Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Bedfellows
make strange
politics. See
Jim Moorheads
Thinking Out
Loud, page 3.

High, Burns To Slug It Out In Runoff

Smothers To Speak At Banquet

The annual UF law reunion is
scheduled for tomorrow with U.S.
Senator George Smathers as
speaker at the 7 p.m. banquet at
the Holiday Inn.
The reunion will feature an edu educational
cational educational seminar on Legal Ser Services
vices Services for the Indigent beginning
at 11 a.m. tomorrow morning in
the law schools courtroom, with
a general welcome by Law Dean
Frank Maloney and Robert M.

Alligator Cartoonist
Wins Pulitzer Prize
uun Wright, 32-year-old Miamian who has been a cartoonist for
The Alligator since last September, earlier this week captured the
Pulitzer Prize journalisms highest honor.
Base paper for Wright is The Miami News, where he started work
14 years ago as a copy boy. Wrights Pulitzer Prize is the fourth the
News has won.
I was washing out my brushes when everybody galloped over and
told me about it, Wright said. All I can say about how I felt is that
I was sort of numb. Its hard to express your feelings on something
like this.
Wright has worked as a Miami News cartoonist four years. Prior
to his cartooning work, he served as photographer.
Wright says his cartoon topics are strictly his own ideas.
Nobody tells me how to do it, he said. I pick my own subjects.
The Alligator is the first and only college newspaper in the nation
to use Wright as a cartoonist. The Miami Edison High School graduate
is not nationally-syndicated, but he is used by several L other papers in
the Midwest and West.
Prior to Wright, Don Addis was the campus newspapers cartoonist
for several years. Addis is a regular contributor to Playboy Magazine
with his sex symbols and currently lives in St. Petersburg, where
he is editorial cartoonist for the Evening Independent.

f)e Jflorti>a Alligator

Vol. 58, No. 131

Ervin, president of the Florida
Bar.
The., classes of 1937-38-39,
1947-48-49, and 1957-58-59 will
be accorded special honor in this
years reunion.
Dean Maloney called tomorrow?
meeting one of the most signifi significant
cant significant ever held at the College of
Law. The American and Florida
Bar Association both have thrown
their weight behind the develop development

University of Florida

ment development of programs to ensure coun counsel
sel counsel for the indigent, and the re reunions
unions reunions talks and seminars are
designed to inform Florida lawyers
Hos this develop development.
ment. development.
The problem
of counsel for
the indigent seg segment
ment segment of the pop population
ulation population has been
highlighted in the
SMATHERS last few years by
Supreme Court decisions to the
effect that every criminal defen defendant
dant defendant is entitled to counsel regard regardless
less regardless of whether he can afford to
retain a lawyer himself.
At 11:30 a.m. Earl Johnson,
deputy director of the Office of
Economic Opportunity, will speak
on that organizations goals and
purposes in providing legal ser services
vices services to indigent citizens.
Neighbor^
hood Legal Ser- JOHNSON
vices Project, a newly-formed
Washington, D.C. legal service
program. He served in this capa capacity
city capacity until his selection as deputy
director of Legal Service Pro Programs
grams Programs for the Office of Economic
Opportunity.
After Johnsons speech there
will be a scholarship luncheon for

PCL Profs View
Runoff Election
Bv YVETTE CARDOZO
Alligator Staff Writer
As the dust settles from the first battle over the governors chair,
a question mark remains suspended above the voters of Florida.
What will the voters do on May 24?
The only certainty in the UFs political science department is the
fact that there is no agreement on the possible outcome of Floridas
second primary election.
Political Science Department head Manning J. Dauer preferred not
to make any specific observations for Florida. He did, however, offer
a few general rules about state gubernatorial elections.
Its no secret that an incumbent who captures only one third of the
total vote is not considered in a good position.
CWith 2,530 of a total 2,561 precincts reporting Incumbent Governor
Haydon Burns had 359,430 votes. Miami Mayor Robert King High was
second with 331,559 votes and Scott Kelly trailed with 319,176 votes.)
According to Dauer, in a run-off from a high level three-way race,
the top man can be expected to take ;only one third of the third
mans vote.

If this did happen in Florida,
it would make High the next gover governor.
nor. governor.
Dauer made it clear, however,
that he was only generalizing with
figures based on other high level
elections. These general rules, he
said, did not necessarily have to
apply to Florida.
But he did say, When the vote
is as close as it was here, the
incumbent is in trouble.
From the other side of the fence
came the views of political science
department instructor Andrew
Baggs.
With High as runoff opponent, he
figures Burns will probably return
to the governors chair.
(See FIGHT, Page 9)

all alumni in the law school li library.
brary. library. John F. Sutton, reporter
for the American Bar Association,
will di c cuss The Office of Eco Economic
nomic Economic Opportunity and the Ethical
Standards of the Bar. His talk
will be followed by a discussion
of American Trial Lawyers Asso Association
ciation Association views on the subject, fea featuring
turing featuring A1 J. Cone, vice president
of the association.
The seminar will conclude with
a panel discussion by all partici participants
pants participants with Marshall Criser moder moderating
ating moderating an evaluation of programs
discussed during the day. Criser,
a member of the Board of Gover Governors
nors Governors of the Florida Bar and a UF
law alumnus, is chairman of a
special Florida Bar Association
committee on legal services to the
indigent.
The evening banquet at the Holi Holiday
day Holiday Inn will begin with a social
hour at 7:00 p.m. sponsored by the
Eighth Judicial Circuit Bar Asso Association.
ciation. Association. Toastmaster for the ban banquet
quet banquet will be Chesterfield H. Smith,
Chairman of the Florida Consti Constitutional
tutional Constitutional Revision Committee and
member of the Class of 4B.
Smathers, the banquets featured
speaker, is a member of the law
schools Class of 3B.
During the alumni activities the
participants wives will be able to
join organized tours of the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center in the morn morning
ing morning and the University Art Gallery
in the afternoon. There will also be
a luncheon for wives in the Health
Center Cafeteria.

Friday, May 6, 1966

..
UFers Fare
Poorly In
Election Bids
Election day was a black one for
local student and faculty public
office contenders.
The one faculty member and two
students who tried their luck at
politics came out of Tuesdays
battle on the bottom.
Richard L. Sterba, professor of
economics, lost to H. Dale Smith
in the District One race for county
school board.
The unofficial totals ga\%Smith,
a High Springs banker, a total of
6,100 votes. Sterba had 4,328.
Sterba, a newcomer to politics,
had expected to get support in the
big Gainesville precincts. Failing
to win this vote, he conceded the
election by 9:30 Tuesday night.
Students running in the first pri primary
mary primary were law student Rick Cata Catalano
lano Catalano from Highland County and
Arlin Dubler, a sociology graduate
from Miami Beach.
Catalano was a distant third in
the three man race for the Group
Three F lorida House of Represen Representatives
tatives Representatives Democratic nomination.
Gainesville attorney William C.
Andrews had an easy win with an
official total of 11,478 votes
(carrying 61 of 68 precincts). His
runnerup, Gainesville school
teacher Thomas Coward, received
5,043 votes while Catalano trailed
with 1,603 votes.
The Group Three race encom encompassed
passed encompassed three counties Alachua,
Gilchrist and Putnam. All three
candidates were Gainesville resi residents
dents residents and newcomers in the poli political
tical political field.
Dubler was a candidate for the
Florida House in Dade County.
Like Catalano, this was his first
stab at running for office.
Dubler ran fourth in a six man
field. He received an unofficial
8,649 votes while the winning can candidate
didate candidate received 50,182 votes.
Another student, Richard Con Condon,
don, Condon, will not take his position on
the ballot until the November elec elections.
tions. elections.
As a Republican candidate for
Group Six of the Florida House,
he did not face opposition in the
primary.

WEATHER
Partly cloudy,
some chance of
showers



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 6, 1966

Campus
Naurs
Briefs

Honor Court Appointments
Honor Court Chancellor Herb Schwartz recently announced the
following appointments for the spring trimester: Dan Carlton,
attorney general; Gerald Bennett, assistant attorney general;
James Garner, chief prosecution investigator; Wilson Crump,
chief defense counsel; Baya Harrison, assistant chief defense
counsel and Dave Cox, chief defense investigator.
Co rope Trip
.The Florida Union Board is offering a reduced round-trip group
flight to Europe, open to faculty, students and staff. The reduced
rate fare of $3lO is a saving of $174 over the regular fare.
The flight will leave New York Jupe 21 and will return August
15. Children under 12 go at half-fare.
Anyone interested should sign up in room 315 of the Florida
Unibn or call university extension 2741 for further details.
AAUP Officers
The UFs chapter of the American Association of University
Professors (AAUP) has elected a new slate of officers for the
coming year. They are: Gladys Kammerer, president; Allen
Sievers, vice president; Irving Goffman, treasurer; Warren Silver,
Aaron Anton and Stanley Laughlin, executive committee.
Swim Class
A non-credit swim class will begin Monday, May 9, at the UF
pool. Classes will be held daily Monday through Thursday, 12 to
1 p.m. The class is open to students, faculty and staff. All inter interested
ested interested persons must register by May 9 in room 227 in Florida Gym.
leg Council
Leg Council will hold its first meeting of the spring trimester
Tuesday, May 10, at 7:30 p.m. in the Florida Union Auditorium.
All members are urged to attend.
Scabbard And Blade
Scabbard and Blade, ROTC military leadership society, recently
elected officers for the 196 C-67 school year. The new officers are:
Tom Shaw, president; Pat McDonnell, vice president; Bob Tray Traywick,
wick, Traywick, treasurer, and Mike Spence, secretary.
literary Magazine
Release, a general interest magazine devoted primarily to
humor, probably will make its initial appearance during the fall
trimester. The new publication was recently approved by the
Board of Student Publications. Release will be similar to the now
defunct New Orange Peel, but will contain more articles of a lit literary
erary literary nature.
Hfs I
FLY!
NOW LEARN IN THE NEW CHEROKEE 140 1
SPECIAL Summer Bonus with this ad. You get (1) 5 per cent 1
discount off package rates, (2) Free log book with solo course, 1
(3) Free ground instruction with each lesson. I
LEARN THIS SUMMER BE READY FOR FALL! 1
CASSELS IN THE AIR I
GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL AIRPORT!
WALDO ROAD I
The MorMi Aillfalor mtrvri the right to rrfulat* Ih* typographical tone of all advrrttfc*n>ent> ami
lo rvrtao or tan away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION E GUARANTEED, though dea'.red position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Manager within
(1) oat day a/ter advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more thar one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled lo nan several limes. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official stud, nt newspaper of iht. L mversliy *>f Florida nd Is
published five times weekly earept during May, June, and July when If Is published s. mi-weekly. On))
odMortals represent the official opinions of Uaelr authors. The Alligator is entered as second class
matter at the United States Po > Offn e at GalnesvtUe.

>

Wooten To Head
Homecoming 66
By ALLEN SODEN
Alligator Staff Writer
Butch Wooten has been appointed
chairman of Homecoming 66 by
Florida Blue Key President Chip
Block.
Wooten, a Sigma Chi, is a junior
in law school. He has held such
offices as honored guest chairman
for visiting VIPs, assistant ban banquet
quet banquet chairman and personnel
chairman of Homecoming in past
years. A native of Tallahassee,
he served as an Honor Court jus justice
tice justice before entering law school.
Homecoming draws approxi approximately
mately approximately 60,000 people, including
alumni from around the country,
to watch the game, parade and
Gator Growl the student pro produced
duced produced talent show, and a series
of breakfasts, dinners and meet meetings.
ings. meetings. This years football game
will be against Auburn on October
29.
Plans are now underway for the
Slogan Contest, said Wooten.
Although there is no definite
deadline yet, it should be sometime
around mid-July.
Last years entries numbered
around 1,400, and included one all
the way from Alaska. The winners
are picked by the State Cabinet.

jnn iiii
I Here are 7 knotty problems II
I facing the Air Force: II
I can you help us solve one? II
m H n
gH| f 8|
ililliflHf/ 6. Space propulsion. As o/
Pi Kmf i
l j B and greater distances, j
pulsion more than any- A
hhHT/ f thing else-will become the
limiting factor. New fuels g
Bj Hhit jfl and new prop
n\ niques must be found, if we *
5T keep exploring t
'Nffii. the mysteries of space And
it may well be an Air Force I
' E HE 1
Em p fpfrP |§y|| .t 1 . l j m c
I Force scientists and engineers will be 4. Space orientation. The orbital prob- comes involved in research and develop
called on to answer in the next few years, lems of a spacecraft, including its ability ment right away. But where the most ex ex
ex we need the best brains available. to' maneuver over selected points on the citing advances are
2 Lunar landing The eQr,h are f f vifal im P rtanc e to the mili- fiOfioil ,akin 9 place yoUn9
exact composition of ut,Nation of space. There are plenty Air Force scientists
I the lunar surface, os | ts and engi^
I acteristics of the space Want to find out how you fit into the
vehicle, enter into / /Jv Air Force picture? Contact your nearest H
this problem. Important study remains to I \ Air Force representative, or mail the cou-
be done-and, as an Air Force officer, [ / ** 1 pon today. 1
I you could be the one to do it! I | B
3. Life-support biology. The filling of \ J \ united states air force I
I metabolic needs over very extended peri- \ / Box a. Dept. SCP 64 8
| ods of time in spoce is one of the most V | Adolph 76,
t fascinating subjects that Nom c ,.t
Air Force scientists are in- 5. Synergetic plane changing. The abil- C " e9e Cl ' I
vestigatmg. The results ity of a spacecraft to change altitude can Address j fl
promise to hove vital ram- also be crucial to space operations. Where \ City S.o.e -Zip Code |
ifications for our life or but in the Air Force could Sc.B.'s get the J I
earth, as well as in outer chance to work on such fascinating proi- BABT IT 1
I SPqCe v eCtS careers? AMERICA'S AEROSPACE TEAM I

