Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida Alligatir

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The 60-member University Choir will present its annual Spring
Concert tonight at 8:15 p.m. in the University Auditorium. The choir,
under the direction of Dr. Elwood Keister, will perform numbers

UF Student Is Running
For Florida House Seat

By STEVE SMITH
Alligator Staff Writer
Law student Rick Catalano has
announced his candidacy for the
State House of Representatives
from Group 3, the group which
includes Alachua County.
Catalano, who is making his po political
litical political debut in the campaign, faces
three opponents in the May 3rd
Democratic primary, in which for
practical purposes, the state rep representative
resentative representative will be elected for
Alachua, Putnam and Gilchrist
counties.
The 26- year-old student is run running,
ning, running, he says, without any organ organization
ization organization at all and without any real
financial support. His strategy is
to try to pick up enough votes from
university-connected voters to off offset
set offset the heavy Gainesville vote
which will be split among his three
opponents, who are better known
locally.
Counting on support from the
seven smaller towns which sur surround
round surround Gainesville (plus Gilchrist
-and Putnam votes), he says I think
I have a chance. There is no in incumbent
cumbent incumbent in the race, and Catalano
says his strictly grass roots
campaign may surprise the other
three contenders despite their
long-time local contacts.
Although he is completely new*
at politics, Catalano is not jumping
in without thinking first. He has
planned to go into state and local
politics for a long time and has
decided that his main concern will
be to communicate with and ex-

University of Florida

CHOIR PRESENTS CONCERT TONIGHT

press the needs of the little
people.
As to running his first cam campaign
paign campaign as an unknown while stay staying
ing staying in law school and holding a
part-time job: The waters cold
now and its going to be cold later.
I want to go ahead and jump in
now.
His appeal to the little peo people
ple people is aimed at giving them a
1 fi
M
IJK
CATALANO
dhance to be heard. Too often in
the past, he says, Tallahassee
has found itself catering to a se select
lect select few.
Examples of those who deserve
a greater opportunity than the past
has provided are the students, the
parents, the educators, the men

written by such composers as Johannes Brahms, Johann S. Bach,
Randall Thompson, Ralph Vaugh Williams and George Bizet. The
concert is open to the public and admission is free.

and women wage earners, the re retired
tired retired folks, the small businessmen
and the small farmers.
This, Catalanos main platform
plank, is supplemented by his se second
cond second appeal, which is one towai d
improved communication between
the people and their represen representative.
tative. representative. At a Democratic rally in
Hawthorne Saturday, April 2, he
stressed his ability to communi communicate
cate communicate with and understand a greater
percentage of the people in Gil Gilchrist,
christ, Gilchrist, Alachua, and Putnam coun counties
ties counties than any of my three oppo opponents.
nents. opponents.
With law school exams begin
ning next week, Catalano is li limited
mited limited right now as to the time
he puts into the campaign. How However,
ever, However, it is enjoying it tremen tremendously,
dously, tremendously, he says, especially the
opportunity to meet people all
kinds.
In an effort to make his cam campaign
paign campaign a personal one, the student
candidate has spent much of the
last few days visiting GalnesvlUe
business establishments, meeting
the customers as well as the bus businessmen.
inessmen. businessmen.
Catalano, a native of Highland
County and a graduate of St. Leo
Prep School, lives with his wife
and three-month-old daughter in
Fla vet HI.
He graduated from Spring Hill
College In 1962 with a major in
philosophy and minors in biology
and chemistry, then taught high
school for two years in Lakeland
before entering law school.

Tuesday April 5, 1966

Today Is The Last Day
J
For Sending Magazines

Today is the last day the UFs Circle K Club will be collecting
magazines to send to American soldiers In Viet Nam.
According to Circle K member Paul Bailey, the drive has been
fairly successful, but things have been a little slow.'.'
Magazines will be collected this afternoon and packaged "by
Circle K members, who will send them on their way to Viet Nam.
Anyone wishing to contribute magazines before this afternoon's
deadline can leave them in the bln in the recreation room of the
Florida Union.
~:v,
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JACK-IN-THE-BOX?
That's no jack-in-the-box. Its Alison Conner, sitting in Circle K's
magazine bin in the Florida Union recreation room. Today Is the last
day for the clubs magazine drive. All magazines collected will be
sent to American soldiers In Viet Nam.

