Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Vol. 58, No. 138

Buchwald Captivates Audience

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THE CONFRONTATION
Art Buchwald seems to be having words with his UF presidential
campaign manager, Alligator columnist Jim Moorhead. Buchwald
kicked off his campaign in University Auditorium Thursday night
before a crowd of better than 1,500.
BULLETIN*
Art Buchwald announced while here, for release today,
he will not run for President. A national poll showed
the country is prejudiced--not against his religion but
his shape. Voters have not backed a fat man for Pre President
sident President since William Howard Taft drove food bills in
the White House to gastronomical heights. Mr. Buch Buchwald
wald Buchwald has instead decided to secure a Supreme Court
appointment so he can spend the rest of his life read reading
ing reading dirty books and getting paid for it. J Moorhead
BROCHURE READY

ACCENT Comes To Life

by STEVE SMITH
Managing Editor
ACCENT, UKs symposium on
vital issues, will have its first
tangible sign of life later this week.
About 3,000 brochures presenting
the ACCENT idea will be ready
tomorrow or Thursday.
Planned for January 19, 20, and
21, the symposium will invite a
varied array of .speakers for a
program of lectures, debates, and
discussion. The theme of the pro program
gram program will be The Responsibility
of Dissent.
The brochure will serve as an
introduction to the symposium idea
and the theme. ACCENT will be
the first such event to be held at
UF, although similar symposiums
have been held at other colleges,
mainly in the north, for a number
of years.
Copies of the brochure will be
distributed in dorms and fraternity

Wife Iflortba alligator

houses in limited numbers. The
main purpose of the publication,
however, is to sell ACCENT
to news men and potential speakers.
According to John Hitch, chair chairman
man chairman of the speakers committee
for ACCENT, no speakers have
been invited yet. He said he is
considering a number of national
figures and that the committee
expects to obtain at least several
men of the stature of Richard
Nixon, Barry Goldwater, James
Farmer, and Clark Kerr.
Ritch said that the ACCENT
program will include speakers
from as many fields as possible.
The committee is particularly in interested
terested interested in having representative
personalities from the areas of
education, politics, religion and the
liberal arts.
The ACCENT executive
committee has been working in the
planning stages since April, when

University of Florida

by 808 MENAKER
Executive Editor
Im not getting paid for this
performance, Art Buchwald told
a crowd of more than 1,500 Thurs Thursday
day Thursday night in University Auditorium.
All the money you paid to see
me is going to The Alligator.
Buchwald, whose column is syn syndicated
dicated syndicated in more than 300 news newspapers,
papers, newspapers, started with a quip and
ended with a quip as he kept the
audience laughing for over an hour.
He spoke on his favorite topic,
Buchwald At Large, touching
on everything from college sex to
the great blackout.
I was pretty nervous about
coming here after reading how
unsafe cars are, he said. My
wife and I decided to make a
pact. We fly on the same plane,
but we take different cars.
Buchwald, a high school drop
out at 16, related how the Univer University
sity University of Southern California (USC)
recently named him as its Alum Alumnus
nus Alumnus of the Year.
I dropped out of school at 16
and joined the Marines. When I got
out of the service I decided it
wouliil be nice to have a high
school diploma, he related. I
got in line at USC to take some
night courses for my high school
diploma. By the time I reached
the end of the line I was enrolled
as a freshman at USC.
He stayed three years at USC
and in his own words had a ball.
4
From the USC campus Buchwald
made his way to Paris, where he
wrote a night club and movie
review column for the Paris edition
of the New York Herald Tribune.
I was pretty tough on the Frepch
films, he said. After all, I
couldnt understand the language.
Occasionally some of my col columns
umns columns get into Pravdaorlzvestia,
Buchwald com mented, Especially
when I attack LBJ. I understand,
however, that they lose something
in the translation.
When the State Department com complain
plain complain e d to Buchwald that the
Russians were using some of his
columns, heretorted:Stopthem!
Buchwald explained to the House
Un-American Activities Com Committee

student body president Buddy Ja Jacobs
cobs Jacobs appointed Charles Shepherd
and Bill Haverfield as' chairman
and assistant chairman. Other
members of the executive com committee,
mittee, committee, selected by Shepherd and
Haverfield, are Ritch, Steve
Schultz, Wayne Rich, Steve Smith,
Mike Dowling, Dr. Raymond Fahien
and Dean Franklin Doty.
Two additional committee mem members
bers members were added by leg council
when it passed on the charter for
ACCENT, but these two have not
begun to lunction with the com committee
mittee committee as yet.
Up to this point the committees
accomplishments have been limited
to preliminary problems such as
scheduling, location, and budgeting.
With the publication of the bro.-
chure, though, ACCENT can be
presented to the public and the
committee will begin inviting
speakers.

mittee Committee that he really is working
for the CIA.
My column is a code, he said.
Every third word means some something
thing something to our agents behind the Iron
Curtain.
It may come as a surprise
to you, Buchwald commented,
but I do make up all my material.
Some of it comes true and thats
what scares you.
As an example, Buchwal 1 pointed
out that Canadians complained re recently
cently recently the U. S. was ignoring
the m, (before the recent sex
scandal, that is.)
I thought they were going to
do something drastic, like build a
wall or drop pamphlets on Minne Minnesota,
sota, Minnesota, he said. I was right. Two
weeks later they blew out every
light in the Northeast United
States.
Buchwald, a man who describes
himself as chicken in the battle
between Washingtons doves and
hawks, told how he volunteered to
join the Peace Corps.
I was all set to go among the
natives on the Riveria, he ex explained,
plained, explained, to live half-naked, to

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KEEP COOI
£ There are many ways to keep cool this summer, >:|
: and UFers will be using a great many of them X
x ; Somehow, though, getting ice in ones face doesnt ::
>: seem appealing. Ah well, anything for the sake of ::
x a picture. (Staff photo be Nick Arroyo.) X
Tickets To Go On Sale
For 'Ladies In Retirement
Tickets for the Florida Players production of Ladies in
Retirement will be available at the Florida Union ticket office
starting June 2.
The tickets are free to students upon presentation of their
ID card.
On Tune 2 and 3, and again on June 6-10, the tickets will be
available from 12 to 4 p.m.
The play will start in the Norman Hall Auditorium on June
8 at 7:30 p.m. The first two days of the production, the play
will start at 7:30 p.m., and for the two final days, June 10 and
11, the play will start at 8 p.m.

Tuesday, May 31, 1966

drink the native wines, to help
them in their wretched existence.
They turned me down, he
lamented. Sargent Shriver had
already applied for the job.
Buchwald turned next to politics,
explaining that the press was really
unfair to Barry Goldwater in 1964.
We quoted him, Buchwald
cracked.
Goldwater said our missiles
were no good. McNamara said
they were, added Buchwald. My
plan would have solved the
problem. Put Goldwater in a
rowboat in the middle of the Pa Pacific
cific Pacific and have McNamara fire a
missile at him. If it hit, then
clearly Barry was wrong.
The first person I heard from
was McNamara who said simply:
lll do it.
Buchwald also gave the audi audience
ence audience the inside dope on how LBJ
selected Hubert Humphrey as his
running mate.
(See BUCHWALD, Pagell)