Dine ITALIAN Style
0" ;;>
V ITALIAN AMERICAN
I CUISINE
IV
NEW SUMMER HOURS
SUNDAY-THIjRSDAY 5-11 p.m.
FRIDAY & SATURDAY 5-12 p.m.
CLOSED MONDAYS
SPECIALIZING IN
i
Spaghetti La sagna-Ra viol i
Veal Parmigiana-Pizza-Manicotti
Egg Plant Parmigiana-Lcbster
Charbrioled N.Y. Strip-Filet Mignon
2204 SW 13th Ph. 376-1867



giiliitiiiiiiiiiiiiiillliiiiiiuiiuiiiuiinniiuiiiiiiimiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuniimiimnniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^
I P&Tnmr I
I DINNER 1
m ~~w 4 WKIS 01 4010 IN
* FtliO CHICKEN 0105
m Mpmmm a utci oioik Os I
F M IKENCH IKIES lOK
mi *** 9 mmm | 1
i DDr
* -n n w i
| VJKVKi! |
I
SHAKES-HAMBURGERS-ONION RINGS |
i I
| 2029 NW 13th STREET |
!
ENGAGE-ABLES
go for
Keepsake*
him i*n the yellow pages under ;VVr. r..T."
Jewelers. * H pomo commt. imc.. utailijmid III)
f*HOW TO PLAN YOUR ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING"j
! Please send new 20-page booklet, "How To Plan Your Engagement
I and Wedding and new 12-page full color folder, both for only 25c.
I Also, send special offer of beautiful 44-page Bride s Book.
I Name Namej
j Namej Address ~
j City State Zip |
I KEEPSAKE DIAMOND RINGS, BOX 90, SYRACUSE^NEWJ/ORKJ

JIM
MOORHEAD'S

As per my instructions, my
secretary has today written Hon Honorable
orable Honorable Messrs. Haydon Burns and
Robert King High to tell them they
can BOTH take a Nassau vacation
if they like, and right now.
They are further admonished,
however, to leave their wives be behind
hind behind to campaign for the next 2-1/2*
weeks until the runoff election. As
far as I am concerned, the candi candidates
dates candidates have nothing left to say that
should be of any interest to any of
us. We all know where they stand
. . have known, in fact, for the
past two years. Its their wives to
whom we should direct our atten attention.
tion. attention.
For I have suddenly realized
what is going on, and I have Lur Lurleen
leen Lurleen Wallace to thank for shedding
the light. This frail female, in
doing what nine redoubtable rep representatives
resentatives representatives of white Southern
manhood could not do -- win the
Democratic nomination for gover governor
nor governor of the Sovereign State of
Alabama has brought suffra suffragette-ism
gette-ism suffragette-ism up to date. Through
Lurleen, equality for womanhood
has developed a new strategy:
Marry your way to power.
Being a citizen vitally inter interested
ested interested in the affairs and welfare
of my state, I naturally try to
exercise a little foresight in view viewing
ing viewing the political goings-on here in
Florida. Now that the handwriting
is on the wall thanks to Mrs.
Wallace I am constrained to
probe beneath the superficiality of
the present return match between
Willie Haydon Burns and Robert
King High and decide who I want
for my governor four years from
now: Mildred Burns or Faith High.
Actually, I know very little about
either one of them. Probably you
dont either. It is (if youll pardon
the expression) high time we, the

Mm hIIL
A PERMANENT PRESS SHlg|f||gj| |
with pow. .. gyp|^Bi|jt
Imagine! Falling for a shirt! But
never seen a shirt do so much for ajgjf pW* VHik
man. Is it the aggressive "V-Taper" ffgjfflggg
or the smooth authentic styled pugpll
manent press 7 Pressed the day it v j§Ff| wjfflm
made, it will never need pressW^i^,
again No more laundry bills. fPI
can spend his money on me ?. % m
THE BUTTON-DOWN VAN M tjj*
WITH BUILT-IN APPEAL
I When a man means business he
I turned-on authority of its authentic j
styling, with its great soft collar j?'
Bf J roll . slim, nimble "V-Taper m
lYv^fit. fastback pleat, collar button J* \
B and locker loop. Plus the spring
swagger of cool short sleeves. V i.
Cool price, too! A g h
I V-Taper $5.00 M
Belk-Undsey
[GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTErI //

THINKING OUT LOUD

*.. Bf' jj-.y'--TTIY v I
: : : ; J -emale
| MOORHEAD |
electorate, informed the ladies that
we have a right to know their qua qualifications
lifications qualifications and where they stand on
the various issues. Only then can
we make a wise decision on May
24. That decision may ultimately
prove regrettable for the four en ensuing
suing ensuing years, but at least we will
have the comfort of knowing were
all taken care of for the four years
after that.
Alabamans can certainly take
pride in the smooth governmental
operation and transition which they
have afforded themselves. With the
only changeover being that of
tenses on Inauguration Day, the
voters have assured themselves
of four more years of the same
kind of progressive government
they have enjoyed under George.
There has been growth (Klan
membership is up several hundred
per cent), slum clearance (a large
part of which has come about
through the demolition of Negro
churches), national prominence
(George is expected to again cam campaign
paign campaign as the states rights candi candidate
date candidate for president), racial harmony
(white and Negro demonstrators
are .brutalized together), increase
in average personal income (pri (primarily
marily (primarily due to the influx of well-paid
federal voting registrars) and pro progress
gress progress in the judiciary field (what
other state can claim more respon-

Friday, May 6, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

sibility for the Voting Rights Bill?).
And the story is only half over!
Dont we, as citizens of Florida,
owe our state as much?
I fully expect this new Fairness
for Females movement to spread
to the national level. I have al already
ready already eliminated Hubert Hum Humphrey,
phrey, Humphrey, Bob Kennedy, Dick Nixon,
George Romney and all the rest
from immediate contention on the
White House scene. Im trying to
decide whether I can live under
Lady Bird or whether I will be
forced to move to Australia.
If youre a real Johnson lover,
you can extend this thing past Lady
Bird, figure on Linda Bird in 72
or 76, and then, if the procedure
predictably reverses itself, per perhaps
haps perhaps on George Hamilton four or
eight years after her. (Wont that
make George Murphy and Ronald
Reagan happy?)
Government by matrimony is
really not a new concept. Some
say the idea germinated in the
mind of Prince Philip who thought
hed get to be king when Elizabeths
term expired. Well, that was a
royal abortion, but you cant blame
him for having high aspirations.
Let us, then, give the Duke of
Edinburgh credit for avant garde
thinking anyway, and now turn our
attention to the Burns-High en encounter.
counter. encounter. Join with me in calling
for the clarification of the Petti Petticoat
coat Petticoat Platforms.
Bedfellows make strange poli politics,
tics, politics, another observer recently
noted, but we must keep up with
the times. So get on the bandwagon
early, start framing your slogans
now (Bewildred? Vote Mildred,
Have Faith, etc.), develop a
suspicion of bachelor or spinster
candidates on any level . and
remember Lurleen in your
prayers.

Page 3



l, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 6, 1966

Page 4

students voices
needed
r
elcome to the l)F campus.
jtjEl Dated May 4, 1966, the first
edition of The Crocodile appeared
on campus Wednesday.
At the outbreak of the Alligator
crisis" much discussion arose
among dissident Alligator staffers
and other student groups on campus
who were highly dissatisfied with
the action taken last trimester
against the editors of The Alligator.
The first thought was to insure
a medium for free expression on
campus, since it appeared the voice
of The Alligator had been stifled
with the firing of the Alligator
editors
The Crocodile, in its statement
of purpose, declared it would
provide what may be termed an
open forum for the student."
The Alligator has no conflicts
with the purposes of the new
campus" paper, regardless of
its position as viewed by the UF
administration.
In The Alligator columns all
important and pertinent issues are
covered to the extent of the interest
showed by the students in their
letters and suggestions to the
paper.
In the past trimester, it was
shown that The Alligator would
cover and freely discuss all im important
portant important campus issues.
This policy is to be continued.
The Alligator has generally been
under the directorship of under undergraduate
graduate undergraduate students whether pur purposely
posely purposely achieved by the board in its
selection of editors or not -- who
should represent the majority of
the students viewpoint.
Some letters and columns
printed in The Alligator in the past
have been questioned as to their
value and importance But they
were printed as an expression of
student opinion.
If university students lose their
freedom of expression, it will be
the result of the same phenomena,
that has caused numerous, state
governments to become con concerned
cerned concerned with the ebbing of states
rights.
A largely apathetic student body
is not only discouraging to a free
student press, but could also be
the death of it.
jtlortba alligator
EDITOR MANAGING EDITOR
Gene Nall Steve Smith
Executive Editor . . Bob Menaker
City Editor Yvette Cardozo
Sports Editor Jeff Denkewalter
Photographers ............ Nick Arroyo
Sam Johnston
Staff Writers Norma Bell, Carl Brown
Arlene Caplan, Dick Dennis, Eileen Dworkin
Margie Green, Kathle Keim, Judy Miller
Allen Soden, Alan Burton, Tyler Tucker J

' |g|§ BULLETIN BOAiU)
xmju- jo rjnf '
*1 ~ .\
SAIGON OFF I 1 f
W sWIFt# UMUS PUt TO p f
||j%-W AMTrtMERICAN pS. j
"We're not allowed to get involved in the internal
affairs of a foreign country."
Dr. Robert

Hutchins
jfflaniel Coit Gilman, the first president of the Johns Hopkins
University, advised one of his most eminent professors to
attend church regularly for the sake of the universitys public
relations. To the same end he reprimanded another professor
for smoking in public.
That was 80 years ago. About the same time a distinguished
professor at Columbia, John W. Burgess, wrote of a candidate
for an academic post, He is a gentleman, a scholar, a man of
good appearance, possesses some property and voted for Mr.
Cleveland in 1884.
The notion that professors must be respectable, in a highly
conventional sense of that word, because the public relations
of the university can be damaged by their unconventionality seems
to be associated with the idea of a university as a center of child
care. The professor must be a model of behavior because his
principal function is to teach young people how to behave in ways
acceptable to society.
This view is, of course, very popular with parents. They
naturally prefer to have the university do what they find inconvenient
or impossible to do themselves. The outrage of the citizens of
California at the strange goings-on of the students at Berkeley
reflected a feeling that the university had failed to instill proper
Californian standards of private grooming and public order in
the youth of the state.
In the midst of the great controversy years ago about requiring
California professors to take a loyalty oath, a well-known citizen
said to me, If we are going to hire these people to look after
our children, we are entitled to know what their opinions are.
*
To him a professor was the next thing to a baby sitter. Since
a baby sitter could obviously make no claim to academic freedom,
how could a professor do so? To him the idea that a professor
is not an employee, and therefore cannot be hired, would be
incomprehensible. The conception of a university as an autonomous
intellectual community and of the professor as a member of that
community is one that Americans have difficulty assimilating.
The professor seems to be gaining independence of social
pressures, not because the idea of a university is better under understood,
stood, understood, but because of the value society has come to place on his
specialized competence. The professors of the country are going
to provide us with the knowledge that leads to power and pros prosperity.
perity. prosperity.
Who would now think of interrupting the work of a Nobel laureate
by requiring him to regulate the deportment of the young? For that
matter, what university president would now venture to advise
him to go to church or to refrain from smoking?
No such odor of sanctity surrounds the teachers in the elementary
and secondary schools. They are still baby sitters. Some advance
has been made. They may now use cosmetics, but they may not
write plays that have bad words in them without arousing
public indignation.
And they are still employees. Judge Michael A. Orenic of Will
County Circuit Court in Illinois upheld the other day the dismissal
of Marvin L. Pickering, a teacher at Lockport High School.
Pickering had published a letter charging that the school board
had spent money on its athletic program while at the same time
saying it did not have money to raise teachers salaries.
Judge Orenic said, in language suggesting that he could use more
schooling, The greater public interest of the schools overrides
the issue of freedom of speech rights of a teacher.
Copyright 1966, Los Angeles Times

