Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
OFFERS BSP PROPOSALS

Reitz Clarifies I Gator Firings Stand

(Copyright 1966, The Florida Alligator)
By GENE NAIL
Alligator Editor
In a speech to the UF Senate, President
J. Wayne Reitz last week clarified his stand
on the firing of Alligator editors at the close
of last trimester and outlined proposals he
had offered to the Board of Student Publi Publications
cations Publications concerning the removal of Alligator
editors for irresponsible journalism.
Reitz proposals, not to be confused with
those passed by the UF Senate, were outlined
to the closed senate meeting and not released
to state newspapers through the UF Division
of Informational Services.
I am of the opinion, and I believe mem members
bers members of the Board of Student Publications
concur in this, that more definite procedures
should be established in handling matters
where editorial irresponsibility becomes a
problem, Reitz told the senate. On April
14, I wrote Professor John Webb, Chairipan
of the Board, and suggested the following:

There will be
an Alligator staff
meeting today at
2 p.m. in the
Alligator offices
in the Florida
Union.

<
LOOK MA... NO SKIS

Gator Ski Club members John Karnes and Mickey
Berkin prepare for the Southern Intercollegiate Tour Tour"'"\~na-ment,
"'"\~na-ment, Tour"'"\~na-ment, to be held May 7 at Cypress Gardens, by ski-

FOR BSP CONSIDERATION
Senate Passes Guidelines

Three guidelines for consider consideration
ation consideration by the Board of Student Pub Publications
lications Publications were passed by the UF
Senate on April 21. The guidelines
were proposed to the board to
prevent a reoccurrence of the ac actions
tions actions taken last trimester involving
three editors of The Alligator.
Meeting secretly, as is the se senates
nates senates custom, the body of UF
professors approved the guidelines
following a speech by UF President
J. Wayne Reitz.
In his speech before the senate,
Dr. Reitz outlined his position on
the recent controversy and offered
proposals similar to those

jje iflonba Alligator

Vol .58 No. 130

1. The Publications Electoral Board
shall have the power to remove the indivi individuals
duals individuals it selects from student staff positions
for cause by a two-thirds majority of the
full membership of the Publications Board.
2. Removal proceedings shall be
brought before the Publications Electoral
Board by the Executive Secretary of the
Board of Student Publications or by the
Chairman. The Board, by a majority vote
of those present, may decide to institute
removal proceedings and shall notify the
staff member by registered mail or by
having him appear personally before the
Board to hear charges against him. He
shall be notified of the date and time and
place where removal proceedings are to be
conducted. At the time of notification, the
Board shall relieve the staff member of his
duties with pay to which he is normally
entitled until conclusion of the removal
proceedings.
3. The proceedings shall begin not less

approved by the senate for consi consideration
deration consideration by the Board of Student
Publications.
The recommendations of the se senate
nate senate were:
Membership of the Board
should not include members of the
editorial or business staffs of stu student
dent student publications coming under the
jurisdiction of the Board.
When charges of misfea misfeasance,
sance, misfeasance, malfeasance or nonfeasance
are brought, there should be ade adequate
quate adequate notice to the parties and due
process during the hearing.
If members of the Publica Publications
tions Publications Electoral Board are interest interested
ed interested parties in any hearing, they

University of Florida

ing barefoot. Anyone wishing to participate in the
tournament should call the intramurals office immed immediately
iately immediately for details.

should be disqualified for tue pur purpose
pose purpose of the hearing.
The senate guidelines were
reached independent of the pro proposals
posals proposals offered by President Reitz
in his speech before the senate at
the time.
Â¥
The Board of Student Publica Publications
tions Publications has tentative plans to meet
for the purpose of electing fall
and winter Alligator editor and
managing editor within the next
few weeks. The date of the meet meeting
ing meeting has not been set.
No special meeting has yet been
planned to consider the proposals
offered by the UF Senate.

than three working days nor more than ten
after notification has been given to thestafi
member. The staff member shall be given
the opportunity to be present at the hearing
to speak in his own defense and to have
others speak in his behalf. The Executive
Secretary or the Chairman of the Board may
call upon such persons as is desired to
present and explain the charges. During the
hearing, the Chairman shall take the ne necessary
cessary necessary steps to insure an orderly and
fair hearing.
4. The proceedings shall be open to the
public unless the staff member requests the
Board in writing .to hold a closed hearing.
In the event such a request is received, then
hearings shall be closed to the public. In
any event, the deliberations of the Board
shall remain secret.
Reitz also noted in his proposals to Webj?
the conflict of interests which can develop
on the board when student board members
are also editors or other key executives

Martin Unhappy
With 'Red Tape?

By YVETTE CARDOZO
Alligator Staff Writer
The familiar tangles of adminis administrative
trative administrative red tape visited the UF
campus while students went home
for spring vacation.
Late last week, Dr. Thomas L.
Martin Jr. reportedly submitted
his resignation as dean of the
College of Engineering.
Sources close to the* matter at attributed
tributed attributed much of Martins dis dissatisfaction
satisfaction dissatisfaction to over-the-should over-the-shoulder
er over-the-shoulder supervision of routine depart department
ment department activities.
Martin told The Alligator he and
UF President J. Wayne Reitz have
discussed the matter but that no
decision has been made.
Dr. Reitz made a similar com-

of The Florida Alligator or other publi publications.
cations. publications.
Certain misunderstandings have de developed,
veloped, developed, Reitz said, because of the wide
range of discussion that the firing of The
Alligator editors has received in the local
and state press.
Reitz action in the firings was questioned
or condemned in editorials appearing in the
St. Petersburg Times, Tampa Tribune,
Gainesville Sun, Miami News and the Day Daytona
tona Daytona Beach Morning Journal.
l assume full share of responsibility in
not issuing clarifying statements, Reitz
said. The initial story which appeared in
the local and state press, combined my
action with a statement issued by student
leaders in which they gave reasons for
expressing dissatisfaction over the editorial
Dolicv of The Alligator.
(See REITZ, Page 16)

Tuesday, May 3, 1966

Nail Is New
Gator Editor
Gene Nail is the new editor of
he summer Alligator.
Nail, 24, was elected to the
editorship by the Board of Student
Publications April 7, after IJF
President J. Wayne Reitz over overruled
ruled overruled the Boards previous de decision
cision decision naming Andy Moor as
summer editor and Yvette Car Cardozo
dozo Cardozo as managing editor.
At the same time, the Board
named Steve Smith, a freshman
in UFs College of Law, as man managing
aging managing editor.
Nail, a senior in UFs School of
Journalism and Communications,
served three and one-half years
in the Air Force and worked two
years for the St. Petersburg Times
before attending St. Petersburg
Junior College.
Smith, 22, graduated from Wash Washington
ington Washington and Lee College, where he
edited the college paper, the Ring
Turn Phi. He is a member of Sigma
Nu social fraternity and Omicron
Delta Kappa leadership honorary.
He is from Jacksonville.

ment stating, I understand Dean
Martin has two very lucrative
offers he is considering but ro
decision has been made as to

whether he will
accept or remain
here.
According to
Martin, the of offers
fers offers Include the
presidency of a
college and en engineering
gineering engineering dean deanship
ship deanship at an out outof-state
of-state outof-state univer-,
sity.
One of the

major troubles seems to be the old
problem of internal and external
(See MARTIN, Page 19)

WEATHER:
Partly cloudy,
clearing by
Thursday.

I
\ a
MARTIN



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 3, 1966

BETWEEN TIGERT AND STUDENTS

Schwartz Wants Fair Play

(Editors Note: In a forthcoming
issue The Alligator wili run the
other side of the issue what
campus police have to say about
due process and the UF student.)
By 808 MENAKER
Alligator Staff Writer
Honor Court Chancellor Herb
Schwartz views the question of due
process under the law for UF
students as a matter of fair play
between the student and the UF
administration.
A student is no less a citizen
because he is a student, said
Schwartz. In the relationship be between
tween between student and administration
there must be a procedural due
process, fitting the requirements
of United States Supreme Court
rulings.
He explained in the past the UF
administration had used outdated
criteria for judging student con conduct.
duct. conduct. They based their right to do
so on en loco parentis and the
contract theory. According to
Schwartz, both concepts rank a among
mong among the most far out ideas
possible.
Schwartz determination to do
something for student rights isnt
recent, but started back in August,
1965, when he was Honor Court
assistant defense counsel.
He related how campus police
burst into the room of two students
they suspected of stealing some
chemical lab equipment without a
warrant. The fact they found the
equipment there was immaterial,
according to Schwartz.
When the case came before
Honor Court Chancellor SidStubbs,
Schwartz moved to surpress the
evidence because it had been ob obtained
tained obtained illegally. The motion was
granted, and the case was dis dismissed
missed dismissed for lack of evidence.
Two guilty people went free
because campus police used their
power unlawfully, Schwartz com commented.
mented. commented.

ji SHAKES HAMBURGERS ONION RINGS jl
;! 2029 N.W. 13 STREET 'j
The florid* Ailljator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisem nt> ar>J
to re rise or turn away copy which tt considers objectionable.
HO pdJITIOH IS GUARANTEED, though des,re The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more thar. one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement advertisementscheduled
scheduled advertisementscheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the university *'l Florida nd Is
published five times weekly except during May, June, and July when It Is published s ml-weekly. Onlv
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class
latter at the United States Poat Office at Gainesville.
p -

