MENSA; Daily, reserved section,
west wing, Main Cafeteria. For
information on membership,
contact Mike Sipe, 8-4950 or
305-21 Diamond Village. Stu Students
dents Students and faculty invited.
FU European Tour: June 21-Au 21-August
gust 21-August 15, 8 weeks 5310.00.
$125.00 deposit at 315 FU.
FU Trip to St. Augustine: July 9.
Leave 12 noon; tour city and
see Cross and Sword, SB.OO.
For reservations call ext. 2741.
FU Trip to August
15-22. $255.00 per person. For
information come by or call 315
FU, ext. 2741. Sign upat3lsFU.
FU Box Office: Noon 4:30 p.m.,
Philadelphia Orchestra, Florida
Players, and BYU Startime tick tickets
ets tickets available.
.
The speaker will be Father Michael Gannon
of the Chapel of Santa Maria in St. Augustine.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
JUNE 8,9: UNION BAG-CAMP PAPER CORP.
Bus. Admin., Acctg., ChE, ME, IE, Chem.,
Forestry.
JUNE 10: HUBER, HUNT & NICHOLS, INC.
CE. CHARLESTON NAVAL SHIPYARD --
NE, EE, ChE, ME.

LOANS
VACATION %y 0
Marion Finance Co.

ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE, CAMPUS

r-fir Musical Scene =
VJp 1*777/ /?£/£> POOLE
Three outstanding concerts are scheduled for the final two weeks
of the Trimester 111-A on the University of Florida campus.
Tuesday, June 7, the University Summer Symphony, conducted by
Edward Troupin, presents a free concert in University Audit Auditorium
orium Auditorium at 8:15.
Troupin has chosen a most delightful summer program for the
University Summer Symphonys concert on Tuesday, June 7. The
first half of the concert will be devoted to Schuberts melodious
Rosamunde Overture and the sprightly Symphony No. 92 in G
Major, nicknamed the Oxford symphony, by Franz Josef Haydn.
Following the intermission, the orchestra will play one of Wagners
most serene inspirations, the Siegried- Idyll, and two bumptious
dance episodes from the ballet Rodeo, by Aaron Copland.
Friday evening, June 10, at 8:15 in University Auditorium, the
University Sumner Choir, conducted by Guy B. Webb, will present
Gian Carlo Minottis delightful work, The Unicorn, the Gorgon,
and the Manticore. Admission for this concert is also free and
everyone is cordially invited to attend.
Gian Carlo Menotti wrote both the words and the music for the
cycle of madrigals which make up his The Unicorn, the Gorgon,
and the Manticore. Although the composition was originally writ written
ten written for chorus, ten dancers, and nine instruments, the University
Choir will present the work in a choral setting. The thirty-voice
select group will be accompanied by Mildred Koger in three of
the madrigals.
Critics have praised the contemporary choral work written in
the style of the early madrigals. After its premiere in Washington,
D.C. in 1956 and in New York in 1957, Life Magazine wrote,
Menottis music, more than anything else, made The Unicorn
the seasons best ballet.
The story revolves around the Man in the Castle (The Poet) who
on three seperate Sundays, promenades a Unicorn, a Gorgon, and a
Manticore. Each time the townsfolk stop to starescandalized,
fascinated, envious. On hearing the animals have each met a sudden
death, the townsfolk march on the castle to stop the hideous crimes."
There they find the Poet dying with his animals, representing youth,
manhood, and old age. In the Poets heart they have remained in intact,
tact, intact, for they were the very essence of his life. The entire meaning
of the fable is contained in the final madrigal, Oh, Foolish
People.
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
As a resounding climax to the concert season, the world-re world-renowned
nowned world-renowned Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted by Stanislaw Skroewc Skroewczewski,
zewski, Skroewczewski, will appear in Florida Gym Tuesday evening, June 14,
at 8:15, under the sponsorship of the University Student Government
through its Lyceum Council. Tickets for the Philadelphia concert
are $2.00 for all UF students and $3.00 for all non-UF students.
Tickets are on sale at the Florida Union Box Office, at the Record
Bar, and at Belk-Lindseys in the Shopping Center. For mail
orders, please send check and stamped, self-addressed envelope
to Florida Union Box Office, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida 32601. Seats for the Philadelphia Orchestra are in re reserved
served reserved sections so that the earlier you obtain your tickets the
better your seating section will be.