aboard the I
\l I
with Ernie Li
ell its all over but the screaming, shoutin
iljand crying for Floridas first Democratic
primary. H
Several interesting developments arose out ofthiC
election:
1. It appears that a good portion of the undecide^l
vote split between the incumbent Gov. HaydoM
Burns and Scott Kelly.
2. Many Kelly supporters WILL be behind HigHj
in the second primary, not because they like HigH
but because they are out to remove Mr. Burn|
3. Almost an equal number of Kelly supporter^
will either not vote or support Mr. Burns. H
4. The total High-Kelly vote, and the closenesM
of both challengers, indicates that High may afteH
all, really be able to unseat Burns, although he|
have to carry the large urban counties by a hugHj
margin to do it.
The areas where the candidates receive!
newspaper endorsement followed the recommen!
dations. For example, in Daytona, Gainesville anJ
St. Petersburg, where High had strong editoriac
endorsement, he ran first.
The whole election was filled with surprises!
especially for the Kelly and High supporters. Thosj
of us fortunate enough to see the returns ove|
WJXT in Jacksonville saw the High people f allin
over themselves in an effort to declare theiH
support of Scott Kelly, who at the time appeared
a sure runoff candidate. Perhaps the man with th
greatest surprise was Scott Kelly himself, whJ
went to sleep in the runoff and awoke to fin|
himself repeating the 1964 finish behind the shore
Miami mayor. f
It once again shows that you cant fight the bi'
city vote alone. If Kelly had only had a largj
base of support (unfortunately Lakeland and Pol
County as picturesque as they may be are no|
large population centers) he would easily have out|
distanced High.
I predicted that Kelly would carry two-third
of everything north of Orange County. The questio
now appears to be whether or not High can surmoun
the North Florida-Orlando-Palm Beach axis fo
Burns. Unfortunately the shoe is on the wrong foot
While I firmly believe that Kelly could have beate
Burns in a runoff (N. Florida plus High votes)
High faces a long struggle to an ugly conclusio
UNLESS he receives the strong enthusiastic suppor
of Sen. Kelly. I
That decision, of course, is left to the Lakelan
flash. I
Another sidelight was the WJXT interview wit
the Republican candidate Claude Kirk, Jr. Kir
said he felt that (and Kelly was leading at the tim
he said it) High would be his opponent in th
general election. He also said hed put $lO on it
As a concluding remark he stated that if Burn
were his opponent he was as good as in Talla
hassee. A choice between Haydon Burns and
virtually unknown Republican. Now THERE is
choice fans! Thats sort of like taking poison
shooting yourself and THEN commiting suicide
I
* *
On the campus scene it looks like a wild org
for student politicos this summer. Studen
Government will embark upon an expedition to th
dormitories complete with all types of paraphenali
to give their message to the people. 1
By the way, over the break Studtatody President
Buddy Jacobs went to Washington with his adminis-1
trative assistant Charles Shepherd. Their primar
purpose was to seek support for the Accen*
symposium for next spring. (The Accent program!
by the way is coming along quite well and wil!
probably draw national attention.) While in
Jacobs inquired into the possibility of federal fundj
for a multi-level parking facility. Jacobs, it wil
be remembered, called for such a plan TWO WEEK
after I suggested it in my platform during this past
student body election. While I certainly dont questioi
Mr. Jacobs intentions, I think he ought to ge!
together with the rest of his party since during the
election, and in office, his party workers have
constantly ridiculed the idea. His party chairmar
and, now SG Secretary of Traffic and Parking,
Bill Sullivan, has constantly called the affair a
joke and a farce. When I told him that Jacobs
had successfully obtained support in Washington,
and that funds were indeed available for the parking
facility he laughed and said it was impossible
Poor Mr. Jacobs. Hes really doing a fine job
(much to the chagrin of many people) and even
when hes right hes wrong. Sullivan, fraternity
brother of the Fijis Jumping Jim Crabtree seems
either to be establishing his own student government
and standards or a stumbling block. And whatever
became of Bob Harper?
By the way Buddy, student government doesn t
have to take no for an answer?
Does it?
Does it care?



I feiffer
Is hv A| o p r- w r~\ m w*f u /> 'ftL ML 1
s myfn zx' -aMlv* mw* yxk xW h
i %*m l| ffl4r ajw
1 \y> fm MlJwi'L M Sofc %Ul Yj I
ill K jjsj Jij
ml ryCV Y a I I fW£ lZ)
1 fACH Jig, (W/M sr'gft 1
I I m 7W iscM rfi M I
w7 *Hj [u ,Ts I
v V'/o 1 j:;V;:
**.*. "' 'vj ****

By HERBERT T. SCHWARTZ
Honor Court Chancellor
(The following article is the first
in a series of two on student rights
by the Chancellor of the Honor
Court, Herb Schwartz. The articles
are excerpted from a long paper
written by Schwartz, entitled The
Student, The University, and Due
Process: A Call for a More Rea Realistic
listic Realistic Approach. Schwartz has
been responsible recently for se securing
curing securing from the UF administration
guaranties against illegal searches
of student rooms and against ques questioning
tioning questioning at the campus police station
without benefit of legal counsel.)
Is the due process requirement
of the Fourteenth Amendment to
the Constitution of the United States
applicable to relationships between
a university and a student?
Until recently the courts have
held with few exceptions, that, al although
though although there exists the necessary
jurisdiction to hear student cases,
this area is one to be entered by
the courts o with the greatest
restraint and v \ While the Su Supreme
preme Supreme Court has 'ooken direct directly
ly directly on the question, > 1961 Ala Alabama
bama Alabama case of Dixon v Alabama
Board of Educations provides
a clear sign that a state-supported
institution may not disregard the
minimum constitutional standards
of due process.
Naturally, the most immediately
severe action that a university can
take in regard to a student is ex expulsion
pulsion expulsion or suspension. T3ie usual
methods followed in the imposition
of one of these penalties closely
approximate a twentieth century
star chamber. Universities
have taken the attitude that college
attendance is a privilege, not a
right, and that a student can be
required to withdraw for any rea reason,
son, reason, or without any reason being
given.
However, the Court in the Dixon
Case pointed out that notice of a
disciplinary meeting to the student
involved is a necessary element
of due process, just as is the
specification of the charges which
form the basis of the hearing.
Likewise, the names of adverse
witnesses should be supplied the
student in advance, and the student
should have the opportunity to have
someone represent him before the
committee.
Certainly it cannot be success successstilly
stilly successstilly argued that an administrative
university board must follow a
stringent type of legal due pro process
cess process with all the related technical

SPEAKING
OUT
rules; but the minimum necessities
of fairness which form the non nontechnical
technical nontechnical root of legal due process
are neither unknown to nor un unattainable
attainable unattainable by university adminis administrators.
trators. administrators.
It might even be cogently argued
that a university should be held to
a stringent standard because an
institution which professes to pre prepare
pare prepare youth for life in a democratic
society might wisely give them an
example of fair play in the conduct
of its own affairs.
When a university answers that
by his attendance a student has
waived his rights to be free from
sanctions imposed in violation of
due process, it is actually saying
that a pre-condition for the pri privilege
vilege privilege of attending school is sub submission
mission submission to an unconstitutional
administrative procedure. It is
simply inconceivable that vital
constitutional safeguards could be
thus whisked out of existence.
The call for administrative due
process is counterbalanced only
by the universitys interest in
efficiency. But the interest of so society
ciety society in the role of educational
institutions is significant enough
to weight the scales in favor of
due process. This is so because

Hand dear but also elegant...
a pleasure to read.
proven a stimulus to the en~
tire field of American lexi-
WORLD cography . 55.95
PUBLISHING COMPANY Without thumb index $5.95

schools exercise crucial powers
in shaping not only the character
of the student, but of society itself.
Only due process safeguards can
effectively guarantee that a univer university
sity university or any other agency will stay
within the bounds of justice. As
Justice Felix Frankfurter pointed
out, The history of liberty has
largely been the history of obser observance
vance observance of procedural safeguards.
A disciplinary or other sanction sanctioning
ing sanctioning action taken against a student
by a university carries with it the
great possibility of consequences
far out of proportion to the grave graveness
ness graveness of the offense.
A professional or graduate
school will look with apprehension
at an applicant subjected to dis dismissal
missal dismissal or disciplinary action by an
undergraduate college. Moreover,
the federal government and the
armed services are loath to grant
to such a person any type of mean meaningful
ingful meaningful security clearance or access
to a sensitive job.
It is only by denying an adminis administrator
trator administrator the prerogative of arbitrar arbitrariness
iness arbitrariness that we can assume every
potential job applicant a secure
minimum basis for his future well
being in a society where each man
cannot wholly be master of his
own destiny. University discipli disciplinary
nary disciplinary action affects a students life
far too significantly to allow even
the slightest possibility of arbi arbitrary
trary arbitrary action.

p i" T
WOULD YOU BELIEVE GATOR ADS SELL!!
j,
' ?-;'4-4 J jMililMfflMM^
*1 \&* *'* y s* &**£-' '.4 ( -?' :v "- i ;^^^^^BjHlMlwpy
A*-^Avl v&y*i?' ?>,y:; **f, ;-Y*
ft .y^ Vr- -~<*'!*^^'BBBWBftMwwyv' >
i*i d i*
9nH^ k wHKtfc
- .
masculine
4^2t
.. .thats the kind of aroma she likes be- $zE?
ing close to. The aroma of Old Spice
Crisp, tarlgy, persuasive. Old Spice ... / \
unmistakably the after shave lotion for j
the untamed male. Try it soon ..she's / \
waiting. 1.25 & 2.00
.. .that's the way it is
with Old Spice
(Qld r^put
SHULTON ^J

Friday, May 6, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS


personal
THE FORCE that clouded mens
mind as to language also clouded
mens mind as to science and re related
lated related fields. Go ahead, learn it or
you will flunk. H. C. Sims, 741
E. 55th St., Hialeah, Fla. 33013.
J-l 30-st-p).
VISIT GATOR GROOMER where
romance blooms. Next door to
Univ. P.O. Self-service and pro professional
fessional professional laundry and dry cleaning.
(J-131-ts-c).
AUDITIONS. THE BENT CARD
COFFEE HOUSE, 1826 W. Univ.
Ave., will hold auditions for any
good-to the last drop entertainers.
Wed., May 11, at 7:30 p.m. (J (J---131-2t-c).
--131-2t-c). (J---131-2t-c).
for sale
TRAILER FOR SALE, 32 x B.
Ideal for married couples or va vacation
cation vacation home. $575. Call 372-3787
between 6 & 7 p.m. (A-130-2t-c).
dOcc YAMAHA Trailmaster. Rug Rugged!
ged! Rugged! Step-through design. Like
new. Only 300 miles. $225. 378-
2032. (A-130-st-c).
TV ANTENNA. Perfect condition.
Complete with 25 pole and 50 of
antenna wire. S2O complete outfit.
Call 378-4577 after 5 p.m. (A (A---131-tf-nc).
--131-tf-nc). (A---131-tf-nc).
1966 WOLLENSAK 4-speed tape
recorder, model 5150. All acces accessories,
sories, accessories, $125. Complete U.S. divers
wet suit, double hose regulator,
weight belt, knife and sea gig, S9O.
Fluorescent draftsmans desk
lamp, $lO. Call 378-3776. (A-131-
2t-c).
ROBERTS 770 Tape Recorder with
reconnended matching 8 speak speakers.
ers. speakers. Relatively few playing hours.
One yr. old. Call 378-4624. (A (A-
- (A- 131-ts-c).
MOBILE HOME, 1964 delux model.
Three bedroom, one furnished to
study, 1-1/2 bath, completely A/C,
washer, large fenced yard. Pool
privileges. Pinehurst Park, 372-
7994. (A-131-4t-c).
1963 BSA, 650 cc. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Best offer. 8-2244 or
6-9723. See at Styles By Phil in
Carolyn Plaza. (A-131-ts-c).
AIR CONDITIONERS for apts and
trailers. All sizes cost plus
10%. Sudden Service Fuel Oil Co.,
authorized Admiral dealer. 907 SW
3rd St. Ph. 376-4404. (A-l 31-
ts-c).
I FRIDAY & SATURDAY
I "OUTLAW WOMEN"
1 in color
I "DALTON WOMEN"
I in color
I "FIVE BOLD WOMEN"
I in color
| MESA OF LOST WOMEN
I Starts Sunday
I
I I MIS Pit TUW IS J
I PI TO
I color A GUNFIGHTER"

for sale
NEW AIR CONDITIONERS. Un Unredeemed
redeemed Unredeemed layaway, never install installed,
ed, installed, for balance due only. Sudden
Service Fuel Oil Co., 907 SW 3rd
St., 376-4404. (A-131-ts-c).
RCA Consol TV, $lO. twin trundle
beds, sls; refrigerator, $10; large
mirror in frame, $lO. Formica
kitchenette set, sls; metal desk,
$lO. Call 378-1778 between 7 and
11 p.m. (A-131-3t-c).
ALL-CHANNEL TV antenna, 20
mast, wire, $25 new (2 mos. old):
sls or best offer. Call 376-9793
after 5. (A-131-2t-c).
for rent
EFFICIENCY single, modern,
A/C, close to Library. S6O a mo.
318 NW 15th Terr. 372-1226. (B (B-1312t
1312t (B-1312t c).
ONE BLOCK from Administration
Building, large 2 bedroom fur furnished
nished furnished or unfurnished apt. A/C.
372-4692 or 376-7534. (B-130-
3t-c).
TWO ROOM efficiency, 3 blocks
from campus. S4O a mo. and sweep
halls. Phone after 5:30, 372-8040.
(B-l 31-ts-c).
ONE BEDROOM APT., one block
from campus. Inquire between 5-7
p.m., 1202 SW Ist Ave. If no an answer
swer answer call Keystone Heights collect
473-4135. (B-131-2t-c).
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY. One
bedroom apt., 1/2 block from Jour Journalism
nalism Journalism Bldg. $75/mo. A/C, all
electric. Ph. 378-4545. (B-131-
lt-p).
TWO CCB, 2 bedroom houses with
appliances. Shady corner lots.
Could partly furnish one house.
One efficiency apt. furnished, pri private
vate private bath entrance, drive. 2225 NE
7th St.; 726 NW 31st Place. Ph.
376-0595. (B-l 31-ts-c).
NEW ONE AND TWO bedroom fur furnished
nished furnished A/C apts with pool. One
bedroom S9O and $95. Two bed bedroom
room bedroom $125. NearUF & Medical Cen Center.
ter. Center. 372-9569. (B-131-ts-c).
PRIVATE ROOM 3 blocks from
campus, S2O a mo. Ph. 372-8840.
(B-l 31-ts-c).