In November, 1965, Schwartz
related, a girl was detained by
campus police in connection with
petty larceny in a sorority house.
The police neglected to tell her
why they were picking her up.
When she asked for legal ad advice
vice advice she was refused, explained
Schwartz. They questioned her
for over three hours and told her
she would have to take a lie de detector
tector detector test to prove her inno innocence.
cence. innocence.
When Schwartz went down to the
station, the girl was released and
told she would be picked up again.
As a result, Schwartz wrote a
letter to UF President J. Wayne
Reitz in January, 1966, protesting
police treatment of UF students.
Dr. Reitz replied there wasnt suf sufficient
ficient sufficient evidence for an actual con confrontation,
frontation, confrontation, but agreed there
appeared a need for greater cour courtesy
tesy courtesy in dealing with students. Later
Reitz ruled that students could not
be interrogated by campus police
without being advised of their right
to counsel, in accordance with the
principles set down in the Supreme
Courts ruling in the Escobedo
case.
In March, campus police ignored
the ruling and interrogated a girl
suspected of petty larceny for over
three hours without allowing her to
secure counsel.
Whether or not she was guilty
doesnt matter, Schwartz said.
The campus police w r ere guilty of
violating her rights.
During finals, Schwartz met with
Dean of Student Affairs Lester
Hale, UF Business Manager Bill
Elmore, President of the local
AAUP chapter Fletcher Baldwin

and campus police chief A. L.
Schuler.
As a result of the meeting, the
following procedures were agreed
upon to insure students of their
rights if questioned by campus
police:
The student must be given a
form explaining that he is waiving
his right to counsel.
The student must be informed
of his rights to counsel, including
his right to have anybody act as his
counsl or advisor.
A list of law students working
on the Honor Court who can be
called on at any time will be avail available
able available in the campus police station.
If, after reading the form
waiving his right to counsel, the
student wishes to sign it, the sign signing
ing signing must be witnessed by two per persons
sons persons other than police investiga investigators
tors investigators and must be notarized.
In addition, some guidelines
were set up to insure campus
housing residents of their rights.
They are:
C Dorm students are just as
secure from search in their rpoms
as they would be in aprivatefjiome.
UF police are the only author authorized
ized authorized searching agents on university
property if a proper search
warrant is issued.
Housing personnel and faculty
dont need a search warrant, but
can only search a students room
for reasons of health, maintenance,
fire or improper conduct.
Schwartz will stomp the dorms
this summer to explain a students
legal rights, while trying to insure
that campus police conform to the
procedures outlined by Elmore and
Dr. Reitz.

ANNOUNCEMENT: I
CHAPMAN COLLEGE, located in Orange, California, one of I
the oldest colleges in the West, is accepting applications for admis admission
sion admission for two 107-day semesters for the fall of 1966 and the spring
of 1967 aboard Holland-America Lines s.s Ryndam. This is the
second year of operation of Chapman Colleges floating campus.
Outstanding college and university students are invited to spend these semes- j
ters at sea, enrolled for 12-15 units of credit, applicable toward the Bachelor |
of Arts, Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Music degrees, or 9-12 units J
toward the Master of Arts degree.
Onboard, students will experience a situation of intense academic concen- I
trqtidn, supplemented by personal meetings ashore with men who are the f
world s leaders, monuments which are the world s heritage, and people whose
apparent differences often prove to hide human similarities. j
College glasses will be held during 56 class days at sea in modem, air- s
conditioned classrooms and laboratories equipped with all facilities necessary J
for course work offered. |

ITINERARIES: Fail 1966 Semester
leaves New York October 2C, duration
107 days; to Lisbon. Barcelona. Marseille.
Civitavecchia (Rome). Piraeus (Athens),
Istanbul, Alexandria (Cairo), Port Said,
Suez, Bombay, Colombo. Port Swetten Swettenham
ham Swettenham (Kuala Lumpur). Bangkok. Hong
Kong, Kobe, Yokohama (Tokyo). Hawaii,
arriving Los Angeles February 4, 1967.

ADMISSION. Students admitted to the program must meet regular admission aualifi- I
cations of Chapman College and upon fulfilling its requirements will receive grades and 4
credits in accordance with its regularly established standards. f
For a catalog listing courses for both the Fail and Spring semesters along with rates jf
tuition and in-port program costs, fill in the information below and mail it to: 1
r -| I
Director of Admissions 1
Chapman College. Seven Seas Division I
Orange, California 92666
Tfc I Present Status
W I Name College /University j
(Last) (First) Freshman 1
I . : 8 111
Address Sophomore I
- I > Junior |
City State __Zip_ Senior I
I I Graduate 1
j Telephone Age M F r 1 I
I I I
| The Ryndam is under Netherlands registry. # l|

'?d i'a it mor ks vsh.ch ic c n ..y on v ? proaj.i or ine Loca-iola Com pc
We admire your spirit,
but you just dont fit
into the team.
v '**' ?
* HBp-j \
*** .< \
JM|
1 I MBBi IfMlmlill
if SMHB
_ 06^0>^; ... '
'' ;f [/
t
Coca-Cola is on everyones team. Thats because
Coca-Cola has the taste you never get tired of ..
always refreshing. Thats why things go better with
Coke .. after Coke .. after Coke.
Bottled under the authority of The Coca-Coia Company by: Gville Coca-Cola Bottling Co. I

Spring 1967 Semester leaves Los Angeles
February 7, duration 107 days; to La |
Guaira (Caracas), Port of Spain (Trim- |
dad), Salvador, Montevideo, Buenos
Aires, Rio De Janeiro, Lagos, Dakar, |
Casablanca, Cadiz. Lisbon, Rotterdam §
(inland to France, Belgium and theNeth- |
erlands), Copenhagen, London, Dublin |
(overland to), Galway, arriving New York I
City May 25, 1967. I



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Tuesday, May 3, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 3, 1966

ItyeJfloribagUltgator

EDITOR
Gene Nall

She UF Faculty Senate met in
secret April 21 to consider a
proposal for establishing guide guidelines
lines guidelines in any future dismissal of
Alligator editors, and recommen recommendations
dations recommendations for the reconstitution of
the Board of Student Publications.
The motions approved by the
senate called for due process in
the dismissal of Alligator editors,
disqualification of members of the
board in cases of conflict of in interest
terest interest and exclusion of persons
under the jurisdiction of the board
from serving as one of its mem members.
bers. members.
The present board membership
consists of four faculty members
appointed by the president of the
university, and three students
elected at large from the student
body.
The senate recommendations
dealt primarily with the student
members of the board.
In the past, many editors and
staff members of The Alligator
have sat on the board while hold holding
ing holding positions on the paper.
Last trimester when the board
fired one Alligator editor and
President J. Wayne Reitz reversed
the board's election of two editors
for the summer paper, all three
student members of the board were
Alligator staffers; two were di directly
rectly directly involved by being the board's
choice for summer editor and man managing
aging managing editor.
The concern over this situation
is understandable, especially when
the board is acting on complaints
against the policy or administra administration
tion administration of The Alligator.
The senate recommendation
would effectively remove from the
board membership all Alligator
staffers. \
This, we Jhink, would eliminate
most of the individuals who have

As any new governmental administration
assumes authority, certain changes are
generally forthcoming.
The Alligator has changed administrations and
likewise changes will be made.
The preface of the new editorial policy established
by the present editors reads as follows:
The overall editorial policy of The Alligator will
be directed towards what is best for the STUDENT.
The Alligator is not an administrative organ, and it
should not hold the protection of the universitys

IJjtjflonba Alligator
Executive Editor Bob Menaker
City Editor Yvette Cardozo
Sports Editor Jeff Denkewalter
Photo Coordinator Nick Arroyo
Staff Writers Margo Cox, Norma Bell, Margie Green
Dick Dennis, Ernie Rehder, John Barnum
Arlene Caplan, Judy Miller, Ernie Litz
Editor-of-this-Issue Bob Menaker

A h CW Pe/iAO'K. PCtM Tk c 7iuA

time for a change

for the STUDENT

shown the most interest in the
paper by devoting their time and
efforts to the paper's success.
Other avenues of change are still
open to the Board of Student Pub Publications
lications Publications that can prevent a like likewise
wise likewise incident from reoccurring.
One of these is for the board to
adopt procedures to require the
students to be representative of
specific colleges or schools. For
example, one could come from the
School of Journalism and Com Communications,
munications, Communications, another from the
College of Arts and Sciences and
the other could come from the
student body at large.
Another choice could be to eli eliminate
minate eliminate students from the board
membership who hold positions of
overall responsibility on the pub publications.
lications. publications. This would include not
only editors and managing editors
(who are already excluded) but
other top position holders such as
executive directors or editorial
directors.
We think a total exclusion of
representatives from the various
publications is unjustifiable as
would be an exclusion of any other
student group such as student
government personnel.
This exclusion would only tend
to widen the gap which exists at the
present on the university between
the academic" journalists and the
working" journalists who put
their knowledge to work while still
learning.
When the board members re reconvene
convene reconvene for consideration of these
proposals offered them by the fa faculty
culty faculty senate and President Reitz,
they should keep in mind that these
are only proposals -- are only one
of the courses of action open to
them, if they choose to prevent the
unfortunate occurrences of March
29.

image as its primary function.
The Alligator will continue to be probing and
controversial.
At times we might step on some toes, but it will
not be with malice. Our primary concern is with
quality education for all students.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz has expressed his
approval of the Board of Student Publicationschoices
for present editors.
We intend to fulfill the obligations inherent in the
role of a campus newspaper.