Campus
News
Briefs ~
UNION DISPLAY
Ancient 18th and 19th century Baroque paintings and plaques
by Mexican folk artists and craftsmen will be on exhibit in the
North Wing Gallery of the University of Florida Union, June
1-30.
The Paintings, or Santos as they are rightfully called, are
statues of the peoples beloved saints. The Santeros painted them
with whatever objects would give them color.
The hanging plaques, usually made of wood, are known in art
circles as Retablos. These are of famous people, holy works
and saints.
VETERANS CLUB
The Veterans Club will meet June 2, at 7:30 p.m. in the
Florida Union Auditorium. Applications for GI benefits are
available and new memberships will be accepted. There will
also be a question and answer session on recent VA rulings.
SCHOLARSHIP WINNER
J. Douglas Canfield of Washington, D. C., has been awarded
a two-year U. S. Steel Foundation scholarship for study in UFs
Department of English.
Canfield will begin studying for his doctorate degree next
September and will receive $2,400 each year.
The U. S. Steel Foundation scholarship represents a renewal
of a fellowship which has been awarded in the past.
Canfield, 25, received his bachelors degree from Notre Dame
University and holds masters, degrees from Yale University
and John Hopkins University.
AFA DAMES
The June meeting of Architecture and Fine Arts Dames will
be a pool party at Lakeshore Towers as guests of the sponsor,
Mrs. J. T. Lendrum. Swimming will be after a short meeting
at 8:00 Tuesday, June 7. Members are asked to bring 10 cents
to help defray the cost of refreshments. If a ride is needed, call
372-7145.
JOURNALISM DAMES
Journalism and Communication Dames Meeting to be held at
the home of Mrs. W. R. Glafcke, 1514 N. E. 14th St., Wednesday,
June 1 at 8 p.m. Guest speaker will be Dr. George A. Dell.
Prospective members are cordially invited to attend.
BABYSITTING SERVICE 1
Babysitting service for married UF students is available
agaip this trimester through the Secretary of Labors office.
For the summer trimester the Secretary of Labors office
will be open Monday through Friday from 2 to 5 p.m. Couples
interested in the service should contact the office at phone 376-
3261, extension 2547.
The following babysitters are available to couples desiring
a babysitter when the office is closed:
Mrs. E. R. Chesser 376-6887, Mrs. Padgett 378-2887,
Lois Njus (news) 378-3776, Allen Soden 375-2776, Jean
Martin 372-6381, Myra Combs 372-3621, Jane Lawrence
372-3621, Elizabeth Summerall 372-6381, Diane Kenney 378-
3351, Molly Cummings 372-6381, Barbara Tisdale 376-9093
Diane Ennis 378-3351, Cathy Bills 372-3621, Kerolyn Kline-
376-2052, Mrs. R. Romero 376-0819, Louise Kimble 372-
6381, Mrs. Ruth Fugua- 376-8808 and Janice Williams 372-3045.
J Ask The D I
Student- I I
I Who I
TO ALL STUDENTS M I
I wH*/ AND UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL t|
[lf "T&jfciSLe
I 'V CAFETERIA I
to revls or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment (or any advertisement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible (or more than one Incorrect insertion o( an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices lor correction must be given be(ore next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is t*ve OflKlil student newspaper o( ihc University of Florida and Is
published live times weekly except during Miy, June, and July when It Is published strni-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator is entered as second class
matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

UF Students Piny For Pay

When the 1966 season of the
outdoor drama, Cross and
Sword, opens in St. Augustine
on June 28, 10 UF students and
four staff members will be among
100 persons involved with the
production.
\For the students, this play will
provide experience in their future
vocations and a salary supported
by the Higher Education Act of

Alumni Contributions Soar
Contributions to UFs Alumni Association 1966 Loyalty Fund drive
soared past the 20 per cent mark this week with more than $42,000
in gifts since the April 1 kickoff breakfast here.
Alvin V. Alsobrook, Loyalty Fund coordinator, said $42,288 has
been provided by 2,335 donors.
We feel we have made a good start with the amount already
collected, Alsobrook said, but we have a long way to go in reaching
our goal of $175,000
It is through these contributions that our university supplements
its budgeted monies. The University cannot meet the needs of today
adequately, nor will it be able to do so in the future, without help
from alumni and friends. The Loyalty Fund drive gives alumni the
chance to help their university, Alsobrook noted.
Support for the Loyalty Fund is solicited personally by volunteers
in each alumni club area throughout Florida, as well as within
organizations in Atlanta and Savannah, Ga.; New Orleans, La.; New
York, N. Y., and Washington, D. C.
The 1965 drive produced $129,723 from 8,910 contributors. Also Alsobrook
brook Alsobrook said the Association is optimistic at least 10,000 alumni will
yield the $175,000 target amount.
The Alachua County Alumni Club leads 36 other organizations
in Florida with 739 donors and $14,056 collected. The Alachua group
already has surpassed its 1965 total of $13,842 which came from 1,022
persons.
Projects financed by Loyalty Fund gifts are programs for which
federal and state tax money is not available to the University. These
include CLASP (Coordinated Local Alumni Scholarship Program),
the John J. Tigert Alumni Chair of Distinction and the Dollars
for Scholars plan.
Under CLASP, outstanding freshman and junior college transfer
students are given $260 tuition grants to attend Florida for two
trimesters. The scholarships are given to students selected by their
local clubs. More than 60 students have benefitted from this assistance
since 1965.

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THREE CAMPUS TRADITIONS
IVV WEEJONS OONIOAN'S Bir 1 W
DONIGANS
FR6-2338 BtL Ilk I
1123 W. Uiiv. flve. II

1965. Under Title IV of this act,
the federal government will supply
$9 for every $1 paid by the
employer to students participating
under the Work-Study Program.
This arrangement is available
fgr acceptable non-profit projects
of public service. Cross and
Sword was approved by the
Florida Board of Regents and sent
to Washington for final authori authorization.
zation. authorization.

Work-Study Program partici participants
pants participants must meet certain require requirements
ments requirements of the Higher Education Act
(family income and need), as well
as provisions outlined by the
University. The University
requires that all participantsiiave
a 2.0 scholastic average a ha that
they have been enrolled at the
University for a minimum of two
full trimesters during the pre previous
vious previous year.
Cross and Sword reflects the
founding of St. Augustine and is
directed by Dr. Leland L. Zimmer Zimmerman,
man, Zimmerman, associate professor in the
Universitys Department ofSpeech
and director of theatre.
University Choir Director El Elwood
wood Elwood Keister serves as director of
music for the production. Michael
Beistle, English instructor in Uni University
versity University College, and his wife
Margaret, a resident counselor in
Rawlings Hall, also will participate
in Cross and Sword.
Work on the production will begin
June 6 with the first performance
scheduled at 8:15 p.m. June 28.
Cross and Sword will be pre presen
sen presen te d nightly except Mondays
through Sept. 4.
Reserved tickets are $3, general
admission is $2 and children (6-12)
will be admitted at half-price.
Children under six accompanied by
their parents will be admitted free.
Advance requests for reserved
seats only are available by writing
to Cross and Sword, P. O. Box
1965, St. Augustine. Checks or
money orders must accompany
reservation requests.
University students participating
in Cross and Sword under the
Work-Study Program are: Frances
Watkins, CarlStrano, David Hutch Hutchins
ins Hutchins on, Linda Mills, Patricia
Anderson, Gerald Rhodes, Sherry
Penn, Steen Johansen and Charles
Harper El.



ok, dear!
( Jtor pizza M
after the flick.
FOR A PERFECT DATE ANYTIME*
TAKE HER T 0...
/O \
M # ITALIAN AMERICAN
# /gM IIS CUISINE
2204 SW 13th St.
Phone 376-1867
Sun.-Thur. 5-11 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 5-12 p.m.
/ / *THAT IS, ANYTIME EXCEPT MONDAYS.
L/ WERE CLOSED THEN.

Want some
good answers
to some
big questions
about your
future?
I Sign up how I
I for an on-campus interview with IBM I
I June 6-7 I
1 If you ask well tell all. About How many plants Jabs and Once youve heard the answers, I
I go-places careers with IBM. technical centers does IBM have? youll probably have one more
I About opportunities in such areas Where are they? And what kind question:When can I start? I
1 as basic and applied research of choice do I have Whatever your area of study, I
device, new product and What about creative freedom for ask us how you might use your I
programing systems develop- the engineer and scientist at IBM? particular talent at IBM. Job I
I ment-and manufacture of pace- what about rewards-financial opportunities at IBM lie in eight I
setting equipment using the and otherwise? major career fields: (1) Research
I latest technologies. and Development, (2) Engineering, I
1 You could begin by firing these vours for (3) Manufacturing, (4) Finance 1
I questions at the IBM interviewer: ue 1 and Administration, (5) Marketing, I
I l. i nociciM the asking. So donit miss you (6) Field Engineering, (7) Systems I
How many technologies is IBM IBM interview. V.sit your place- Engineering, (8) Programing. IBM 1
I active in? ment office and sign up now. is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 1
How can IBM keep me If for any reason you cant make it
technologically hot through- on campus, feel free to visit
out my career? your nearest IBM branch office. B PJ Iwfl
Or write: Manager of College
8 Relations, IBM Corporate Head- fi
9 quarters, Armonk, NkY. 10504. m
A

The Film
Notebook

The tortures of a man running
away from the mob predominates
as the theme of Mickey One.
Mickey One, marvelously inter interpreted
preted interpreted by Warren Beatty and
producer-director Arthur Penn,
is a comic taken over by the un unseen,
seen, unseen, yet omnipotent force of the
underworld. He finds himself in
debt to them with his life as the
price. In the early footage, we see
him talking with his employer
Ruby Lapp (Franchot Tone), trying
to find out just how much he owes,
and not being able to find a mone monetary
tary monetary price. His decision to run
away comes as an impulse to
JxEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, 10? ea.
20 & Over, 9?
Copies Made While You Walt
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AYE

by Reuben Ellis

escape, while Ruby yells after him
that this is impossible.
The paranoia of a man fleeing,
afraid of everything and everyone
is brutally placed before us. We
have the dereliction and dispair
of the Chicago bowery; the struggle
of his mind as fear creeps in at
every step, every turn. Finally he
decides to try to work as a comic
in a cheap nightclub. He hires an
agent (Teddy Hart) in order to get
a job and finds a small measure
of success. The initiative of his
agent to bring him bigger and
better things, brings back the
shadow of fear and anguish.
True to the axiom that behind
every good man stands a woman,
is Jenny (Alexandra Stewart). Her
warmth, understanding and loving
care is quite touching. She finds
herself unable to comprehend com completely
pletely completely Mickeys tremendous para paranoid
noid paranoid feelings and trys to lead him
back to the life he once led. She
succeeds, only to find that she has
aided in returning him to the
monster of his tremendous fears.