E£Ej] StothTodou/
i>r^ri3thStat23rdoadP
Telephone 378-2434
f/ WINNER OF
3 ACADEMY. AWARDS
julielhristie /M,
BEST ACTRESS |
JOF YEAR
>T COSTUME
DESIGN
>T SCREEN PLAY
larliiHi
it 1:00,3:10,5:20,7:35,9:50 #P
JRENCEHARVEYDIRK BOGARDE J
ACRES OF FREE PARKING ROCKING CHAIR LOGE

Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 6, 1

for rent 1
FURNISHED ROOM in new home,
central A/C, linens furnished. 3
miles from Univ. 3820 NW 17th
Terr. Male student. 376-4478 or
376-4005. (B-131-2t-c).
AVAILABLE JUNE 15th. Conven Convenient
ient Convenient garage efficiency. Across
from campus. Would like to rent
by the year. Apply 321 SW 13th St.
(B-131-lt-c).
TWO FURNISHED APTS for rent,
upstairs SBO per mo., downstairs
S7O per mo. Utilities furnished.
Located 9 NE 9th St. Call 376-
0672. (B-131-st-c).
FURNISHED one bedroom house,
S6O per month, including water.
See at 3117 NW 6th St. (B-131-
1 t-c).
THREE BEDROOM, two bath, pri private
vate private home. South of University Inn
Motel. Fireplace in living room,
3 to 6 students acceptable. $l2O
per mo. 372-6232. (B-130-4t-c).
FURNISHED APTS, One each, bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, $25 per mo. One each, bed bedroom
room bedroom apt., $55 per mo. One each
efficiency apt., $35 per mo. All
utilities supplied except gas. 320
NW 3rd St. 372-0481, Mr. Kaplan.
(B-130-st-c).
FURNISHED APTS. 220 SE 7th St.
A/C, one each 4 bedrooms SIOO
per mo. One each 2 bedrooms --
$75 per mo. 372-0481. Mr. Kaplan.
(B-l 30-st-c).
HUGE FURNISHED 3 BEDROOM
brick house, 1/2 block from Ad Administration
ministration Administration Building, 1226 SW
3rd Ave. 376-7534 or 372-3576.
Special Summer Rates. (B-l 30-
3t-c).
LIVE IN COOL LUXURY at dorm
rates in the swingingest apt. build building.
ing. building. One block off campus. LA
FONTANA. 372-3576 or 376-7534.
(B-l 30- 3t-c).
4
wanted
WANTED: Girl to share 1/3 of 2
bedroom apt. One block from cam campus
pus campus with A/C. Only $33.33 a mo.
plus utilities. Summer and/or Fall,
Winter. Call 372-6229. (C-130-
2t-nc).

9
wanted
COED TO SHARE APT. 3 blocks
from campus. Will have private
A/C room, washer and dryer, $35
a mo. Phone 372-8840 or 378-1161.
(C-l 31-ts-c).
WANTED: Roommate for 1 bed bedroom
room bedroom apt. at Village Park. S6O/mo.
plus utilities. A/C, swimming pool.
Call 376-8363. (C-131-2t-p).
WANTED: Used girl's English ra racer
cer racer or inexpensive motor bike or
scooter. Need desperately. Call
Karen or Gordon at 6-1345 after
4 p.m. (C-131-tf-nc).
NEED 2 ROOMMATES University
Garden Apts. S4O/mo. 372-0987.
(Cl3l 2t-p).
MALE TO SHARE 4 room apt.
2 blocks from campus with cook cooking
ing cooking facilities. Only S2O a mo. plus
utilities. 1540 NW 4th Ave. be between
tween between 12-4 p.m. (C-l 31- t-p).
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share large 2 bedroom, A/C, apt.
Two blocks campus. $33 a mo.
Free cook and maid service. Ph.
378-1243 late afternoon or even evenings.
ings. evenings. (C-131-2t-c).
IMMEDIATELY: Female room roommate
mate roommate for A-term. Modern, A/C,
large bookshelves, only 5 blocks
from campus. $45/mo. Call 378-
2360. (C-131-st-p).
ROOMMATE WANTED for IH-A
Trimester to share A/C apt. S4O
mo. plus utilities. La Fontana Apts.
#406. (C-131-2t-c).
ROOMMATE WANTED for 3 bed bedroom
room bedroom 1 bath house. Rent $35. One
block off 13th St., 5 mins, to cam campus.
pus. campus. Call 378-4624. (C-131-ts-c).
help wanted
PART TIME WORK for Univ. stu student
dent student to live on premises. Room
rent to constitute part of compen compensation.
sation. compensation. For more information, ph.
376-3012. (C-131-lt-c).
goooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooro
IfegpW C h al^
JH3333N
" THFATPT* 8 §
HflTlXSVvnnraraii
/f^Lemmon
WkM *****
Natalie
Wood
rgr mmsar-sr,
PSjl
P^THEATRE^ii

help wante
FLORIDA STUDENTS through Ilf
rect selling can earn S2OO a wet
plus valuable school
You must be bondable and
strate sales ability. This is a fHB
or part time job depending on yAB
For information on this outstai*
ing job offer call 372-1549
arrange for an interview lrnmeAS
ately. (E-131-lt-p).
' r-
WANTED: Alligator carrier.
have car and Ist and 2nd
free on Tuesdays and Prida|
Contact Bernard Mackey, 3
3261, ext. 2832, or 378-4052. (M
131-tf-nc).
SUMMER JOB, full time or
time. Prefer students with
Science and/or chemistry
ground. Must meet
of Federal Work Study PrograH
Call 378-2600. (E-130-3t-c). |
qfflnnsinii
_i4ooJjmrHorf*_RomJ Rt. isl H I Ijt
TONITE NEW TO*
Thru Tuesfc HITS 1
No. 1 Color At Dus
* IEE MM *1
IN HIS OSCAR AWARfI
WINNING ROLE !! I
SjAiJ
IBALLfIUI
color! |
50.2 188 MARVIN Hll
Stiffs RMtsl
I
/UaJV, A I |^|
I THRU SAT I
"UMBRELLASofI
< CHERBOURG!
[ 1 -3-5-7-9. ,1
*wSUN-TUES*J
II
w/OULD YOU LIKE Jo \ U
SEE A FRENCH [I
4 MOtfE* f|
y Belmondo Signoret_
Anna ri



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

services
'
L. . i
EXPERT TAILORING by Mrs.
Dora Manookian. Alterations of all
kinds of mens and womens clothing.
35 yrs. experience. Prices reason reasonable.
able. reasonable. Call 376-1794. 1824 NW Ist
Ave. (M-131-4t-c).

I ROBBIES I
Best In Steaks
Meal^^^^BQ^jandwiches
11718 W. University Ave. I
I *(>11 The Gold Coast I

I How to make a snap course
I out of a tough one!
1 nhviouslv Olds 4-4-2 crammed for its finals. It masters miles with a 400-cubic-inch V-8,
4-barrel carb and a rumbling pair of pipes. Cools corners with heavy-duty suspension
I : nd front and rear stabilizers. Goes to the head of its class with the sportiest configuratton 1
, or | line tires. All this, and straight As in economics, t 00...
ever to top four red-line tires, nu i l nOkT TO Ol DS FOR THF NEW' I
I like matching its modest price to your pocket. LOOK TO OLDb rOK IHb INtw. 1
M TORONADO NINETY-EIGHT STARFIRE EIGHTY-EIGHTS CUTLASS F-8S VISTA-CRUISER 4-4-2
I '(tep out front | n LDSMOB ILE SM I
I in a Rocket Action Car! IJJ
HH GREAT TIME TO GO WHERE THE ACTION IS .. SEE YOUR NEARBY OLDSMOBILE QUALITY DEALER NOW:

services
*' - ~, ...
BLANKET RESERVATIONS for
meeting space in Florida Union
now being accepted. Forms at
information desk or reservation
office, rm. 108. (M-131-lt-c).

Friday, May 6, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

services
IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios, 372-0300. (M (M--
- (M--
wanted
TEACHERS WANTED. Southwest,
entire West and Alaska. Salaries
$5400 up -- Free registration.
Southwest Teachers Agency, 1303
Central Ave., NE, Albuquerque,
New Mexico. (E-131-7t-p).
TYPEWRITER RENTALS
YOUR OLYMPIA DEALER
604 N. MAIN STREET
' KISER'S
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
|"Gator Ads Tbell."
j DAFFY DUCK

Page 7

c.
wanted
WAITER WANTED for Summer
Trimester, 4 until 8 p.m., 5 days
a week. Apply in person, Larrys
Wonderhouse, 14 SW Ist St. (E (E---131-2t-c).
--131-2t-c). (E---131-2t-c).
STUDENT GOVERNMENT needs
volunteer workers for the summer,
undersecretaries and typists. Ap Apply
ply Apply Rm. 310, Fla. Union. CE-131-
2t-c).
autos
1955 MERCURY V-8. Radio and
heater, automatic transmission,
good condition. Call 372-5729 after
3 p.m. (G-l 31-lt-c).
1963 VW 1200. White, completely
overhauled, excellent condition.
Ph. 376-3261, ext. 2271 between
9 a.m. 6 p.m. (G-l 31-st-c).
1962 T Bird. Low mileage, loaded.
Ph. 472-2593, Newberry. (G-131-
4t-c).

-v
autos
1956 CHEVY. New metallic blue,
all new interior, radio and heater.
Immaculate one owner, low mile mileage.
age. mileage. Call 378-2421 mornings or
evenings. (G-131-3t-c).
*
1964 PONTIAC LEMANS conver convertible.
tible. convertible. 5 new white wall tires, R&H,
bucket seats, 6 cyl., 4-speed
transmission. Excellent condition.
Call 2-6330 after 5 weekdays. (G (G---131-2t-c)^
--131-2t-c)^ (G---131-2t-c)^
real estate
CORNER NW 29th Ave. and 34th
St. Three bedroom, 2 bath, central
A/C and heat, 2 car garage. Rea Reasonable
sonable Reasonable down payment. Many ex extras.
tras. extras. Ph. 372-5969. (I-131 -3t-c).
LOW DOWN PAYMENT to married
student or staff. Three bedroom,
1 bath, $13,200, shady fenced back
yard. Near campus, golf, pool. 121
NW 25th St. 372-7715, or 376-
8565. (I-131-ts-c).
THREE BEDROOM, 2 bath CCB
home. Quiet neighborhood, con convenient
venient convenient location for schools,
churches, shopping. Extra large
corner lot, well landscaped, pri privacy.
vacy. privacy. Flexible financing cash to
mortgage terms continue 4-1/2%
GI mortgage. Payments at $72.
Sale price -- $15,500. Drive by
626 NE Bth Terr, (just east of
Fair Oaks) or call 376-7665. (I (I---131
--131 (I---131 3t c).
VERY MODERN 3 bedroom, 2-1/2
bath home in highly restricted area
just out city limits. Near elemen elementary
tary elementary school Selling price, $26,000
or will lease by owner. Ph. 372-
8175. (1-131-2 t-c).
I HILLEL 1!
| FOUNDATION |
Schedule Os £:
Regular Events
>: FRIDAY: Services
@7:30 p.m.
j:-: Oneg Shabbat (3)8:30
iij: SATURDAY: Services jij
X; @10:00 a.m.
ijij SUNDAY: Brunch £
@ll a.m.
General Meeting
*: This Sun., May 8
|JO IN THE CROWD ANDj
l| Come To Hillel |f
WONDERING 4F YOUR
CASH WILL SURVIVE
THE MONTH????
&
PATRONIZE 'GATOR
ADVERTISERS FOR THE
BEST BUYS ANYWHEREI



Page 8

t, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 6, 1966

By ARLENE CAPLAN
Alligator Staff Writer
SG President Buddy Jacobs and
Charles Shepherd, hisadministra- .*
tive assistant, took UF issues to
Washington, D.C. during the tri trimester
mester trimester break. Issues discussed
were:
O Feasibility of acquiring Fed Federal
eral Federal Aid for multilevel parking fa facilities.
cilities. facilities.
O Implementation of the Cold
War G.I. Bill on the University
Level.
O Accent 67.
Parking is an acute problem
on campus, said Jacobs. We
found that monies have been dis discontinued
continued discontinued for parking facilities on
a state level, but can be obtained
through the Housing and Urban
Development Bill under the Public

UF Faculty St. Pete-Bound
Ten UF administrators and faculty members will travel to Pinellas
and Hillsborough counties May 9-13 for a series of 17 speaking en engagements
gagements engagements to acquaint citizens in that area with the institutions varied
programs and future goals.
The University of Florida Days project, which covered Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach counties for 28 appearances last November,
will include four stops in Clearwater, six in Tampa and seven in St.
Petersburg.
Groups hosting the collegiate speakers will be the Clearwater and
St. Petersburg Chambers of Commerce along with Kiwanis, Lions,
Sertoma, Optimists, Rotary, Meninak and Exchange organizations.
University President J. Wayne Reitz will attend the St. Petersburg
Chamber of Commerces Town Meeting program at 8:15 a.m. on
May 10 at Bayfront Center and join University Relations and Develop Development
ment Development Dean Alan Robertson in presenting some brief remarks about
campus activities.
Dr. Reitz has arranged a press conference for all Pinellas and
Hillsborough County media immediately following the breakfast at
9:45 a.m. also at Bayfront Center.
fru Whats New
The Browse Shop
RENAISSANCE PAINTING Franco Russole
POWER AND THE GLORY Graham Green
SOUND AND THE FURY William Faulkner
I NEVER PROMISED YOU A ROSE GARDEN
Hannah Green
THE FLIGHT OF THE FALCON
Daphane du Mauier
BRAVE NEW WORLD Aldous Huxley
THE FEMININE MYSTIQUE Betty Friedman
HARD COVERS
CHEMICAL KINETICS Laidler
IN COLD BLOOD .Truman Capote
SUPERCONDUCTIVITY Schrieffer
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00
Campus Shop & Bookstore
Lost Your Contact?
' V* : ~ A
Qato AOs mAke Contacts!