MANAGING EDITOR
Steve Smith

PLEASE |
Limit Letters To The
Editor To 250 Words ijij
And Make Sure
Theyre Signed. We g
Will Omit Names g
At Writer's Request. :§

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"The phenomena are getting restless lately."
Dr. Robert
Hutchins
>The polls suggest that the voters prefer congressional can-
V didates pledged to bring about a quick settlement in Viet Nam.
The slow pace of the march to victory, the disintegration of the
South Vietnamese government and the cost of the war are certain
to increase the pressure on all American politicians in the coming
weeks.
The internal situation in South Viet Nam is highly embarrassing.
Short of a minor miracle, it seems impossible for the United
States to avoid trying to govern the country itself, and doing so in
the most public kind of way.
A distinguished foreign visitor to the Center for the Study of
Democratic Institutions discoursed for an hour and a half on South
Viet Nam without mentioning the government. I asked him why, and
he replied, Does it exist?
This has been a fair question at any time. Today it admits of
only one answer. If the government of South Viet Nam does not
exist, then at whose invitation do we remain, whom are we sup supporting
porting supporting and how can we escape appearing to Southeast Asia as an
imperialistic power?
Enthusiasm for the war on the ground that it is good for business
should vanish as businessmen reflect on an article in the April
issue of Fortune, by William Bowen, called NThe Viet Nam War:
A Cost Accounting.
Bowen shows that when there were 235,000 American service servicemen
men servicemen in South Viet Nam, our costs were running at a yearly rate
of more than sl3 billion.
He reports that Defense Department witnesses in closed con congressional
gressional congressional hearings have predicted a build-up to 400,000 men, or
more, and that Gen. William C. Westmoreland, the commander
in Viet Nam, has reportedly requested an increase to 400,000 by
the end of December.
Bowen says, With that many U.S. servicemen in South Viet Nam
the cost of the war would run to s2l billion a year even more
if bombing and tactical air support increased in proportion to the
build-up on the ground.
Bowen suggests that visible results, which might console us for
vast expenditures, are few and far between. The nature of the
war, he says, contributes to making it peculiarly expensive
for its size. Our technological sophistication is not easily em employed
ployed employed against meaner or elusive targets. We run up huge costs
just trying to find some guerrillas to shoot at.
He says, There is an almost profligate disparity between the
huge quantities of U.S. bullets and bombs poured from the air upon
targets in Viet Nam and the military and economic damage the
bullets and bombs do . The costs to the enemy of repairing the
are picayune compared to the costs to the United States
of doing the damage.
i I
*' V /
Bowen quotes Secretary Robert McNamara as saying that the
bomb tonnage dropped by us has been literally unbelievable
and concludes that much of that literally unbelievable bomb ton tonnage
nage tonnage merely smashes trees and blasts craters in the earth.
Bowen thinks the people do not understand how much the war
is costing and that the administration has taken no pains to explain
e figures it may not understand them itself. He says, It's
goo e that Americans will still consider the war worth winning
w ien they get the message about the war's costs and its impll ca
tions for taxes and inflation.
Not a very good bet, because the war, even at this price, cannot
be won.
(Copyright 1966, Los Angeles Times)



Editor:
It would seem that everybody
knows how to run The Alligator
except the editor.
Outstanding among these would
surely be the signers of the petition
indicting Editor Benny Cason and
Editorial Assistants Andy Moor
and Yvette Cardozo. However,
since the accusers names were
not available, one can only guess
those who wished Editor Casons

X The following persons have also written letters to the Alligator X
:x expressing the same or similar sentiments as the letters we have ::
printed. We regret that limitations of space prevent us from x
v. printing all pertinent letters on the subject. X
$: The Editors >:

B. R. Ashley
xj Isabel Barten
:£ Jeffrey Lee Bialek
g Arthur Crummer
>jj Mary Lewis Crummer
X C. H. Dutcher
jx Lee Fennell
$: William Goldberg

squelch the infidels

Editor:
Thank goodness the powers powersthat-be
that-be powersthat-be woke up in time to squelch
the infidels in The Alligator office!
Everyone knows that this is not a
matter of freedom of the press, but
one of responsibility; every free freedom
dom freedom carries with it the responsi responsibility
bility responsibility not to rock the boat.
The constant harrassment of
state politicians and friends of
the university by Cason, Moor
and Cardozo were not in the best
interests of maintaining the pre present
sent present quality of higher education in
Florida. They should have acted
like other student leaders and ig ignored
nored ignored the shortcomings in the
educational system, so that maybe
those shortcomings would have
gone away without anyone ever
knowing they were there.
There can be no excuse for their
attacks on Dean Mautz and other
university bureaucrats, who have
enough trouble keeping the insti institution
tution institution running efficiently without
having to worry about history pro professors
fessors professors and other trivia.
Why couldnt they have supported
the administration in everything,
like the student political honchos
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Cason 'caused a stir

removal from his powerful position
as editor.
Cason, indeed, has not been a
willing tool of either the ad administration
ministration administration or Student Govern Government
ment Government officials. Neither has he been
a puppet of Blue Key, working un under
der under the omnipresent influence of a
dangling Blue Key. Is there any
truth to the rumor that he declined
to fill out a Blue Key application
even after being advised to do so by

Paul Grossman
Richard H. Hiers
Irene Moreda
Steve Newmark
John Potocki
Ernie Rehder
Howard M. Rosenblatt
Marshall Rosenthal
Rick C. Seid

and Florida Blue Key? Worst of
all, they had been using the edi editorial
torial editorial page to express their per personal
sonal personal opinions!
Instead of placing The Alligator
under the School of Journalism,
why not make it an organ of In Informational
formational Informational Services, so that the
administration will have less trou trouble
ble trouble preventing a repetition of this
outrage? Then, with blessed con consensus
sensus consensus restored, maybe The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator will have space for coverage
of more important matters, like
campus fads and fraternity parties.
Ron L. Seckinger, 7AS
ffoEIFI
fls Election Day.|
If You Dont
Vote Now;
Dont
Gripe
Later.

Sm What's H,w
The Browse Shop
THE DRAWING OF HEINRICH KLEY
THE TRIAL Andre Gide
FREE AND INEXPENSIVE
LEARNING MATERIALS
OF TIME AND THE RIVER Thomas Wolfe
THE STRANGER Albert Camus
EUROPE ON $5.00 Arthur Frommer
PSYCHO-CYBERNETICS Maxwell Waltz
THE KINETIC THEORY OF GASES... Loeb
VECTOR ANALYSIS Wilis
RELATIVITY Bohm
Store Hours 8:00 A. M to 5:00 P. M.
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00
Campus Shop & Bookstore

David Self &
Michael Sipe :*
Harvey D. Starin
Joel Starkey &
,V
Janna Steed
Ernest Wilson
William A. Wilson
C. K. Yearley

Blue Key members? Blue Key offi officials
cials officials it seems are very uneasy
concerning anything or anyone who
cannot be put under their political
thumb.
It would seem also that there
may be much more to the petition
than first meets the eye. Careful
reading reveals a tone of urgency
underlying the charges leveled at
Editor Cason. Points one through
four seem to reflect that mem members
bers members of the administration are
running scared from articles
published in The Alligator and
articles exerted from outside the
university by political figures in
Tallahassee and friends of the
UF.
Article five of the petition has
been completely blown out of pro proportion
portion proportion by Blue Key members in indignant
dignant indignant with The Alligator and
looking for an excuse to accomplish
their objectives, namely removal
of Editor Cason. Expressions like
Childish antics and irresponsible
conduct unbecoming a student in
such a leadership position seem
hardly a well choice, and indeed,
a libelous choice of words to de describe
scribe describe a minor incident.
Articles six and seven are the
only articles which should be
judged upon by the Board of Student
Publications. These fire the only
points which carry weight con concerning
cerning concerning the editorial responsibility
of The Alligator.
I would like to quote Board of
Student Publications member H. B.
Clark as paying a newspaper is
worth nothing if it isnt causing
a stir. This is exactly what The
Alligator and Editor Cason have
been doing. Is it just possible that
he has been causing too much of a
stir? With exactly 14 days and 10
issues remaining why did the
Board of Student Publications vote
to take such drastic measures as
firing of the editor. Has no one
taken a look at the good that has
been accomplished by The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator this past trimester?
How is it possible that four fa faculty
culty faculty members, two responsible
Student Government officials, and
three highly qualified student board
members cast the necessary two twothirds
thirds twothirds majority required for im impeachment
peachment impeachment on the meager evi evidence?
dence? evidence?
Joseph S. Wesley

