Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
High-Kelly Team Here Today
.# t* - juj j< t t.t.t *** ** *

WEATHER:
Party cloudy un until
til until Wednesday,
clearing by
Thursday, some
chance of show showers.
ers. showers.

Smothers Critical Os Sen. Fulbright

At the Florida Law Reunion
Banquet Saturday night, U. S.
Senator George Smathers sharply
criticized recent remarks made
by his erudite friend and collea colleague,
gue, colleague, J. William Fulbright, chair chairman
man chairman of the Senate foreign relations
committee.
Fulbright (D-Ark.) has made se several
veral several official statements opposing
the present policy employed by
President Johnson in administra administration
tion administration of the war in Southeast Asia.
The Senator has demanded the
U. S. withdraw its 245,000 troops

Welborn Suesegents,Prof

by Yvette Cardozo
Alligator Staff Writer
. Former UF Foodservice Direc Director
tor Director Gay H. Welborn made the news
again this week with his damage
suits against the state Board of
Regents and UF journalism pro professor
fessor professor John V. Webb.
Welborn became a focus of at attention
tention attention last trimester when he
charged the UF was loosing nearly
$700,000 a year on private vending
machine concessions.
The charges came on the heels

j l> y
- r i
I II A*,
WHO WILL REPLACE SLOAN?

QHieJfloriba Alligator

Vol. 58, No. 132

from Viet Nam, thereby allowing
self-determination and self selfgovernment
government selfgovernment to the people of that
country.
His most recent statements have
protested the destruction caused
by the presence of the military
force. The detriment, he contends,
is to the culture and history of the
Vietnamese people.
I become more and more dis disturbed
turbed disturbed at the speeches ... of my
colleague who has fallen into the
trap of uttering sweeping, but naive

of his dismissal as Food Service
director because of irreconcil irreconcilable
able irreconcilable differences between himself
and UF Business Manager William
Elmore.
Welborn contends he was fired
without cause or provocation
and is suing the Board of Regents
for accumulated pay on 55 days
vacation leave and 61 days sick
leave.
In a separate suit against Webb,
Welborn alleges the journalism
professor falsely and mali maliciously
ciously maliciously told acquaintances of

University of Florida

statements in the spotlights
glare, Smathers said.
Smathers began by illustrating
that the individual in a democracy
must not disobey laws because he
does not believe in them. He as associated
sociated associated this disobeyance with an anarchy
archy anarchy and disunity.
According to Smathers, when a
law, or decision of policy, has
been decided by legal process, all
citizens must subordinate them themselves
selves themselves to the ruling so that maxi maximum
mum maximum order and unity may exist.
As the individual must abide by the

Welborn that Welborn was a liar
and was not a person who could be
believed.
Under terms of his contract
Welborn was allowed to accumulate
one day a month sick leave up to
90 days. He was also allowed 30
days a year vacation leave.
In addition to the vacation and
sick leave pay, he is demanding
payment of wages from February
21 through July 1, expiration date
of his one year contract.
(See WELBORN, Page 3)

Sloan Leaves UF
For N.C. State
By TYLER TUCKER
Alligator Staff Writer
Who will sing the National Anthem at home basketball games?
Saturday, head basketball coach Norman Sloan announced that he
had signed a three-year contract to coach at North Carolina State,
his alma mater. Consequently his wife, Jo Ann, who usually sings the
national anthem, will also make the move to Raleigh.
Sloan said he was very satisfied with the terms of the contract.
He will fill the vacancy at State left by Press Maravich, who resigned
to take a similar position at Louisiana State.
This past week, John T. Calswell, Chancellor at North Carolina
State, and the schools athletic council had been considering three
candidates for the job: Sloan, Bill Gibson of Virginia, and Mel Thomp Thompson
son Thompson of the Citadel.
Sloan came to Florida from the Citadel in 1961. His first year he
was named Coach of the Year in the Southeastern Conference while
guiding the Gators to a 15-11 record.
He began his basketball career at N. C. State as a player under the
late Everett Case. His sophomore year, 1946-47, Sloan was a member
of Cases first Atlantic Coast Conference champions.
Upon graduation from N. C. State, Sloan became head coach at
Presbyterian College, where he spent four years and posted a 70-30
record. Sloan then became assistant coach at Memphis State. In 1956
he was named head coach at the Citadel.
Sloan will now take the helm of the Wolfpack basketball team. Case
coached the team until# 1963 when poor health forced him into retire retirement.
ment. retirement. The command then went into the hands of Maravich who built
an Atlantic Coast Conference champion in his first full year. Last
season Maravich led the Wolfpack to a second place finish.
Many applicants for the position left by Sloan have been received.
Among them are Hugh Durham, Florida State assistant; Joe Williams,
young coach at Jacksonville Univ.; Glenn Wilkes, Stetson; Mel Thomp Thompson,
son, Thompson, the Citadel; Bill Gibson, Virginia; Bill Campbell, Carson-Newman;
and Chuck Noe, South Carolina.
Recruiting for the University of Florida basketball team will be
continued by Jim McCachren, assistant coach, and Brooks Henderson,
freshman coach.
The new coach selected by the Athletic Board will have the oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to familiarize himself with his new basketball team when
Florida makes a July tour of South America sponsored by the State
Department. On the trip the Gators will play 20 games in one month.

laws, so must he stand by national
policy as directed by law, in this
case the license of the President
to control military force in Viet
Nam.
The President has pursued our
objectives ... in a cool, in a pre precise
cise precise and in a measured manner.
His is the single and sole respon responsibility
sibility responsibility for the conduct of that war,
and his are the hands that hold the
cards of destiny, Smathers said.
To charge that our soldiers
despoil Viet Nam, as he did the
day before yesterday, to me seems
simplicity, the height of absurdity.
Even before the days of Sherman,
people knew that war is hell, and
yet this distinguished Senator
stands before the people of this
nation and says that this nation...
is actually destroying the culture
and history of the South Vietnamese
people.
They have not been hurt any
more than the people of Italy were
hurt, or the people of France were
hurt, or the people of West Ger Germany
many Germany were hurt when our troops
were there and freed them .
and allowed them to continue with
their culture, Smathers said.
(See SMATHERS, Page 3)

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

''IPS* V H m
t- Jfw m, Jr
I become more and more dis disturbed
turbed disturbed at the speeches of my col colleague
league colleague . ?
>* up
. . who has fallen Into the
trap of uttering sweeping, but
naive statements in the spotlights
glare.
jfll
Hpr
m
*'We are not in Viet Nam to
shrink freedom but rather to en enlarge
large enlarge its boundaries for the peo people.
ple. people.
fHigh To Speak§
I On Education |
*,*!
Miamis Mayor Robert King |x
High will officially open his *
:£ campaign for the second De De:£
:£ De:£ mocratic primary with a ::
:$ speech on campus today at 3:30 xj
:$ p.m. in University Auditor- :$
ium. He will speak on £
cation.
$: High, along with Senators jx
jx Scott Kelly and Fred Karl, jx
X; is scheduled to arrive at
.X; Gainesville Municipal Airport
at 3 p.m. :j:j
High will lead a motorcade :j:j
:j:j from the airport to the univer- :j:j
:j:j sity. After his campus speech,
:j:j he is scheduled to speak at jx
jjjj Buchholz Junior High, accord- jx
jjj: ing to Leon Polhill and Ed Kay, j:j:
jij: co-chairmen for Students for
:j:j High. $

* BUY BUCH BUCHWALD
WALD BUCHWALD TICK TICKETS.
ETS. TICKETS. See story
on page nine.



# Tbe Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Mat 11, Ist-t

Page 2

CtRM*
Hi

(! Prsf Bits Awtrl
Dr. Paul Turrnnu, IT professor of chemistry asp or^rr or of
liie OrgArdc Dherr.istr IXvis.:or, vs. s the redpner: of tr.t T.:nzi
A ware during las: Friday's sessjor. of ti* Me-gang-lr?- Miuiatur*
ir. Ta.~p£_ This awarr is preseut£*r annusD} r: r z. FI-or;ra chemist
demons* ram rig oatsia.7i.-dng ahtirry arc corcrftsnioos :r. researc:,
teaching axir arminisuram
Jaralism Ptmis Simper
The JoanAJlsir arc Coirrrxiiacaiions Dares will have a rc-er rc-erer
er rc-erer ~ftsr supper ar the Vsiversin Woroer/s Club, the Perry House,
this Saruroay, May 4, a: t:3I p.n.
Hii4ii§sfitH fitik
Dr. Myrnx. S. Heirungsfielu, professor of marketing ir ITs
College of Business Arrrrasrraoor, was oarer Marketing
F uueaxor of toe Year' by Sales arc Marketing Executives-ln-
this wee* ir. Bostor.. Dr. Hei dtngsfie- o is a nationally nationallykne-vr
kne-vr nationallykne-vr consultant ir .rite Seir of marketing arc racketing research.
Ifctim Cacert Tuifkt
j T*rc Lyceum Council concerts are scheduler raring term ED-A.
Carter Nice, violinist from Jacksonville, arc FI arc Varan, a
pianist, will appear ir University Auitnrr tonight a: 5:15.
Selections performed -will include Beethovers Sonata ir G
Major and Hanoi's First Rhapsody.*'
Taneusr Keraer, a concert pianist frorr Warsaw, Poland, will
pee the secoxc concert Tnesoa;-, May 14.
Fr*f Fiklishs Histtrf
Florida A Runrrer Years Arc, originated for the Florida
Civil war Centennial Committee arc the Florida Library and
-Historical Coir mission, has beer publisher ir book font It was
edited by IT professor of history, Dr. Samuel Proctor and is
available through the Fiorina State Library and Historical Corr Corrmissinr
missinr Corrmissinr ir Tallahassee.
Art iiprsiictias
Students arc faculty bar. rev rent fine art reproductions frorr
the T CF library. These framer arc read> to hang Color prints may
be rented for SI .DO $1.75 per picture per trimester. The prints
are or display ir. the Humanities arc Browsing Rooms arc ar the
Clrcularior Desk. Works in dune reproductions of Klee, Picasso.
Yar Gogh, arc others.
lsi Cmcil Taiikt
Dec Council will meet tonight ar 7:31 rr the Florida L nice.
Auditorium.. Caucuses will be a: 7 pm. Decisior Partys caucus
will be ir Room 305 and Student Party's ir. Room 3C*4.