D.C. Trip Accomplished A Lot For UF

Facilities land program.
The University of Tennessee is
presently implementing this pro program.
gram. program. At a convention this week weekend,
end, weekend, Jacobs hopes to speak to the
people from Tennessee and get
more information.
To discuss the Cold War Bill,
Jacobs and Shepherd were directed
to the Office of Labor and Public
Welfare.
We wanted to better understand
what financing is available for
Veterans on campus. This is a
personal proposition between the
regional Veterans Administration
Board and the individual student
veteran, said Jacobs. He said
SG plans to assist veterans by
dispersing information regarding
available money in June.
Accent 67, UFs academic sym symposium

posium symposium organized to bring different
speakers to campus, was met with
enthusiasm from Senators George
Smathers and Spessard Holland,
according to Jacobs. He explained
they are supporting Accent 67,
and will be cooperative in recruit recruiting
ing recruiting speakers for the implementa implementation

I SUNDAY 1
is s&kfniUi l*ft&
I W as LITTLE PIGS hou se I
I MEAL JUST 1/2 PRICE, after spm I
I or Cold Drink Free purchase
I ,^4llirnrrEGiJLirsiZEpsLr
I !11 K LEb MB ECU EjAN pWI
lip H V/ttk /yy//*?///
jyggO
MjHllllilipWifii
> ~****~*~
I Anything goes when you wear "IT'S CRICKET" 1 9
I ticnal Men s Toiletries. Try it and see. (Girls, give it and find out!) S
After-shave, 4 oz., $3.50. Cologne, 4 oz., $4.50. S
vai aL.e in drug stores and cosmetic departments of department stores. fi
B Another fine product ot [ffi Kayser Roth

is

tion implementation of the program.
The Washington trip lasted only
a day and a half, but Jacobs and
Shepherd both feel what they ac accomplished
complished accomplished would have taken
months if they were limited to
correspondence and telephones.
We now have good contact with

our state senators and will be able
to use their facilities when We
need them. We got a lot done in
a short time and were very pleased
with the reception we were giv en
and the efficient and most cooper cooperative
ative cooperative assistance of our senators
concluded Jacobs.



["FLORIDA
UNION
BARBERSHOP
excellent service
Specializing in all types
of Hair Styles
jyk
ua I
FREE HAIRCUT
EACH DAY
Located Next To
CLUBRENDEVOU^^
Gator Ads Sell!
CALL UF EX: 2832

MB M
m. I J Ml W
til
M ~s|ji
XwtgrVvoVgtt XwtgrVvoVgtt,*
,* XwtgrVvoVgtt,* YMm The greatest name in socks fm?#siioss fm?#siioss
- fm?#siioss you Fresh and different in design and color. I
wear a tie vour socks Never fall down on the job.
, .. ,l -if Socks with the Silken Touch,in
should come over the call.
And stay there. Without tugging. 80 4 nylon, 20 h stlk.
Whenever you sit down, sock (no. leg) Regular fits men up to 6ft.-- w /
should be showing. Tall men Ver 6ft s *?-
Ban-Lon" OT. C." (over-the-calf) hose. Another fine product of Kayser-Roth

(jro^PafiT)

You cant use generalized rules
for this race, he said. Were not
talking about X, Y, and Z, were
talking about Burns, High and
Kelly.,

CESSNA
IS HERE)
First ten people to bring in this ad will
receive their first lesson absolutely free
with the purchase of any of our summer
package courses. Call 6-1245 or see
Steve White.
LEARN TO FLY IN THE MODERN CESSNA 150
CESSNA
IN THE LARGE HANGAR
GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL AIRPORT
WALDO ROAD

High 9 Burns Fight It Outi

Because of the personal issues
in the Florida race, Baggs said
no one could count on two thirds
of Kellys vote automatically go going
ing going to High as a sympathy vote.
His prediction was that 40 per

cent of the Kelly voters would
stay home with the rest of the vote
splitting equally between Burns and
High.
I hope Im wrong, but I think
Im being realistic, he said.
Explaining his feelings, Baggs
said the redneck vote might have
gone to Kelly in a Burns-Kelly race
would never go to the liberal may mayor
or mayor from Miami.
In addition, Highs campaign
is too issue oriented. He cant keep
the enthusiasm up, Baggs said.
As Baggs sees it, Highs only
hope would be to shift gears and
sell himself as a dynamic leader
instead of an honest man.
Hes played that tune too long,
Baggs said. The voters of Flori Florida
da Florida are not interested in a good
man, theyre interested in a strong
man.
Baggs pointed out that in Florida
the formal powers of the governor
are relatively weak (compared to
those of a more metropolitan
state).
High has to show the state he
will be able to use the informal
powers of the state to run Talla Tallahassee,
hassee, Tallahassee, Baggs said.
He felt Burns tactic now would
be to try and hold the status quo.
Unless something drastic hap-

Friday, May 6, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

pens like a big scandal or na natural
tural natural calamity Burns will be
ahead, he said.
Dauer and Baggs also discussed
their feelings on the vote totals of
the primary.
Dauer said the results had not
been surprising.
The legitimate polls showed it
would be neck and neck, he said.
Dauer also said it was no sur surprise
prise surprise to him that Burns fnished
first.
A strong political organization
can maximize its vote. It can get
its voters to the polls, he ex explained.
plained. explained.
Baggs said he had expected
Burns to do better, but attributed
the lower-than-expected total to
Kellys good showing.
I dont think many people ex expected
pected expected Kelly to do this well, he
said.
Dauer disagreed with the widely
held view around the state that
voters were apathetic in this elec election.
tion. election.
He noted that voter turnout was
62 per cent -- 10 per cent more
than predicted by state political
exDerts.
The main issue, he said, was
education.
The 1965 legislature was the
first since World War II not to
make provision for teacher pay
raises, additional enrollment or
school buildings, Dauer noted.
No one actually started the edu education
cation education issue, he said. It started
itself during the road bond cam campaign
paign campaign when the Duval schools be became
came became disaccredited.
All three candidates made edu education
cation education an issue.
Dauer also observed the emer emergence
gence emergence of the education issue as a
sign of a final maturing of Florida.
In past years, he said, the main
issues were segregation and min minimal
imal minimal necessities such as high highways
ways highways and roads.
This doesnt mean the state
wants or will get bad roads, he
quickly added. The point is that
people are now looking upon the
state for higher level state
services.
Metropolitization is creating a
new set of issues education,
urban renewal, and civil service,
Dauer said. Florida is entering
a new phase. Its beginning to sound
like a metropolitan state.
This book can help you to
Draft
a ...
B I M
SELECTIVE SERVICE
COLLEGE QUALIFICATION TEST
by Davit! R. Turner
Scientifically planned to help you achieve
your highest score
Provides intensive training, drills and re reviews
views reviews in every phase of Test
Tells you exactly what to study . helps
you find your weaknesses fast anti correct
them
Contains many sample tests, Q.&A. prac practice
tice practice to give you the feel of the Test . in increase
crease increase your confidence
Plus Special Tips & techniques for scoring
high
YOU ( AN TAKE THIS TEST ONL Y ONCE!
BE PREPARED!
Available at your college or local bookstore
AN 3HTO PUBLICATION
Weve helped millions
pass all kinds of tests."
PATRONIZE,
GATOR
ADVERTISERS

Page 9



1, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 6, 1966

Page 10

Prwntly Ufd North Side
boc bocdock
dock bocdock
South Side
\ \\ PROPOSED SITE
LJ house
PROPOSED AREA UNDER STUDY

Evelyn Patrick Silvers, winner of the Miss University of Florida
title 14 years ago, will return to her college campus May 22-27 to
serve as a co-narrator for the UF Alumni Associations 1966 film,
The Magic Tower.
Mrs. Silvers, wife of television comedian Phil Silvers of Sergeant
Bilko fame, will work with Student Body President Buddy Jacobs of
Fernandina Beach in providing the sound narration for the 28-minute
color film thats being prepared for release in August.
The Magic Tower is the third in a series of promotional produc productions
tions productions by the Alumni Association designed to inform alumni, parents,
students and Florida residents of the growth and significant achieve achievements
ments achievements at UF. ii -

u :
f] JMm
t 1 '"'*y w
w Y
.
MRS. SILVhRS
Miracle on 13th Street was the
1964 film and Road to the Moon
was prepared last year. Dwight
Godwin, manager of the Univer Universitys
sitys Universitys Photographic Services De Department,
partment, Department, and John Paul Jones,
professor of journalism in the
School of Journalism and Commun Communications,
ications, Communications, served as producer and
writer, respectively, for all three
films in the series.
Mrs. Silvers, mother of five
daughters who will be at home in
Beverly Hills, Calif., while she
works on The Magic Tower, is
a former resident of Orlando and
plans a trie there May 28 to attend
a reunion of her high school class.

-r

Former Miss UF
To Narrate Film

As a student at the University of
Florida, she was named Military
Ball Queen several weeks prior to
her selection as Miss University
of Florida. Evelyn also was a mem member
ber member of the Florida Debating Society.
She went to New York when she
was 21 years old, eyeing a career
in show business and did stay ac active
tive active in that field, as well as in
radio broadcasting with the Voice
of America, until she married
Silvers.
Summer Concerts
To Begin Tuesday
UFs summer concert series
starts Tuesday, May 10, at 8:15
p.m. in University Auditorium with
a violin performance sponsored by
the Lyceum Council.
Violinist Carter Nice will give
a performance of Beethovens
Sonata in G Major, Opus 30,
No. 3; Prokofieffs Sonata in D
Major, Opus 94a; Bartoks First
Rhapsody; Blochs Nigun, and
de Fallas Suite Espagnole.
University students will be ad admitted
mitted admitted by showing their identifi identification
cation identification cards; faculty, stall, school
students and children will pay $1
and cost to the general public is
$2. Tickets will be on sale at the
door.

DISCUSSES SOUTH SIDE
Wauburg Committee Meets

By JUDY MILLER
Alligator Staff Writer
Tuesday, May 3, the Wauburg
planning committee met to discuss
plans for the undeveloped acreage
at UFs Lake Wauburg recreation
area.
The south site was obtained three
years ago by student government
and is under the supervision of the
Florida Union Board. UFers have
enjoyed use of part of the north
side for several years.
Last week a group of SG and UF
officials toured the entireWauburg
property, north and south sides,
to determine future use for the
area.

I I
jM Ik
Y -y- s Pm: ;
I
!r $ :: !y
St m m BwbhSs IfB ,J ffi M Bk
M J§ |g rn m : rlf r v '' M Wk BWFm. jfl Bk
'hs m' s§ Hr w )m 1 pb
mn J 2 ffi h9H HB i V | wv
I Nothing I
I can take the press out of Lee-Prest slacks I
Not that it's on his mind right now. And it needn't be. Those Lee- I
I Prest Leesures can't help but stay crisp and neat. No matter what you I
I put them through. They have a new permanent press. So the crease stays I
in. The wrinkles stay cut. Permanently. And that's without ironing. No
I touch-ups, either. They're made from Lee's special blend of 50% polyester I
I and 50;% combed cotton. For wash and wear... with conviction. I
Incidentally, that permanent press is the only change we've made I
I in Leesures. They still have, that lean, honest 100 k... smart, tailored fit. 1
I New Lee-Prest Leesures. Test their permanent press yourself. It isn't I
I .necessary, but it's a great way to spend an evening. From $6.00 to SB.OO. I
I Lee-PReST Leesuresr I

At yesterdays meeting, SG pre president
sident president Buddy Jacobs expressed in interest
terest interest in immediate development
of the north side while Dean of
Academic Affairs Lester Hale pre previously
viously previously had said he was in favor pf
extensive use for the south side.
Also mentioned at Tuesdays
meeting was former UF Vice Pre President
sident President Harry Philpotts opinion that
any future development of Wauburg
property should take place after the
new Florida Union is completed and
used extensively.
Intramurals Director Spurgeon
Cherry feels it will be several
years before any improvements
on the property could be afforded.