/ *. J < 1 1. i sSfe^^^lEffiSiijT-f

ijjg ' ~. j iA y J I Y Y
inium Ip
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you cant lick em, join em, its refreshing to find a I
maverick legislator who believes if you cant join 8
em, lick em! Last summer, when Congress refused 8
to hold Vietnam hearings, Wisconsins Representative B
Robert W. Kastenmeier held them on his home ground. B
VIETNAM Hearings: Voices from the Grass Roots 1
($1.95 Doubleday paperback) is a transcript of testi- 8
mony given at Mr. Kastenmeiers hearings. It is, 8
writes the reviewer in Harpers magazine, an ex- 8
traordinary cross section of witnesses, committees, 8
and individuals who took great trouble and thought to 8
organize and express their opinions. B
Here is what professors, army officers, scientists, 8
physicians, ADA members, Young Republicans, Amer- 8
ican Legionnaires, and people from every segment of 8
American life say about the war. Every shade of opin- 8
ion is represented, giving full justice to both sides of B
the question. Theres a good deal of food for thought B
in this unique hearing which The Neie York Times 8
calls a new political phenomenon. 8
f ... Wm
/ 1
Student freedom and student rebellion at the Uni- 8
versity of California at Berkeley were issues that 8
brought one of the worlds most famous centers of 8
learning to the edge of collapse. Os lasting interest 8
and value, The Berkeley Student Revolt: Facts 1
and Interpretations ($1.95, an Anchor Original) was 8
edited by two professors, then at Berkeley, Seymour B
Martin Lipset and Sheldon S. Wolin. It is particularly B
interesting because the editors themselves reflect so B
vividly the split in opinion of the faculty as well as B
the students. 8
Mr. Lipset takes a dim view of the uprising, writes 8
A. H. Raskin in the N. Y. Times lioolc Re vie ok He B
sees it as a portent that all universities may be forced 8
to capitulate to the coercive tactics of radical minori- 8
ties . Mr. Wolin seems to feel that such a develop- 8
ment would be far from disaster . Fascinating. 8
The N. Y. Herald Tribune, in discussing what they call B
The Varsity Snag.Vsays, The editors . seem to 8
have chosen to collaborate precisely because they took B
opposite roles in the controversy and see its meaning B
differently. Their selections are indeed scrupulously 8
balanced ... it amounts to a genuine documentary that 8
merits close attention . The merit of The Herkeley 8
Student Revolt, however, is that it is not bound by the 1
perspective of either of its editors. Its selections pro- 8
vide the terms for subsequent debate about the broad- B
est questions that grew out of the free speech crisis. 8
The two books reviewed above are published by the 8
sponsors of this column, Doubleday Anchor Books, 277 8
8 Bark Avenue, Xew York City and Doubleday & Com- 8
8 puny, Inc., Garden City, Xew York. Youll find them at 8
8 one of the best equipped booksellers in the country 8
8 your own college store. 8
! PATRONIZE 'GATOR ADVERTISERS
I

Tuesday. Mav 3. 1966. The Florida Alligator. ]

Page 5



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

personal
JUDY, THERE ARE ONLY 25
DAYS LEFT. ED. (J-l 30-lt-nc).
. - --
THE FORCE that clouded mens
mind as to language also clouded
mens mind as to science and re related
lated related fields. Go ahead, learn it or
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The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, MaV 3, IJ6^

Page 6

for rent j
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Apply 321 SW 13th St. (B-130- It-c).
LIVE IN COOL LUXURY at dorm
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Tuesday, May 3, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 3, 1966

f ..pHHHfe^v 1 £Kx WYwiHBHRSRKP^'
k. '<.. xi. tt'M m SflP^^K j? -" .*, yijip',s'..
V.-V-V^
I -' BBwi^
\ : MAaaKHp^
|kJ|| Jg ~J
435 H '^l
Wm. ' b Kil 1 -- > *V y \
m~ iP i w Hpiill' m
,: v ; 818
HHnMRHB , <4a&
MUSEUM RECEIVES SIO,OOO

Mr. C. A. Pound Sr., left, presents a check for
SIO,OOO to Samuel T. Tell, fund raising chairman
for the new Florida State Museum. Looking on are
UF President J. Wayne Reitz, standing center, Mu Museum
seum Museum director J. C. Dickinson and Mrs. Pound.

...And Valuable Collection

An invaluable collection of Indian
relics was donated recently to the
Florida State Museum by Mrs.
Henry (Katie M.) Simpson and fa family
mily family of High Springs.
Dr. J. C. Dickinson, director of
the museum, labeled the Simpson
familys gift the best collection
of Florida Indian materials re remaining
maining remaining in private hands.
Dr. Dickinson said the collection
is composed of approximately
9,000 specimens gathered by the
Simpson family over the past 40
years. He said their value was en enhanced
hanced enhanced due to the extremely high
quality of the specimens and the
fact that a complete record of the
sources makes the items more
useful from the standpoint of edu education.
cation. education. We are especially pleased
to receive this collection inasmuch
as we have been actively interested
in obtaining it for the past 10
years.
Mrs. Simpson, who has chron chronicled
icled chronicled the growth and method of
research as a family hobby
throughout the years, said that the
family decided to donate the relics
to the State Museum when they

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learned that a fine, new museum
building was to be built on the UF
campus.
The new building is to be fi financed
nanced financed by $1,112,650 in federal
funds, $350,000 from the state and
SBOO,OOO in private donations.
The collection will represent a
memorial to the Simpson family
and will serve as a tribute to the
long years of work they have dedi dedicated
cated dedicated to it.
The Simpson collection had a
small beginning.
Mrs. Simpsons son Clarence,
10 years old in 1920, found an
arrowhead under a tree and brought
it home, where the rest of the
family greeted it with interest.
The family already had a naturalist
inclination, having amassed a large
and comprehensive collection of
bird eggs and moths and butter butterflies.
flies. butterflies.
Now, the family became in interested
terested interested in Indian relics.
Clarences trouser pockets, ac according
cording according to Mrs. Simpson, yielded
many more arrowheads in the
following months. The rest of the
family began to search around the

The contribution opened the Gainesville area fund
effort to provide for construction of the new building
on the University campus. A total of SBOO,OOO needs
to be raised to supplement $1,112,650 in federal
funds and $350,000 in state money.

area for relics. They found many.
Then, as the interest grew into
an active hobby, they began to plan
field trips to likely sites and lo locations
cations locations which they felt might pro provide
vide provide concentrations of the relics.
In cultivated fields 10 miles
north of High Springs they wan wandered
dered wandered in search of items for their
fast-growing collection, finding findingmany
many findingmany new specimens.
In a newly acquired Model T
Ford they bounced across wooded
fields and plaias. They drove to
Paines Prairie and the Wauburg
Lake area south of Gainesville.
The family continued to collect
their specimens until the children
matured and left to form families
of their own, but never ceased to
search when they found spare time
and a likely spot.

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Museum Gets BoosJ
From Contributions.
A 85,000 gift by Mr. and Mrs. W. A. (Bill) Shands has moved advar
contributions for the Gainesville phase of the fund effort for the n
F lorida State Museum near the $">0,000 mark. Chairman Sam t. d
announced recently.
In making their gift, the former state senator and his wife cal
tlie proposed museum an exciting educational, cultural and econor
boon' to the area.
For many years, I, along with many others, have hoped and worl
for ways to place the museum in facilities in keeping with its gr
potential to the area and the state/' Shands said. It is a pleasure
join in this opportunity to realize that goal and I strongly urge oth<
in the community and state to pitch in toward the construction o
nationally ranked museum.
The local fund drive, under the leadership of a nine-man commit
headed by attorney Dell, was announced last month. A total statew
goal of SBOO,OOO is being sought to combine with $1.4 million in st
and federal funds already available.
A $2.2 million structure, equal in size to two entire Seagle Buildin
is planned on the UF campus to house the museum.
Earlier gifts included $22,500 in support by members of the ft
committee and separate SIO,OOO gifts from Mr. and Mrs. C. A. p o i
Sr., and R. L. Henderson, trustee of Prairie View Trpst.
A drive seeking backing for the museum from local business fir
is currently under way, in addition to the advance gifts pha
i (Q STETSON/)
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been in use over 60 years. They are knpwn and
accepted in more than a million shops, hotels,
restaurants, air terminals, etc., the world over.
time you travel, insist on First National
City travelers checks.
They cosfjust one cent per dollar.

UF Officials
Tour Wauberg
Theres more to Lake Wauburg
than meets the eye.
In addition to the 13-acre site
known to most UF students, the
university also owns an undevelop undeveloped
ed undeveloped 70-acre tract across the lake.
UF officials and student govern government
ment government toured the site Friday as a
prelude to setting up long-range
plans for the propertys use.
The group sought to determine
which of the sites would be used
for a university retreat and
which would be developed as a
recreational area.
A conflict currently exists over
the lands jurisdiction; one part is
under the Florida Union Board and
the other under an administrative
board.
Coordinated development of the
land will be discussed at the next
meeting of the administrative
board, which will take place Wed Wednesday.
nesday. Wednesday.
jii
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x upon us. Soon youll see nothing but hot, uncomfortable UF students x
:: running around campus and youll be glad that youre in your nice £
x cool cage. x
* * : tl
I
| APPAREL FOR MEN AND WOMEN |
I l
ljr Kuiurrsitii S>l?np
Across From Campus '* #5
! Jim in niiimiin Ilf 7

Tuesday, May 3, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



NEW UN/ON

Symbolizing the rapid growth of the UF, the new
Florida Union dominates the campus skyline. Soon to
be ready for use, the new Union will contain, among
other things, a 16-lane bowling alley, a branch of the
Campus Book Store, a barber shop, student govern

808 HOPE
fr jf -^SflVapS
Hoi i Hope came to < a inpu> l.i-a month com tc-
Ol ArnoM Mi >ociet\ 11. N. t:i.. 'i .-. 1 :: : 'oii.ir
' ( & *. **l, ft for Scholars. Hope kept nr aw'limcr 0,.-t
:>ji *^C 5 ft in stitches toi (ivoi olio aih! one hall 1 1. an s, hit hitft
ft hitft on h
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ALLIGATOR BHBBIBBBI
STAFF

ment offices, and of course, thc> countrys finest
cplb '. e paper The Florida Alligator. The old
Florida Union will still see service and will be used
for classrooms and offices by the College of Arts
and Sciences.