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 31, 1966,

Castle, played oy Hura Hatneld,
is a night club owner, nature food
eater and former Dorian Grey.
(Did I say former?) We are never
certain what his connection with
the mob is, but would like to believe
that he is not mixed up in it. He
acts well.
The soft spot in my heart goes
to Kamatari Fujiwara the artist.
He speaks not one word of English,
relying solely on pantomine for
expressing his feelings. Contin Continually
ually Continually appearing in various parts of
the movie, one wonders if he is
supposed to symbolize something.
Finally we see his masterpiece,
a huge white sculpture of scrap
metal that has as its purpose the
destruction of itself in order to
set itself free. In this scene we
get the prime Jine, Freedofh is
courage. Even Kamataris hope
is frustrated. As his sculpture is
in the process of destroying it itself,
self, itself, along comes the fire depart department
ment department to put out the flames. From
this point on, a change comes
over Mickey and the details of
how he tries to gain the courage
to set himself free are quite an
experience.
The direction of Arthur Penn
is excellent and the photography
is just a little above average. All
through the movie the audience
is given the opportunity to see and
almost feel how Mickey does; even
though one can see how so many
situations can be interpreted as a
threat at just a magnification in
Mickeys mind, as he tries to run
and hide. The story by AlanSurgal
is a good one and I believe he
gets his message across. For the
music lovers you hear Stan Getz
in the background.
I recommend this movie to
psych majors or anyone who likes
a good thriller that doesnt have
to keep you on the edge of your
seat to let you enjoy it. I would
rate it ***l/2 out of four.
Enrollment Up
For 3-A
Final enrollment of 8,351 stu students
dents students for UFs spring trimester
and Term 3-A shows a 20 per
cent increase over the same per period
iod period last year.
Statistics reflect 5,621 under undergraduates,
graduates, undergraduates, 1,867 graduates, 490
law students, 114 in medicine and
259 in GENESYS (Graduate
Engineering Education System).
Eighty-five of the GENESYS stu students
dents students are counted as graduates,
yielding an overall figure
of 1,952 nearly 24 per cent
of the spring and 3-A total.
Among the 5, 956 men and 2,395
women enrolled, the University
College for all freshmen and soph sophomores
omores sophomores tops the list with 1,708
students.
IHILLEL
FOUNDATION
SURFSIDE PICNIC
Sunday, June 5
Leaving Hi 11 el
Promptly 8:30
SHABBAT DINNER
Friday, June 10
Commencing With
Kiddush At 5:30
CALL 2 -2900
For Reservations, by
JUNE 2 For Picnic
JUNE 7, Dinner

Page 3

I w
5?



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 31, 1966

{[fit 9lUgator
EDITORIALS
conflict:
X
in whose interest ?
he newly-approved conflict
of interest regulations
concerning student representatives
of the Board of Student Publications
(BSP) -- prevent any representa representative
tive representative of the student publications
from serving on the policy-making
board.
Also the BSP will maintain its
majority of faculty members over
student representatives.
While no definite consensus of
publication boards can be ascer ascertained
tained ascertained from other collegiate sys systems,
tems, systems, the following examples
should be noted:
0 The Minnesota Daily publica publications
tions publications board also a policy-making
board has nine students on the
15-member boards All board offi officers
cers officers must be students o
0 The Auburn Plainsman publi publications
cations publications bqaYd has five students on
their nine-member board.
0 The Dakota Student publications
board has as its permanent chair chairman
man chairman the editor of the student
newspaper 0
0 The Tulane Hullabaloo's gov governing
erning governing publications board is com composed
posed composed of 11 students and three
faculty members. Eight of the
students are editors of student
publications and three appointed
by the student senate Q
While we do not claim these
cases to be a perfect represen representation
tation representation of collegiate publications
board, we do think two trends are
apparent: the publications boards
are moving towards -- or already
are --a student majority, and the
boards do contain representatives
from the student publications u
Is this asking too much?
The Alligator recommends. .
We recommend a reconstitution of the Board of
x Student Publications along the following lines:
1) The Board will be composed of three faculty
members as appointedby the university president.
X; 2) The Board shall be composed of four mem mem&
& mem& bers from the student body as follows:
xj A) President of the student chapter of Sigma
x Delta Chi, Vice President of the Student Body
and President of Florida Blue Key shall be
|:j: ex-officio members of the Board.
£ B) The fourth student member shall be named
by the then-present members of the board
X; from nominees offered by the new editors of
student publications. The editors can jointly
X; nominate one candidate, or each nominate an
X individual candidate. The Board will be bound
X- to accept the recommendations of the editors.
% 3) The Director of Student Publications shall
serve as chairman of the Board without voting
privileges.
4) The present Publications Electoral Board
X shall be scrapped and allow regular membership
X of the Board to assume responsibility for electoral
;X proceedings.

Mm t
Dr. Robert
Hutchins
Mhy shouldnt Michigan State University, or any other uni university
versity university that can get a contract, do the dirty work of the
CIA?
When President Lyndon B. Johnson carried his battle with the
intellectuals to Princeton, he said, with the evident intention
of ingratiating himself with his audience, that the academic
community has become a central instrument of public policy in
these United States.
If this is so, why shouldnt the academic community and the
CIA, also a central instrument of public policy, get together?
Why should the president of Michigan State refuse the implied
applause of the President of the United States?
The answer must be found in the lingering sense that there
are limits to the notion that the university is a central
ment of public policy. Although we do not know what is inappro inappropriate
priate inappropriate for a university, we feel that there are some things it
cannot do without sacrificing its reason for existence. One of
them, apparently, is to take up spying.
So at the convocation on the university held by the Center for
the Study of Democratic Institutions, Sen. J. William Fulbright
said the danger to the university goes beyond that raised by
contracts with the CIA. He pointed out that these are so egregious
that once they are known there is a tendency to terminate them
with all possible haste. We are all slightly revolted by spying
in general and intensely disturbed by the thought that we may
not be able to distinguish between secret agents dressed up as
professors and professors dressed up as secret agents.
Sen. Fulbright went on to say, I suspect that when a university
becomes very closely oriented to the current needs of govern government
ment government it takes on some of the atmosphere of a place of business
while losing that of a place of learning.
At the same convocation Harrison Brown, the noted geochemist
of the California Institute of Technology, showed that federal
outlays for science in colleges and universities now exceed
$1.3 billion and account for about two-thirds of the total research
expenditures of these institutions.
Brown said most of the grants come from government agencies
that are mission oriented. Hence, the work done is dictated
by the agencies. Any connection between what the agencies
want and what the pursuit of truth would suggest is purely coin coincidental.
cidental. coincidental.
The last speech at the convocation was made by Jacques
Barzun, provost of Columbia, who said that in the name of
public service the universities practiced genteel prostitution.
Can there be a respectable marriage between public service
and the academic community? Only, I believe, on the terms
stated to the convocation by Walter Lippmann.
He said the academic community performed the greatest possi possible
ble possible public service, and the only one that could properly be asked
of it, if its members sought the truth for its own sake, without
regard to how it could be applied, whether it could be sold,
whether it was useful, respectable, popular or patriotic.
(Copyright 1966, Los Angeles Times)