He wants to bring in a recreation
consultant to study the area.
Cherry is in favor of one large
building on the lakes south side
with smaller facilities also in the
area.
SG treasurer John Darlson sug suggested
gested suggested immediate plans for usage
of the north side and more long
range plans for the other side.
(I UI.RC 1 C*\ v^
GATOR ADS \
ARE DREAMY!/
iuJRy ?
i I



+tcyj& yy Tflk S
s|9nMHHgHrap& J|
HB H
I I
vnA*. I
,.. TftWiC vW
: I
|S4 | /
'
mV w
*s'- JH&
' H*
I
* V- |flr
?. "iWmif
HONDA I
A Honda will circumvent parking lots and take I
you directly to your destination. And, you II have I
a lot more fun getting there. As for economy, I
prices start about s2ls*! And you II meet the I
nicest people! I
Free Brochure: Write American Honda Motor Co., Inc.
Department C 6, Box 50, Gardena, California 1966 AHM
* plus dealer's transportation and set-up charges I

tor r Decisi^B
** President J. Wiyne Relti both Bokrd members, bkd beet *cl ff) ~
O editors Benn^^j
Mm f W Mmm n m mester. His decision Id, was ADd J' Moor and Vyrt^gag
An attacked the <
-ft* r § Jf f Mm A t V# m i** etaims ,h ' >elr orfanlta- Al "cator restoS^^^ElE
" r /VomAW Lr tr-"-"" =rrs-J
*&*' -- ..... J Ousted UF Editor Reveals
. BkaoVJ b v eltp \ rC >lft* *** 9 the press, academic frwedo *****
Ptesl^ 1 L.rt o*ders asked la kt *!* ry J
o_. ... . nan to Endorse Candid^M
Pc 'r: 3Bbred U. Ur h Loirors
Wsw=* onttnu. to the editor B
e on the
shr she B
-a5 a, m
Harpers Decries Timid Papers

By STEVE SMITH
Alligator Managing Editor
A free college press may be at
times immature or irresponsible
-- but, says an article in this
month's Harpers Magazine, the
benefits of allowing an independent
student voice outweigh the risks
that it will be abused.
The article, written by former
editor Jeff Greenfield of the Uni University
versity University of Wisconsins Cardinal,
coincides closely with the firing of
three Alligator editors at the end
of last trimester. Entitled Col College
lege College Newspapers in Search of Their
Own Voice, Greenfields article
presents the methods and results
of control over student papers. He
then offers an argument for free freedom
dom freedom from these controls.
Greenfields thesis is that on
the basis of the record made by the
free student press, the risks in inherent
herent inherent in encouraging the active
voice (of student papers) seems
very much worth taking, however
awkwardly or im maturely the stu students
dents students sometimes handle the re responsibilities
sponsibilities responsibilities of freedom.
What makes these (indepen (independent)
dent) (independent) papers qualitatively better
than their passive counterparts?
To begin with, he says, they
attempt to deal with the full range
of complex issues about educa educational
tional educational values and methods. Well
before the Berkeley explosion they
were raising hard questions about
what the point of higher education
was.
The author concludes citing
many examples-- that the achieve achievements
ments achievements of the free college press
have more than justified the risk

SAVE ON I
SPORTSWEAR
Blouses, Skirts, Slacks, I
Shorts and Shells 1
now 1/3-1/2 Off "s"
Also I
"Spring Dresses and Suits 1
Reduced 20-331/3% Off Reg. Price I
Choose from: Arnels, Cottons, Seersuckers, Dacrons I
Sizes: 3-15, 6-8 I
ALL SALES FINAL I
311 and 313 N.W. 13th St. 1
Free Parking Regular Charge I
In The Rear Or Central Charge 1

taken by their schools in permitting
an independent news source for the
campus community.
He describes the minority of
student papers which have reached
this level in two ways: such papers
are both free and active; free
of administrative restrictions, and
active because they are lucky
enough to have energetic and arti articulate
culate articulate editors.
UFs Alligator, as recent events
show, cannot be called really
free. Although there has been
no censorship, future editors have
been warned they may make them themselves
selves themselves expendable.
But The Alligator does go far
toward fitting Greenfields defini definition
tion definition of an active paper, as
opposed to a passive one. In the
active student press, says Green Greenfield,
field, Greenfield, while the run-of-the-mill
(fraternities and football) stories
are covered, there is also a large
number of items seldom seen in
the more passive press:
Coverage of a major piece of
international or national news by
wire service ... a news story
about an impending curriculum or
academic policy change; an inter interpretative
pretative interpretative or analytical piece on
that policy; an investigative story
on a key campus problem, such as
housing shortages, student em employment
ployment employment wages, or community
opposition to campus expansion...
Editorials may cover a routine
campus dispute, or the war in
Viet Nam, or sexual morality, or
communist speaker bans, or any anything
thing anything else which comes into the
mind of an articulate writer who
hasnt learned not to offend. The

Friday, May 6, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

columns and letters are even more
wide-ranging, a reflection of the
ferment that is a part of any lively
campus community, the article
says.
The Alligator fits such a defi definition
nition definition to the extent that its activism
has been tolerated by the paper's
ultimate controllers. Generally a
great deal of activism has been
permitted.
The Alligator has not been sub subjected
jected subjected to the more restrictive
forms of control discussed by
Greenfield.
But The Alligator is, indeed,
scheduled in the near future for
a professional editorial assistant
who will represent the Board of
Publications on the newspaper staff
and who will have one of three
votes (the editor and managing edi editor
tor editor also will have one each) in de deciding
ciding deciding editorial policy.
Greenfield also points out that
control of the student press .
need not be as heavy-handed as
confiscation or dismissal." The
newspaper may be barred from
the meetings of important deliber deliberative
ative deliberative bodies (not unknown at Flor Florida)
ida) Florida) and denied access to campus
administrators . The editor is
thus faced with the choice of either
waiting for the story to be released
during a time and in a format con convenient
venient convenient to the school, or else run running
ning running the risk of being irresponsible
or underhanded or inexcusably in inaccurate."
accurate." inaccurate."
And perhaps being fired.
In the face of such risks and such
pressure, direct or indirect, most
student papers withdraw from
controversial topics and develop
flaccid and timid coverage." Many
college papers have developed the
art of saying nothing at great length
to near-perfection."
Certainly the UF administration
doesn't seriously want The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator to be this kind of paper
something which, in the main, it
has not been and hopefully never
will be. As Greenfield points out,
not many college administrators
would oppose a free press in the
abstract. But situations like the
recent Alligator firings are not at
all uncommon.
Where does The Alligator stand?
As a creditably active paper, Mr.
Greenfield would probably say; but
not as one without restrictions on
its freedom. Freedom of the press
for The Alligator can become a
question of whose judgment can be
substituted for that of the editor.
At present, this responsibility
lies in the Board of Student Pub Publications
lications Publications despite the recent
direct intervention by President
Reitz.
The authority of the board over
The Alligator is somewhat similar
to that faced by every newspaper
editor as his publisher or board
of directors.
Here at UF, the controversy over
the student newspaper is still in
abeyance.

Page 11



Page 12

> The Florida Allieator, Friday, May 6. 1966

DOTY INAUGURATED
Dr. Franklin A. Doty was Inaugurated in the new general classroom
building Wednesday as new Dean of the University College.
Doty replaces Dr. Byron Hollingshead as head of the largest of the
UFs colleges and schools.

IFC Donates
Blood For
Grandson
Across 1,100 miles the Inter Interfraternity
fraternity Interfraternity Council will stretch a
helping hand to the grandson of
former UF President John Tigert.
Dr. Tigert was UF president for
almost 20 years. He died a year
ago.
His grandson Mark Rivas, a
delicate youngster of nine, Is
scheduled to undergo open heart
surgery June 12 in New York.
This Is the boys second operation.
The first was performed in Miami
four years ago.
The hospital has estimated 35
pints of blood will be needed for the
operation.
Not long before Marks first
operation, his father was seriously
burned and permanently injured.
His mother, Mary Jane Tigert Ri Rivas,
vas, Rivas, works as an elementary school
teacher.
A friend of the family said Mrs.
Rivas was deeply concerned about
the needed supply of blood.
So when Student Body President
Buddy Jacobs learned of the boys
need, he contacted Bill Bryant,
advisor to campus fraternities, and
arranged for IFC to supply the
needed blood.
Mrs. Rivas recently wrote a let letter
ter letter to Jacobs thanking him and the
IFC for their help.
Its a tremendous comfort
to know that if we cant get the
rest of it donated during June,
we can rely upon the IFC, she
said.

Tfrfts FREE DELIVERY
Jbljl free GIFT
WRAPPING
PRESCRIPTIONS 24 houp
and fine DEVELOPING
COSMETfgS SERVICE
ODI'S FLORIDA'
PHARMACY PHARMACY
116 Central Plaza 421 NW 13th
| 376-2444 372-2523 |

surfers-
Surfin' knit shirts, crew or
Henley collars, in your
favorite color combo's.
300 & 400
Surfin' jams and trunks,
solids, plaids and cool
Hawaiian florals.
From 4 00
(Catalina and others)
HOME
OF THE THECRAZY
CRAZY THECRAZY fj
LITTLE
TAILORS jT
|
112 W. University Avenue

HEALTH RELATED PROFESSIONS

Gardner Cites UF College

John W. Gardner, secretary of
health, education and welfare, has
cited UFs College of Health Re Related
lated Related Professions as one of the
nations leading examples of co coordinated
ordinated coordinated programs for training
much needed sealth profession professionals.
als. professionals.
The College of Health Related
Professions is the universitys
thirteenth and newest college. Last
year the colleges name was chang changed
ed changed from Health Related Profes Professions
sions Professions to its present name.
Gardner cited the Florida pro program
gram program in recent testimony before
the Sub-Committee on Public
Health and Welfare of the House
Committee on Interstate and Fo Foreign
reign Foreign Commerce.
The Committee is considering
legislation the Allied Health
Professions Personnel Training
Act of 1966 (HR13196) to in increase

Art Carved settings \
hold a diamond so delicately,
its almost frightening. Bartow City Jewelry Store I
Cocoa William Bailey
J \ Coral Gables Carrolls Jewelers
! \ Daytona Beach Hells Jewelers
\\ j 1 Fort Lauderdale Carrolls Jewelers
I b \ Fort Lauderdale Lords Jewelry Co.
i\ ||||i \ I \ Fort Lauderdale Pribbles Jewelry Store
i \/r a \ | > XT'; Fort Walton Beach Vandergrlff Jewelers
1 \ \ 1 1 / i Gainesville Rutherfords Inc.
f \ \ / / Homestead Fischer & Son
j i 'y \ \ j ; Jacksonville Underwood Jewelers
j j } ) 1 / / Key West Beachcombers Jewelers
/ j j j j / / j '.yj Miami Little River Jewelry Co.
j j j f' j J j / / Perry Wells Jewelry
j j / // / / Panama City Armstrong Jewelry Co.
/ I / jf / / / Plantation Jacksons-Byrons Fine Jewelry
/ \ / j / y / Pompano Beach Jacksons-Byrons Fine Jewelry I
/ ".'.r/' : f J st Augustine Phinney Jewelry
/ St. Petersburg Bond Jewelers
j i / Tallahassee Vason Jewelers
! f/ Tampa Adams-Magnon Jewelers
/ y Tampa Beckwith-Range Jewelry Co.
/ Vero Beach Duose Jewelry Co., Inc.
I / Wauchula R, H. Herr Jewelers
, West Palm Beach Krauss Jewelry
I /Ve vc even designed a diamond Winter Haven Freemans Jewelry
\ engagement ring to resemble the soft fragile
f petals of a new spring flower. j
j So the diamond jon show off to the I
' world won t only be dazzling, but elegant too. J
j i In the new Art Carved collect ion, jj
\fu can choose from slim, soaring, majestic
\design.;. And without being frightened. ~ j
because since wc guarantee I
all the diamonds no scr, no also j
; ; guarantee the\ mil stay right there. I
i\rtQirved
FOR A COWPLIM ENTARY ARTC ARVED BROCHURE, SEE YOUR AUTHORIZED ARTCARVED JEWELER OR WRITE I
J.R. WOOD & SONS. INC., 216 EAST 4STH STREET, NEW YORK NY 10017
NOTICE
The Board Os Student Publications Is Accepting Applications For The I
Following Positions. Forms Should Be Picked Up in Room 9Of The I
Florida Union And Returned No Later Than May 20, 1966. 1
POSITIONS I
EDITOR IN CHIEF, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR (TRIMESTER 1 &2, 1966-67) I
jMANAGING EDI IOK, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR (TRIMESTER 1& 2, 1966-67)1
A- jHH
Applicants must be available for interview on date of selection. I

crease increase training opportunities for
medical technologists, physical
therapists, rehabilitation counse counselors,
lors, counselors, new types of technologists
and others in allied health fields.
He termed the Florida program
a comprehensive grouping of cur curricula
ricula curricula in a college within a uni university
versity university with programs which pro provide
vide provide advance training for urgently
needed supervisors, administra administrators
tors administrators and teachers for the skilled
health professions and their re related
lated related sub-professional groups,
Gardner said.
The proposed legislation is de designed
signed designed to support schools such as
the one at UF. The act would offer
improvement grants to build up
trained personnel to meet the in increasing
creasing increasing demands for health care
arid grants for construction of
teaching facilities.
It would authorize a three-year

program to provide federal assis assistance
tance assistance to schools and students for
expansion and improvement of bac baccalaureate
calaureate baccalaureate and advanced degree
training; extend loan forgiveness
to doctors practicing in rural areas
? .d provide for conversion of loan
programs for students in nursing
and health professions which would
allow federal subsidy, guarantee of
privately financed loans and direct
federal loans.
Dr. Samuel P. Martin, provost
of the universitys J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, followed Secretary
Gardner in testimony before the
House sub-committee, and urged
enactment of the Allied Health Pro Professions
fessions Professions Personnel Training Act,
but called for extension of the loan
forgiveness feature now offered to
medical and nursing students to
also include students in the allied
health professions.