Action Was...
Last trimester was one that won't be e (lSl \
forgotten by most IJF students.
It was a year which saw many new building
arising from a few concrete slabs until uL
neared completion
It was a year which saw UF's small band of
liberals win some recognition from the ad administration
ministration administration and the student body.
It was a year which saw the emergence of a
powerful third parly voice in campus politics
-- and which also saw Birthday Party's Pet e
Boylboll participate in the campaigns witliflis
ever-present shovel.
It was a year which saw SG proxy Buddy
Jacobs recognized as the hardest slave driver
since Simon Legreer
It was a year which saw the Fight in' Gators
fluctuate from greatness to mediocrity
sometimes in a single night.
It was a year filled with wonderful memories.
The Alligator has tried to capture some of
these memories and at the same time present
a glimpse of what the summer has in store.
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BATTLIN 808
Battlin Bob Hoflinan struggles witli FSUs Charlie J-airchi' 1
for the hall. Hoffman symbolized the 19GT>-G6 edition of Florida >
basketball team -- Rreat at one moment and mediocre the llt "'
With some line players coming tip from the finest freshman term
in Uhs history, Coach Norm Sloan is looking forward to a banne
season.



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PETE 'DUG UP 9 ISSUES
Peter Boyllx>ll and running mate Jack Myers dug up the
issues in last trimesters student government race. Boylboll
was a familiar sight at political rallies -- standing ever ready
with his trusty shovel. Boylboll lost to Buddy Jacobs and Student
Party, attributing his total of over 100 votes to the fact that they
must have pulled the wrong lever. On the serious side, Ernie
Litz Apathy Party was a strong third party voice, polling over
2,000 votes, the most ever by a minor party candidate.
Signs Os Summer

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.MOST OF ALL ... RELAXING r
i V" *'
Summertime is many tilings to many people.
. fJ vacations, summer job, school, armed forces
reserve to beat the draft, travel and more, but
most of all summer means relaxing -a chance
to let your troubles drift by in the hot, lazy
atmosphere that seems to go with summer. In
the summer, things seem to go slowly, leaving
time for everything you just couldnt seem to
squeeze in during the course of the year.
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A FROLICSOME DUO
Believe it or not, this frolicsome duo is performing a valuable
service. Beast Bob McClintock is chasing Beauty Linda Hargett to
, raise money for the World University Service. The Beauty and Beast
contest is the UFs way to raise money for a worthwhile cause.
SUMMERTIME IS TAN TIME
Summertime is tan time. Time to go up on the roof of your dorm,
take a trip out to Lake Wauburg, or go out and tan on the front lawn
as this young lady seems to be doing. Too much sun can mean a great
deal of discomfort later, as many UFers unfortunately will find out
this summer.

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ALLEY OOP !!
Alley oop!! Th@ UF student looks like hes going to make one heck
of a belly whopper when he hits the water. Swimming at UFs pool Is
just another way UF students will choose to beat the heat this summer.



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday. May 3, 1966

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UFS OUTSTANDING GRADUATES

Winners of UFs outstanding graduating senior
awards are (left to right) Richard Serrist, Mel Melbourne,
bourne, Melbourne, scholarship; Richard Kirk, Ft. Lauderdale,
athletics; James Hauser, Miami Beach, and Lynn
Wol'y, Orlando, leadership. They received citations

Veterans Club To Meet

The new UF Veterans Club has
announced it will hold a special
meeting on Wednesday, May 11, at
7:30 p.m. in the Florida Union
Auditorium. The purpose of the
meeting is to clarify the application
procedures for veteran-students
who are eligible for the educational
benefits of the recently passed GI
Bill.
There is no VA office in
Gainesville to distribute the forms
or to assist in their completion,
said club president Bart Kimball.
The Florida State Department of

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HIGH RISE LUXURY
AT DORMITORY RATES
Office Hours 3:30-6 PM Weekends 10 AM-6 PM ]
207 N.W. 17th STREET I
K
next to University Post Office J

Veterans Affairs has one man here
in town, and he is responsible for
all of the veterans in Alachua
County.
The Registrars Office is not
responsible for securing all of the
technical information about appli application
cation application procedures and eligibility
status. It is clearly a case of do doit-yourself,
it-yourself, doit-yourself, and that is exactly what
we are doing. The Veterans Club
will assume the responsibilities of
securing this and other important
information and disseminating it to
the veteran-students, he added.

from UFs Alumni Association at the annual tom tommencement
mencement tommencement ceremonies in Florida Field stadium,
April 24. All four winners received degrees in
business administration.

Gatop AOs Sell!
CALL UF EX: 2832
For Specialized Service

cost less at
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GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION I
I ' **
REPOSSESSIONMake An Offer: I
N 1962 OLDS 98 |
1964 FORD 1-Ton Truck I
| Call Mrs. Louis* Hinton, UF Ext. 2973 I

Dine ITALIAN Style
Qs^
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NEW SUMMER HOURS
SUNDAY-THURSDAY 5-11 p.m.
FRIDAY & SATURDAY 5-12 p.m.
CLOSED MONDAYS
SPECIALIZING IN
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PIBPI
BEa
HERALD EDITOR ADDRESSES SENIORS

Miami Herald Editor Don Shoemaker addresses
UF's graduating seniors during the annunal com commencement
mencement commencement ceremony at Florida Field April 24.

Editor Calls For Educated
Communication Os Ideas

Degree recipients at UFs com commencement
mencement commencement ceremony April 24
were told their contribution to the
future must be one of educated
communication of ideas and lead leadership
ership leadership in a prosperous world of
increasing complexity and pro promise.
mise. promise.
i>
Speaking to the graduating stu students,
dents, students, Don Shoemaker, editor of
the Miami Herald, reminded them
the story of man has countless

chapters of mortal confusion and
misdeed which were the tragic
yield of prejudice or pride or
sloth; in other words, the failure
to communicate.
History is full of wrong guesses
which really represent breaks in
the lines of communication,
Shoemaker asserted. He cited
Pearl Harbor and the Bay of Pigs
as examples.
Shoemaker went on, In the
United right of dissent
has legal recognition but it often
is snubbed by popular opinion. A
case in point is the war in South
Viet Nam which most of us support
but which some find an odious
misuse of political power.
I need not remind you that the
right of dissent is a kinsman of
academic freedom. We tend to
dismiss the dissenter to make makeshift
shift makeshift policy in Southeast Asia as
a servant of subversion. Well, of
course, he could be. But the thought
has yet to communicate itself to
the body of knowledgeable Ameri Americans
cans Americans that every foreign policy short
of declared war must attract
dissent if it is to endure dissec dissection.
tion. dissection.
To read into this kind of dissent

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Al| f GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL AIRPORTI
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Tuesday, May 3, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

UF President J. Wayne Reitz is seated next to
Shoemaker and Dr. Wayne McCall of the Florida
Board of Regents in shown at right.

the black or white of disloyalty is
simply to encourage the mistaken
belief that a large number of Amer Americans
icans Americans are disloyal, Shoemaker
stressed. What glee this must
give the Communists! They are
able to say to the uncommitted
people that the United States is
about to be subverted by hosts of
ideological camp followers. In
other words, the United States is
far down the road of communism
--so get with it!
In conclusion, Shoemaker said,
The challenge I suggest to you,
then, as certified education people
is the challenge to communicate
quality, to radiate ideas, to insist
out of your acquaintance with the
wisdom of the ages that Americans
must be free and knowledgeable,
to use your diploma as a license
of leadership and a banner of fol followership.
lowership. followership. This can be the promise
of Florida. This would be the hope
of America.
A total of 3,737 studentsl,47l
candidates for degrees from the
current trimester and 2,266 who
have earned degrees since May,
1965 were recognized at the
graduation ceremony at Florida
Field.