Tornadoes
Hit Florida
TAMPA, Fla. (UPp A squall
line packing winds of 100 miles an
hour slammed tornadoes into
Tampa and central Florida Mon Monday,
day, Monday, killing at least five persons,
injuring 250 more and damaging
millions of dollars worth of pro property.
perty. property.
The American Red Cross at
Tampa said it had reports of 15
dead but added the information was
based on estimates and hearsay,
nothing definite."
The screaming twisters cut a
swatch of destruction 40 miles wide
from the Tampa Bay area on the
Gulf of Mexico almost due east
across Floridas midriff.
The tornadoes hit at least 10
cities and towns flattening homes,
knocking over utility poles, smash smashing
ing smashing cars and trucks, and disrupting
water service and electricity.
The worst hit areas were in
North Tampa, the Carrollwood-
Forrest Hills sections, and an
area northwest of Lakeland in
Polk County, about 35 miles east
of Tampa.
Early reports said 350 homes
were damaged in central Florida
including 60 destroyed. Twenty
trailers in an area stretching from
Tampa to Winter Haven were de destroyed.
stroyed. destroyed.
The roof of a girlsdormitory at
the University of South Florida in
Tampa buckled with 300 coeds in inside.
side. inside. No serious injuries were re reported,
ported, reported, although part of the roof
was blown away.
At Tampa, Lakeland and Cocoa,
the powerful winds overturned
school buses. Miraculously, only
a few minor injuries were re reported.
ported. reported.
Authorities attributed the squall
line to an advancing late season
cool weather mass moving down
from Georgia and Alabama.



Page 2

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nomination o~ M~s. Constance Baher Mazier,
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committee prvestigatptr toe use a: z tree car P* Purmaslpf Otr~
actor Rarer Sllter PaprctnP sap me committee ma re com men:
tot Canine aooo some genera regular or tr serwt a.- z code n
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Viet Crisis Worries Rusk

V ASHING TC )N IH Seer e*-
mry of State Ceui Rusk
serious conce>n Monday over the
political crisp in Souti \'iei Nam,
nut ne saic it had not vet interfered
viP Pie war effort..
Rusk testifiec at a closed nie*et nie*etinp
inp nie*etinp of Pie Senate Foreigi. Relatione
Committefe as police battled riottrip
Bucidnis: vouPis ii Saigoi. and Viet Vietnamese
namese Vietnamese paratroopers landed at Lra
Soviets Are
Ready ToFight
MOSCOW (TJPD A leading
Russiai genera; said Monday Piat
tnousanas of Soviet seddiers and
saiiore nave volunteered to fight
agains: America! anc allied troops
ii Viet Nan.. He said Pie voluij voluijteers
teers voluijteers incluae entire Soviet militarv
units.
The disclosure was made by Gen.
Alexei lepisnev, hear of political
aamimstratioT; of the Soviet army
anc navy, p. e speed, before the
2Jrc Communist parry Congress in
Moscow.
But the generals announcement
was taaei more as ai. expression
of Soviet support for Hanoi than £
threat of direct intervention by
Soviet troops.
Soviet Communist party chief
Ceonic L Brezhnev made e similar
reference tc Sonet volunteers for
Vie: Nan las: ye£r but only if
tne Bano. regime asked for them.
Sr far NorP Viet Reh iiec made
nr suci request publicly.
l episnev spoke or the last day of
aenatf or Brezhnevas five-hour
report, oeliveret last Tuesdsy, or
the genera, polfpcal situation p.
tne Soviet Dnioi ant ahroau.

FOR A STRAIGHT SHOOT'N DEAL
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ICED TEA or COFFEE 694
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UNIVERSITYCAFETERIAS

Nan } ; iv vueH aiitl-governmeut
d emone-t rat iohs.
Ti>(- viate ldepartment autiounoec
It had evidence that the Cun;mu Cun;munlst
nlst Cun;munlst Met Ccm;; were trying tc ex exploit
ploit- exploit Pie disorders Pueatening.
Pren ier Nguyen CaoKve military
regime.
but Sen. f rank Church, L>-Idaho,
saw anoPrer underlying cause. T
tldnk It would be a mistake to bor borrow
row borrow Pie Cotnmunists as at. excuse
or as a cover lor what ii. re a Jll y
is a continuing and persistent cb vi vision
sion vision among Pie Vietnamese, tie
said after Pie Senate Committees
2-1/2 hour seseior. with Rust.
After the briefing, Rusk told
questioners he did not have the
necessary information to say what
role Communists have played ii
the rioting.
He pictured the political unrest
as a struggle among various civi civilian
lian civilian factions in Soutfc Viet Nan lor
a greater share of power in any
future constitutional government.
He called the anti-. American tone