r Orange
- A

Campus Calendax
PLEASE TURN IN ALL ITEMS FOR CAMPUS CALENDAR TO THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS OFFICE, FLA. UNION

FRIDAY, MAY 6
MENSA: Daily, 11:15-1:30, re reserved
served reserved section, wz'ng r Main
Cafeteria. For information on mem membership,
bership, membership, contact-Mike Sipe, 8-4950
or 305-21 Diamond Village. Students
and faculty invited.
VISTA: 9-5 p.m., Student Service
Booth.
BASEBALL: 3 p.m., Perry Field.
Florida vs. FSU.
VISTA: 10 a.m. & 3 p.m., 324 FU.
Movie.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 11
ENGINEERING WIVES: 9:30a.m.,
Student Union. Meeting for election
of officers. Crazy Hat theme -- make
a crazy hat and wear it. Prizes given.
EUROPEAN TOUR: June 21 -Au -August
gust -August 15. 8 weeks -- $3lO. $125 de deposit
posit deposit at 315 FU.
GATOR SAILING CLUB: 7:30p.m.
118 FU. Welcome to sailors old and
new. Everyone invited.
PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM: 4 p.m.,
Bless And. i( The Pressure Depen Dependence
dence Dependence of the Knight Shift in Platinum

Administrative Notices To Students, Faculty Sc Staff

TO STUDENTS:
JOBS AVAILABLE: Jobs are available for students
interested in part-time sales work while in school
and full time during summer break. A representative
will be on the campus at 2 p.m. Wednesday, May 11,
to discuss employment. Interested students should
contact Mrs. Stechmiller, Student Employment Office,
124 Tigert Hall.
INTRAMURAL PARTICIPANTS: All persons or
teams interested in participating in intramural ac activities
tivities activities during the 111-A session must be registered
with the Intramural Office, Room 229, Florida Gym,
prior to 5 p.m., Friday, May 6. Sports available are
softball (men £nd women), singles tennis (men and
women), singles handball (advanced and beginners),
mixed doubles bowling, mixed doubles tennis and
coed volleyball.
ROOM RESERVATIONS: Blanket reservations are
General Notices
placement interviews
(Sign-up sheets are posted in the Placement Office,
Bldg. H. All are degree-level positions. Asterisk in indicates
dicates indicates summer employment availabe for juniors.
Interviews will be held in Florida Union unless other otherwise
wise otherwise indicated.)
MAY 20: HOUDAILLE-DUVAL- WRIGHT CO. --
BBC, CE. OLIN ME, ChE, IE, Met. E. SYSTEMS
ENGINEERING LABORATORIES, INC. EE.
MAY 23: PHILLIPS PETROLEUM CORP. -- Gen.
Bus., Acctg., Lib. Arts, Ed. DELTONA & MACKLE
CORP. BBC. THE BELL SYSTEM nontech nontechnical
nical nontechnical group meeting, 5 p.m., FU. THE BENDIX
CORPORATION Ps, EE.

and Cadmium. Tea will be served
at 3:30 p.m. in 132 Williamson Hall.
MEDICINE LECTURE SERIES:
12:10 p.m., MSB Aud. Prof. T. W.
Herbert: Einstein, Heisenberg,
Harvey, and Shakespeare.
SPANISH LECTURE: 8 p.m., FU
Aud. Manuel Ray, a leader of Cuban
Revolution: The Struggle for De Democracy
mocracy Democracy in Cuba. In Spanish. Joint Jointly
ly Jointly sponsored by Political Science
Dept., Latin American Club, Div. of
Latin American Studies.
SATURDAY, MAY 7
- -r
MOVIE: 7 & 9:15 p.m., Walker
Aud. (< The Sun Also Rises.
BASEBALL: 3 p.m., Perry Field.
Florida vs. FSU.
INDIA CLUB: 8 p.m., 324 FU &
Johnson Lounge.
CHILDRENS CERAMICS CLASS CLASSES:
ES: CLASSES: 9 a.m., FU Craft Shop. Ages
8-11. 6 sessions -- $6.00.
SUNDAY, MAY 8
UNIVERSITY GALLERY LEC LECTURE:
TURE: LECTURE: 3 p.m., Univ. Gallery. Horace
Jayne, Curator of the Museum of

now being accepted for meeting rooms in Florida
Union during the spring trimester. Forms are avail available
able available in the reservation office or at the Information
Desk.
WORKERS NEEDED: Student Government needs
volunteer workers (secretaries and typists) for the
summer. Apply in Room 310, Florida Union.
MALE STUDENTS: Special physical fitness classes
will be conducted at Florida Gym during periods 2,
3,4, and 6, Monday through Friday. This is a non noncredit
credit noncredit activity. Interested students may sign up with
Mr. Foy Stephens in the varsity weight room.
'
TO FACULTY & STAFF:
SURPLUS PROPERTY: Boating equipment for sale
to the highest bidder. Minimum acceptable bids are:
Johnson 75 hp outboard motor s3so; boat, Mitchell,
17 feet $100; trailer, Hurricane ssO. Bid appli applift
ft applift
UNCLAIMED PACKAGE: The Campus Mail Room
has a package from Reliance Merchandising Company,
Philadelphia, Pa., which has no name on the address.
It contains electronics parts valued at $2.60. The in invoice
voice invoice number is 15417; the money order number is
6,481,895,177. The company has no name on the order.
Please claim your package as soon as possible.
SWIM CLASS: A non-credit swim class will begin
Monday, May 9, at 12 noon in the Florida Pool. Stu Students,
dents, Students, faculty and staff members are eligible. Regis Registration
tration Registration will be at 10 a.m. Monday, May 9, in Room 227,
Florida Gymnasium. All staff members must have a
$2 swim card, available at the Gym. This card, which
is good throughout the summer for recreational swim swimcation

and

BLUE BULLETIN

Friday, May 6, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE,
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE.

Fine Arts, hist Buddhist Painting of Western China.
INDIA CLUB MOVIE: Ek DilSau
Afsane. 8 p.m., MSB Aud. English
sub-titles. $.75.
DUPLICATE BRIDG' 1:30 p.m.,
215 FU. Students, faculty and staff
only.
UNITARIAN FELLOWSHIP: 11-
noon. FU Aud. Prayer service.
MON DA Y, MAY 9
UNIVERSITY WOMENS CLUB:
11:30 a.m., Blue Room, Student
Service Center. Luncheon.
CRAFT SHOP SPECIAL SESSION:
2:30 p.m., FU Craft Shop. Sand Sandcasting.
casting. Sandcasting. No registration.
FU DANCE LESSONS: 7:30 p.m.,
FU Social Room. Every Mon. & Wed.
for five weeks, beginning May 9.
SIO.OO per person; $18.50 per
couple. For information call Ext.
2741, 315 FU.
FU BOWLING LEAGUE: 7 p.m.,
Palm Lanes. Bus leaves FU at 6:30
p.m.
U of F VETERANS CLUB: 121
FU, 123 FU, 210 FU, 9-5 p.m.;
118 FU, 7-11 p.m.

cation swimcation forms are available in 106 Tigert Hall, Pur Purchasing
chasing Purchasing Division. Bids are to be opened May 5. rhe
equipment can be inspected by contacting Alvin Keel Keeling,
ing, Keeling, Surplus Warehouse, Ext. 2530.
PERSONNEL REMINDER: All faculty members who
will not be teaching the 111-A spring term are remind reminded
ed reminded to contact the Personnel Office immediately re regarding
garding regarding continuation of their Blue Cross-Blue Shield
and Gulf Life Hospitalization coverage. Since no pay payroll
roll payroll deduction can be made for faculty members not
teaching the 111-A term, coverage will terminate if
direct payment is not made through the Personnel
Office.
FACULTY CLUB MEMBERS: Luncheons are served
at the Faculty Club, overlooking the golf course, from
12 noon until 1:30 p.m. every day. For reservations for
one of the five private dining rooms (at no cost), call
Ext. 2561. Thursday night buffet suppers are served
6-7:30 p.m.
ming, is the only fee for the course. Registration is
limited to 40 persons.
BAKE SALE: The Arts and Science Dames will
sponsor a bake sale Saturday, May 7, in front of Publix
in the Gainesville Shopping Center, beginning at 10 a.m.
O & B DEADLINES: All notices for the Orange and
Blue Bulletin must be received in the Division of
Informational Service by 9 a.m. the day BEFORE
publication. The Orange and Blue will appear in The
Alligator on Tuesdays and Fridays. Deadlines are 9
a.m. Mondays, and 9 a.m. Thursdays. Items for
Campus Calendar must be sent to the Public Functions
Office, Florida Union.

Page 13



Page 14

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 6, 1966

808
Menaker
EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Mew Coach?
From where I sit, it looks like Florida may have a new basket basketball
ball basketball coach sooner than it expected.
Coach Norm Sloan has been doing a pretty good job with the
Gators, bringing them up into the realm of big time basketball,
along with the rest of the SEC. Sloan may leave something to be
desired, but he has been more successful than his predecessor,
John Mauer, now an NFL scout, whose teams sported losing
records for many years.
I wouldnt blame Sloan if he wanted to leave Florida. North
Carolina State is his alma mater, and every coach must dream
of that glorious day when he returns in triumph to his former
campus.
Sloan has been here six years and has had some very good
basketball teams. They werent as good as the talent might have
indicated, but not every coach can get the best out of his players.
In Sloans case, this is true more often than not.
It's Hard
Its hard for a player to do his best when he knows he may be
yanked the moment he misses an easy shot or makes a floor
mistake.
Its hard for a player to do his best when he knows that he may
be subjected to vituperation and not encouragement when he makes
a mistake.
Its hard for a player to do his best, when, after losing a game
in which he plays his heart out, he is cut by a disgruntled coach
often in public.
Sloan has been guilty of this in the past, but I wonder whether
or not his superior coaching ability overshadows his fault. Sloan
IS an excellent coach, but hes a pretty poor amateur psychologist,
something every successful coach must be.
Im not asking Coach Sloan to baby his players. They dont need
it. What they do need is a little more understanding.
They need to know theyre not going to be pulled from a game
because of a few mistakes.
They need to know their coach has confidence in them, that
they wont be denied the privilege of eating a meal after losing a
game, case in point, this years Tulane game.
The'y need to know their coach cares as much about developing
them as young men as he does about having a winning basketball
team.
Os course, Sloan has to push his players some or he wont have
a winning season. A few losing seasons and Florida has a new
coach anyway. What Im trying to get across is that Norm Sloan
can treat his players a little more like human beings than like
basketball machines -- to be turned on and off at will, press the
button and win a game.
Believe it or not, Im all for Coach Norm Sloan, and I hope
he will stay at Florida a long time. But he needs to take a long,
hard look at his player-coach relations. When he does, the
Fighting Gators wont be afraid to lose because they know theyll
be shamed by the coach. Theyll win because they want to win
not because they are afraid to lose.
f

1 YOU WONT GET FAR ON I
$940
I WITHOUT A UTTLE HELP I
I Try Alitalia. They have a 15 day tour of Portugal and Madeira for 1
I that surprisingly low price. More surprising is what it includes: 1
I air fare, hotel with private bath and breakfast, taxi transfers be- I
I tween airports and hotels, passage to Madeira and sightseeing in I
I Lisbon, Estoril and Sintra. It just goes to show you, when it comes 1
I to bargains, Alitalia goes all the way. 1
IHouse of Travell
ISiii 3415 w Univ I
378-1601 I
1 LOCATED NEXT TO NEW WINN-DIXIE I

ABC

-v y /+~-
r^^gi§|aK9|
-

ITS
ELEMENTARY ;