Page 13



ls The l lorkla Alligator, Tuesday, May 3, 1 966

Page 14

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SUMMER A |
VS j
WINTER 1
Winter's traditional
student squash during
registration gives way
for the less hectic pace
of summer term. |

(IF Will Use 'Left Overs'

Less than 9,000 students will be
using facilities geared to a 17,000
member student body. But the
left over facilities wont all be
idle, according to UF Director of
Housing Dr. Harold C. Riker.
For mens housing, Fletcher,
Sledd and parts of Buckman and
Murphree Halls, will be used for
UF students. East and North Halls
in the Tolbert Area will also be
used for UF students.
For Thomas and Murphree
Halls, repair work is scheduled.
Hume is being reserved for fresh freshman
man freshman orientation. Incoming fresh freshmen
men freshmen and their parents will stay
at Hume during these special early
registration and orientation ses sessions,
sions, sessions, which are spaced over the
summer months.
For the girls, Jennings, Raw Rawlings
lings Rawlings and parts of Yulee will be
open.
Yulee will be on an as needed
basis, Riker said. This means

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tour of sun-struck Portugal, Spain and Morocco. Price: $599.00.
This highly unusual tour combines the beauty and tradition of
Spain and Portugal with everything that is exciting and fun in
exotic Morocco. If youre ready for a little rest and rehabilitation,
this is what the doctor ordered.
<.
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3415 W. Univ
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LOCATED NEXT TO NEW WINN-DIXIE
Prices based on 21/14-day Round Trip Jet Economy Tour basing

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~ 'TvjHpE^lh^^^Sii^MHr2i2 ~wwwr
4 .Jfcj£ V
%; :7 W/k
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mSSeKBu EhEI 11 K

some girls now assigned to Yulee
might be moved to Jennings and
Rawlings if space becomes avail available,
able, available, he explained.
Reid Hall is scheduled to house
graduate women during B term.
Many of these students are
teachers on summer vacation,
Riker said.
Many of the remaining dorms
will be used for special short
courses. These include the sum summer
mer summer high school band camps and
adult courses.
Food Service facilities sched scheduled
uled scheduled for summer use are: the Main
Cafeteria and Campus Club, The
Florida Room in Norman Hall (for
breakfast and lunch only) and the
Hub, which will work on a reduced
schedule.
In the dorms, Jennings and Raw Rawlings
lings Rawlings Hall cafeterias will be open
along with the Tolbert Area Snack
Bar (on a reduced schedule).

Summers Here

The si;' ns sitmmol have
arrived -- students arc discount
iiiv. that vacant |>arkintw slices
a-rent .*\tiii<*t at'tei' all. classroom
halls h>ok strangely empty. Os!
campus apartments are suddenly
I a surplus commodit> and the paler
of winter study has given way to
varying shades of sunburn and itchy
peeling.
The UK registrars office esti estimates
mates estimates that 8,000 students will en-
I roll lor spring and summer classes
this year. On Monday alxnit 7,800
I students began studies. The re re|
| re| maining 1,800 are not expected
I until B term.
| The 8,900 figure is just over half
I last falls enrollment of 17,274 and
I winters enrollment of 10,175. And

TYPEWRITER RENTALS
YOUR OLYMPIA DEALER
604 N. MAIN STREET
KISER'S
OFFICE EQUIPMENT

w
though it seems
a little empty a around
round around campus,
the registrars
office says sum summertime
mertime summertime enroll enrollment
ment enrollment has been on
a steady rise
over the past
three years.
In 19 6 3 the
spring summer
total was 7,500
students. This
climbed to 8,062
for 1964 and
jumped again to
8,378 last year.
As to the boy boygirl
girl boygirl ratio, the
estimate of 6,500
men and 2,400
women provides
2.7 boys for
every girl.

The active go for Robert Bruce's surfer trunks The cut easy. The plaid brawny. In stretch
fabric of Dacron polyester, cotton and Lycra spandex from Galey and Lord. A Division of
Burlington Industries. For your nearest retailer.write us at 1407 Broadway, New York 18.
Galey Lon/

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Deodorant Stick, $1.75 =
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Spray Cologne, $3.50
Buddha Soap Gift Set, $4.00 A -s~==
Cologne, 4 oz., $3.00
After Shave, 4 oz., $2.50 swank, new york sole distributor
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Phone 376-6472 Phone 378-2959



loye Likely Out For 66

|Hversity of Florida's none-
Kght football picture was dim-
H further last week as first
Her defensive end Chip Hove
Mrwent surgery which will
Hy force him to miss the 19G6
Hive, a senior from Jackson Jackson
Jackson 'Beach, has been a starter
|*past two seasons and was
H te( ] on to be one of the better
Hnsive ends in the Southeastern
He re nee next year.

I LOVE LACY LINGERIE
f' )_
I DECOR \ |
§ IMPO RTS \ I I
w CANDLES \
W INCENSE
I* FLAGS
* GAGS "Close In For The Way Out"
I Open 10 'Til 6 Closed Monday
*OA£A AR

1 If filll 3 II j After excursion (by others) into sport shirt country of an I
I H I, ]| ,Ml| unknown nature, the Proprietor is pleased to announce the
~j the f.ycle. Shirts of solid tradition, here, rolling ||
along as of yore. I

Hcjye broke his leg during spring
football practice and continuing
pain i esulted in a consultation of
doctors and a decision to operate.
The operation took place in. Jac Jacksonville
ksonville Jacksonville at Baptish Memorial.
This is a loss of major im impoi
poi impoi tance, said Florida head coach
Flay Graves. Chip has l>een a good
defensive end the past two years,
and with his experience and ma maturity
turity maturity I thought he would he as line
a boy at his position as there would

be in the league this fall.
Adding to our problem is the
knee injury to our other starting
end, Don Barrett. We are not sure
of his condition for next season.
As of right now, however, we are
figuring on Barrett and Brian Jet Jetter
ter Jetter as the starting defensive ends."
From an injury standpoint this
just-concluded practice was the
worst since Graves came to Flor Florida
ida Florida in 1960. In addition to Hove and
Barrett, injuries eliminated Don
Knapp, John Feiber, Ed Warner,
Paige Cutclilfe, Jetter, Charlie
Pippin and Steve Spurrier from
either a major portion or all of
spring work. Defensive halfback
Dan Maury missed the entire
spring, not having full recovered
from a spleen operation after the
Georgia game last fat).
The only regular on last years
defensive line who is now set to
start in 1966 is guard Red An Anderson.
derson. Anderson.

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
As National Bank Examiners
For The U. 5. Treasury Dept
In Atlanta, Jacksonville, Miami,
i
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DEGREES IN ECONOMICS, BUSINESS
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1315 Fulton National Bank Building
Atlanta, Georgia 30303 \
OR CALL (404) 526-6625 ___

UF Gridders
Make History
Go Gators," the first complete history of University of Florida
football, will go on sale between the first and 15th of August, author
Arthur Cobb announced Saturday.
The book will include a historical review of every football game
ever played by Florida, according to Cobb, manaing editor ofithe
Pensacola Journal;
Cobb, author of Coffee Break, said the book will feature the 10
Greatest Gator Teams and 10 Greatest Gator Games as picked by
sportswriters who have covered Florida football dow r n through the
years.
Special comments about partiular games and teams wall come from
Bobby Dodd, head coach at George Tech: Wally Butts, ex-Georgia
head coach; Bob Woodruff, athletic director at the University of
Tennessee; Doug Dickev, ex-Gator quarterback and last years South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference Coach-of-the-Year at Tennessee and many others.
In addition Ray Graves, current Gator head coach and the winningest
coach in Florida history, provides opinions and a surprising pick of the
greatest victory any Gator team has won during his time.

Netters Ink Gator Pact

Greg Hilley and Willis Sherwood,
a pair of highly-sought tennis pros-

Tuesday, May 3, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

pects, have signed grants with the
University of Florida.
Gator coach Bill Potter made the
announcement today and said
these are two of the best tennis
prospects we have ever signed. I
think both of them have the poten potential
tial potential to play equal to our current
freshmen, Armi Neely and Jamie
Pressley.
Neely, current National Indoor
Junior Champion, and Pressley,
are regarded as the two finest
tennis prospects in Gator history.
They powered the frosh to an un unbeaten
beaten unbeaten year in 1966.
Hilley was a teammate of Neely
at Tampa Plant in 1965 and has
wins over most of the juniors in the
South and over the country. His
father is tennis coach at the Uni University
versity University of South Alabama and was
tennis coach at Lamar Tech in
Texas when they were the nations
top collegiate team.
Sherwood was the Alabama State
High School singles champion last
year and also State Jaycees Cham Champion.
pion. Champion. He has wins over most of the
top singles players in junior com competition.
petition. competition.
Potter said the signing of this
pair is the first of many expected
in the next few weeks i-n a stepped steppedup
up steppedup Gator tennis recruiting program
designed to bring national promi prominence
nence prominence to the University in this
sport.
The 1966 Gator freshman team
was the best in the schools history.
Register Now
For Intramurals
Registration is open for Intra Intramural
mural Intramural participants for the 3A ses session.
sion. session. Sports available during 3A
will include mens softball, wo womens
mens womens softball, singles handball
(advanced and beginners), mens
singles tennis, womens singles
tennis, mixed doubles tennis,
mixed doubles bowling, and coed
volleyball.
All participants must be regis registered
tered registered prior to 5:00 p.m. Friday,
May 6th. Registration will be in
room 229 Florida Gymnasium daily
from 8:00 to 5:00. Softball, volley volleyball,
ball, volleyball, and bowling registration will
be for teams only. The other sports
are for individuals only.
For coed volleyball there must
be three girls on the court out of
the six players at any one time.
All students, students wives,
faculty, and staff members are
eligible to register for summer
intramurals.
XEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, lUv ea. 20&
Over, 9 Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUI K-SAVE
1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 3, 1966