Dine ITALIA* Stylel
0" :
KJI ITALIAN AMERICAN I
I CUISINE I
NEW SUMMER HOURS I
SwNDAY-THURSDAY 5-" c.~. I
FRIDAY i SATURDAY 5-12 c-~. I
CLOSED MONDAYS I
SPECIALIZING IN I
Socaretti-Lasagnc-Rc viol i I
Veal Pam icl one ~Pi zzc KAont cofti
Eac Plant Pamicionc-Lczster
Cr>crt:ra' T ec N.Y. Strip-Filet Mignon
r* / c *
m- t TI f r ( O w w

, ul> ir-y - w rm tfct m*' te toCU to to ** - LirUtori*. c
90 ** 11, . nwtttr .*. <* to*-*- .to to~rttorr tyto
*_ F ,T2r7Tr ntM .. rtu,r Miru to*** t Mwrtun v to*C* *' ia,lr
fI) ~ or or tor oto rtorrc- tMti fctoics lor armiw > to C*~ to tor, to.
, c# w of 'll i rmrui. -*c b
_ r*i rMffli AI.UC. ATOU u 1
TK _ | > m aAi t - -__ Mri Mkiy rarTTr ton.* lUy Jto * *" r r n
P-** flw j l ,7 m -j- at imi atofcwrv Tto #>*** u toto pK * cbu
to

i.Crhool Finishes Sixth

Cor m mean: ns res uir
hist: ii the national 'Aiiliam rs~
drl;o Hearst Founcatjoc writing
contests.
The school- placer sixth out of
4: ir. tots years ccm petition.
year the IT w: firs: glace to roe
nanorwioe ccrrpetit:; ns.
Winri.no VF students "-en war*
iJurs r -r-r. -m. r

mg t W. < I
*Are you sure today
is homecoming? I
r Hi
/ HBB
gMMMtittMNBI
I
Any game is more fun with ice-cold Coke on hand. Coca-Cola has the taste yau ifik I
never get tired of ... always refreshing. Thats why things go better w.th Coke ... Rggfl
after Cake ... after Coke.
k. of th. Coca Colo Compos, by GAINESVILLE COCA-COLA BOTTLING I
' HHhHHHBBHK
r z*v HhKr
I lu/as a culy hAiiucl l>Ahy. Hov l>Al>y look at me now!
I Get CURL mi the new I r natural CutU with th v tool, tv.uny ral body remains You en|oy h.ur l |ylin ImmmlomHoi months'
What H v out uiih resist Mann onl Ml imlmml uih respoml
I to ClRl fRII. Keep umuk il You II hi ,\ Mn,olhie loi Mire' v ,*ZZ.'

; f Miami, ar.d Carolyn Watt of
* Williams wor* second, 11th and
iStb place awards. His second
Tacr stor. concerned a girl cured
of a i are at *e j
vuier Health Center. His 11th
r ace story was a spot news stor>
or. the firing of the AlUgator edi editors
tors editors last trimester.
He won the 13th place for a .ea .ealure
lure .ealure inteniew with Dr. Vincent

McGuire concerning accreditation'
of schools.
Martinez won a fifth place for
general news writing with his story
on an airplane hijacked in an at attempt
tempt attempt to reach Cuba. He also won
a 14th place award for a feature
on Cuban refugees living in Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville.
Miss Watt won a fifth place for
a feature on the mother of a men mentally
tally mentally retarded child.



Students In IV
TO ALL STUDENTS M
AND UNIVERSITY personnel j
I fC*
I V V CAFETERIA

khE mu
Want some
good answers I
to some
Hsl *;-' t ||||||
I big questions I
about your
future?
4^B': H
IH y ' mm
tlf .1
.
|l||| '. .. '
m -.
HH e ,- 'f, '..' .. .. -..'.R^R:
HH ". ,, i hb
I Sign up now I
fl for an on-campus interview with IBM fl

I if you ask, well tell all. About
I go-places careers with IBM.
I About opportunities in such areas
I as basic and applied research
I device, new product and
I programing systems develop-
I ment-and manufacture of pace-
I setting equipment using the
I latest technologies.
I You could begin by firing these
1 questions at the IBM interviewer:
1 How many technologies is IBM
active in?
I How can IBM keep me
technologically "hot" through through
through out my career?
nj v

How many plants, labs and
technical centers does IBM have?
Where are they? And what kind
of choice do I have?
What about creative freedom for
the engineer and scientist at IBM?
What about rewards-finangial
and otherwise?
The answers to these and all
questions about IBM are yours for
the asking. So don't miss your
IBM interview. Visit your place placement
ment placement office and sign up now.
If for any reason you cant make it
on campus, feel free to visit
your nearest IBM branch office.
Or write: Manager of College
Relations, IBM Corporate Head Headquarters,
quarters, Headquarters, Armonk, N.Y. 10504.

( fua r| 1)
Welborn left his job on January
21 but was paid through February
21 plus 30 days vacation leave.
The suit also claims the UF
refused to return several items be belonging
longing belonging to Welborn, including
recipes, books and recipes, books
and records.
When contacted by The Alligator,
Elmore said Welborn had sent a
letter to the UF Business Office
concerning the Regents suit.
This letter, said Elmore, has
been forwarded to the Regents

Welborn Sues Webb

Once youve heard the answers,
youll probably have one more
question:When can I start? I
Whatever your area of study, I
ask us how you might use your
particular talent at IBM. Job I
opportunities at IBM lie in eight
major career fields: (1) Research
and Development, (2) Engineering, I
(3) Manufacturing, (4) Finance
and Administration, (5) Marketing, I
(6) Field Engineering, (7) Systems I
Engineering, (8) Programing. IBM I
is an Equal Opportunity Employer. I
IBM I
<*

attorney in Tallahassee, Ralph
Odum.
When questioned further, El Elmore
more Elmore preferred to make no
comment.
The incident with the journalism
professor reportedly involved a
conversation between Webb and
former Alligator editors Benny
Cason and Andy Moor.
According to Cason and Moor,
Webb made the comments during
a conversation in the Campus Club
Cafeteria.
While discussing stories on Food
Service Cason said Webb called

Tuesday, May 10, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Welborn a trouble maker and a
liar.
Cason said he told Welborn of
the incident shortly after its occur occurance.
ance. occurance. Welborn told The Alligator
he had been thinking of bringing
the suit for some time.
The suit charges Webbs state statements
ments statements were made with intent to
injure the plaintiff and cause his
reputation great harm, and were
made without any basis or justi justification.
fication. justification.
Webb said the suit had surprised i
him but that he couldnt comment
further on it until he has a chance
to contact his lawyer.
Smothers Raps
Fulbright
f l tm N*
We are not there (in Viet Nam)
to shrink freedom, but rather to
enlarge its boundaries for the
people, he added.
Fulbright has suggested that the
U. S. withdraw all commitments
from Southeast Asia, leaving the
people and governments alone, al allowing
lowing allowing what he feels is the freedom
which all individuals deserve. Ac According
cording According to Fulbright, there is no
immediate danger or harm to the
people themselves, or to the U. S.
government and its opposition to
Communist elements contained in
some areas.
If South Viet Nam were to fall
into Communist hands, it would
precipitate the demise of freedom
in all the nations of Southeast Asia:
Malaysia, Burma, Thailand, Cam Cambodia,
bodia, Cambodia, and Indonesia, Smathers
warned.
It is not entirely unlikely that
with Southeast Asia in its grasp,
the Communist would then direct
their energies toward subverting
the Philippines, New Guinea, and
the Australian continent.
Our forces will remain as long
as the government of South Viet
Nam wants us there, Smathers
concluded.
XEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, 10$ ea.
20 & Over, 9?
Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 WESTUNIVERSOT i AVE
1 NEED CASH )
( IN YOUR POUCH? 1
£ELL THOSE THINGS
YOU DON'T NEED
WITH j
I GATOR ADS j

Page 3



Page 4

l, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 10, 1966

QTfjeJfloriba Alligator

EDITOR
Gene Nall

Kelly for High for...

&hhhh . the password is
W INTEGRITY.
And now it is the password for
more than just the High Team.
Many supporters -- not past or
former of Scott Kelly will
he out fighting to get a former
opponent on the Democratic ticket
for the November gubernatorial
elections.
It's already apparent that some
Kelly supporters will give their
support to incumbent Gov. Haydon
Bums. They say the gap between
the political philosophies of the
two men is too wide to bridge.
Following the turn of the tide in
the election returns, Kelly said
that he would give his active sup support
port support to one of the two leading
Democratic candidates.
To many it was obvious the sup support
port support would go to Miami Mayor
Robert King High. Personalities
aside the two candidates have both
campaigned vigorously for two pri primary
mary primary goals: quality education soy
all the state and integrity in the
governor's office.
These issues, Kelly said in
his statement supporting High,
are more important than any po political
litical political ambitions of any man be because
cause because they affect the lives of every
human being living in Florida.
Kelly achieved two goals by
throwing his active support to
Mayor High: he preserved, to a
certain extent, his political influ influence
ence influence -- particularly if a large
number of his supporters cast
their votes for High in the run runoff
off runoff on May 24.
He also proved he was interested
in good government above political
considerations.
Kelly supporters -- not past or
ex-supporters must think more
highly of their candidate now that
he has had the opportunity to, and
did show the seriousness of his
desire to have a more responsible
state government.
We think that anyone labeling
himself a Scott Kelly supporter can
be proud of his candidate's actions.
In clear conscience, a vote for
good government and quality edu education
cation education for the state can be cast for
the candidate Kelly has said he
would support.
Their candidate may have been
eliminated in the first primary,
but they still have a loud voice

M la 0u Pe/iAO4I P(U Tkl ThA.