The authentic,traditional,
\Jr classic, conservative button
r i down. Very acceptable.
long points on this Arrow
M / Decton Oxford are just right.
Anything more would give you too
much roll. Other noticeable details:
jQ Back collar button, box pleat and
\T%k Sanforized-Plus, in a wash and
II / wear that goes past midnight
I Cum Laude TBmIBI
button-down oxford...
Stop in and see this handsome shirt at your I HI LjjjJ
earliest opportunity. Youre sure to find just V r
the right stripes and colors you prefer in
our wide selection ... for they were chosen for
the college men on our campus. *5.00 1 in H I
| GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER 1302 NORTH MAIN STREET / V j | 1
mm m - .. :::
The classic button-down ... w
DECTON OXFORi
ride up. Tapered along lean, trim
lines in a wash and wear fabric that
is Sanforized-Plus labeled and fIHH . V '<£&;'T&HviKdy
refuses to wrinkle. See this Bold
If 11

The Most Student-Minded Businessmen
ADVERTISE IN THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
Call Ex: 2832



This is your chance,
Student #7026941.
Drink Sprite and be
somebody* mr^bis
Take heart. Take a dime.
Then take a bottle of Sprite
from the nearest pop
Suddenly in
your hand. Cold.
cackle fiendishly f
and rub your hahds M p
probably chilled
the bone by now.)
You tear off to a /
corner, alone, but K
within earshot of l §
your fellows. i
m
And then? And then 7 And then you unleash it.
SPRITE! It fizzes! It roars! It bubbles with
good cheer!
Heads turn. Whisperings. "Whos that strangely
fascinating student with the arch smile. And what's
in that curious green bottle that's making such
a racket?"
And you've arrived! The distinctive taste and
ebullient character of Sprite has set you apart.
You're somebody, uh...uh, whoever-you-are.
fyfl |oj SPRITE. SO TART AND
Uni I I I'm TINGLING. WE JUST COULDN'T

HELP! HELP! \
ID GIVE ANYTHING
SAVE DEAR NICK FROM JJ/SsL
GETTING ROUGHED UP M&KTIkB
WHILE SHAVING CLOSE!^f f yjA
\. SOd-SOd
GIVE HIM MEl'k
fi'LL GIVE HIM A CLOSE) Ml jKj2/
SHAVE AND A ) &I S9
for his birthday. O- any big occasion The Norelco Jh^
Flip-Top Speedshaver 20. Just about the* most wanted shave 4031
there is for closeness and comfort. Famous Norelco oto V blades
stroke whiskers off. No grab. No pull. No cut. No mck.Ea yn P J?
top' cleaning too. It costs less than a cashmere sweater and Jp
iop ueunii y p C If vou want to spend a little Jmm
you get a smoother date out of it. P.b. it you wu k p pmore
more pmore give the Norelco Speedshaver 30 (at right). 35 closer
shave's. 9 'Floating heads/ too. And a pop-up trimmer for sideburn
All the trimmings-and no stings attached.
ft/ote/cO The Close Electric Shove
1966 North American Philips Company, Inc., *0^ ^

Harlan Eyes
Next Year
For Florida swimming coach
Bill Harlan, whose Gators just
closed out another season as South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference champions,
thoughts of next year are more
pleasant than usual.
First of all Harlan looks forward
to the boys coming off the finest
freshman team in the schools his history.
tory. history. Secondly, he has several key
boys returning from this years
varsity, most notably Blanchard
Tual and Tom Dioguardi.
Dioguardi is generally acknow acknowledged
ledged acknowledged to be the best freestyler
in the history of Florida swim swimming.
ming. swimming. He has been elected captain
of the 1966-67 team and recently
won the Tex Oliver trophy as the
most valuable swimmer on this
years team. This marked the se second
cond second consecutive year Dioguardi,
of West Palm Beach, has captured
this honor.
Tual is an exceptional back backstroker
stroker backstroker who was injured early this
year and never able to gain the
form he showed during his sopho sophomore
more sophomore season.
Up from the freshman team will
be boys like Barry Russo, Andy
McPherson, Steve Macri, Bobby
Bridges, Bruce Page, John Prim Primrose,
rose, Primrose, Richard Ahrens, John David Davidson
son Davidson and Kip Whiteside. All of these,
according to Harlan, are good
prospects and will serve to give
the Gators the depth they need and
lacked this past year.
Florida won the SEC for the 11 th
straight time this past season. The
Baby Gators made it a sweep by.
taking the freshman division, also.

SPORTS
With Jeff Denkewalter Denkewalterl(jjp
l(jjp Denkewalterl(jjp Sports Editor
* W /
Yes, Virginia (or Tom, Dick, and whoever else is reading this),
there is an Alligator sports section this summer.
At least there better be. That's what theyre paying me to do.
No, 1 wont criticize Ray Graves foregoing for two in the
Sugar Bowl. -'
No, I wont browbeat Norm Sloan for losing to the LSU basket basketball
ball basketball team.
I will though earnestly try to cover the sporting scene for you
this summer. That includes varsity athletics such as baseball
and track, campus intramurals, and national sports such as major
league baseball and the professional golf tour.
Incidentally, if you have ever had the urge to write any type of
sports, come on down to the basement of the Florida Union any
Sunday or Wednesday evening after 6 and ask for the guy who
claims hes sports editor. Ill be happy to have you join the team.
Just Maybe They Will
Things Id like to see happen: or ten easy ways to improve
this crazy world .
1. The Gator football team go an entire season without choking
a game against a weak opponent.
2. The Gator basketball team do likewise.
3. Defensive coach Gene Ellenson stay here atUFand not leave
for West Point --a man of Ellensons football caliber and savvy
would be almost impossible to replace.
4. The Boston Celtics lose the National Basketball Association
championship.
5. Cassius Clay lose a fight to a boxer.
6. Cassius Clay fight someone who is a boxer not a cripple
like Patterson, a one-minute wonder like Liston, or a brawler
like Chuvalo.
7. Jimmy Carnes have a long, winning tenure as track coach
at UF heres one good guy who doesnt finish last.
8. Mickey Mantle retire -- its sad to watch this once great
super-star reduced to a hobbling has-been.
9. Steve Spurrier throw a straight, bullet-like pass to a re receiver
ceiver receiver instead of those floating, wobbly footballs he tosses all
too frequently.
10. Dizzy Dean remain unemployed as a sportscaster he 1
makes me sick.
A Quick Glance
Floridas top two high school cagers will be scoring hoops for
out-of-state teams the next four years. Cocoas giant center Bob
Seemer signed with Georgia Tech and Tampa Hillsboroughs
Ronnie Jackson has inked with Auburn . Hoopsters who have
signed for the Gators so far are Tony Duva of Fort Lauderdale,
Ed Lukco of Warren Harding, Ohio, High School, and transfer
student Harry Dunn of Chipola Junior College . Lukco is re regarded
garded regarded as the No. 1 high school cage star in the Buckeye State
... A quickie question: How many horses have won the Kentucky
Derby? Think carefully . Answer in Fridays column .
| Last Call For Intramurals |

Registration is open for Intra Intramural
mural Intramural participation for the 3A ses session.
sion. session. Sports available during 3A
will include mens softball, wo womens
mens womens softball, singles handball
(advanced and beginners), mens
singles tennis, womens singles
tennis, mixed doubles tennis,
mixed doubles bowling, and coed
volleyball.

Special Offer!
ft) PICNIC TIME
1 pt> BAKED BEANS reg. 45?
1 pt. MACARONI SALAD reg. 45?
1 P l COLE SLAW reg. 45?
* Included FREE with purchase
| of BUCKET of Kentucky Fried
if Chicken.
$0 9 5
Bucket includes 15 pieces of
chicken, 1/2 pt. gravy, and
1 doz r Bs.
* *1
HA TURING COL HARLANO SANORS'ORIGINAL RtOPf V.
114 SW 34th ST. 7\

Friday, May 6, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

All participants must be regis registered
tered registered prior to 5:00 p.m., Friday,
May Gth. Registration will be in
room 229 Florida Gymnasium daily
from 8:00 to 5:00. Softball, volley volleyball,
ball, volleyball, and bowling registration will
be for teams only. The other sports
are for individuals only.

Page 15



Page 16

j, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 6, 1966

By TYLER TUCKER
Alligator Staff Writer
Head basketball coach Norman
Sloan yesterday denied reports
that he had accepted the top basket basketball
ball basketball position at North Carolina
State.
The position was vacated when
Press Maravich, Wolfpack coach
for the past two seasons, took the
reins of Louisiana States basket basketball
ball basketball team.
Os eight original candidates only
UF vs. FSU
In Baseball
Today, Sat.
Florida goes into its big baseball
series at home against FSU this
weekend with four hitters aver averaging
aging averaging over .300.
Led by outfielder Skip Lujacks
.389 the Gators also have second
baseman Bruce Moore at .341,
outfielder Jim Frazier at .321 and
catcher Jack Kenworthy at .307.
While the Gators cannot match
FSU for power at the plate Frazier
has compiled a record which will
rank him with most any collegiate
slugger in the country. The big
(6-4) junior has hit five doubles,
five and five home runs
to accumulate 56 total bases and
drive across 35 runs in only 24
games.
Floridas top pitchers, the pair
which will go against the nationally
third-ranked Seminoles, are Kelly
Prior, 5-2 and an ERA of 2.14,
and Ray Rollyson, 5-3 with an ERA
of 2.21.
Rollysons last start was in
Lexington, Kentucky when he stop stopped
ped stopped the Wildcats, 9-5. Prior
turned in a beautiful four-hitter to
beat Tennessee, 2-0, his last time
out.
This two-game series opens a
five-game set between the two
clubs. The remaining three will
be played in Tallahassee. The base baseball
ball baseball series will decide who gets
the scholarship which is donated
by the West St. Petersburg Ex Exchange
change Exchange Club to the school winning
the most intercollegiate athletic
contests.
The record is 5-5-2 thus far in
the 1965-66 rivalry between Flor Florida
ida Florida and FSU. Florida won in foot football,
ball, football, golf, track and twice in
basketball.

| POWER YOUR PLAY
/is#/uv/tr
top-rated racket string
K
iTTTrTft-uiliP^^
?I* I l'^y
Msrs iflww smw (/m/fff
rnmnmm
;,i/ V.-^. S
ASHAWAr PRODUCTS. INC Ashaway. Rhode Island

N.C. State To Choose Sat.

Sloan, Bill Gibson, head coach at
Virginia, and Mel Thompson, pre present
sent present coach at The Citadel, remain
in contention. The three were in interviewed
terviewed interviewed by N. C. State officials
Monday and Tuesday of this week.
I was told that the decision
will be made "Saturday morning,
Sloan said. The results should
come from Raleigh by noon Satur Saturday.
day. Saturday.
Sloan is a 1951 graduate of N.C.

TO A_LL_ STUDENTS M
AND UNIVcRSITY PERSONNEL t
IfY
I CAFETERIA
1 1212 N. AAAIN ST. (4 min, from Campus)

iysPggSlgl
f
/)( DO YOU HAVE
WHAT IT
TAKES TO HE
A LEADER?*
*lf you do, dont settle for less.
*
' i
If you will complete your first two years of college this spring may request postponement of your military service while you
and have not had ROTC training, you now have a special complete your stuu.es for a graduate degree.
opportunity to earn an Army officer's commission in the next Mod . x
. v ... f *§. i ... .. Most large business and industrial firms prefer the co ege
two years. You can qualify to fulfill your military obligation as oraHi.ato ,ho i,,, . . . y
u ... .Jr , graduate who has been trained and commiss oned as an
an officer while you study for a college degree in a field of nf f irpr ut+ + ..
our choice otncerwho has the ability to organize, motivate and lead
your c oic othersand who has had expe r; ence in accepting responsi-
Through a new two-year Army ROTC program you will bilities beyond his years.
receive leadership training and experience that will bevalu- You owe it to yourself to investigate this important op opable
able opable assets for the rest of your life, in either a military or a portunity.
civilian career. You will receive an allowance of S4O each For complete information on the new two-year Army ROTC
month during your Junior and Senior years. If you desire, you program see the Professor of Military Science on campus.
ARMY ROTC

WILL SLOAN LEAVE UF?

State. He played under the late
Everett Case at State and was a
member of Cases first Atlantic
Coast Conference championship
team in 1946-47. Since graduation
he has been assistant coach at
Memphis State, head coach at
Presbyterian College, and head
coach at Florida.
Sloans record at Florida is
84-64, including two Gator Bowl
Tournament championships and a

third place, finish in the South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference. He was
Southern Conference Coach of the
Year twice, and SEC Coach of the
Year once (1960-61).

([ u.i, EUROPE Jrnt;o A
l mediterranean f travel l^
ROUND THE WORLDfc JervKE ]l
(f AIR AND N.
STEAMSHIP TICKER.
INDEPENDENT tt \
. ESCORTED TRAVEL
S AUTO RENTAL AND
PURCHASE
WORLD
Y\\\ J/J travel.
SERVICE
808 W. University Ave. 376-464

xerox copii£
1-19 Copies, lOv ea. 20&
Over, 9$
Copies Made While You Wai
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1020 W. UNIVERSITY AYE.