(From Page 1)
To the average reader, Reitz
said, it would appear that I en endorsed
dorsed endorsed the specific reasons given
by the students.
This included their concern of
undue criticism of University
officials, service functions, aca academic
demic academic and other matters pertaining
to the University, he said.
The president said three points
still need further clarification.
These are, he said:
Is it the intent of the ad administration
ministration administration to prevent criticism
in The Alligator of University aca academic
demic academic procedures, service func functions
tions functions and state administrative pro procedures?
cedures? procedures?
In light of recent experience,
is there a need for developing more
specific due process procedures by
the Board of Student Publications in
handling matters of this kind?
Was the decision reached
and action taken by the President
influenced by pressures from with without
out without the University?
On the first question, President
Reitz said it was his intention just
to install management responsive
to the total spectrum of student
needs.
I interpret this to mean that
with accuracy and with no taint of
malice, students are free to criti criticize
cize criticize the University service func functions,
tions, functions, the University academic
procedures, the University ad administrative
ministrative administrative procedures, and state
administrative procedures, es especially
pecially especially as they pertain to Uni University
versity University affairs, Reitz added.
On the second point dealing
with due process for removal of
Alligator editors -- Reitz said he
thought the board agreed with him
that this type of procedures should
be established.
Reitz outlined these procedures
in his proposals to board chairman
Professor John Webb.
The third point the president said
needed clarifying was that dealing
with possible outside influence.
Reitz said there was no influence
exerted from outside the Univer University.
sity. University.
It is true that a group of elected
and responsible student leaders
called upon me and expressed great
displeasure over the news and edi editorial
torial editorial management of The Alli Alligator,
gator, Alligator, Reitz told the senate.
Students Have
Free Expression
Freedom of expression on the
UF campus is guaranteed by the
U. S. Constitution, Florida state
laws and UF rules, said Honor
Court Chancellor Herb Schwartz.
Schwartz explained that UF stu students
dents students have always had freedom of
expression but no specific rules
were in existence on campus re regarding
garding regarding free speech and dissemi dissemination
nation dissemination of literature.
There are no rules about giving
away literature, said Schwartz,
but the administration recently
has set up some guidelines as to
what literature can and cannot be
sold on campus.

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Reitz

No political figure in or out of
office influenced in any way what whatsoever
soever whatsoever the action which was
taken, he said.
The news release issued by the
Division of Informational Services
following the UF Senate meeting
quoted Reitz as saying he had
spoken with Gov. Haydon Burns on
the day he sent the letter to board
chairman Prof. John Webb, re reversing
versing reversing a board decision of March
29, and calling for new elections
for the summer editor.
Because he is governor and
chairman of the State Board of
Education, I considered it appro appropriate
priate appropriate to greet him during his visit
here in Gainesville, Reitz said.
The most common complaint of
the student groups was that they
had been denied adequate news
coverage in The Alligator. Too,
Reitz mentioned The Alligator staff
complaint of insufficient journalis journalistic
tic journalistic help.
This argument does not appear
valid in that numerous instances
have been related of the submis submission
sion submission of prepared news stories for
publication which seemingly got
lost or were sidetracked in order
to make room for an inordinate
amount of space dedicated to co columns
lumns columns and letters to editors which
all too often reflected inaccurate
and unfounded derogatory criti criticisms,
cisms, criticisms, Reitz said.
In closing, Reitz told the senate:
It obviously would an
easier solution to have handled
this in some other fashion, but in
the current case and circum circumstances,
stances, circumstances, I believe that the action
of the University administration
was proper.
Were lining up
12,000
office workers for
SUMMER JOBS
now!
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Typists, stenographers, switch switchboard
board switchboard operators, file clerks, key keypunch
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them all, in over 400 cities,
because Manpower is the world's
largest temporary help service.
So, if youre going to be available
for summer work and want the
best job you can get, stop in at
the Manpower office in your
home city.

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'V CAFETERIA

Heres the
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career.
. \ ...
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Your name:
c y..
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Its the one you sign on at your
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June 1-2

Want growthwith a difference?
Career excitement-with
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in the nations fastest-growing
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IBM can offer you extraordinary
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Research, Development,
Manufacturing, Programing
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If you want the facts about these
careers, you II want to talk to
the IBM interviewer.
Certainly, he wants to talk to you
about these key jobs.
Theyre jobs with technical
responsibility. Where you can

By YVETTE CARDOZO
Alligator Staff Writer
The red tape complaint on
both the university and state level
is no stranger to the UF campus.
During Fall Trimester the cam campus
pus campus rocked with rumors of a re resignation
signation resignation threat by UF President
J. Wayne Reitz.
Reitz denied the resignation but
before the matter settled down, the
UF Faculty Senate condemned
Floridas double check budget
system for education and the local
AAUP warned against the dangers
of drowning in a sea of red tape.

put your ideas to work and
earn superior rewards.
In a growth company like IBM,
responsibility and advancement
come rapidly. In fact, during
the next five years IBM expects
to appoint approximately 6,000
new managers. A wide range
of training and education
programs will help you meet
the challenge of growth.
So visit your placement office
now for a line on IBM. Sign
on it for your interview. If for any
reason you can't arrange an
interview, visit your nearest
IBM branch office. Or write:
Manager of College Relations,
IBM Corporate Headquarters,
Armonk, New York 10504.

'RedTape Familiar Echo

IBM is going places.
Why not come along?
-a
Whatever your area of study,
ask us how you might use your
particular talents at IBM.
Job opportunities at IBM lie in
eight major career fields:
(1) Research and Development,
(2) Engineering,
(3) Manufacturing, (4) Finance
and Administration,
(5) Marketing, (6) Field
Engineering, (7) Systems
Engineering, (8) Programing.
IBM is an Equal Opportunity
Employer.
IBM

One example of Reitz problems
involved the hunt for a vice presi president
dent president to replace Harry Philpott who
left to become president of Auburn
University.
Reitz budgeted $22,500 for the
new mans salary and this was
approved by the Regents. But when
Reitz located a possible replace replacement
ment replacement and began talking shop, he
discovered the salary had been
sliced to $20,000 by the Budget
Commission.
The UF is still without a vice
president.
This double check system in involves

Tuesday, May 3, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

volves involves a second ratification by the
Budget Commission after the
initial appropriation has been
made.
Members of the UF political
science department say Florida
is alone in its budget policy. All
other states in the U. S. appro appropriate
priate appropriate an initial sum and then
leave detailed usage decisions to
a Board of Regents.
One danger of this system is the
delay in issuing faculty contracts
for the academic year. Contracts
in Florida are issued months after
those in other universities around
the nation.
The result for Florida is a sys system
tem system where professors can be se several
veral several weeks into the working
trimester before their contracts
have been fully negotiated.
Kelly In Town
Gubernatorial candidate Scott
Kelly yesterday told a small
crowd of UF students and Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville residents that Haydon Burns
has made a grave error in the
education field.
Kelly hopped into Gainesville for
%a quick speech as a part of his last
minute whirlwind tour of the state.
The "grave error he referred
to concerned Burns plans for fi financing
nancing financing the proposed $5,000 mini minimum
mum minimum salary for teachers.
"Burns wants the state to set the
law (for minimum salaries) and
leave the counties to pick up the
tab, Kelly said.
"Thats the big difference, he
said. "I have committed myself
to provide relief from property
taxes and yet he (Burns) wants
county property taxes to pay.
Kelly beamed an air of confi confidence
dence confidence and energy. "Theres no
doubt in my mind that were lead leading,
ing, leading, he said.
He noted a recent poll in Burns
alma mater, Andrew Jackson High.
Kelly beat Burns 274 to 208.
He also said the Fort Lauder Lauderdale
dale Lauderdale News has been added to the
list of newspapers endorsing him.
Kelly said he will switch planes
again. Today he will trade his
Lear-jet for a fighter jet, and try
to hit as many cities as possible
before the polls close. He just
recently got the Lear jet to re replace
place replace his helicopter.
Kelly said he would be back in
town again today but did not know
exactly when he would arrive.
Gurfi
V I IMS
SSfPep Ivry
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p
fI&HH You'!' b bit
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LITTLE
TA,LORS
112 W. University Avenue

Page 17



Orange

Page 18

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 3, 1966

Campus Calendar
PLEASE TURN IN ALL ITEMS FOR CAMPUS CALENDAR TO THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS OFFICE, FLA. UNION

UNION BOARD: Tues., May 3,
4:45 p.m., 215 FU.
FLORIDA SPEOLOGICAL SO SOCIETY:
CIETY: SOCIETY: Wed., May 4, 7p.m. 212 FU.
COMPUTING CENTER USERS:
Wed., May 4. 105-B (Aud.), College
of Architecture and Fine Arts.
BATIK WORKSHOP: Wed., May 4,

Administrative Notices To Students, Faculty Sc Staff

TO STUDENTS:
JOBS AVAILABLE: Jobs are a available
vailable available for students interested in
part-time sales work while in school
and full time during summer break.
A representative will be on the cam campus
pus campus at 2 p.m. Wednesday, May 11, to
discuss employment. Interested stu students
dents students should contact Mrs. Stech Stechmiller,
miller, Stechmiller, Student Employment Office,
124 Tigert Hall.
ROOM RESERVATIONS: Blanket
reservations are now being accepted
for meeting rooms in Florida Union
during the spring trimester. Forms
are available in the reservation
office or at the Information Desk.
INTRAMURAL PAR TICIPANTS:
All persons or teams interested in

General Notices

PLACEMENT INTER VIE WS
(Sign-up sheets are posted in the
Placement Office Bldg. H. All are
degree-level positions. Asterisk in indicates
dicates indicates summer employment avail available
able available for juniors. Interviews will be
held in Florida Union unless other otherwise
wise otherwise indicated.)
MAY 9: CHEVRON CHEMICAL
COMPANY (Ortho Division) -- all
majors.
MAY 17: GRAND UNION COM COMPANY
PANY COMPANY -- all majors. SWIFT &
COMPANY PHOSPHATE CENTER
-- Chem., ChE.