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Tuesday, June 7, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

MONEY
AVAILABLE
Up to S6OO
POR YOUR SECOND CAR

222 W. University Ave.

THE
SMOOTH
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By
Formfit/Rogers
Ask to see
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STORE HOURS:
9:30-6:00 Daily
2401 SW 13th St.

Page 11



!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 7, 1966

Page 12

Job CorpsNow Start For Hard Luck Kids

By TERRY-ANN GANNETT
ALLIGATOR STAFF WRITER
He was a high school dropout -- constantly being
tosses from one foster home to another.
He had probably tried his hand at more than one
job, but unskilled labor gets laid off all toooften.
Today, Danny McLester, 19, returned home with
the equivalent of a high school diploma, experience
in on-job training as an automobile mechanic and
the promise of a good job in Tampa.
This is the Job Corps.
Russell W. Hurd, youth counselor for the Florida
State Employment Service in Gainesville, said
McLester is a good example of what happens when
someone from this area is sent to the Job Corps.
There are three million jobs in the U.S. begging
for qualified workers, yet there are two million
people unemployed, Hurd exmplained. The Job
Corps is an attempt to fill this need for skilled
personnel and at the same time take young people
out of unpleasant environmental conditions and give
them a chance to make something of themselves.
In operation only about two years, the Corps
already is handling over 40,000 boys and girls from
all over the country.
As a federal organization, the Job Corps is handled
through state employment agencies. In Gainesville,
the Florida State Employment Service is located at
315 SE 2nd Ave.
The first qualification for Job Corps training is
age. Boys and girls from 16 to 21 who have; been
out of school for three months are eligible. They
must plan to stay at the Job Corps center for a
minimum of three months. The maximum time
allowed at a center is two years.
Hurd said applicants are first given a pre-screen pre-screening
ing pre-screening form. It includes age, physical and behavioral
status.
Physical and behavioral status are quite im important,
portant, important, he explained. The Job Corps is not the
place for the physically handicapped or theemotion-

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TTie Peace Corps offers no magic wand, but for boys and girls like
this, it can be a beacon of hope in an otherwise dark world.
. l^^fcu*
ally disturbed. 4.
From a list of nine categories the applicant must score in five to
be eligible for training. These include overcrowded family conditions,
transient family, unskilled parents and living in a poverty-stricken
9.1*62L
There are no poverty-stricken areas designated as such around
Gainesville, Hurd said, but where an applicant lives is a pretty
good indication of the type of environment he comes from.
When an applicant is accepted at this stage, his name is sent to
Tallahassee. Within five days his assignment is returned to Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville.
The applicant may be assighed to any one of 100 Job Corps centers
in the United States.
One important aspect of the program is that the government also
supplies a monetary compensation for trainees while they are at the
center.

For each month someone is at the center, SSO goes
into savings for him. If he qualifies, he may send $25
of this home to dependents, which the government
will match.
What is life like at the center? The primary func function
tion function of the Corps is to educate and train, Hurd
emphasized.
With a ratio of five students to one teacher,
trainees receive individual attention.
It is a new way of teaching, Hurd explained.
These youngsters have already proven they cannot
gain from instruction in the ordinary public school
method.
Hurd mentioned that the government is presently
analyzing this system to find possible applications
which might benefit the public schools.
Schooling is completed through the same high
school diploma equivalency test administered to the
armed forces.
When feasible, students are encouraged to go on
to college. Several have received scholarships and
continued their education, Hurd said.
While at the center, students receive specialized
training in some field such as automobile mechanics
or other skilled labor. The Corps is instrumental
in finding trainees a job after they leave the center.
All is not peaches and cream at the center,
explained Hurd. It is run like the army. You get
up when it's time to get up, eat when it's time to
eat, go to school when its time to go to school.
But this is necessary to maintain discipline where
so many people are living together, and it should
be expected. 1
Its not rigid and strict, however, he added.
* J It is merely organized and planned.
So much public criticism has been levied at
the program. You begin to wonder if the Corps
is right. But when I pick someone up at the airport
whos returning from the experience, like Danny
McLester, I know it cant be all wrong.



voting Problems? Try Marriage

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Photo by Nick Arroyo
ELIGIBLE TO VOTE?
Being married, these UF students have a better chance to qualify
r voting in Alachua County than do their unhitched classmates,
lys County Election Supervisor Alma Bethea.