f V 4> j
qj
Menaker
Executive Editor
Is there really an Art Buchwald?
Sounds absurd. .but stop and think it over.
The pieces begin to fall into place.
I walked into University Auditorium Thurs Thursday
day Thursday night a few minutes before Buchwald was
due to speak. On the way to my seat whom
should I spot but the Don Quixote of student
government, Ernie Litz.
I exchanged greetings with him and took
my seat a few rows away.
A hush settled over the audience as Forums
Chairman Jack Zucker made his introduction.
The silence turned to applause as Buchwald
made his way to the podium.
Then it hit me.
The walk, the black curly hair, the stout
build, the glasses and the most damaging
evidence of all -- the voice.
I turned my head and looked back. Buchwald
was on stage, but Litz was nowhere to be seen.
Holy Superman!
Art Buchwald is Ernie Litz, or vice versa.
Whichever way you prefer.
Sound foolish?
Have you ever seen Litz and Buchwald to together?
gether? together?
Has ANYONE seen Litz and Buchwald
together?
As Buchwald-Litz walked off stage and
disappeared behind the curtains I turned around
and there was Litz-Buchwald applauding like
the rest. As if I werent on to his little secret.
Further proof: After his appearance a few
of us accompanied Buchwald-Litz to Wolfies
cocktail lounge for a libation or two. He stead steadfastly
fastly steadfastly refused to go to the Schooner Room a
few doors away. For fear he would be recog recognized,
nized, recognized, of course, and his plans would be ruined.
Someone suggested to me that Buchwald is
really journalism professor H. G. (Buddy)
Davis, noting the similar gait and acid wit.
I hold no stock in this supposition.
There is only room in this World for one
Buddy Davis.
Litz-Buchwald ran a strong campaign for
student body president last trimester without
any outside help. As Alligator columnist Jim
Moorhead pointed out, Buchwald-Litz is run running
ning running for U. S. President in 1972, but if Litz-
Buchwald runs for UF student body president
in 1967, it might serve as an accurate baro barometer
meter barometer of public opinion.
Litz-Buchwald revealed to me Thursday night
that he plans to bring many prominent Wash Washington
ington Washington figures to Gainesville next year to help
him become student body president.
Dont be surprised if Lyndon, Bobby and
Teddy come to campus next year to stomp
the campus for our hero. Imagine hearing such
stirring battle cries Is LBJ cares -- do
you care? or Apathy and the Great Society
for me.
Think about it! Its only a short step from
student body president to the White House.
(George Smathers goes there all thevtime.)
LBJ hasnt been too happy about endorsing
either Hubert or Bobby for 1972. Litz-Buch Litz-Buchwald
wald Litz-Buchwald could be the man if he can prove himself
at UF.
Yes, beware of the infamous Mr. Litz-
Buchwald or he may fool you as he has fooled
countless others, perpetrating his diabolical
scheme on an unsuspecting public.
alligator
Editor Managing Editor
Gene Nail Steve Smith
Executive Editor Bob Menaker
City Editor Yvette Cardozo
Sports Editor Jeff Denkewalter
Photographers Nickn.rroyo
Sam Johnston, Steve Kanar
Staff Writers Norma Bell, Carl Brown
Alan Burton, Arlene Caplan, Dick Dennis
Eileen Dworkin, Margie Green, Marti
Kalishnikoff, Kathie Keim, Judy Miller
Steve Scott, Allen Soden, Tyler Tucker



Florida |
Politics |
By MIKE GARCIA
m
The best laid plans of mice and men often times go asunder. On
May 23 some very carefully laid plans did go asunder and carried
with them one of the towering giants of Florida politics, Haydon
Burns. Many people have wondered how it was possible to beat
Burns.
How was it possible to beat the man who had the endorsement of
39 newspapers including Floridas largest daily, The Miami Herald?
How was it possible to beat the man who had the endorsement of
80% of the Mayors and County Commissioners of Florida?
How was it possible to beat a man of unlimited financial resources?
The answer is not simple. However, there are some heavily
significant factors which contributed to the downfall of Haydon Burns.
These factors are:
The bribe charge against Scott Kelly
The block vote charge
The personality of Haydon Burns
The first mistake Burns made was to infer that Scott Kelly tried
to sell his endorsement. The $500,000 bribe charge alienated many
conservative Kelly people who would have voted for Burns. Whether
the charge was true or not, Burns had no proof and therefore left
himself open for a direct attack from Kelly. The very fact that Kelly
had been eliminated from the race was more beneficial to Burns than
any bribery charge even if Burns could have proved it. By eliminating
Kelly Burns had only one man to contend with. However, Burns
decided to make the charge and in so doing prompted Kelly to get
back in the race and stump the state in vindication of his honor.
The second mistake was to interject the race issue into the
campaign. It appears that Burns, seeing the victory of conservative
Wallace in Alabama, believed he could capitalize on the North Florida
anti-Negro sentiment and thereby cut the ground out from under the
Kelly-High team. His plan worked well with the conservative whites
but he lost about 40,000 Negro votes.
Burns carried the small counties by only 2 to 1 when he should
have carried 3 to 1. He did not figure on the increased amount of
Negro registrations since 1964. In his effort to lock up North Florida
he lost votes in populous Central and South Florida. High carried
Hillsborough and Pinellas by fantastic margins. Burns had trouble
in carrying his own county of Duval.
Burns suffered from the same disease which affected Scott Kelly
in 1964, i.e. he carried the majority of counties but lost the election.
The third factor is perhaps the most significant of all the
Burns personality. Haydon Burns is a very single-minded man.
He listens to very little advice and heeds practically none. Burns
was his own strategist, tactician, speech-writer and advisor. The
problem of wearing so many hats is evident. To be a good speech
writer, strategist and tactician you must be in touch with the mood
of the people. A candidate is unable to do this as he is too wrapped
up in campaigning to see his own faults.
Os course no one, outside of Burns, will ever know what prompted
the irresponsible and politically undesirable charges against Kelly.
Nor will anyone know why Burns tried to fan the flames of racism
anew. However, one political lesson will be learned from this election.
If ever there was an issue that caused people to rally behind a candi candidate
date candidate with unbelievable strength in the face of seemingly unsurmountable
odds it was INTEGRITY. And all the money in the world cannot offset it.
See Whets New
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Editor:
I am more than a little annoyed
at your editorial of Friday, May
20th which concerned demonstra demonstrators
tors demonstrators and the civilian draft.
First of all, did it ever occur
to you that people who take a stance
against a more popular position do
think about it first, do have some
validity? But more than that, it
might surprise you to know that
many people who demonstrate
also write to their Congressmen
and President (often many times)
and even vote.
There is a group called The
we did it
Editor:
Guess What? we did it!
Last Tuesday the Democrats of
Florida seemed to vote with
REASON rather than DESIRE. As
Scott Kelly would say, we really
did nominate an honest man for
governor. But its not over yet,
because there is the general elec election
tion election in November. The Republican
candidate, Claude Kirk, Jr. WILL
give Bob High a good run for his
(little bit of) money. Kirk did quite
well when he ran for U. S. Seantor
against Senior U. S. Seantor Spes Spessard
sard Spessard Holland in the general election
of 1964, when he polled nearly
600,000 votes!
Contentment (or maybe even dis discontentment
contentment discontentment in some cases) and
complacency on the part of the
Democratic electorate could very
easily give Kirk the election.
I reason this on the hypothesis
that the registered Republicans
will deliver a bloc (remember
that word) vote to their candi candidate.
date. candidate. Come November, lets all
remember The Last Hurrah.
Thank you and your newspaper
for the support you gave to an
honest man Robert King High
for Governor.
Cordially,
Chuck Elliott, 3AR
ai
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Letters To The Editor

"protestors are concerned

Voters Pledge Campaign which
was formed recently expressly to
exercise their vote on the War:
they will only vote for candidates
who support a position of quick
seccession of our efforts in Viet
Nam. Many protestors are
aware of the democratic process
and seek to use it effectively.
I also have some thoughts about
the defense secretarys proposal.
Capitalist thought, once upon a
time, argued that any productive
person contributes to the general
welfare of all citizens. Does a
teacher contribute to society? or

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The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 31, 1966 1

a man who builds a school? (how
about a man who builds the teach teachers
ers teachers house?) or a shipping clerk
who sends out books to the school?
I think that its pretty hard to
define who is not somehow bene benefiting
fiting benefiting his country. Youths do not
have to be drafted, regimented or
organized in order to prove their
worth and love for country. As a
matter of fact, most protestors
are deeply concerned with their
country and, more importantly,
humanity.
Yours truly,
Marguerite Rosenthal