I NOTICE
1 Appli cot ions Are Now Being Accepter Fo r
I EDITOR and MANAGING EMTOt of
I THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOF tor trig
I Summer Trirr.es f e r
I Applications Are Due & 2:30 orr r April 6
I In The Board o's Stooen* Publications Office.
I 9/ Floriaa Union. Applicants *Ajsr be
I Available For Interview APEJL 7, 1966.

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tot soHoartr? of tut Soutt vietl
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ttfor*. iron tut mail jo: a: aan- >*
Otettl flat fim* Oj.
yrubstst im serious concert about
tut evidence of iusaurla- ;^ r
con mtaet memuen, iuc u-Hry
Seu liar: L. Mmi. } E-£_£ v
Kusr gavt tut impressioi tnere
wet littit presen: after-Barr* to
n-tfear? nut ii Soutr V&- s^zl.
pator



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Tuesday, April 5, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3

BIG



Page 4

1, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 5, 1966

ALLIGATOR
EDITORIALS
a step backward
/jAne of the landmark cases brought before the
'lt'United States Supreme Court in 1965 was Es Escobedo
cobedo Escobedo vs. Illinois. The case itself is not important
but the principle behind it has had far reaching im implications
plications implications in the law enforcement field.
On the basis of the Courts decision in the Esco Escobedo
bedo Escobedo case, a person is entitled to legal counsel the
minute he is brought down to a police station for'
questioning. The reasoning behind this 4s that police
have been known to sweat a confession out of a
confused suspect who may very well be innocent
of the charges brought against him.
Last Friday, the University police sweated a con confession
fession confession out of a dazed, frightened girl, accused of
petty larceny involving UF property, according to
Honor Court Chancellor Herb Schwartz.
When the girl asked if she could have legal coun counsel,
sel, counsel, she was told she could not.
When the girl askecWf she had to talk right away,
or answer questions, she was told she had to con confess
fess confess and that it was getting late.
She confessed.
Whether or not she was guilty of the crime she
was accused of isnt really important. The fact she
was coerced into confessing is.
In years past, University police were permitted
to search students rooms without a warrant. They
were also permitted to question a student without
allowing that student benefit of counsel.
When Schwartz campaigned for office, he promised
to do something about this obvious violation of a
students civil liberties. When Schwartz was elected,
he did something about it.
One week after Schwartz* election, UF President
J. Wayne Reitz issued an order to campus police
that no rooms were to be searched without a warrant,
that no student was to be questioned without being
given the right to secure counsel.
Last Friday, the University police sweated a
confession out of a dazed, frightened girl.
For a while, it looked as though theUF was taking
a step forward, refuting the charges that the campus
would soon become another Berkeley over the issue
of civil liberties. After Fridays fiasco it looks as
though the University has taken a step backward into
ignorance.
Bob Menaker
another
BOOM
ilt will be a breeze this spring for students
summer jobs. In fact, the selection
should be so wide that students can work at some something
thing something they like, in addition to earning enough money
to stay in school.
We had a hint of this early winter quarter when a
magazine editor visiting campus remarked he is
hiring more girls because the draft is slicing off
part of the labor market.
The suspicion was confirmed this week when the
Labor Dept, revealed the unemployment rate is at
its lowest point since the Korean War boom year of
1953: 3.7 per cent or 3,158,000 persons. Overtime
has increased as well.
The reasons for the decrease in unemployment and
for the likely squeeze on the available labor supply
in coming months are that the draft is removing
young men 18 to 24 years old from the labor market
and that defense expenditures are spurring employ employers
ers employers to expand their operations, thus opening up new
jobs.
This upward pressure on the economy means stu students
dents students must have those jobs to keep pace with rising
costs, for as the nations manufacturers fill orders
for defense material, they put less effort into keep keeping
ing keeping abreast of consumer demand. Consequently,
prices rise and workers demand wage increases to
match. Thats inflation.
The end, of course, is not in sight. The Labor
Dept.s report said the increase in the armed forces
of 330,000 men that was projected in the Presidents
budget message could result in significant tighten tightening
ing tightening of the job market . Since very little expansion
in the labor force can be expected from men over 24
years of age in 1966, and not many jobs can be filled
from the remaining unemployed men, substantial
additional pressures would be exerted on the man manpower
power manpower supply.
Happy job-hunting.
Minnesota Daily