with their vote in the May 24
second primary.
1 :j||
I* I
m mOmm f JSEf i
/Jp m jfqSff /
*
most important
t is significant that Miami
Mayor Robert King High --
with the assistance of Scott Kelly
-- chose the UF as the opening
for his final round of the Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic nomination fight.
Both Kelly and High have ex expressed
pressed expressed throughout their campaign
the importance they were placing
on better education as an issue in
this campaign for governor.
In the opening rounds of his
campaign, Scott Kelly spoke here
at the university. He told the group
of interested students that whoever
was elected the next governor of
Florida would ride into the office
on a platform strongly supporting
better education.
This visit is not only an indica indication
tion indication of the UF's importance, but is
symbolic of the importance of edu education
cation education as an issue in the guber gubernatorial
natorial gubernatorial runoff.
Alligator
EDITORIAL STAFF
Executive Editor Bob Menaker
City Editor Yvette Cardozo
Sports Editor Jeff Denkewalter
Photographers r Nick Arroyo
Sam Johnston
Staff Writers Norma Bell, Carl Brown
Arlene Caplan, Dick Dennis, Eileen Dworkin
Margie Green, Kathie Keim, Judy Miller
Allen Soden, Alan Burton, Tyler Tucker

MANAGING EDITOR
Steve Smith

-p-Musical Scene
yj) WITH REID POOLE
Chairman, Department of Music
Carter Nice, young violinist in his mid-twenties from Jacksonville
Florida, with Flavio Varani at the piano, will present the first concer
of the Summer Trimester Tuesday evening, May 10, at 8:15 in Univer University
sity University Auditorium. The concert is presented under the aegis of the Studen
Government Lyceum Council. Regular Lyceum Council prices prevail
$2.00 for the general public, SI.OO for University of Florida faculty
staff, and high school students and children; University of Florid:
students are admitted on their I.D. cards. There will be no advance*
ticket sale. Tickets will be available at the door Tuesday evening
Please enter and purchase tickets through the west Auditorium en entrance,
trance, entrance, the entrance nearest the Century Tower.
Carter Nice was born in Jacksonville, Florida, and received hi
early musical training as a scholarship student at the Eastman Schoo
of Music, where he received his Bachelor of Music degree and s
Performers Certificate in Violin. Upon graduation from Eastman
Mr. Nice went to New York to study with Raphael Bronstein at th<
Manhattan School of Music where he received his Master of Mush
degree in 1964. Mr. Nice has appeared widely in recital and as solnls
with orchestras in the eastern part of the United States.
Mr. Nice received favorable reviews for his program in New Yorks
Carnegie Recital Hall. The New York Times reviewer reported
He disclosed a sweet tone and confident technique in Veracinis E minoi
Sonata and a fiery temperament that made Beethovens Kreutzer
Sonata the invigorating experience it can be.
Mr. Flagello (the composer) .. had every reason to be pleased, for
the exciting performance made the strongest of impressions for his
sonata . .
Mr. Nice has selected a program for Tuesday evening calculated to
please the discerning concert-goer. The first portion of the program
will be devoted to the Sonata in G Major, Opus 30, No. 3, by Bee Beethoven,
thoven, Beethoven, followed by the spectacular Sonata in D Major, Opus 94a,
by Sergei Prokofieff.
Following intermission, he will offer the Bela Bartok First
Rhapsody, Ernest Blochs passionate Nigun, and the Suite
Populaire Espagnole, by Manuel de Falla.
It is with much regret that we announce the cancellation of the
concert by Soprano Sarah Traverse Turner, originally scheduled for
Tuesday evening, May 17. The cancellation has been made necessary
by schedule conflicts.
Dr. Robert
Hutchins
I achieved, briefly, the ambition of every right-thinking
vJ7 man. I became associated with a very large sum on money.
I refer to the Ford Foundation.
My experience during that period and my observation before
and since convince me that a thorough examination of the founda foundations
tions foundations in American life is overdue.
No such examination has yet been made. The two formal con congressional
gressional congressional investigations staged in the 1950 s were absurd on their
face. They aimed to show that *he foundations were subversive.
The effort was to portray Ford, Rockefeller and Carnegie, their
heirs and assigns, conspiring to overthrow the government of the
United States.
Or, if the owners and nominal managers of these great fortunes
were not knaves, they must have been fools, for they had allowed
the foundations, it was said, to get into hands of officers and
employees who were surreptitiously supporting subversion.
The credibility gap here was so wide that the congressional
investigators aroused more laughter than alarm.
Congressman Wright Patman has lately been on a line of inquiry
that must be taken seriously. He has been doing noble work in
trying to find out whether the foundations are really foundations.
He has been asking to what extent they are tax dodges, vehicles
of financial manipulation, public relations devices and instruments
of private aggrandizement rather than public service.
He has been concentrating on the donors use of foundation
money for his personal advantage. This is important, but it is
only a small part of the problem.
In lolanthe, Gilbert and Sullivans Lord Chancellor sings:
In my court I sit all day
Giving agreeable girls away.
If you substitute millions for girls you get the popular picture
of the foundation executive.
But it is not as idyllic as all that. The foundation officer knows
very well that the money he is giving away would have gone to the
government if it had not gone into the foundation. If the Ford Foun Founation
ation Founation had not been established, the government would have collect collected
ed collected millions in taxes, and spent them presumably, in the public
interest.
By setting up the foundation, the Ford family retained control
of the Ford Motor Company. The public does not care who owns
e company; it should care about whether it gets as much public
service from the foundation as it would have from the taxes.
The government is going into field after field formerly octurned
by private philanthropy. The last big development is federal
nancing of the fine arts. And I have not heard any serious sug suggestion
gestion suggestion that governmental subsidy is less efficient or discrimina discriminating
ting discriminating than foundation grants.
Governmental subsidy results from consensus. But so do foun foun< < ih S p CJ pltal of Philanthropy has been refuted by the history of
e or } < pndation; it cannot be accused of being venturesome.
. e fo U dati ns have in fact accepted the soponic advice given
y one of the congressional investigating committees:?' They should
nfof Vel |\ C * P rorr| oting ideas, concepts and opinion-forming
era w ich run counter to what the public currently wishes,
approves and lies.
(Copyright 1966, Los Angeles Times)



Schwartz criticizes university policy

(Editors Note: This article is
the second in a two-part series
by Herb Schwartz on The Student,
The University, and Due Process:
A Call for a More Realistic Ap Approach.
proach. Approach. In Tuesdays column,
Schwartz argued that due process
requirements should be applicable
to a universitys administrative
procedures. Today he begins by
attacking the strongest reasons
which have been given by univer universities
sities universities for their being free from
due process standards.)
By HERB SCHWARTZ
Honor Court Chancellor
University administrators often
defend their lack of due process
with the analogy that the university
stands in the place of a parent to
its 'student body. This is a refer reference
ence reference to the old common law doc doctrine
trine doctrine of in loco parentis.
How realistic is this assertion?
Does a university apply the doc doctrine
trine doctrine only to students who have not
reached their majority? Does the
doctrine extend to students who
attend college in their home town,
with their parents nearby?
In fact, the doctrine breaks down
without the necessity of bringing
out such exceptions. A university
administration cannot possibly act
in the place of a parent for a stu student
dent student body running well into the
thousands. When the doctrine e evolved,
volved, evolved, in England, college
students were, for the most part,
much younger than today. Todays
college student, besides being old older,
er, older, is more mature than his pre predecessors
decessors predecessors were, even at a com comparable
parable comparable age.
The familiar argument for the
application of in loco parentis be because
cause because of legal lack of capacity can
no longer be seriously supported
in light of the makeup of todays
student population. The median
college student age hovers around
twenty, and the number of students
who have reached twenty-one ex exceeds
ceeds exceeds one million.
Yet no university subjects minor
students.to parental control
while leaving those over twenty twentyone
one twentyone free of such control.
The idea of in loco parentis
involves other anomalities. Take,
for example, the right of a student
to be free from an unreasonable
search. If the doctrine can be ap applied
plied applied to minor students living on
campus, logically it must extend
to those living off-campus as well.
But it is ludicrous to assert that
an administrator could knock at a
students off-campus home and
demand to conduct a searcn in
loco parentis. The illogical nature
of the doctrine in support of ad administrative

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ministrative administrative power is manifest in
theory and in application.
If administrators defend on the
basis of an implied consent from
the students parents to maintain
discipline, one could quickly reply
that no parent would want his child
subjected to reprisals without the
utmost in due process protection.
Another support for a univer universitys
sitys universitys summary action against a
student is on the basis of an im implied
plied implied contract, in which the stu student
dent student waives his objections to uni university
versity university disciplinary action when he
enrolls. This stand is usually based
on a statement in the catalog that
registration connotes agreement
with the terms of certain condi conditions
tions conditions in the catalog.
The contract theory, though, will
not withstand the searching scru scrutiny
tiny scrutiny of constitutional principles.
Students and the university do not
form any reasonable contract be because
cause because they do not meet in the
market place at arms length.
There can be no negotiation or
meeting of the minds, and no
valid contract, between student and
university because there is no
equality of bargaining. The student
is forced to agree to whatever
terms the university may make
because he has no place to turn if
he does not agree.
For example, it is unreasonable
to argue that if a student does not
wish to submit to the UFs admin administrative
istrative administrative rules he can choose to go
to another school. It is very likely
that only the UF (or a certain other
college) offers the course of
studies he wishes to pursue. And
to suppose that a student could turn
down this contract by not attend attending
ing attending college at all is even more lu ludicrous.
dicrous. ludicrous.
The courts have been very re reluctant
luctant reluctant to review the due process

I ROBBIES I
Best In Steaksl
Q B^andwiches
rtv & BILLIARDS^
1718 W. University Ave. I
'OnThe Gold Coast* I

Speaking Out

nature of university administra administrative
tive administrative hearings. The liberty of uni universities
versities universities to make any disciplinary
rules they wish has become a
guarded doctrine.
In view of the vastly important
ramifications of such hearings, the
deference granted to the univer universities
sities universities in their administrative pro procedures
cedures procedures cannot and probably will
not be continued. The arguments
of implied contract and in loco
parentis cannot hope to remain in
a favorable light before the courts,
especially as Fourteenth Amend Amendment
ment Amendment rights continue to become
more clear in other areas.
As long as we live in a society
which grows more complex while
attempting to emphasize the dig dignity
nity dignity of the individual we must
assure that no one is put at a dis disadvantage
advantage disadvantage through an arbitrary or
unfair administrative proceeding,
or through the lack of any pro proceeding
ceeding proceeding at all. To protect the in individual,
dividual, individual, the courts must become
more sensitive to possible pro procedural
cedural procedural unfairness by universities.
This does not mean all the re requirements
quirements requirements of the Fourteenth
Amendment must be recognized by
universities, but there is a desir desirable
able desirable minimum of due process that
the courts should enforce.
(Similarly the courts should watch
for administrative due process in
the workings of all other private
governments which hold sway
over so many people today.)
The right to a hearing, to cross crossexamine
examine crossexamine an accuser, and know knowledge
ledge knowledge of the full slate of charges
before a hearing is not too much to
require of any agency with sanc sanctioning
tioning sanctioning powers especially when
a persons future may depend on
the outcome.
If the university has been able
to reach fair decisions in the

past without such procedures, it
certainly would be in a better po position
sition position to arrive at a fair decision
after the benefit of these few basic
guarantees of our legal system.
A presumption of innocence should
abide with the student, and the bur burden
den burden of proof should be placed en entirely
tirely entirely on his accusers.