Page 5



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
1959 LAMBRETTE Motor Scootor.
Runs good. SSO. Ph. 372-5136.
(A-138-25-C).
COMPLETE Fuel Injection setup
for Chevy 327 or 283. Complete
with dual point distributor and
drive. $l2O. Ph. 372-5136. (A (A---138-25-c).
--138-25-c). (A---138-25-c).
LEAVING TOWN: Player piano
that works and rolls, $200; Zenith
TV, antenna and stand, $35; Brew Brewing
ing Brewing apparatus, bottles and instruc instructions,
tions, instructions, $6; Bar, $10; misc. furniture
and fixtures. 1021 S. W. 6th Ave.
6-1155 or 6-6919, weeknights 5-7.
(A-138-lt-nc).
1966 HONDA 50cc. Open frame
motorcycle. Only 2 mos. old, 500
miles. Must sell fast. 242 T Flavet
HI after 5 p.m. (A-137-3t-p).
ARIEL 650-40 HP Motorcycle. New
tag, tires, paint, chrome, etc.
Mechanically sound. Personal rea reasons
sons reasons force sale. $650 invested,
asking $525. 376-1429. (A-137-
st-p).
1965 HONDA 150, 3,000 miles, like
new. S3BO firm. Brand new RCA
portable tape recorder, S4O. Call
376-0708, (A-137-3t-c).
SACRIFICE: 1965 Yamaha 125 cc,
$315; 22 Hornet with 6x Weaver,
a real varmenter, SSO.
6178. (A- 133-ts-c).
28-FOOT HOUSE TRAILER. A/C.
Can be seen. Shady Nook Trailer
Park, 3101 SW 34th St., ph. 376-
7559. (A-135-st-p).
AIR CONDITIONERS for apts and
trailers. All sizes cost plus
10%. Sudden Service Fuel Oil Co.,
authorized Admiral dealer. 907
SW 3rd St. Ph. 376-4404. (A-131-
ts-c).
NEW AIR CONDITIONERS. Un Unredeemed
redeemed Unredeemed layaway, never install installed,
ed, installed, for balance due only. Sudden
Service Fuel Oil Co., 907 SW 3rd
St. 376-4404. (A-131-ts-c).
for rent
AVAILABLE NOW, Comfortable
.efficiency apt. for 2 people. Also
single room for gentleman, across
from campus. Apply 321 S. W.
13th Street. No car needed. (B (B---138-2t-e).
--138-2t-e). (B---138-2t-e).
TWO BEDROOM, 1 Bath, A/C,
CCB. Available June Ist. Patio,
Fla. room, furnished. SSO a mo.
for one, N.E. section. 378-1695.
(B-138-2t-c).
STUDENTS ONLY. Furnished A/C
efficiency apt. Also 1 br. trailer.
Near Univ. $75 per mo. includes
water and garbage collection. Ph.
372-5182. (B-138-2t-c).
1 lUtWI >| II
I I
1 Last Times Tonight 1
I AGENT FOR H.A.R.M I
I WILD, WILD WINTER I
I Both in Cclor, I
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I 633 SQUADRON I

for rent
ATTRACTIVE Modern room, A/C
Ideal for student who needs a quiet
pleasant place to study, 372-7883.
(B- 138-ts-c).
AVAILABLE for Sept. Ist. Duplex
for male students. S4O per student.
East apt. accommodate 4students.
West apt. accommodates 3 stu students.
dents. students. Only 500 ft. from Tigert
Hall. 1231 S. W. 3rd Ave. Call
Anna Hinson, 378-2559. (B (B---137-ts-c).
--137-ts-c). (B---137-ts-c).
AIR CONDITIONED room for rent.
One block from campus, maid
service, new wall-to-wall carpet carpet-ing,
-ing, carpet-ing, sink, new refrigerator, new
easy chair, large desk, bookshelf
and special appliance outlet.
Available June 18, $55 per mo.
376-9247. (B-135-st-c).
EFFICIENCY APT. Furnished,
private bath, entrance, drive. $65.
Utilities furnished. 2225 NE 7th
St.. Ph. 376-0595. (B-134-ts-c).
TWO BEDROOM HOME, furnished.
Across from Holiday Inn. Available
B-term or Fall Tri. 372-6232.
(B-l 34-ts-c).
FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM APT.
available B-term or Fall Tri.
across from Ramada Inn. 372-
6232. (B-134-ts-c).
ROOM FOR RENT, 1714 NW 3rd
Place. About 2 blocks from College
P. 0., just off 17th St. Available
now. Ph. 372-8227. (B-135-4t-c).
FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM APT.
Large room, nice and clean. Near
campus. Water furnished. $62.50
a mo. Reliable person. Ph. 376-
8819. (B-137-4t-c).
FURNISHED APT. for B-Term.
One bedroom, A/C, private patio,
SW 34th St. $ 100/mo. plus utilities.
Available June 20th. Call ext. 2741
(8-5). Evenings 376-7873. Suitable
for two people. (B-137-3t-p).
LARGE ONE BEDROOM furnished
apt. A/C, for married couple, 303
NW 19th St. $95 a mo. Call after
6 p.m., 372-7287. (B-135-ts-c).
LARGE DIVIDED ROOM, 12x22,
private entrance and shower, utili utilities
ties utilities and linens included. Ph. 372-
3191 or 372-8903. (B-133-ts-c).,
PRIVATE ROOM 3 blocks from
campus, S2O a mo. Ph. 372-8840.
(B-131-ts-c).
|TjuyUimK Tis-rV |
| sEnroFafll
'Wmmm
* T -T- T T J
A A A A A A. A. A. A XJL.. |
UIUMBDA'I I
KSO lf> I
tE isftiA L ? I
I
, Loved [ /
I 7 j I
|
Sturt j
! BG6ART
| otrraEmrt J

1, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 31, 1966

Page 6

for rent
NEW ONE AND TWO bedroom fur furnished
nished furnished A/C apts with pool. One
bedroom S9O and $95. Two bed bedroom
room bedroom $125. Near UF & Medical
Center. 372-9569. (B-131-ts-c).
wanted
TWO Female Roommates to share
2 bedroom Fredricks Apt. Heated
pool, A/C. For B-term and if
possible Fall and Winter. $39.
378-2950 or 378-1769. (C-138-
2t-c).
BRIGHT, EAGER 18-year-old
wants summer job at UF. Plans
pre-med study here later. Experi Experienced
enced Experienced in clerical work, mechanics,
machine shop, food services .Quick
learner. Call Bryn Peterson at
Cedar Key 2451. (C-138-2t-nc).
rnmmmm n
WHITE HOUSEWIFE desires one
day or 1/2 day work. Cook, iron,
clean. Call 372-5269 after 5. (C (C---138-4t-c).
--138-4t-c). (C---138-4t-c).
ONE FEMALE Roommate to share
2 BR Apt. in Village Park in
Sept, fall 372-0932. (C-138-lt-c).
WANTED: Male Roommate to
share 3 BR House. Rent $35 plus
utilities. 410 N. W. 19th Lane. Call
2-3498. (C- 138-2 t-p).
ROOMMATES WANTED for B Bsession.
session. Bsession. Village Park apt. with
balcony overlooking pool. S4O per
mo. Call 376-2315. (C-137-3t-c).
WANTED: To share truck for
moving to Kansas last of June.
Ph. 372-0317. (C-137-4t-c).
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wanted |
COED WANTED for B-Term. Ruby
D. Apts. A/C, pool. Call 378-1732.
(C- 137-2 t-c).
APT. and female roomates wanted
for Fall Trimester. Call 376-2315.
(C-137-3t-c).
COED ROOMMATE for term 3-B.
Modern A/C apt. 3-1/2 blocks
from campus. $45 a mo. Call 378-
4523. (C-137-3t-c).
WANTED: Floor model stereo; gas
or electric stove; player piano.
Call 372-5269. (C-137-4t-c).
WANTED: Beautician. Full or part
time. Ph. 378-4520. (C-136- st-p).
WANTED: Middle aged males to
serve as subjects in a research
project sponsored by Univ. Health
Center. Many benefits and few
discomforts. Call Dr. Zaunei, ext.
2815 or 378-4116. (C-135-st-c).
WANTED: FEMALE ROOMMATE
for Fall and Winter Term, Village
Park. Judy Young or Rita Green Greenberg.
berg. Greenberg. 2219 Jennings. 372-6381.
(C-135-4t-c).
ROOMMATE wanted immediately.
Coed to share apt. expenses thru
August. Rent $45 a mo. Ph. 8-1304
or UF ext. 2731. (C-137-ts-c).
WANTED: Driver to drive car to
Denver anytime in June. 372-7991.
(C- 137-2 t-c).

LAST bSLCheCea
B J I F 1 I p *OOuCTON
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JOHNNYAND OH, LORDY HOW HE OIN W W\
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trade
TRADE: 1960 MKI Sprite in good
condition for Motorcycle 175
350 cc. John Bradin, 108 N.W. 13th
St., Apt. 5, 376-9252. No 1949
Royal Enfields, etc. (D-138-2t-p).
TRADE 1959 Austin-Healey Sprite
with radio and heater for a VW of
comparable value. Call 378-1006
after 5. (D- 37-3 t-c).
autos,
1965 PLYMOUTH WAGON. V-8,
automatic transmission, R & H,
A/C, power steering. Leaving
country will accept old car for
equity, you take over payments.
Dr. Lieberman, 376-3211, Ext.
5721 or 466-3178. (G-138-2t-c).
1942 CHEVROLET COUPE. New
paint, new tires, tinted glass. Call
376-8415 after 3 p.m. (G-135-
st-p).
1965 BARRACUDA, 273 V-8.
4-speed transmission, excellent
condition. Best offer accepted.
Call 376-9038. (G-133-ts-c).
1954 OLDS 88 COUPE. Call 378-
4687. (G-137-3t-c).
1965 RED MUSTANG CONV. V-8,
4-speed. Call 378-1973 after sp.m,
(G-137-st-c).