The Florida Alliga tor

'A Mmh ft Oa Rw* Tl

"You Think Drysdale Is Good Waitll You See Koufax"
a true gentleman
Editor:
The sudden death of Professor Mell H. Atchley on Sunday,
April 3, removes a devoted teacher from our Sociology Depart Department.
ment. Department.
Professor Atchley carried a heavy burden of teaching and
student counseling in a program of social work internship. In his
19 years of continuous duty in Peabody Hall he served on countless
committees for the University. Many generations of graduate stu students
dents students in both sociology and education have reason to be thankful
to him for serving with patience and deep human understanding
on their committees.
No academic department can hold together for very long with without
out without at least one reliable man upon whom registrars, deans,
colleagues and students can always depend. In the Sociology
Department Professor Atchley served as that invaluable and
indispensable person throughout the administrations of several
different departmental chairmen. He was the source of continuity
and the core of reliability.
As time goes on one hardly expects to find research professors
of the social sciences present in either their classrooms or their
offices. Nobody is any longer surprised to discover them jaunting
about the country, or the world, gathering data, attending inter international
national international conferences, building up their careers and adding to the
prestige of their universities the luster of their names. One
hardly expects them to be available at home when needed.
Professor Atchley was available. His office door was open, and
not only for students. He kept a unique and complete reference
file on every student he had ever taught so that he could be im immediately
mediately immediately helpful to social work agencies and other employers
needing information on students job qualifications.
Mell Atchley enjoyed his teaching. He cut through the deadly
dull statistics and jargon- loaded vocabulary of sociology by teach teaching
ing teaching it in plain English spiced with homespun humor. One had only
to pass his open classroom door and hear the ripples of laughter
to catch the close rapport between students and teacher. He re recruited
cruited recruited countless workers for crime correction, juvenile pro probation
bation probation and child welfare by inspiring his students with faith that
the social cripples thrown on the junk heap by an affluent indus industrial
trial industrial society, the disabled and the alienated, can be helped.
For many years sociologists have been in very short supply
in a market of rising demand. T Any sociologist who chooses to
do so can advance his career by moving from campus to campus
or in and out of government service. Corporations will pay much
more than colleges can pay. It requires a special kind of loyalty
for a man to stay put in one state university, serving its state
agencies, its students and its administration.
Mell Atchley had that kind of loyalty. He put his university his
students and his colleagues above his career. He was known
throughout the state and the South for his contributions in the
field of social welfare and he was very active in community or organization.
ganization. organization.
The members of the First Methodist Church will miss his
welcoming handshake at the front door on Sunday mornings
The prisoners at Raiford will miss his visits. The boys and girls
and the counselors at Marianna and Ocala training schools will
miss him. The welfare workers of Gainesville will miss him
And we of Peabody Attic, his students and colleagues will miss
him sorely. Only his family will miss him more. To them we
extend our heartfelt sympathy. -
Joseph S. Vandiver, Professor and Chairman, Sociology
Sociology Department Faculty
Sociology Department Members

MI KK MALAGHAN S
Campus
Perspective
The fraternity system at the University of
Florida has completed an exhausting week of
self evaluation.
The Greeks admitted the fact they were in
trouble. The retreat, under the direction of
Bob Mims, critisized them in that light.
While eight areas were researched, the con concepts
cepts concepts of scholastic excellence, mature leader leadership,
ship, leadership, and public relations dominated the week
of self-insight.
The leaders of the IFC realize what has been
apparent to the administration for the past three
years. The student body today is a different
entity than in 1961.
In 1961 a raw score of 200 on the senior
placement test was all that was necessary to
enter the UF. Next fall the average entering
freshman will have an average score of 420.
Florida is fast becoming a club for the intel intellectual
lectual intellectual elite of the state.