On Campos
xy ( Hy the author of Hally {found the Flog. Hoys!",
*7 Me dill is," etc.)
THE COLLEGE PRESIDENT:
HIS CAUSE AND CURE
Oh, sure, youve been busy, what with going to classes, doing
your homework, catching night crawlers, getting married,
picketing but cant you pause for just a moment and give
thought to that dear, dedicated, lonely man in the big white
- house on the hill? I refer, of course, to Prexy.
*- (It is interesting to note that college presidents are al always
ways always called Prexy. Similarly, trustees are always called
Trixie. Associate professors are always called Axy-Pixy.
Bursars are called Foxv-Woxy. Students are called
Algae.)
But I digress. We were speaking of Prexy, a personage
at once august and pathetic. Why pathetic? Well, sir, con consider
sider consider how Prexy spends his days. He is busy, busy, busy.
He talks to deans, he talks to professors, he talks to trus trustees,
tees, trustees, he talks to alumni. In fact, he talks to everybody ex except
cept except the one group who could lift his heart and rally his
spirits. I mean, of course, the appealingest, endearingest,
winsomest group in the entire college delightful you, the
students.
It is Prexys sad fate to be forever a stranger to your
laughing, golden selves. He can only gaze wistfully out the
window of his big white house on the hill and watch you at
your'games and sports and yearn with all his tormented
heart to bask in your warmth. But how? It would hardly
be fitting for Prexy to appear one day at the Union, clad in
an old rowing blazer, and cry gaily, Heigh-ho, chaps!
Whos for sculling?
No, friends, Prexy cant get to you. It is up to you to get
to him. Call on him at home. .Just drop in unannounced. He
will naturally be a little shy at first, so you must put him at
his ease. Shout, Howdy-doody, sir! I have come to bring a
little sunshine into your drear and blighted life! Then
yank his necktie out of his vest and scamper goatlike
around him until he is laughing merrily along with you.
Then hand him a package and say, A little gift for vou,
sir.
For me? he will say, lowering his lids. You shouldnt
have.
"Yes, I should, you will say, because this is a pack of
Personna Super Stainless Steel Blades, and whenever I
think of Personna Super Stainless Steel Blades, I think of
you.
Why, hey? he will ask curiously.
Because, sir, you will say, though you are no longer
a young blade, still you gleam and function. Full though
you are of years and lumps, rheumy though your endocrines
and flaccid your hamstrings, still you remain sharp, inci incisive,
sive, incisive, efficacious.
Thank you, he will say, sobbing.
So it is with Personna, you will continue. Naturally
you expect a brand-new blade to give a close, speedy shave.
But how about a blade thats had hard and frequent use?
Do you still expect a close, speedy shave? Well, sir, if its a
Personna, thats what youll get. Because, sir, like you, sir,
Personna is no flash-in-the-pan. Like you, sir, Personna
abides.
He will clasp your hand then, not trusting himself to
speak.
But away with gloom! you will cry jollily. For I ha\e
still more good news to tell you of Personna!
How is that possible? he will say.
Hearken to me, you will say. Personna, in all its en enduring
during enduring splendor, is available not only in Double Edge style
but also in Injector style!
He will join you then in the Personna rouser, and then
he will bring you a steaming cup of cocoa with a marsh marshmallow
mallow marshmallow on top. Then you will say, Good-bye, sir. I will re return
turn return soon again to brighten vour dank, miasmic life.
Please do, he will say. But next time, if you can pos possibly
sibly possibly manage it. try not t< come at four in the morning.
. v M.:\ Sh iltm :m
Prexy and undergrad, late and soon, lair neat her and foul
the perfect shaving companion to Personna Hlades is Burma
Share. It comes in regular and menthol: it soaks rings
around any other lather. He kind to your kisser; try Personna
and Burma Share.

Tuesday, May 10, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

The most certain way for uni universities
versities universities to continue to secure
themselves against the fearful
spectre (in their view) of judicial
review arising out of disciplinary
proceedings is to establish and
adhere to the rudimentary features
of procedural due process des described
cribed described in this two-part article.

Page 5



I crator classifieds

for sale |
TRAILER FOR SALE, 32 x B.
Ideal for married couple or va vacation
cation vacation home. Tall 372-3787
between 6 & 7 p.m. (A-130-4t-c).
4 SPEAKER ZENITH STEREO.
AM-FM. $379 brand new: sell for
$l5O or best offer. 2-7433 after
5 p.m. 296-8 Diamond Village.
(A-132-st-c).
ALL CHANNEL TV ANTENNA with
rotator. In good condition. Has 40*
mast, lead wire and guy wire. Cost
$125 new, will take SSO. Call 372-
3890 after 5 p.m. (A-132-3t-c).
196£ FRONTIER MOBILE HOME.
10 x 50. Two bedroom, A/C,
washing machine. Early Amer.
decor. Excellent condition. Ph.
376-1876. (A-132-lt-p).
1966 WOLLENSAK 4-speed tape
recorder, model 5150. All acces accessories,
sories, accessories, $125. Complete U.S. divers
wet suit, double hose regulator,
weight belt, knife and sea gig, S9O.
Fluorescent draftsmans desk
lamp, $lO. Call 378-3776. (A-131-
2t-c).
ROBERTS 770 Tape Recorder with
reconnended matching 8 speak speakers.
ers. speakers. Relatively few playing hours.
Ope yr. old. Call 378-4624. (A (A---131-ts-c).
--131-ts-c). (A---131-ts-c).
MOBILE HOME, 1964 delux model.
Three bedroom, one furnished to
study, 1-1/2 bath, completely A/C,
washer, large fenced yard. Pool
privileges. Pinehurst Park, 372-
7994. (A-131-4t-c).
1963 BSA, 650 cc. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Best offer. 8-2244 or
6-9723. See at Styles By Phil in
Carolyn Plaza. (A-131-ts-c).
AIR CONDITIONERS for apts and
trailers. All sizes cost plus
10%. Sudden Service Fuel Oil Co.,
authorized Admiral dealer. 907 SW
3rd St. Ph. 376-4404. (A-131-
ts-c).
NEW AIR CONDITIONERS. Un Unredeemed
redeemed Unredeemed layaway, never install installed,
ed, installed, for balance due only. Sudden
Service Fuel Oil Co., 907 SW 3rd
St., 376-4404. (A-131-ts-c).
RCA Consol TV, $lO. twin trundle
beds, sls; refrigerator, $10; large
mirror in frame, $lO. Formica
kitchenette set, sls; metal desk,
$lO. Call 378-1778 between 7 and
11 p.m. (A-131-3t-c).
ALL-CHANNEL TV antenna, 20
mast, wire, $25 new (2 mos. old):
sls or best offer. Call 376-9793
after 5. (A-131-2t-c).
80cc YAMAHA Trailmaster. Rug Rugged!
ged! Rugged! Step-through design. Like
new. Only 300 miles. $225. 378-
2032. (A-130-st-c).
for rent
I
CCB, 2 bedroom house with appli appliances.
ances. appliances. Shady corner lots. Could
partly furnish one house. One effi efficiency
ciency efficiency apt. furnished, private bath
entrance, drive. 2225 NE 7th St;
726 NW 31st Place. Ph. 376-0595.
(B-l 31-ts-c).
NOW AVAILABLE. Furnished one
bedroom house. S6O per mo., in includes
cludes includes water. See 3117 NW 6th St.,
or call 372-7427. (B-132-1 t-cT.
UNEXPECTEDLY available at
summer rates, comfortable and
convenient efficiency apt. across
from campus. Also single corner
room for gentleman. Apply 321
SV !3th St. (B-132-t-c).