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I
autos
1959 VOLVO. New paint, clutch,
battery, and tag. Best reasonable
offer. Ph. 378-4905. (G-135-4t-p).
1961 PONTIAC CONVERTIBLE.
Good top and tires, excellent me mechanical
chanical mechanical condition. Just the thing
for summer. Call 378-1629 be between
tween between 5-8 p.m. (G-135-st-c).
1964 FORD. V-8, one ton pick-up
truck. Flat Bed. Call Mrs. Hinton,
376-3261, ext. 2973 or 372-2969
after 6 p.m. (G-136-4t-c).
1962 OLDS 98, with A/C. Make an
offer. Call Mrs. Hinton at 376-
3261, ext. 2973 or 372-2969 after
6 p.m. (G-136-4t-c).
real estate
THREE BR, 2 bath, 2 car garage,
parquet floors, central air and
heat. Almost new. Corner, N. W.
34th St. and 29th Ave. 372-5969.
(1-1382 t c).
LOW DOWN PAYMENT to married
student or staff. Three bedroom,
1 bath. $13,200, shady fenced back backyard.
yard. backyard. Near campus, golf, pool. 121
NW 25th St. 376-8565. (1-131-ts-c).

i
EIRST NATIpNAL CITY BANK
'*** TWENTYMO IJLAR 9 ***-*-
* oimw Ull l*M WWIil fllilHi WB* uiimimilm Mil & 7a q J
Other travelers checks
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.. .until you lose them!
5 >
:| yyy*i-v>
Going to swing this vacation? Dont take losablf n. Take First National City travelers checks.
You can cash them anywhere. But their big ? tage is a faster refund system. See below.

Other leading travelers checks, like First
National City travelers checks, can be cashed
all over the world.
But if you think all travelers checks are alike,
you may be in for a rude shock if you should
lose your checks.
With other leading travelers checks, elaborate
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But, if you lose First National City travelers

First National City Bank Travelers Checks
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real estate
THIRTEEN THOUSAND or less
will buy nine room house near
University and Finley on Quiet
wooded deadend street, with three
bedrooms, one bath, fireplace,
hardwood floors at 304 N. W. 24th
St. Ph. 372-9795. (I-138-ts-c).
AVAILABLE FOR OCCUPANCY
Sept. Ist, on lease basis, furnish furnished
ed furnished 4 bedroom, 2 bath home. Be Between
tween Between NW 22nd and 23rd St. S2OO
per mo. Call Anna Hinson, 378-
2557. (I-137-ts-c).
GOOD BUY. House for sale. Phy Physician
sician Physician at Health Center leaving
town. Good neighbors. Three bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, 2 bath, lots of extras. Only
$14,430. Call 372-5567. (1-137-
st-c).
BY OWNER 1/2 block from Little Littlewood
wood Littlewood School. Three bedroom, 2
bath, central heat, screen porch,
patio, double carport, paved cir circular
cular circular drive, deep well pump.
Beautiful landscaped lot with large
oak trees. Living room, dining
room, and hall carpeted. 3404 NW
7th Place. 376-1886. (I- 136-4 t-c).

Page 7

. T
checks, you don't have to worry. There are more
than 20,000 placesaround the world authorized
to give you a fast refuncjright on the spot!
First National City travelers checks come from
the leader in world-wide banking, and have
been in use over 60 years. They are known and
accepted in more than a million shops, hotels,
restaurants, air terminals, etc., the world over.
Next time you travel, insist on First National
City travelers checks.
They cost just one cent per dollar.

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 31, 1966

real estate
SALE: 200 acres fertile soil.
Access to 2 lakes, long canal
frontage. Good farm or recreation recreational
al recreational area development. Robert C.
Smith, Registered Real Estate
Broker, Hwy. 441, Micanopy, Fla.
(I-135-stp).
personal
VISIT GATOR GROOMER where
romance blooms. Next door to
Univ. P.O. Self-service and pro professional
fessional professional laundry and dry cleaning.
(J-l 31-ts-c).
VACATION SPECIAL to UF per personnel:
sonnel: personnel: Take advantage of special
rates at the ARROWHEAD LODGE,
one mile from Cypress Gardens,
on the Cypress Gardens Road.
Largest pool in Winter Haven.
A/C, TV. (J 135 st c).
lost-found
LOST Light blue wallet between
Main Library and NW 2nd Ave.
Must have very important U.S.
Residency Card. Reward. Zeida,
372-6625. (L-136-ts-c).

services
u
CHILDRENS CARE. Ages 4-6. In
my home June thru August. 5 days
a week or part time. Experienced
and trustworthy. 311 N. W. 15th
Terr. Ph. 376-2072. (M-138-lt-c).
Grand Opening. Everything half
price. FAMILY THRIFT STORE.
Renovated furniture. 202 SE Ist
Ave. Ph. 376-9255. (M- 137-ts-c).
MXlll I I
RUBYS ALTERATIONS. 12385. W.
3rd Ave. 376-8506. (M-1 32-ltf-c).

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Exquisitely designed cabinet of genuine oil tin- **
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Broadband FM/RF Amplifier. AFC/Automatic TrUm I
Bass Boost" Circuit. Large 6" x 4" speaker. |/%| |ir I
Wavemagnet AM, Line Cord FM antennas. UV/ULH O I
Precision vernier tuning. 7%" high, wide, I
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services
I N A H% RR Y ? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios, 372-0300. (M (M---131-ts-c).
--131-ts-c). (M---131-ts-c).
Rotary & Printing
CALCULATORS
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Page 8

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 31, 1966

T^
I The 'MISTER SANDWICH Os Gainesville I
I NOW IS I
rMister Pizza
NOW! Si
I FREE Delivery I
I 6-1252 & 8-12301
I A Free Gift Awaits You! I
I rCC\ I
I Cone lo And Try I
I The NEW Alans Pizza f~ 111
I In Carolyn Plaza. 1 l
I AND Don't forget the many delicious special sandwiches
1 (Subs and Regulars) that are made exclusively at I
r Sandwich) CUBANA!!!! I

I PAYDAY SHORT TERM
I BUDGET MONTHLY
I $75 3O-DAY
I Cost: $2.25 Interest
I FR 6-5333

Campus Calendar

rueS(ia -'' MENSA: Reserved section, west wing, Main Cafeteria,
Ma y daily, 11:15 a.m. 1:30 p.m. For information on
membership contact Mike Sipe, 8-4950 or 305-21
Diamond Village. Students and faculty invited.
Student Economy Committee: 210 FLU, 4-6 p.m.
Union Board: 215 FLU, 4:45 p.m.
Tuesday Evening Supper Club: Presbyterian Student
Center, 6:30 p.m. Non-denominational. Everyone sin single
gle single and over 21 invited. SI.OO.
Music Department Concert: The Fruchtmans, harpsi harpsichord
chord harpsichord and viola da gamba; University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship: 4th Floor, Main
June 1 Library (at top of stairs), 5:10 p.m. Prayer Meeting.
Judo Club: South end of Fla. Gym, 5:30 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society: 212 FLU, 7 p.m.
Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity: 116 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club: 118 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Craft Shop Special Sessions: Gravelcraft FLU Craft
Shop, 7:30 p.m. No registration.
Thursday Christian Science Organization: FLU Aud., 4:45 p.m.
June 2 U of F Veterans Club: 324 FLU, 7:30 p.m.
Others Playday Dance: Saturday, June 4, 8 p.m., South of FLU.
(Social Room in case of rain.) No admission.
Baptist Students: Saturday, June 4, 8:45 a.m. Sign up
on poster at Baptist Student Center before Thursday,
June 2. 75£ per person.
Craft Shop Special Sessions: Monday, June 6, 2:30 p.m.,
Block Printing, FLU Craft Shop. No registration.
FLU Trips:
European Tour: June 21 August 15, 8 weeks
$3lO. $125 deposit at 315 FLU.
St. Augustine: Saturday, July 9. Leave 12 noon; tour
city and see Cross and Sword, SB.OO. For
reservations call ext. 2741.
Trip to Guatemala: August 15 22. $255 per person.
For information come by or call 315 FLU, ext.
2741. Sign up at 315 FLU.