Gator Ads...uh...Go-G0!

V '" '-. 1 1 ~..
£&
Vrf |R> w. 4%
I*|| 1% The Man from
ISll'T Interwoven*
She worked for H.E.E.L., the world-
Ijjj. And she always wore a sweater
|| Now R wanted that stitch-even
% I sweater with her still in it! I
IMpifcgb* : 8851^
9 V jjSS WJ&

By ERNIE REHDER
ALLIGATOR STAFF WRITER
UF students--If you want to vote in Alachua County
your best bet is to get married.
According to Alachua County Election Supervisor
Alma Bethea, married students have a better chance
to register in Alachua County than do their single
counterparts.
Mrs. Bethea pointed out that under Florida law
the place where a married man and his family resides
is generally deemed to be his permanent domicile.
According to the Florida Constitution, a person who
wants to become a voter must take up permanent
residence in Florida for one year and in the county
where he wishes to vote for six months.
This is complicated because the potential voter must
show intent to make his residence permanent. Ac According
cording According to Mrs. Bethea, being married might tend to
show permanence.
The difficulty in determining intent or purpose is
due to vague laws covering such cases, she explained.
Most students come to Alachua County for special or
temporary reasons. Under the law, this makes them in ineligible
eligible ineligible to vote here.
Students who feel they are qualified to register in
Alachua County should contact the county supervisors
office in the Courthouse Building before October 8 for
the November general election, she said.

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iP::iHHHIHfIHBHHfIHHHHIHHKI]IBHI
Veterans
Schwartz and Bill McCormick, as student
coordinators for the Robert King High organization
since 1964, have been witness to all the growing
pains of the organization.
A Look At
Early High
By ERNIE LITZ
ALLIGATOR STAFF WRITER
In February 1964 it was already High time.
At least for Marty Schwartz and Bill McCormick,
it was.
The two UF law students then met Miami Mayor

Robert King High in Gainesville
and were immediately impressed
with him and his sincerity, accord according
ing according to Schwartz. They became stu student
dent student coordinators for the UF and
worked throughout the state with
county and local organizations for
High.
Schwartz pointed out that at the
early stages of the '64 campaign
the High organization was not a
massive well-led affair. "At the
time, Schwartz says, "there were
only about five or ten active people
in North Florida working for
High.
McCormick singled out the early
members as including then-UFer
Howard Glicken, Gainesville edu educators
cators educators Oscar Servin and Eckrol
Olsen, and local businessman Nat
Pozin. 1
-Schwartz recalled some of
early mix-ups due to the lack of
a large organization. We were
sort of jacks-of-all-trades then.
We did everything from put up
signs to writing newspaper ads.
"At one point we met the High
Bandwagon with Mrs. (Faith) High
in Lake City and then discovered
we lacked the funds to pay for the
gas to get the bandwagon moving
again.
McCormick said that the band bandwagon
wagon bandwagon did eventually get rolling
again, though.
"In the 64 election Highs North
Florida headquarters were in our
living room where we stored all
the campaign literature and
signs, he added.
The 66 effort first began on a
sunny day last December in Mi Miami
ami Miami when Schwartz and McCormick
met with many of the people in the
state High organization.
McCormick stated "Everyone
was real enthusiastic and there
was a real change in the structure
of the organization. It was a much
better coordinated, tight-knit
group.
"Working here in Gainesville
was perhaps the easiest place in
the state, he continued, "because
of the UF and its place in Mayor
Highs proposals for education.
Schwartz singled out Kelly stu student
dent student supporters for High in the
second primary as Eddie Kay,
Dan Meserve, and county chiefs
Windy Wilkerson and Bob Saun Saunders.
ders. Saunders.
The regular High organization
at the UF and in Alachua County
was headed by student members
Leon Polhill, Clyde Taylor, Ernie
Litz and George Swinford.