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 10, 1966

Page 6

I for rent
TWO ROOM efficiency, 3 blocks
from campus. S4O a mo. and sweep
halls. Phone after 5:30 p.m., 372-
8840. (B-131-ts-c).
NICE SMALL APT. 3 blocks north
of BSU, now available. Private en entrance,
trance, entrance, utilities furnished. Quiet.
Ph. 376-2072. (B-132-lt-c).
BABY CARE. In Christian home,
experienced and trustworthy.
$12.50 per week, Mon.-Fri. 311
NW 15th Terr. Ph. 376-2072. (B (B---132-lt-c).
--132-lt-c). (B---132-lt-c).
LEAVING GAINESVILLE, must
sublet beautiful one bedroom apt.
with swimming pool and A/C. Call
378-4424. (B-132-2t-c).
FOR MARRIED COUPLE or 2
Students. Three large rooms, fur furnished
nished furnished apt. Available for occu occupancy.
pancy. occupancy. Close to Univ. 376-9864,
111 SW 3rd Ave. Also small apt.
for one man. (B-132-3t-c).
1/3 BLOCK from Law College,
two bedroom, furnished apt. suit suitable
able suitable for 4. Call 372-3853 after 5
p.m. (B-132-1 t-c).

l Last Three Days At 1:00-3:10-5:20-7:35-9:50
ram JULIE CHRISTIE
raTBI BEST ACTRESS A
B 1 OF THE YEAR W
yjj lliiriiiiij
wr£ Horace Haiw-DBBosaroe
Ijdiflil STARTS FRIDAY
I Tl>>om 37-2434 |
A academy
i rr,
k ACRES OF FREE PARKING HOCKING CHAIR LOGE^
MARLOWhSt
M BRANDO W
w ay SAMSP/ffif/S k l
m fOl'mllDitlUt'willl'M!H ! ;
UiniAM HOPKINS' HMIIU 111 l i*] GfllH'U Hll JBy

for rent
PRIVATE ROOM 3 blocks from
campus, S2O a mo. Ph. 372-8840.
(B-l 31-ts-c).
EFFICIENCY single, modern,
A/C, close to Library. S6O a mo.
318 NW 15th Terr. 372-1226. (B (B---131-2t-c).
--131-2t-c). (B---131-2t-c).
ONE BLOCK from Administration
Building, large 2 bedroom fur furnished
nished furnished or unfurnished apt. A/C.
372-4692 or 376-7534. (B-130-
3t-c).
NEW ONE AND TWO bedroom fur furnished
nished furnished A/C apts with pool. One
bedroom S9O and $95. Two bed bedroom
room bedroom $125. Near UF & Medical Cen Center.
ter. Center. 372-9569. (B-131-ts-c).
FURNISHED ROOM in new home,
central A/C, linens furnished. 3
miles from Univ. 3820 NW 17th
Terr. Male student. 376-4478 or
376-4005. (B-131-2t-c).
FURNISHED APTS. 220 SE 7th St.
A/C, one each 4 bedrooms slOO
per mo. One each 2 bedrooms
$75 per mo. 372-0481. Mr. Kaplan.
(B-l 30- st-c).

for rent
FURNISHED APTS. One each, bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, $25 per mo. One each, bed bedroom
room bedroom apt., $55 per mo. One each
efficiency apt., $35 per mo. All
utilities supplied except gas. 320
NW 3rd St. 372-0481, Mr. Kaplan.
(B-130-st-c).
TWO FURNISHED APTS for rent,
upstairs SBO per mo., downstairs
S7O per mo. Utilities furnished.
Located 9 NE 9th St. Call 376-
0672. (B-131-st-c).
HUGE FURNISHED 3 BEDROOM
brick house, 1/2 block from Ad-*
ministration Building, 1226 SW
3rd Ave. 376-7534 or 372-3576.
Special Summer Rates. (B-130-
3t-c).
l lonite Ihru Thursday
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I FT
For Mole And
Female Students
Os The
University Os Florida.
4
OdC
.. .An Assortment Os Fine, Nationally Advertised
ProductsCourtesy Os Famous Manufacturers.
YOU WILL RECEIVE SUCH PRODUCTS AS THESE:
Male Pac
Macleans Toothpaste
Tackle Shave Cream
Alka-Seltzer (35<: size)
Absorbine, Jr.
Old Spice Lime After Shave Lotion
Halo Shampoo
*-
Female Pac
Pond's Dreamflower Talc I
Pond's Angel Face Compact Make-Up
Fresh-Start by Pond's
Macleans Toothpaste
Lustre Creme Shampoo
Neutragena Soap
Confidet's Sanitary Napkins
Deep Magic Moisture Cream
Alka-Seltzer
i
V
plus
Sales
Tax
THIS VALUABLE ARRAY OF PRODUCTS COMES
TO YOU WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF THE
MANUFACTURERS'. CAMPUS PAC IS YOURS
ONLY WHILE THE SUPPLY LASTS...
EXCLUSIVELY AT
AND BOOKSTORE

classifieds I

for rent
LIVE IN COOL LUXURY at dorm
rates in the swingingest apt. build building.
ing. building. One block off campus. LA
FONTANA. 372-3576 or 376-7534.
(B-130- 3t-c).
ONE BEDROOM A/C APT., one
block from campus. Inquire be between
tween between 5-7 p.m., 1203 SW Ist Ave.
If no answer call Keystone Heights
collect, 473-4135. (B-l 31-3 t-c).
wanted
ROOMMATE WANTED for IDrd
Trimester to share A/C apt. S4O
mo. plus utilities. La Fontana Apts.
#406. (C-131-2t-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
modern apt. with A/C, sliding
glass doors, patio. $45; 1/2 of
utilities. 376-5517; 378-3770 after
1 p.m. (C-132-3t-c).
WANTED: Roommate for one bed bedroom
room bedroom apt. $37.50 a mo. plus utili utilities.
ties. utilities. 303 NW 17th St., apt. 17.
Call 376-4245. (C-132-3t-p).
EXPERIENCED lead guitarist-vo guitarist-vocalist
calist guitarist-vocalist wants job with local, es established
tablished established band. Formerly with
Playboys.* Have own equipment.
Call Frank at 372-5556. (C-132-
2t-p).
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
modern A/C apt. Swimming pool.
$45 mo. plus utilities. Ruby D.
Apts. Call 372-5265, 5:30-7 p.m.
(C- 132-2 t-p).
WANTED: Roommate for 1 bed bedroom
room bedroom apt. at Village Park. S6O/mo.
plus utilities. A/C, swimming pool.
Call 376-8363. (C-131-2t-p).
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share large 2 bedroom, A/C, apt.
Two blocks from campus. $33 a mo.
Free cook and maid service. Ph.
378-1243 late afternoon or even evenings.
ings. evenings. (C-131-2t-c).
IMMEDIATELY: Female room roommate
mate roommate for A-term. Modern, A/C,
large bookshelves, only 5 blocks
from campus. $45/mo. Call 378-
2360. (C-131-st-p).
WANTED: Used girls English ra racer
cer racer or inexpensive motor bike or
scooter. Need desperately. Call
Karen or Gordon at 6-1345 after
4 p.m. (C-l 31-tf-nc).
NEED 2 ROOMMATES University
Garden Apts. S4O/mo. 372-0987.
(C-131 2t-p).
ROOMMATE WANTED for 3 bed bedroom
room bedroom 1 bath house. Rent $35. One
block off 13th St., 5 mins, to cam campus.
pus. campus. Call 378-4624. (C-1 31-ts-c).
Gator Ads Just Kill Me!
vaKfr

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Tuesday, May 10, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

help wanted
FLORIDA STUDENTS through di direct
rect direct selling you can earn S2OO a
week plus valuable school scholar scholarships.
ships. scholarships. You must be bondable and
demonstrate sales ability. This is
a full or part time job depending
on you. For information on this
outstanding job offer call 372-1549
and arrange for an interview im immediately.
mediately. immediately. (E-l 32-lt-c).
11 1
WANTED: Experienced student to
maintain apt. house pool. Salary
to be arranged. Call 376-6720 for
appointment. (E-132-2t-c).
SUMMER JOB, full time or part
time. Prefer students with Plant
Science and/or chemistry back background.
ground. background. Must meet requirements
of Federal Work Study Program;
Call 378-2600. (E-130-3t-c).
WAITER WANTED for Summer
Trimester, 4 until 8 p.m., 5 days
a week. Apply in person, Larrys
Wonderhouse, 14 SW 4st St. (E (E---131-2t-c).
--131-2t-c). (E---131-2t-c).
STUDENT GOVERNMENT needs
volunteer workers for the summer,
undersecretaries and typists. Ap Apply
ply Apply Rm. 310, Fla. Union. (E-131-
2t-c).
WANTED: Alligator carrier. Must
have car and Ist and 2nd periods
free on Tuesdays and Fridays.
Contact Bernard Mackey, 376-
3261, ext. 2832, or 378-4052. (E (E--
- (E--
autos
EXTRA CLEAN 1959 PORSCHE
Conv. Michelin X tires, tuned
Bursch exhaust system, Marchal
driving lights, very reasonable.
Call 376-2257. (G-132-2t-c).
1961 FORD FALCON. Excellent
condition, 4 door, navy blue. SSOO
or best offer. Call 2-7433 after
5 p.m. 296-8 Diamond Village.
(G-l 32-st-c).
BARGAIN AT $l5O. 1960 Ford
Fairlane. 4-door sedan, power
steering and brakes. See after
5 p.m., 372-8325. (G-l 32-2 t-c).
1963 VW 1200. White, completely
overhauled, excellent condition.
Ph. 376-3261, ext. 2271 between
9 a.m. 6 p.m. (G-l 31-st-c).
1962 T Bird. Low mileage, loaded.
Ph. 472-2593, Newberry. (G-131-
4t-c).
1956 CHEVY. New metallic blue,
all new interior, radio and heater.
Immaculate one owner, low mile mileage.
age. mileage. Call 378-2421 mornings or
evenings. (G-l 31-3 t-c).
1964 PONTIAC LEMANS conver convertible.
tible. convertible. 5 new white wall tires, R&H,
bucket seats, 6 cyl., 4-speed
transmission. Excellent condition.
Call 2-6330 after 5 weekdays. (G (G---1
--1 (G---1 31-2 t-c).