MONEY AVAILABLE
$25 S6OO
MARION FINANCE CO.

~rP~: Musical Scene =
Vi)
I Chairman, Department of Music
Efrim Fruchtman, viola da gamba, and Caroline Sites Fruchtman,
harpischord, will present a concert of music of the baroque era
in University Auditorium tonight at 8:15 p.m. The concert is
sponsored by UFs Department of Music and everyone is cordially
invited to attend. There is no admission charge.
The program includes harpischord selections by William Inglot,
Giles Farnaby, and John Bull. The viola and harpsichord join to
play sonatas by Dietrich Buxtehude, George F. Handel, J. S. Bach,
and C. F. Abel. In addition, the Fruchtmans will offer the Suite
in A Major by the French master Francois Couperin.
Efrim and Caroline Sites Fruchtman were both trained in music
performance at conservatories: Efrim at the Juilliard School of
Music and Caroline at the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music. In
musicology they received masters and doctoral degrees from the
University of North Carolina, where they worked with Glen Haydon,
William Newman, and others. In Europe, Efrim studied in Vienna
and Caroline in Florence. Their interest in both performance and
research found an outlet in their preparation together of historical
recitals. Much of the material for their programs is edited by them
from manuscript sources.
Efrim, whose research specialization is in the field of early
musical instruments, is the author of articles in music journals on
the baryton, viola da gamba, and violoncello. Caroline's research
and publications are on Benedetto Marcello and the baroque chamber
cantata. They are presently collaborating in a study on the use
of instruments in baroque chamber cantatas and duets.
In their collection of musical instruments are an 18th century
French pardessus and bass viole da gamba, a 17th century Italian
viol, and several transverse flutes.
Efrim Fruchtman, presently on the faculty of Trinity University
in San Antonio, formerly served on the faculties of the Ohio State
University and the University of Arizona, at which institutions
he directed the collegium musicum.
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These lovely young ladies are just one of the many fine acts tha*
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Be Creative: Join' FU
Craft Shop Classes

Climb ajpoard the Summer Fun
Special and head for creative ad adventures
ventures adventures at the Florida Unions
Craft Shop. All summer long spec special
ial special classes and demonstrations
will be offered for children and
adults alike.
A ceramics class for children
will begin on Wednesday, June 8-
July 27. The fee is SB.OO for eight
lessons. Five pounds of clay,
glazes, and firings are included in
the fee. Ages are limited to 8-11
years. Class will meet from 9:00-
11:00 A.M. in ¥U raft Shop, Room
120.
Two series of childrens arts
and crafts classes will begin on
June 14-July 7 and on July 12
August 4. Age limit is 6 through
9 years and the fee is SB.OO for

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 31, 1966,

UFs Deseret Club is sponsoring
the Brigham Young University pro production
duction production 8.Y.U. at 8:15
p.m. June 15, in University Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium. A SI.OO donation is re requested
quested requested for admission. The
proceeds will go to Dollars for
Scholars.
Startime B.Y.U.with a cast
of 40 singers and dancers, will
feature colorful dancing numbers,
comedy acts, and song routines
ranging from Broadway shows to
classics, as well as an all-cast
opener and closer.
Shows put on by students from
Brigham Young University in Utah
have been successful in the United
States and all over the world. One
of the best known was Curtain Curtaintime
time Curtaintime USA" which traveled the
Middle East last year in behalf
of the State Department. The State
Department acclaimed it the great greatest
est greatest talent show it ever sent abroad.
Several other B.Y.U Program
Bureau shows have been sponsored
by the Department of Defense and
have traveled throughout Europe
and the Orient entertaining U. S.
troops.
Tickets for the show are avail available
able available at the Florida Union Ticket
Desk.

8 lessons. Class meets on Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday and Thursday mornings from
9:00 fjhOO A.M. in the Craft
Shop. All materials will be pro provided.
vided. provided.
Ceramic Classes for adults will
begin on June 14-July 7th and again
on July 12-August 4th. Both ses sessions
sions sessions will meet twice weekly on
Tuesday and Thursdays from 7:30-
9:30 P.M. Fee for the 8 lessons
is $5.00 and includes 5 lbs. of
clay and all firings. Mrs. Olive
Briggs will be the instructor.
Advance registration is neces necessary
sary necessary for all classes. Please call
376-3261, ext. 2951, to sign up.
The regular hours of the Craft
Shop are 2-5 P.M. Monday through
Friday, 7-10 P.M. Sunday through
Thursday.

Page 9



Page 10

', The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 31, 1966

Museum Comparable To Smithsonian

by TERRY AN GANNETT
Staff Writer
Imagine a museum in Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville comparable to the Smithsonian
Institution in Washington D.C. See
it on the UF campus in about three
years.
The Florida State Museum is
soon to be housed in a 2 and one onequarter
quarter onequarter million dollar structure
the size of five Seagle buildings,
according to B. P. Mitchell, execu executive
tive executive vice president of the
Gainesville Area Chamber of
Commerce.
The project will be financed by
the Florida State Legislature and
private gifts, Mitchell explained.
In 1965, the Legislature passed
a bill to appropriate $35,000 for
the museum on the condition that
1.9 million more be raised pri privately.
vately. privately. The bill was sponsored by
Senator J. Emory (Red) Cross and
Representative Ralph Turlington.
Mitchell said the first large gift
was initiated by Dr. J.C. Dickinson,
director of the museum. Through
repeated visits to Washington, he
prompted a 1.1 million dollar
contribution from the National
Science Foundation.
Dean of University Development,
and Relations, Alan J. Robertson,
and George W. Corrick, head of
University Development, are cur currently
rently currently conducting a campaign to
raise the remaining SBOO,OOO.
Os course its not right to name
one person who is responsible for
the whole idea, said Mitchell,
but it was Dean Robertson who
pushed the idea of keeping the
museum in Gainesville. Its been
his wish all along.
Mitchell said the first $200,000
had to be raised in Gainesville.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz
contacted S. T. Dell, director of
the chamber, to form a committee
of Gainesville businessmen to
raise the money, explained Mit Mitchell.
chell. Mitchell.
On May 8 it was announced that
the SIOO,OOO mark had been
reached.
About half of this was in the
category of SIO,OOO gifts, said
Mitchell, and several more large
contributions have been received.
Mitchell explained a pledge
plan slOO a month for two

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years which is now being offered
to Gainesville businessmen.
The museum has always been a
part of the University and the
proposed construction site for it
has long been designated for a
museum, Mitchell commented.
The chambers main interest
in this matter is, of course for
Gainesville, said Mitchell. This
will be a definite tourist attraction
for the entire area.
The museum presently draws
50,000 persons yearly. Mitchell
estimated the new complex will
draw over 250,000.
Lack of space in the museums
present location, Seagle Building,'
University Ave., limits display to
only three per cent of available
material.
Mitchell said he hopes the cre creation
ation creation of a proper display area will
encourage donation of materials.
Two such donations have been made
since the plan was announced.

Patron Dinner Tonight |

More than 250 Gainesville residents are expected to attend a gala
formal dress patrons dinner for the new Florida State Museum
tonight at the Ramada Inn.
Invitations have been extended to those who have contributed S2OO
or more to the local drive and others have been invited to make gifts
of this amount to attend the unique fund dinner.
Patron tickets are still available, local museum fund chairman
S. T. Dell emphasized. They may be reserved by calling the campus
office of the University of Florida Foundation, Inc. (376-3261, Ext.
2906), today.
Dell said response to the appeal for patron donations had been
enthusiastic and predicted the dinner will be a victory celebration
for the people of Gainesville.
The patrons dinner is scheduled as the climax of a local drive to
support construction of the new $2.2 million building for the Florida
State Museum on the UF campus. More than $1.4 million in state
and federal funds is already committed and SBOO,OOO in private support
is being sought to assure the facility.
Contributions from Gainesville in excess of SIOO,OOO already have
been reported. Dell indicated the final figure to be announced at the
patrons dinner will be substantially above that amount.
The Gainesville drive is the forerunner of a statewide fund campaign.
University and fund officials have announced that names of all
patrons Jtiose making gifts of S2OO or more will be included on
a bronze plaque to be hung permanently in a special area of the
museum.
Program for the patrons dinner will include a full report by the
fund committee on contributions to date, and a description of the
proposed building and its exhibit facilities by Dr. J. C. Dickinson,
museum director.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz will appear on the program to
express appreciation to patrons and other fund supporters. John W.
Donahoo, president of the University of Florida Foundation, Inc.