, t The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 7, 1966

Page 14

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gator year
IN REVIEW
The 1965-66 Gator sports year has come
and gone, leaving behind memories of triumph
and defeat, joy and sadness, fulfillment and
frustration.*
In the coming weeks, Alligator sports editor
Jeff Denkewalter and staff writers Alan Burton
and Tyler Tucker will try to recapture some
of the more memorable moments of the past
sports year byway of pictures and words.
Football, basketball, baseball, track, and
all the other varsity sports which comprised
the 1965-66 Gator sports year will be covered
in detail. The title for this vast undertaking --
Gator Year In Review.
The three photos at left show the first touch touchdown
down touchdown scored on Florida Field turf last season.
In the first picture Gator defensive halfback
Allen Trammell (number 23 in white) picks up
the football after a fake field goal by Wayne
Barfield (number 48) and starts around the
onrushing Mississippi State defenders
In photo number two, Trammell turns on
the speed at the Bulldog twenty to elude sever several
al several would-be tacklers.
In the final picture, Trammell bulls his way
over the last two Mississippi State defenders
to give the Gators an early lead. The moment
of glory, however, was short-lived as the
Bulldogs came back to hand the Gators their
first defeat of the season.

Gator Sports Briefs

Outfielder Skip Lujack of Braden Bradenton
ton Bradenton was the leading Florida hitter for
1965-66, according to final Gator
baseball statistics.
Lujack hit .348 with 40 hits in 115
trips to the plate. He led the team in
hits, doubles, total bases and was
second in runs-batted-in.
Top pitcher was Kelly Prior, who
finished 8-3 with a sparkling 1.54
earned run average. Prior and Ray
Rollyson both worked 93 and one onethird
third onethird innings to top the team in
this department.
Three Gators wound up hitting
over .300 for Coach Dave Fullers
23-12 club. Captain Jack Kenworthy
batted .322 and slugger Jim Frazier
hit .305 while topping the team in
triples and home runs with five of
-?ach, runs batted in with 39 and

1966 GATOR 14 Wm and Mary 1 £
£ BASEBALL RECORD 17 Wm and Mary 2
£ 2 Georgia 13 x
v 21 Georgia 7 £
Fla. Opp. 12 Auburn 4 £
x 4 Florida Southern 5 8 Auburn 2 £
£ 5 Miami 10 6 Furman 3 X;
£ 4 Miami 3 5 Miami 7 £
£ 6 Miami 5 3 Miami 1 £
£ 3 Florida Southern 1 9 Kentucky 5 xj
X* 8 Rollins 1 2 Tennessee 0 X
:$ 9 Rollins 8 4 FSU 16 :£
:£ 5 Vanderbilt 0 1 FSU } 0 -X
£l6 Vanderbilt 0 14 Rollins 3 £
S 5 Georgia 2 5 Rollins 2 £
x 1 Georgia 4 o FSU 1 £
4 Yale 10 0 FSU J 4 £
£ 4 Yale k 1 6 Jacksonville 2 £
X 5 Auburn 10 4 Jacksonville 2 £
X 1 Auburn A 3 Jacksonville 4 £
I i S SPENtT"* # )
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being second in doubles (seven) and
total bases (61).
First baseman Tom Shannon was
the leading base stealer with eight.
* *
University of Florida has signed
Lance Novak of Chicago, Illinois to
a tennis scholarship, head coach Bill
Potter announced today.
Novak has been team captain the
past two seasons and most valuable
player four consecutive years for
Luther North High. He was runnerup
in the Chicago Metropolitan Tourn Tournament
ament Tournament and won the Boys Western
Indoor Championship in 1964.
An excellent student, Novak plans
to study law at the University.