Page 7

real estate
CORNER NW 29th Ave. and 34th
St. Three bedroom, 2 bath, central
A/C and heat, 2 car garage. Rea Reasonable
sonable Reasonable down payment. Many ex extras.
tras. extras. Ph. 372-5969. (1-131-3 t-c).
LOW DOWN PAYMENT to married
student or staff. Three bedroom,
1 bath, $13,200, shady fenced back
yard. Near campus, golf, pool. 121
NW 25th St. 372-7715, or 376-
8565. (I-131-ts-c).
THREE BEDROOM, 2 bath CCB
home. Quiet neighborhood, con convenient
venient convenient location for schools,
churches, shopping. Extra large
corner lot, well landscaped, pri privacy.
vacy. privacy. Flexible financing cash to
mortgage terms continue 4-1/2%
GI mortgage. Payments at $72.
Sale price 515,500. Drive by
626 NE Bth Terr, (just east of
Fair Oaks) or call 376-7665. (I (I---131-
--131-- (I---131- c).
VERY MODERN 3 bedroom, 2-1/2
bath home in highly restricted area
just out city limits. Near elemen elementary
tary elementary school Selling price, $26,000
or will lease by owner. Ph. 372-
8175. (I 1312 tc).
services|
BLANKET RESERVATIONS for
meeting space in Florida Union
now being accepted. Forms at
information desk or reservation
office, rm. 108. (M-131-lt-c).
EXPERT TAILORING by Mrs.
Dora Manookian. Alterations of all
kinds of mens and womens clothing.
35 yrs. experience. Prices reason reasonable.
able. reasonable. Call 376-1794. 1824 NW Ist
Ave. (M-131-4t-c).
IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios, 372-0300. (M (M---1
--1- (M---1
RUBYS ALTERATIONS. 1238 SW
3rd Ave. 376-8506. (M-132-ltf-c).
personal
ANYONE INTERESTED in taking a
3 week course in Senior Life Sav Saving,
ing, Saving, contact Marc Lawrence at
376-8740, today or tomorrow. (J (J---1
--1- (J---1
THE LEGAL STATUS OF JUVE JUVENILES.
NILES. JUVENILES. A public discussion with
panel members: Jack Durrance,
Alachua County Commissioner;
David Offord, Prof of Psychiatry;
George Fletcher, Prof of Law;
Fletcher Baldwin, Prof of Consti Constitutional
tutional Constitutional Law. Sponsored by the
Gainesville Chapter, American
Civil Liberties Union. To be held
Wed., May 11,8 p.m. Hillel Foun Foundation,
dation, Foundation, 16 NW 18th St. (J 132 t-c).
I 1 '
I FREE KITTENS. Two gray striped
males and one black and brown
striped female. Call 372-6018 after
5:30. (J 132- 1 t-c).
VISIT GATOR GROOMER where
romance blooms. Next door to
Univ. P.O. Self-service and pro professional
fessional professional laundry and dry cleaning.
(J-1 31-ts-c).
AUDITIONS. THE BENT CARD
COFFEE HOUSE, 1526 W. Univ.
Ave., will hold auditions for any
good to the last drop entertainers.
Wed., May 11, at 7:30 p.m. (J (J---1
--1 (J---1 31-2t-cO.
THE FORCE that clouded mens
mind as to language also clouded
mens mind as to science and re related
lated related fields. Go ahead, learn it or
you will flunk. H. C. Sims, 741
E. 55th St., Hialeah, Fla. 33013.
(J-130-st-p).



1116 Orancre e*

Page 8

3, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 10, 1966

Campus Calendar
PLEASE TURN IN ALL ITEMS FOR CAMPUS CALENDAR TO THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS OFFICE, FLA. UNION

Tuesday Pre-Med and Pre-Dent Students: Register with the Pre-
May 10 Professional Counseling Office," 111 Anderson, May
9 May 20.
Union Board: 4:45 p.m., 215 FU.
Tuesday Evening Supper Club: 6:30 p.m., Presbyterian
Student Center. Non-denominational: everyone single
and over 21 invited. SI.OO.
Lyceum Council: 8:15 p.m., Univ. Aud. Carter Nice, Vio Violinist.
linist. Violinist.
Sigma Tau Engineering Fraternity: 7:30 p.m., 512 Eng.
Bldgi Business meeting: refreshments will be served.
Students for High: 9 a.m. -1 p.m., Student Service Booth.
MENSA: 11:15 1:30 p.m., reserved section, west wing,
Main Cafeteria. Daily: for information on membership
contact Mike Sipe, 8-4950 or 305-21 Diamond Village.
Students and faculty invited. Daily.
Students for High Rally: 3:30 p.m., Univ. Aud.
Wednesday FU Dance Lessons: 7:30 p.m., FU Social Room.
May 11 Engineering Wives: 9:30 a.m., Blue Room, Student Service
Center. Election of officers: Crazy Hat Theme make
a crazy hat and wear it. Prizes given. j

Administrative Notices To Students, Faculty Sc Staff

TO STUDENTS:
JOBS AVAILABLE: Jobs are available for students
interested in part-time sales work while in school
and full time during summer break. A representative
will be on the campus at 2 p.m. Wednesday, May 11,
to discuss employment. Interested students should
contact Mrs. Stechmiller, Student Employment Office,
124 Tigert Hall.
WORKERS NEEDED: Student Government needs
volunteer workers (secretaries and typists) for the
summer. Apply in Room 310, Florida Union.
MALE STUDENTS: Special physical fitness classes
will .be conducted at Florida Gym during periods 2,
3,4, and 6, Monday through Friday. This is a non noncredit
credit noncredit activity. Interested students may sign up with
Mr. Foy Stephens in the varsity weight room.
SPEECH SCREENING TESTS: All teacher education
majors are required to satisfy speech screening re requirements
quirements requirements BEFORE being admitted into the Advanced
General Notices
SWIM CLASS: A non-credit swim class will begin
Monday, May 9, at 12 noon in the Florida Pool. Stu Students,
dents, Students, faculty and staff members are eligible. Regis Registration
tration Registration will be at 10 a.m. Monday, May 9, in Room 227,
Florida Gymnasium. All staff members must have a
$2 swim card, available at the Gym. This card, which
is good throughout the summer for recreational swim-
UNCLAIMED PACKAGE: The Campus Mail Room
has a package from Reliance Merchandising Company,
Philadelphia, Pa., which has no name on the address.
It contains electronics parts valued at $2.60. The in invoice
voice invoice number is 15417; the money order number is
-6,481,895,177. The company has no nameon the order.
Please claim your package as soon as possible.

I CASH **s> LOANS MONEY
I $25 to S6OO C& c ^ c u P * 6OO
I PAYDAY-SHORT TERMS U M /OR YOUR SECOND CAR
I 376-5333 MONOn I" IflQfl C G 10. 222 W. University Aw

Professional Sequence or enrollment in EDS 400, EDE
400 and EDE 300, 301 and 302. Students expecting to
enroll in these courses in 111-B or in September must
satisfy this requirement. Students may make appoint appointments
ments appointments in Room 124, Norman Hall. Speech screening
appointments will be available during a two-day period
only, and will not be given during ni-B.
ENGINEERING STUDENTS: The English Screening
Examination for engineering students will be held
Tuesday, May 10, 7-9 p.m. in the Engineering Audi Auditorium,
torium, Auditorium, 270 Engineering Annex.
IDENTIFICATION PHOTOS: All students returning
to the University in September will be required to
have photographs taken for the new identification cards.
Students will receive notification during May to appear
for their photo appointments. When reporting to photo photography,
graphy, photography, each student must have his Social Security
card with him. If a student fails to respond after rea reasonable
sonable reasonable notice is given, or if a student loses his ID
card after it has been delivered to him, he will be

SPANISH REVIEW: Adults interested in reviewing
and improving their spoken Spanish are welcome to
meet in Room 423, Medical Center, at 7 p.m., each
Wednesday.
O & B DEADLINES: All notices for the Orange and
Blue Bulletin must be received in the Division of
Informational Services by 9 a.m. the day BEFORE
publication. The Orange and Blue will appear in The
Alligator on Tuesdays and Fridays. Deadlines are 9
a.m. Mondays, and 9 a.m. Thursdays. Items for
Campus Calendar must be sent to the Public Functions
Office, Florida Union.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
(Sign-up sheets are posted in the Placement Office,
Bldg. H. All are degree-level positions. Asterisk in indicates
dicates indicates summer employment availabe for juniors.

BLUE BULLETIN

Arts & Sciences Dames: 8 p.m., home of Cheryl Bledsoe,
516 NE 12th Court. Informal meeting.
Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity: 7:30 p.m., 116 FU.
Craft Shop Special Session: 7:30 p.m., FU Craft Shop.
Sandcasting. No registration.
U of F Veterans Club: 7 p.m., FU Aud. Lecture.
Dairy Production Banquet: 7 p.m., Student Service Center.
Gator Sailing Club: 7:30 p.m., 118 FU. Welcome to sailors
old & new. Everyone interested invited.
Florida Speleological Society: 7 p.m., 212 FU.
Thursday Christian Science Organization, 4:45 p.m., FU Aud.
May 12 The Second Governor's Debate: CANCELLED.
Friday FU Street Dance: 8 p.m., south side of Florida Union.
May 13 Admission free. Live entertainment by The Mystics.
(FU Social Room if it rains.)
Other European Tour: June 21 August 15. 8 weeks 5310.00.
$125 deposit at 315 FU.

ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE,
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE, CAMPUS
/ ' " 0
; S' C : . ;

required to pay $5 for his ID card. Do not report for
a photograph unless you have received an appointment
notice.
TO FACULTY & STAFF:
PERSONNEL REMINDER: All faculty members who
will not be teaching the 111-A spring term are remind reminded
ed reminded to contact the Personnel Office immediately re regarding
garding regarding continuation of their Blue Cross-Blue Shield
and Gulf Life Hospitalization coverage. Since no pay payroll
roll payroll deduction can be made for faculty members not
teaching the 111-A term, coverage will terminate If
direct payment is not made through the Personnel
Office.
FACULTY CLUB MEMBERS: Luncheons are served
at the Faculty Club, overlooking the golf course, from
12 noon until 1:30 p.m. everyday. For reservations for
one of the five private dining rooms (at no cost), call
Ext. 2561. Thursday night buffet suppers are served
6-7:30 p.m.
* V. W"
Interviews will be held in Florida Union unless other otherwise
wise otherwise indicated.)
MAY 20: HOUDAILLE-DUVAL-WRIGHT CO.
BBC, CE. OLIN ME, ChE, IE, Met. E. SYSTEMS
ENGINEERING LABORATORIES, INC. EE.
MAY 23: PHILLIPS PETROLEUM CORP. Gen.
Bus., Acctg., Lib. Arts, Ed. DELTONA & MACKLE
CORP. BBC. THE BELL SYSTEM non-tech non-technical
nical non-technical group meeting, 5 p.m., FU. THE BENDIX
CORPORATION Ps, EE.
MAY 24: TRAVELERS INSURANCE COMPANIES
all majors.
MAY 24, 25: GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION
Ps, IE, EE, ME, Math. THE BELL SYSTEM
Gen. Bus., Lib. Arts, Ed.
MAY 25: LEVITT & SONS, INC. CE. THE BELL
SYSTEM technical group meeting, 5 p.m.