Florida will soon have 30 junior colleges.
Next year the UF will be limiting their num number
ber number of transfers.
In short, the independent arriving on Floridas
campus is more concerned with the getting an
education than ever before.
Fraternites must accept this challenge. The
leaders of the IFC have. President Clyde Taylor
and vice-presidents Manny James and Jim
Kincaid are concerned with the new role of fra fraternities
ternities fraternities on this campus.
The fraternities must go beyond the phase of
merely refraining from hazing. Now they must
play the role of a leader in academic achieve achievement.
ment. achievement.
The well rounded man is giving way to the
well educated individual.

Greek evaluation week pointed out the need
for fraternities to adjust to the influx of wiser
freshman and 20-year-old transfer students.
The real threat to the fraternity system now
lies with the individual chapters and their mem members.
bers. members. Will they take advantage of the Greek
Evaluation week and develop attitudes and pro programs
grams programs to attract the new Florida student?
The public image of the fraternity has been
under attack for years. To compound the prob problem
lem problem the Greeks have many publics challenging
them.
One public is the parents of the brothers and
rushees. Often a pledge who flunks out blames
the fraternity. This can be the reason, more
often it is not. Next year the fraternities will
rush the parents explaining the duties and re responsibilities
sponsibilities responsibilities of their son in a Greek organiza organization.
tion. organization.
The fraternities will do that if they follow
up their retreat with actions.
The most favorable public the fraternities
is the administration. They are most conscious
of Greek leadership. This public has been dis disappointed
appointed disappointed some in the past. When a fraternity
embarresses the school, they are violating the
confidence of a friend. All the deans in Tigert
are Greeks.

A third public is the community. Too often a
few fraternities do a few service projects around
Christmas and Thanksgiving and forget the rest
of the year. All too often fraternities are dis discourteous
courteous discourteous to their neighbors by producing noise
during the week.
A fourth public is the fraternities themselves.
Each time a fraternity knocks a fellow Greek
house detract from the system as a whole.
Why give an independent ammunition to knock
they system?
Clyde Taylor and Bob Mims are to be con congratulated
gratulated congratulated for administrating and leading a week
of self evaluation. Now, if the fraternities will
act on their own suggestions and not wait until
they are in dire trouble, the retreat will have
been a remarkable success.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Accepts
All Letters To The Editor. Due To
Space Limitations, However, We Are
Unable To Print Letters Exceeding 350
v/ords. All Letters Must Be Signed.
Names Will Be Withheld Upon Request
T^ e Editors Rese.rve The Riaht To Select
Or Reject Letters Fa; Rublreation.



community benefits from performance,
suffers from derelicition

Editor:
Enclosed please find a letter
which I submitted to the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville paper. I did so in preference
to the campus paper because I think
that Gainesville as a whole is in involved
volved involved in defining the role of The
Alligator, and because I think the
whole community benefits from
your proper performance of your
function, and suffers from your
dereliction of duty.
Also, in case you should fail to

Editor:
The current situation with The Alligator remains
highly emotionally charged. I think that many people
on both sides have acted with a lack of restraint and
reason. As a former Alligator editor and campus
leader I feel it my duty to speak out now.
My personal opinion is that Mssrs. Cason, Moor,
and Cardozo have been dealt a great injustice in the
manner in which they were treated. My feeling is
that a lot of ill-will regarding personalities was sub substituted
stituted substituted for logic and reason. I doubt seriously that
in the current state of affairs we will ever learn all
the factors in the devious intrigues and arrangements
behind the impeachment proceedings.
I do strongly feel that at this time the most correct
manner of handling the nature and substance of the
charges made is that we need a full and open hearing
with all the charges aired, proven and/or defended.
I think many people have taken sides without hear hearing
ing hearing all the facts. I feel that this would be the most
equitable manner in which to settle The Alligator
question at this time. Perhaps Editor Cason is guilty,
perhaps not. In any event I think that responsible
individuals can openly deal with the charges. I think
that the seven-point charges should be proven by the
accusers and the accused defend themselves to them.
Then there can be no doubt as to the handling of their
case.
Dr. Reitz certainly has the right to take the action
he did. Never having heard the other side, however,
leads me to believe that the removed individuals
have not been allowed to adequately present their
case. I think whether they are right or wrong they
do have a right to a form of due process in which to
defend themselves to the reasons given for their