1966 FLORIDA
35-GAME
BASEBALL STATISTICS
v*
(23-12 Overall, 8-4 SEC)
g Batting Record >4
£ Player G AB R H 2B 3B HR TB SB RBI PCT. 44
4 Skip Lujack, OF 33 115 'lB 40 11 l 3 62 1 26 .348 g
Jack Kentworthy, C 28 90 18 29 11 0 32 7 8 .322 44
Rufus Frazier, OF 30 95 20 29 7 5 5 61 0 39 *305 4:
X Bruce Moore, 2B 35 119 27 33 6 1 3 50 1 24 .277 g
4 Dan Cushman, 3B 35 128 25 34 7 4 2 54 4 23 .266 g
44 David Hodges, SS 24 63 13 15 3 1 2 26 1 8 .238 g
44 Tommy Shannon, IB 29 92 19 20 2 0 2 28 8 14 .217 :?
44 Don Pendley, SS 26 74 20 15 2 1 0 19 7 3 .203 £
g Bill Blomgren, OF 32 100 14 19 0 1 0 21 2 13 .190 g
LESS THAN 45 AT BATS
44 Ed Gross, C 17 40 6 13 1 0 0 10 0 9 .325 g
44 Ed Woolfolk, P 11 10 0 3 000301 .300 g
44 Danny Griffin, P > 8 10 0 3 1 0 0 4 0 1 .300 g
Ray Rollyson, P 16 28 4 7 200802.250 g
Bob Hawkins, IB 15 28 3 6 1 0 0 7 0 4 .214 g
Adrian Zabala, P 11 16 23 100403 .188 g
Jack Withrow, OF 12 16 2 3 0 0 0 2 0 1 .188
4 Joe Bekeris, OF 15 14 7 2 0 0 0 2 3 1 .143 g
: Danny Orr, P 21 29 7 4 10 703 .138 g
: Kelly Prior, P 15 25 6 3 1 0 0 4 1 0 .120 g
Dan Dupree, P 220 0 000000 .000 g
PITCHING RECORDS
: Player -x
: : Kelly Prior 16 8-3 .727 93-1/3 16 62_ 37 62 1.54 g
i: Ray Rollyson 16 7-0 .538 93-1/3 33 77 30 66 3.19 g
j: Danny Orr 5 2-0 1.000 15 2 12 3 6 0.40 X X>
> X> Don Pendley 3 2-0 1.000 18 2 10 9 7 1.00 g
4Ed Woolfolk 6 1-1 .500 10 2 11 5 5 1.81 g
4 Dan Griffin 9 2-1 .667 26-1/3 10 23 4 23 3.42 g
4 Adrian Zabala 12 1-2 .333 37-1/3 28 49 22 23 7.80 g
4 Tom Shannon 1 0-0 .000 2/3 0 0 0 0 0.00 ;X
4 Gary Keller 1 0-0 .000 1/3 3 0 3 1 g

STUDENT DISCOUNT 40 %
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INFORMATION CALL 378-1966
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UF Athletes
Score High
The finest scholastic record ever
compiled by University of Florida
athletes was achieved in the recently
completed Winter Trimester, Di Director
rector Director of Athletics Ray Graves an announced
nounced announced recently.
This is a tribute to the high cal calibre
ibre calibre student-athlete taking part in
our program, said Graves.
Academically this is the best tri trimester
mester trimester weve ever had.
Overall, 43 Gator athletes made
3.0 or better out of a possible 4,0.
Os this group 13 were football
players. The grade point average of
the probable starting offensive foot football
ball football team was 2.41 and of the defen defensive
sive defensive team it was 2.54.
Football players making 3.0 or
above include Jim Benson (3.35),
Jack Coons (3.23), Steve Ely (3.23),
Sam Ford (3.25), Steve Heidt (3.00);
Don Knapp (3.11), Steve Koepke
(3.07), Bill Mcride (3.41), Dick
McCarl (3.66), Butch Poland (3.00),
Doug Splane (3.25), John Watson
(3.18), and John Whatley (3.60).
Other top Gator honor point
averages:
TrackJohn Alvarez, 3.93, Gary
Cavant, 3.66. TennisJoe Godfrey,
3.87, Jamie Pressley, 3.33.
BaseballJack Kenworthy, 3.75.