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FJQ I ONION RINGS 25c
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hold a diamond so delicately,
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Buchwald To r Humor 9
Campus On May 26
By MARTI KALASHNIKOFF
Alligator Staff Writer
Art Buchwald, celebrated syndicated newspaper columnist, will
speak on the UF campus Thursday, May 26th, at 8:15 p.m. in Univer University
sity University Auditorium.
The subject of Buchwalds talk will be his favorite topic, Buchwald
at Large. He is being brought to campus by the Florida Union Forums
Committee.
For one week starting today and ending Tuesday, May 17th, UFers
will be given special reduced rates on tickets: students, $1.00; faculty,
$1.50. The tickets will be on sale from noon until 4:30 p.m. at the
Florida Union Box Office. After May 17th, ticket sales will be opened
to the general public, all tickets selling for $2.00 each.
Forums Director Jack Zucker explained admission must be charged
because the Committee doesnt have adequate funds to sponsor the
event, and that we wanted to have at least one major speaker during
A term. Zucker added the Forums Committee is grateful to Leg
Council for consenting to back Forums in the event they are not fi financially
nancially financially successful in this endeavor. This further made it possible
to contract Mr. Buchwald.
Buchwald has starred on TV, and is a best-selling author. His
latest assault on Americas humor being And Then I Told The Presi President
dent President (The Secret Papers of Art Buchwald).
Buchwald spent 14 years abroad as a columnist, then changed his
vantage point to Washington, D. C. From there he has been successful
observing the political scene both here and abroad. His news column
is syndicated in some 225 newspapers around the world.
In 1949, he was hired by the European edition of the New York
Herald Tribune. His column, Paris After Dark, was filled with
bits and pieces of offbeat information about Parisian night life.
The column became Europes Lighter Side, and now is simply,
Art Buchwald. Today his column has achieved an institutional
quality, as Time magazine put it.
In his famous tract, The Conscience of a Columnist, he put forth
his plan. He urged Congress to get on with its business, he told the
Generals and Admirals in the Pentagon to stop quarreling, he took
the wraps off the CIA, and he told college students that if they wanted
to have sex on the campus, they would have to do it on their own time.
In less than three years, Buchwald straightened out most of the
pressing problems in the United States. Thanks to his efforts, the
country is now in its most prosperous period. Lyndon Johnson has
been left with nothing to do but open a dam or a new airport.
UF Student Killed In Crash
Lamae Wragg, 23, a former UF student, died in Clearwater last
Thursday of injuries sustained in a plane crash. Miss Wragg and three
others were headed to West Palm Beach and the Bahamas in a single
engine Cessna Skyhawk. The plane crashed and burned shortly after
take-off.
Miss Wragg was born in Gadsden, Alabama, and moved to Clearwater
with her family in 1952. She graduated from Clearwater High School
in 1958. She had studied in Tours, France, and had been employed by
Life Magazine in New York before deciding to return to the UF last
September.
She came back to the UF with her father, Otis Wragg, who was com completing
pleting completing work on his Masters degree. Mr. Wragg is a freshman English
instructor here. Mr. Wragg and his daughter lived off campus during
the week and generally went to Clearwater to spend time with the
rest of the family weekends.
Miss Wragg was also a part time secretary for the UF Press. She
transferred to the University of South Florida for the summer.
Miss Wragg is survived by her father, Otis Wragg 11, her mother
Mary Wragg, a teacher in Pinellas County, and two brothers, Alec,
12, and Otis 111, a staffer of the Evening Independent newspaper.
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Tuesday, May 10, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



Page 10

), The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 10, 1966

Accent Committee Names Symposium Theme

By JEULEY LIVINGSTON-
Alligator Staff Writer
The Responsibility of Dissent
has been chosen as the theme for
UF's Accent symposium to beheld
next year.
The theme was announced
Thursday afternoon at the meeting
Cuban Exile Says
Island Is Ripe
For Liberation
By ERNIE REHDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Manuel Ray, ex-minister of pub public
lic public works of Cuba and a leader of
the Junta Revolucionaria Cubana
(JURE) exile group, spoke Friday
night on the necessity of continu continuing
ing continuing the struggle for the democratic
liberation of Cuba.
The speech, delivered in Span Spanish,
ish, Spanish, was received by a good crowd
at the Florida Union Auditorium.
Ray occupies a moderate posi position
tion position among Cuban exile leaders.
He said the time is ripe for Cuba's
liberation because of the total frus frustration
tration frustration existing within Cuba today.
Exile groups should not hope
to overthrow the Castro govern government
ment government by invasion, he said, be because
cause because of its military power and
rigid political control.
Ray conceded that Castro is a
great political strategist, although
he is also a poor administrator
who represents the worst possible
government for Cuba.
The present intention of his
group, according to Ray, is to
unite all democratic Cuban groups
who support the original goal of
the Cuban Revolution: national in independence
dependence independence accompanied by po political
litical political and economic democracy.
The forthcoming Congreso de
Revolucion Democratica proposed
by Ray would work toward es establishing
tablishing establishing a united democratic
movement.
Contact with democratic ele elements
ments elements within Cuba should also be
made, he said. The democratic
exile groups should think in terms
of forming a base for democratic
government in Cuba after the de demise
mise demise of the Castro regime, which
has crushed this base within
Cuba.
Rays talk was jointly sponsored
by the Center for Latin American
Studies, the Department of Po Political
litical Political Science, and the Latin
American Club.
BSP Will Meet,
Mull Changes
The Board of Student Publica Publications
tions Publications will meet Friday, May 13,
to consider procedural changes and
a possible reconstitution of its
membership.
The proposals have been offered
by UF President J. Wayne Reitz
and the UF Senate.
Reitz proposals, outlined in a
secret meeting of the UF Senate
on April 21 id establish gui de deli
li deli
.t renu _u of Alligator, or
'* Mhlications editors.
en.-ie proposals passed at the
April 21 meeting suggested a re reconstitution
constitution reconstitution of the Board of Student
Publications to prevent the seating
of any publications staffers on the
board. Also included were due
process and conflict of interest
proposals.
The proposals were offered in
order to prevent a reoccurrence
of the proceedings last trimester
when Alligator editor Benny Cason
was fired by the Board of Student
Publications. The following day,
Reitz removed the interim editor
Andy Moor and revoked the boards
election of Moor and Yvette Car Cardozo
dozo Cardozo for summer editor and man managing
aging managing editor of The Alligator.

of a committee appointed by Accent
Chairman Charlie Shepherd to
choose an idea to provide con continuity
tinuity continuity for the symposium. Shep Shepherd
herd Shepherd said the speakers invited to
appear during the program will
be asked to aim their talks toward
the theme.
Topics such as morality, poli politics,
tics, politics, science, culture and econo economics
mics economics may be incorporated into the
dissent theme, according to Shep Shepherd.
herd. Shepherd. The chairman of UFs first
weekend symposium commented
that the responsibility of dissent
is a theme which can be used to
look at national and international
affairs as well as local matters.
Its a very apt theme for any
university, Shepherd added, be because
cause because of the amount of controversy
over todays student dissents re regarding
garding regarding such topics as Viet Nam
and academic freedom.
One reason the theme was cho chosen
sen chosen over several other good pos possibilities,
sibilities, possibilities, Shepherd said, is that it
lends itself to the aim of showing
the student the connection between
the issues he studies in the class classroom,
room, classroom, and the realities of life
embodied in those issues.

As a Pan Am Range Professional on the ETR youll have a pretty good idea
after the first year or so. Pan Am is responsible for specifying almost all the
a range instrumentation hardware and systems for the nation's space and mis misas
as misas a new graa, sile launches at the Eastern Test Range. Its a vast technological operation
giving you exposure to a great diversity oi advanced tracking, telemetry, com-
CIO IJOIL know munications, data handling and display systems which will help you choose
c7 in a fairly short time where your careier interests lie.
where you want to he Even when you do decide, you arent tied to your first area of discipline.
** Quite the contrary. The nature of the new range technology produces and
7 lipnr? TYflYtl nmn Pan Am encoura g es a multi-disciplined individual who works in many spe spet*
t*- spet* Off iff ft ftvtt/ cialties (radar, telemetry, electrical, optics, command/control, timing, hydrau hydraulics,
lics, hydraulics, statistics, infrared, orbital mechanics, structures, air conditioning, instru instrumentation,
mentation, instrumentation, communications and many others).
At the onset you have several main directions open to you.
You may find that systems engineering is what youre best qualified for. In
our Engineering Group, youll be developing specifications for range instru instrumentation
mentation instrumentation systems, evaluating bids from industry, providing technical guid
ance for future development, monitoring manufacture and installation, and
phasing systems into operational status.
C> r you may be best suited to the front line as an Operations Engineer a real realtime
time realtime monitor of vehicle flight performance at one of the down-range tracking
stations from the Bahamas to the Indian Ocean, or on one of the fleet of
advanced range instrumentation ships.
On the other hand, you might qualify for our engineering administration
groups involved in technical management, industrial engineering, environ environmental
mental environmental operations control, production control, industrial support, instrumen instrumentation
tation instrumentation and facilities planning.
Whatever your initial preference, youll be seeing the entire range in operation.
For further information, see yo nr Placement Director. Or write to Manaeer of
College Relations, Dept. 6 02 6
guided missiles
W RANGE DIVISION
PAN AMERICAN WORLD AIRWAYS, INC.
750 S. ORLANDO AVENUE, COCOA BEACH, FLORIDA
An Equal Opportunity Employer

SHEPHERD
...heads
Accent.
Members of the theme commit committee
tee committee include Dr. Ernest R. Bartley,
political science department, Dr.
Franklin A. Doty, Dean of the Uni University
versity University College, Dr. Charles H.
Fairbanks, Anthropology depart department,
ment, department, and students Julie Colomitz,
Bill McCollum and Shepherd. Dr.
Theron A. Nunez, also of the An Anthropology
thropology Anthropology department, is re replacing
placing replacing Dr. Fairbanks during the
summer term.
The idea for Accent came from
an inter-university meeting
attended by Shepherd last tri trimester
mester trimester in his capacity as adminis administrative
trative administrative assistant to the student body
president. A number of northern
colleges and some schools (mostly
private) in the South have been
successful in staging similar pro programs.

grams. programs. The UF will be one of the
first state schools in the South to
put on one of the symposiums.
Accents executive committee
has been working for over a month
now, after being named by Presi President
dent President Buddy Jacobs April 6. The
com mittee consists of Bill Haver Haverfield,
field, Haverfield, assistant chairman; John
Ritch, speakers chairman; Wayne
Rich, program chairman; Steve
Smith, publicity director; Steve
Schultz, finance chairman, Ernie
Litz, magazine; Dean Franklin

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Doty; and Dr. Raymond Fahielc
Former Alligator editor Benny
Cason was appointed to edit the
Accent magazine but has dropped
out of school. Shepherd appointed
Ernie Litz as interim editor until
a final selection is made.
Other students who are working
at high levels in Accent include
Mary Kay Cooper, who is execu executive
tive executive committee secretary; and Nel
Laughon, who is editing an Accent
brochure to be published within
two weeks. ;



Gators Split With FSU

By ALAN BURTON
t Alligator Staff Writer
Kelly Prior, with an assist from
ie weatherman, pitched and batted
ie Gators to a 1-0 victory over
tate- rival Florida State Saturday
t Perry Field. The game was call calld
d calld in the bottom of the seventh
ining as the rain that had been
ireatening all weekend finally
ame.
Saturdays game was a complete
eversal from Fridays contest
rhich saw the erratic Florida nine
rop a 16-4 decision to the hard
itting Seminoles.
Prior, pitching his second shut shut,ut
,ut shut,ut in a row, walked two, struck
iut four and gave up five hits en
oute to his sixth win in eight
lecisions.