Valued at $500,000, the Pearsall
Indian Collection is already a part
of the museum. It is considered as
one of the finest collections of
Indian artifacts in the country.
Mitchell noted that this col collection
lection collection was purchased for theUni theUnivers
vers theUnivers it v two years ago by an
annonymous donor from Tampa.
The inability to properly dis display
play display this fine collection was pro probably
bably probably what started the ball rolling
on the idea of an entirely new
building for the museum,
reflected Mitchell.
Although the museum will be
designed primarily for university
teaching, Mitchell again em emphasized
phasized emphasized the importance of this
project to Gainesville.
It will be the only such
attraction in the entire
southeastern United States, he
said, and it will always be free.

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'



The Captivating Mr. Buchwald

LBJ didnt really want to run
with anybody, but didnt know if it
was unconstitutional, Buchwald
said. He called Attorney Gen General
eral General Bobby Kennedy who said that
LBJ would need a running mate
suggesting a Massachusetts New
York man with nine children.
He couldnt make up his mind.
One day he was having a bar-b-q
lunch with Lady Biid in the Blue
Room, related Buchwald.
Lyndon, we owe the Humphreys
a dinner, said Lady Bird.
Lady Bird, ahm too busy to
have dinner with Hubert, but Ill
make it up to him somehow.
And thats how Hubert Humphrey
, became our vice president,
j Buchwald said the most mail
| he ever got about one of his
columns came after he wrote about
I sex on campus.
In the column, Buchwald sup supposedly
posedly supposedly interviewed several male
college students on the subject
of pre-marital sex and came up
with the following,answers:
USC football player: A few
weak guys may succumb to a
female, but most wouldnt
think of an affair before mar marriage.
riage. marriage.
Princeton Man: Its okay
for girls. They have nothing
to lose. Girls think less of
you when you give in.
UF agriculture student: The
I subject never comes up here
at Florida.
I got over 400 letters on that
I column, Buchwald said, and
I most of them were from college
males, all asking the same ques-
Ition: Who did you talk to? Stop
homosexuals.
Buchwald also took time out to
* comment on Floridas foibles
I was in Palm Beach recently--
the charity capital of the world.
They have so many charities there
that thevve run out of diseases.
Buchwald said he wasnt
£ encouraging the UF faction, headed
I by Alligator columnist Jim Moor-
K head, that was backing him for U.S.
president in 72. He did say, how-
I ever, that he was sorry he missed
I the very clean campaign for
I governor.
After his speech, Buchwald
attended a reception in his honor
[ at the Florida Union.

% sii, *.
m fat mk O9H
M..
JBiigg
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111 ;£s&%
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GATOR EMBEZZLERS?
Im not getting paid for this performance/' Buchwald told the
' audience. All your money is going to The Alligator.

J A BL v *A

An audience of better than 1,500 sat through
an hour of Buchwald humor and loved every minute

I-.S'j-B (o' 7 & ja*
1 k ) v T
4 W ~ 9K v \WmM
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-
WATCH THE BIRDIE

lt seemed like everybody was posing with Art
Buchwald, so some Alligator staffers decided to
get into the act. From left are: Jim Moorhead,
Alligator columnist; Bob Menaker, Alligator Execu Executive
tive Executive Editor; Nick Arroyo, staff photographer; The

AND THEY LOVED IT
-vo -vo

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 31, 1966,

of it, as he spoke on his fe/orite topic, Buchwald
at Large.

Man himself; Steve Conn, Student Publications Busi Business
ness Business Manager; Jack Zucker, Forums Chairman and
Joan Reese. This is Arroyos first time in the
Gator in a picture after shooting hundreds of photos
for the paper.

j|p M, ||| > J ft f||
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SWEET REVENGE
I was a high school dropout who went to USC without a diploma,
he said. I got my revenge though. They named me Alumnus of the
Year.

Page 11



The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 31. 1966

Page 12

ALAN

Students, alumni and Floridians should be proud of the records
Gator athletes compile for themselves and the university. Proud,
of course, of their athletic accomplishments -- but also proud
of their high academic achievements that often go unnoticed.
Academic achievements obtained by Gator athletes draw little
notice because of two generally held misconceptions:
1. Many Gator athletes are admitted to the university who
dont meet admission requirements.
2. Athletes receive a lot of help in their studies to maintain
elegibility, extra help that is not offered to the general student
body.
Are athletes required to present the same high school academic
requirements as non-athletes? The answer is yes.
Our university is generally considered to be one of the top
three schools in the South. With Tulane dropping out of the
conference, the controversy over who is the number one school
academically in the SEC, the Greenies or UF, has been decided.
It is tough to get in such a school, yet a fellow who wants to
play ball at UF must meet the same entrance requirements as a
non-athletic student -- he gets no special breaks, regardless of
what athletic talent he may possess.
One of the first things a Gator coach does during the recruiting
season is to send in a list of prospects to the admissions office.
If the admissions office says no, the boy is crossed off the list
He receives no further consideration.
Does the athletic department approve of such a policy? The
answer is a hardy yes.
Education First
When Ray Graves was considering UFs offer to become
Athletic Director and football coach, he was warned that it would
be difficult to build winning teams here because of the admission
requirements.
Coach Graves, and top coaches from the high school ranks
up to the pros believe that a boy who can make it at a quality
school will have both a better attitude and a greater ability to
think under pressure.
Once accepted to the university, do athletes receive extra
help to keep them in school? No, they dont.
Dr. Edward Holden is paid by the Athletic Department on a
part-time basis to conduct an organized study program. Athletes
are compelled to attend study hall every week night. If a boy
doesnt is considered a training violation. Tutors are
available as well as help sessions before progress tests. This
is ALL the aid an athlete receives in his studies aid that
every student at the university has access to.
The grades just released for the winter trimester point out
that Gator athletes, as a group, earned one of the highest grade gradepoint
point gradepoint averages ever achieved at the university by athletes.
Considering the time spent on the practice field, traveling and
in actual competition, this is no small achievement.
A long over due, but well-deserved hats off to the Gators!

Gators Split
Two Vs. JU
A noticeable lack of hitting
strength cost the Gators a two twogame
game twogame sweep over the Jacksonville
University Dolphins last Friday at
Perry Field.
In the opening game of the twin twinbill,
bill, twinbill, UF right-hander Ray Roily Roilyson
son Roilyson hurled a four-hitter in leading
the Gators to a 4-2 triumph. For
Rollyson it was his sixth victory
matched against five defeats.
Danny Orrs triple in the second
inning knocked in two Gator runs.
First-sacker Bob Hawkins batted
in another UF score.
In the night-cap, the Gators
bats were silenced by a trio of
Dolphin hurlers. UF managed only
three hits in the entire game in
going down to defeat, 4-3.
Rufus Fraziers double and Bill
Blomgren's sacrifice fly drove in
two of the three Gator tallies in
the first inning. However the Dol Dolphins
phins Dolphins stormed back with single
scores in the second and third and
two runs in the fifth to win. UF
starter Dan Griffin absorbed the
loss for the Gators.
In splitting the pair with JU,
the Gators closed out the 1966
campaign with a 23-12 mark.
| Slugger
PITTSBURGH (UPI) -- Pitts Pittsburgh
burgh Pittsburgh Pirate outfielder Roberto
Clemente has batted over .300
for the past five seasons, winning
two batting crowns in that time.
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UF Track Club Wins

Running away with the track
events and holding their own in
the field, the Florida Track Club
toppled heavily-favored Tennessee
to win the Southeastern Track and
Field Championships Saturday.
Im extremely happy'and
pleased at our effort here said
Gator track coach Jimmy Carnes
following his team's triumph in
Atlanta, Georgia.
UF compiled a total of 42 1/2
points to outdistance the second secondplace
place secondplace Vols by almost twenty points.

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The Gators scored first place
triumphs in the 440-relay, 440-
intermediate hurdles, 880-yard
run, mile run, mile relay, and the
discus.
Bill Roberts, Ed Mahoney, Jim
Brown, and Alan Turner comprised
the 440-relay team which went the
distance in 42.9 seconds. Running
the mile relay were Roberts, Ma Mahoney,
honey, Mahoney, Brown, and Dieter Gebhard.
They completed the circuit in
3:22.3.
John Morton bested all efforts

in the discus with a heave of 168
feet. In the 440 hurdles, Roberts
led the pack with a 55.4 timing.
Gebhard won the 880 in 1:56.8
and Frank Lagotic took the mile
run with a time of 4:24.2.
Part of our boys tremendous
effort was hurt by the heavy rain
here, stated Carnes. The wet
ground slowed down some of the
running events. However, the
important thing to remember is
the fact that the Gator team did a
great job.