I CASH
1 CONSOLIDATE BILLS
1 TRAVEL EXPENCE
I $25 SoOC
I Marion Finance Company Inc.
I 222'W. University Ave,

Many Alachua Countians
VOTE
FOR MARION FINANCE for
prompt, courteous, and confidential service.

5, 6. 9 a o m. or 1:30 p.m. 3 sessions
-- $6.00 (fabric not included). Re Register
gister Register 120 FU, Craft Shop. Instruc Instructors:
tors: Instructors: R. Straty & A. Strickland
PAINTING FOR FUN: Thurs., May
5,7 p.m., 215 FU. 6 sessions --
$5.00. Instructor: Dr. R. Carson.
Sign up at 315 FU.

participating in intramural activi activities
ties activities during the 111-A session must
be registered with the Intramural
Office, Room 229, Florida Gym,
prior to 5 p.m., Friday, May 6.
Sports available are softball (men
and women), singles tennis (men
and women), singles handball (ad (advanced
vanced (advanced and beginners), mixed
doubles bowling, mixed doubles
tennis aid coed volleyball.
TO FACULTY & STAFF:
SURPLUS PROPERTY: Boating
equipment for sale to the highest
bidder. Minimum acceptable bids
are: Johnson 75hp outboard motor
-- $350; boat, Mitchell, 17 feet --
$100; trailer, Hurricane -- SSO. Bid

MAY 17, 18: GENERAL ELEC ELECTRIC
TRIC ELECTRIC COMPANY -- Acctg., Fin.,
Bus. Admin., Econ., Math.
MAY 18: SUN LIFE ASSURANCE
CO. OF CANADA lns., Bus., Lib.
Arts, Ed. RYDER TRUCK LINES,
INC. Gen. Bus., IE, Acctg. W.T.
GRANT COMPANY Gen. Bus.,
Mktg., Lib. Arts, Ed.
MAY 20: HOUDAILLE-DUVAL HOUDAILLE-DUVALWRIGHT
WRIGHT HOUDAILLE-DUVALWRIGHT COMPANY -- BBC, CE.
*
GENERAL NOTICES
COMPUTER MEETING: A meet meeting
ing meeting will be held at 4 p.m. on May 4

and

BLUE BULLETIN

ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE,
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE.

FU DANCE LESSONS: Mon., May
9, 7:30 p.m., FU Social Room
Single $10.00; Couple -- $18.50.
Sign up in 315 FU.
CHILDRENS CERAMICS CLASS CLASSES:
ES: CLASSES: Begins Sat., May 7, 9 a.m. Ages
8-11. 6 sessions -- $6.00. Register
120 FU, Craft Shop.

application forms are available in
106 Tigert Hall, Purchasing Divi Division.
sion. Division. Bids are to be opened May 5.
The equipment can be inspected by
contacting Alvin Keeling, Surplus
Warehouse, Ext. 2530.
PERSONNEL REMINDER: All fa faculty
culty faculty members who will not be
teaching the 111-A spring term are
reminded to contact the Personnel
Office immediately regarding con continuation
tinuation continuation of their Blue Cross-Blue
Shield and Gulf Life Hospitalization
coverage. Since no payroll deduc deduction
tion deduction can be made for faculty mem members
bers members not teaching the 111-A term,
coverage will terminate if direct
payment is not made through the
Personnel Office.

soy all current and prospective users
of the Computing Center, Staff mem members
bers members will be on hand to answer
questions in Room 105-B, College
of Architecture and Fine Arts, A
presentation will be given on the
capabilities, uses and costs of re remote
mote remote n console equipment for tie-in
to the new IBM/360, Model 50 large largescale
scale largescale computer to be installed in
January, 1967.
BAKE SALE: The Arts and Sci Science
ence Science Dames will sponsor a bake sale
Saturday, May 7, in front of Publix
in the Gainesville Shopping Center,
beginning at 10 a.m.

LOANSI
short mu payday j
BUYING SECOND CAR I
525-S6OO I
'* n ii ;ji -rxii ; ip.iliy Inc. I
__- . B



I (From Page I)
Kpe.
Mnplaints have included com-
K 0 n asinine and restrictive
S wor k, and the double
Bucracy of Floridas edu edunal
nal edunal budget system.
I e administrator sounding off
e situation asked, If you have
through Tallahassee to hire a
assistant or to cut a door
ugh a partition, isnt that red
9
dont mind being audited by
(federal or state government
(he university, he continued,
( having to put through ten
( es of paper to get a small job
( is too much.
It present, Floridas state uni uni(ities
(ities uni(ities must submit to a second
(k on fund usage after the initial
get appropriation is made.
Irida is the only state where
|h a double check is used.
Inother university official said,
I the University is going to hire
lop notch leader, why not give
I the responsibility instead of
|king over his shoulder.

> '?C
> 'l 1 r y 'i v., \, -' ttf* **l? ** l) "'D *' /*" st, t" ,vi r 1 'c \f \ 'f'
t v 7. '^' s i^,.K'? 5 & f^-!ySi s***+ a '''it? l j *'*
flwyavg g, -p; 18E
Vi .( "'> },.//. _>J/%\ ** w -' / f ~ .//* c* <, '*t j

Martin Upset Over r ed Tape 1

Who knows most about what is
best for Florida engineering than
the best engineer in the state?
he asked. Who in the adminis administration
tration administration or Board of Regents is a
better engineer?
This matter of budgetary double
checking and other time consuming
red tape is more than merely an annoying,
noying, annoying, say some members of the
engineering department.
Advances in engineering are oc occurring
curring occurring in lightning speed these
days and the college of engineering
wants to be ready, one member
pointed out.
As much as three years may
elapse between requesting money
and receiving it, he said. And with
engineering advancing at its pre present
sent present pace, it is difficult to estimate
needs three years in advance, he
said.
t>
Though nothing concrete has yet
come of the talks bet ween Martin
and Reitz, it is reported that Mar Martin
tin Martin did submit a verbal resignation
which Reitz refused to accept.

When asked if he thought any anything
thing anything might be done to lessen the
red tape problem, Martin said he
couldnt tell at this point.
Thats what Im spending my
time thinking about, he comment commented.
ed. commented.
When questioned further, Martin
said he didnt feel it was fair to all
parties concerned for him to be become
come become involved in a public contro controversy.
versy. controversy.
Martin came to the UF in 19G3
and replaced Dr. Joseph Weil as
dean of the Engineering College.
Weils comment on the situa situation
tion situation was, I guess hes run into
the same problems that I did.
Discussing Martin, Weil said,
Os all the engineering deans in
the country, hes certainly at the
top.
Weil also said Martin has been
discouraged.
But I know hed rather be Dean
of the UF Engineering College than
president of some of the largest
engineering colleges in the coun country,
try, country, he added.

Martin came to the UF from the
U niversitv of Arizona where he was
also dean of the College of En Engineering.
gineering. Engineering.
Among Martins accomplish accomplishments
ments accomplishments since coming to the UF is
the GENESYS (.Graduate Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering Education System) program,
which offered a solution to the
problem of off-campus post-grad post-graduate
uate post-graduate education for engineers in
Florida.
GENESYS involves a network of
classrooms tied together by closed
circuit two-way television. Thus,
instant two-way communication is
provided between students and pro professors
fessors professors who may be hundreds of
miles apart.
Martin has in the past turned
down offers of better positions in
other universities and colleges in
order to remain with the UF en engineering
gineering engineering program.
I HAVE YOU VOTED?
I .

Tuesday, May 3, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Med Students
Fellowship
Recipients
Two third-year medical students
at UF, Dennis F. Pupello of Tampa
and Ray L. Columbaro of Vero
Beach, have received fellowships
to study in Colombia, South Amer America.
ica. America.
They will be assigned to the
University of AntioquiainMedellin
for nine weeks beginning next Feb February
ruary February as part of their fourth year
of medical training.
The fellowships are awarded by
the Louisiana State University Col College
lege College of Medicine for students and
faculty members of medical
schools to study tropical medicine
and health conditions in Latin
America. They are supported by a
grant from the National Institute
of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
Arrangements for UF students
to participate were made by Dr.
Henry E. Meleney, professor
emeritus of medicine in the College
of Medicine at UF, who spearhead spearheaded
ed spearheaded the beginning of the program
while at LSU in 1955.
This is the seventh consecutive
year UF medical students have
been accepted for these fellow fellowships.
ships. fellowships.
Have 18 Howls ol
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e i
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a i

Page 19



Page 20

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 3, 1966

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