Sumer Earuiugs Program
FOR COLLEGE MEN
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Above Average Earnings
15 SI,OOO Cash Scholarships
3 All Expense Paid Trips Abroad
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P. F. Collier, Inc.
640 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 10019
Please Mention Both Your Summer and School Addresses

FOR THAT HOME STYLE BARBECUE
TRY OUR TUESDAY SPECIAL
n YYbARBECUED BEEF ON 1 BUN
tossed green salad
IMn/PP
he Gators, who were outhit
5-3, scored the lone run of the
game in the third inning as David
Hodges sacrifice to deep center centerfield
field centerfield brought Prior in from third.
Prior had been sacrificed to third
after lashing a double to deep left
center to open the inning.
Spectacular fielding plays by byshortstop
shortstop byshortstop David Hodges, second
baseman Bruce Moore, and first
baseman Tom Shannon, and alert
play by catcher Ed Gross kept
Prior out of hot water.
game was a different
story. Shoddy fielding, poor base
running, costly mental errors, and
the inability of Gator pitchers to
get the ball over the plate spelled
defeat for Florida.
Pete Sarron and Jim Lyttle had

Seven hits between them as the
Seminoles collected thirteen hits
and eleven walks off the combined
efforts of five Gator hurlers. State
pitching ace Wayne Vincent allowed
only four hits in raising his record
to 8-1.
-
COACH FULLER
Wins One Loses One
Gator pitcher Ray Rollyson ab absorbed
sorbed absorbed his fourth loss of the sea season
son season against five wins as he gave
up eight runs in six "innings. He
was followed to the mound by Ed
Woofolk, Gary Keller and Adrian
Zabala. Tom Shannon was called
in from his first base position in
the ninth inning to get the final
two outs after the Seminoles had
scored seven times.
The only bright spot for the Ga Gators
tors Gators was Skip Lujacks two-run
homer in the ninth inning.
The split in games gives the
Gators a 19-9 record for the sea season.
son. season. Florida and Florida State
remain tied for the season in all
sports at 6-6-2.

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READY TO FIRE
Gator righthander Adrian Zabala deals one to FSU
batter in Friday's contest won by Seminoles, 16-4.
Savannah To Host
Auto Race May 14

Nearly 100 of the best drivers
in the Southeastern and Eastern
United States, as well as the mid midwest
west midwest are expected to participate
in the national championship road
races to be held at the eight-turn,
two mile Savannah- Effringham
Motorway, Savannah, Georgia, on
May 14-15.
The event, co-sponsored by the
Savannah Area Chamber of Com Commerce
merce Commerce and the Savannah Region,
Sports Car Club of America, is the
first national race of such magni magnitude
tude magnitude in Savannah since the early
part of the century.
Entry applications have been
sent to all national class drivers
in a nine-state area and selected
champions in all regions. Among
the numerous cars expected to be
at the event are Porsche, Lotus-
Ford, Cobra, Ferrari and Mustang.
y ashaway VANTAGE
For Tournament Play
Appro*. Stringing Cost I
Tennis $9 A
f ASHAWAY PRO-FECTED
For Club Play 1
Approx. Stringing Cost I
Tennis $7 I
Badminton $6 A
ASHAWAY MULTIPLY
For Regular Play
Appro*. Stringing Cost I
Tennis $5 M
Badminton $4

Tuesday, May 10. 1966. The Florida Alligator.

One of the entrants who has al already
ready already confirmed that he will run
in the Savannah-Effringham races
is Peter Holden Gregg of Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, Florida, driving his new
Porsche Carrera 6. The Carrera
6, a specially constructed racing
machine, won its class at the Se Sebring
bring Sebring 12-Hour Race and the Day Day
Day ma 24-Hour Continental.
The weekend activities are sche scheduled
duled scheduled to begin Friday night with
registration. This will be followed
by technical inspection for all cars
which will be open to the public.
On Saturday and Sunday morn mornings
ings mornings there will be practice sessions
with a full slate of racing on both
afternoons. On Sunday, the annual
John Rueter Memorial Trophy race
will be the principal event.
(Diamond Briefsl
Gator basketballer Gary Keller
turned baseballer for the first time
Friday against the Seminoles. He
pitched to four men in the ninth
inning, walking three and striking
out one. Gary had been working out
with the team all season but hadnt
pitched due to a rule set down by
Coach Sloan. The rule in effect
said that basketball players had
to devote full time to basketball.
It looks like Gary will be able to
pitch now that Sloan has moved on
to North Carolina State; or at least
until a new basketball coach is
named.

Scouts from the Phillies,
Braves, Mets, Orioles and White
Sox were at Perry Field for the
games this weekend. Although they
came here to watch the Seminoles,
they seemed to be quite impressed
with Gator Skip Lujack.

The Gators 1-0 victory Satur Saturday
day Saturday was the first time that the
Seminoles have been blanked this
year. State had been averaging
over ten runs per game.

Page 11



Page 12

1, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 10, 1966

Menaker-
EXECUTIVE EDITOR JP* 1

Two things happened over the weekend that, for better or worse,
have shaken up quite a few people. The New York Yankees fired
Johnny Keane and Norm Sloan quit his job at UF to become head
coach at N.C. State.
Taking them one at a time, the firing of Johnny Keane shook me
up more than the announcement that Norm Sloan was leaving Flor Florida
ida Florida to coach at his alma mater. The Yankees have never fired a
coach at mid-season, regardless of how he was doing.
This step marks another sign of decadence in the Yankee
organization. For once, the Bronx Bombers are acting like any
other club. It used to be that the Yankees were different. You
never knew how, but they were. Maybe it was that haughty air of
confidence or those pin striped uniforms that were said to make
any ball player a star but somehow the Yankees were a step
above the ordinary.
There is no doubt in my mind that Ralph Houk will move the
Yankees out of the American League cellar. The soft-spoken
Keane cant really be blamed for the decline and fall of the Yankee
empire, but someone had to be the sca£e goat and he was it. Houk,
with his take-charge military manner was a fine manager and
should have no difficulties with the men from CBS, the Yankees
that is.
Maybe he can get some good performances out of Roger Maris
or Elston Howard. Maybe he can coax a last great season out of
Mickey Mantle, who leads the Yankees in batting despite having
only one RBI and no home runs. At any rate, watching the Yankees
from here on out should be an interesting experience to say the
least.
As for Coach Norm Sloans decision to leave Florida, it doesnt
bother me too much, but you shouldnt say anything bad about the
departed, so I wont.
Norm Sloan did bring Florida into an era of big league basket basketball,
ball, basketball, raising them from the SEC doormat to a title contender in
less than six years.
Norm Sloan did a fine recruiting job. Take a look at last years
freshman team. The results speak for themselves. No less than
three men off that team have had a chance to play and possibly
start at some time during the season, namely Neal Walk, Andy
Owens and Kurt Feazel.
Norm Sloan did revive basketball as a spectator sport at UF.
Before he came, Florida basketball fandom was generally limited
to the cheerleaders and a few die-hards.
Norm Sloan did a lot for Florida basketball, most of it in the
plus column. Well just close by saying good luck to Coach Sloan.
He may have had his faults, but he was always straight forward
and frank.
QUIPS AND COMMENTS . Saturdays Kentucky Derby con contained
tained contained one of the most lackluster fields in the Run for the Roses
since Needles completely outclassed a field of 16 colts back in
1965. When favored Graustark was injured and unable to race,
many oddsmakers went with Kauai King and they were right
all the way ... As the St. Pete Times pointed out Sunday, this
is Fords year for racing. Michael Ford was Kauai Kings jockey
in the Derby, and Ford won the Sebring Grand Prix of endurance
earlier this year.

I See Whats N* w 5
The Browse Shop
ISLAND Huxley
THE MARBLE FAUN Hawthorne
THE GREAT GATSBY Fitzgerald
FOR KICKS Francis
ARMAGEDDON Uris
ONE TWO THREE.. .INFINITY. .Gamov
HUMAN KNOWLEDGE Russell
HARD COVER
' THE MAN%ITH THE GOLDEN GUN
INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
AN INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY
THEORY VOL. I VOL. II
I
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00
Campus Shop & Bookstore

Game Moved
To 10 a.m.
UFs scheduled baseball game
against Rollins Saturday, May 14,
has been switched from afternoon
to morning to avoid a conflict with
the State High School track meet
in Gainesville.
The Gators will face Rollins at
10 a.m. instead of the normal 2
p.m. starting time. The State Class
A and AA meets will be run on the
Florida track that afternoon.
UF and Rollins also meet in a
single game Friday afternoon, May
13, with the starting time scheduled
to be 3 oclock.'-

Mail this
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woman answers, hang up. My wife isn't quite ready for the idea yet. \
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MOTORS INC.
AUTHORIZED
OEALER
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