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ALLIGATOR SPORTS COLUMNIST
A Look Back
From the archives of mythology:
A gaunt man of thirty with smooth black hair handed the man
in the ticket booth a dollar. He pushed his way through the turn turnstile
stile turnstile and made his way along the asphalt drive to.the bleachers.
Taking a seat between two coeds, he took out his binoculars and
focused them on the pitcher who was taking his last warmup throw
to the catcher.
The night air was cool and gentle, brushing against his face.
He was a loyal Gator fan and having missed his train to Champion,
America, he was patient. The clear night with its glowing diamond
stars eased his irritation. He relaxed and watched the game.
Kelly Prior was pitching, looking for his ninth victory in a row.
The Gators always hit well when Prior was on the mound. But,
the entire pitching staff worked well at night; they liked hurling
under the lights. Their arms were loose and strong in the sooth soothing
ing soothing warmness of the April evenings.
A win tonight would stretch the Gators win streak to eighteen
games and would practically insure an SEC berth in the regional
NCAA tournament in Gastonia, N. C.
The infielders fired the ball around the skirt of the infield
grass. Danny Cushman, the third baseman, then handed the ball
to Prior and gave him an assuring pat on the back.
The Start
A loud, excited murmur echoed through the stands. A cheer
went up from the Sigma Chi block which was packed. Tem Temporary
porary Temporary seats followed the foul lines into the shadows, seating
the students who had not bought reserved tickets. Five thousand
students, the largest crowd of the season packed Perry Field.
The crowd roared as Prior fired a high, hard strike past the
Auburn leadoff batter.
The light towers flooded the field with light. Coach Dave Fuller
motioned centerfielder Rufus Frazier farther over in shallow
left center field.
Another resounding roar arose from the stands as Prior broke
a curve past the swinging hitter. Catcher Ed Gross rifled the
ball back to the pitcher.
Prior rocked into his windup and threw a sizzling fast ball by
the batter. Gross whipped the ball to Cushman who shuffled it
underhand to Dave Hodges at shortstop; the ball was thrown to
Bruce Moore at second base, to David Fuller at first, back to
Gross, to Cushman, and again to Prior.
The next batter for . . came over the speakers but was
lost in the shouts of the crowd. Students and dates were on their
feet clapping in anticipation of a conference championship.
Prior got the next two batters out on a grounder deep in the
hole at short where Hodges made the play and on a weak pop fly
to Moore on the edge of the outfield grass. The Gators hustled
to the dugout for the bottom of the first inning.
A Year Ago
Only a year ago the Gators had finished a pretty good season
winning 23, but losing 13. But this year, playing their first sea season
son season under the new lights of Perry Field, they had a 31-4 record.
Funds for the lights had been raised easily with the cooperation
of the Athletic Director, the alumni, the campus fraternities,
and friends of the university. Students had taken interest in the
fortunes of its baseball team and had turned out in large num numbers
bers numbers at every game.
The possibility of winning the national championship had shower showered
ed showered the university with spirit.
Bruce Moore stepped in the batters box. On the first pitch
he stroked a line drive into center field for a single.
Dave Hodges dug his cleats firmly in the clay. He took the
first pitch -a ball. The next pitch was high -- ball two. He
watched the next two pitches go by-- both strikes, leveling
the count to two balls and two strikes. On the next pitch he hit
a bloop single into right field, sending Moore to third.
The crowd roared.
Shouts of encouragement went up when Skip Lujack came to bat.
He was hit by the first pitch. He trotted to first base to load the
bases.
Rufus Frazier, the left-handed hitting cleanup hitter, was at bat.
Pandemonium broke out in the stands. The fans were screaming
for victory. The din rose and rose into a deafening thunder.
The Climax
It was here in the first inning -- the beginning that would
make the difference.
Frazier took a smooth swing and lifted the fast ball high into
right field. The towering drive soared. The rightfielder went
back, back -- deep into right field. He stood against the fence
next to the 380 ft. sign waiting for the ball. It disappeared over
his head -- and over the fence.
It was a grand slam.

Tuesday, June 7, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Doughty Doug
East Lansing, Mich. (UPI) Doug
Roberts, Michigan States star
hockey center, was the highest point
scorer in the schools history.
Roberts also was named to the 1965
All-American team selected by the
American Hockey Coaches Assoc Association.
iation. Association.
GAtop AOs Sell!
CALL UF EX: 2832
For Specialized Service

Page 15



Page 16

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 7, 1966

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