Editor:
A few words on Mondays paper.
Concerning that brilliant reprint
from (what was that again) The
Rock County Herald of Luverne,
Minnesota (is that a Hearst or a
Knight paper?), I must say that I
am a tired American who is tired
of tired Americans who are
tired of those tired Americans who
are tired of tired Americans.
I have read and heard that the
Alligator photographers walked out
last week. Today I count 18 pic pictures
tures pictures by Arroyo, Sherman and
Johnston. I should exclude John Johnston
ston Johnston from rebuke (for after all,
he is a businessman with higher
responsibilites). But I did read
and hear that a certain twosome
(among others) of Arroyo and Slier
man walked out in protest of the
firing of Cason and Moor. Well,
apparently they didnt, or maybe

grand
OPENING!
Thurs., Fri., Sat.
SURPRISES
n
NW 6th St. ajH6th^v^

Litz comes out loud
and strong

doesnt like advertising

keep an open forum on issues of
concern to the students of the uni university
versity university (and this ranges from Viet
Nam to Spirit Hats), I wanted an
opportunity as a reader of the
Sun to remind that newspaper
of its partial responsibility, to me
and other student readers, to fill
any hiatus that you should leave by
your failure. In this I am not so
pretentious as to think I am any
more than one of your or the
Suns readers, but I do feel

they had a change of heart. How
fortunate for them and unfortunate
for such martyrs as Jones and
Kanar.
All in all, I thought todayspaper
was quite excellent. I particularly
enjoyed the Quick-Save ad on page
3, the Red Barn ad on page 12, the
University Gardens ad on page 10,

I NOTICE
TOMORROW'S BIG 'GATOR WILL BE
THE LAST OF THE WINTER TRIMESTER.
ROBBIES
Best In Steak
Q J^Jandwiches
1718 W. University Ave. I
QnThe Gold Coast I

dismissal. I believe that now is the time for the
entire affair to be aired and cleansed.
I wish to be quite equivocal in that I remain a
third group that is supporting neither Student
Body Pres. Buddy Jacobs nor ex-Editor Benny Cason.
I just feel that we, the students, and the faculty, are
entitled to a full public hearing where opinions can
be made, and sides chosen, on the basis of fact,
and not personalities and emotions.
I think that many so-called student leaders have
supported Jacobs without checking with their groups.
I feel that this is an unfair method of criticism. If
these groups do wish to support Jacobs I say fine.
But I feel that this is not the case. Have meetings
of Mortar Board, the Student Government Cabinet,
the Legislative Council, Women Students Associa Association
tion Association been held? No. I feel that the representatives
of these groups should seek a vote of investigation
and/or support before signing letters, petitions and
telegrams using the titles of officer for that group.
The nature of the removal of student editors leaves
many questions unanswered, not only in this parti particular
cular particular case, but in all future operations of student
newspapers, their responsibilities, management and
direction. Whether The Alligator should be a glorified
Orange and Blue Bulletin or not should be de decided
cided decided now.
Can anyone truly be afraid of allowing Cason & Co.
to defend themselves? I hope not, for this will most
certainly raise even greater doubts than now exist,
and may be admission of the gravest fears.
Ernie Litz
Alligator Editor, Spring 1965,
and current graduate student

that I am entitled to submit an
opinion.
Karl R. Gildersleeve, 7AS
TO THE
GAINESVILLE SUN
Editor:
As you note on page one of the
31 March issue, Mr. Cason, Mr.
Moor, and Miss Cardozo have been
dismissed from the campus news newspaper
paper newspaper staff. The reasons given in involve
volve involve specific instances in which

the University City Photo ad on
page 19, and the Freeway ad on
page 20. And, of course, theres
the classifieds. A real fine effort.
By the way, new editors, have
you read the Gainesville Indepen Independent?
dent? Independent? Some very interesting
ideas .
Don Federman, 7AS

the Alligator coverage was ap apparently
parently apparently thought to be objection objectionable,
able, objectionable, such as editorialcomments
regarding the History Department,
(and) Vice President Robert Mautz
. . inaccuracy in reporting .
the dismissal of Gay Welborn .
harrassment of State Government
officials, etc. General criticisms
include failure of the students
responsible for the publication of
the Alligator to exercise and
'accept the responsibilities with
which they have been charged.
At this time there is some ques question
tion question as to whether or not these
reasons and criticisms are the
real ones for which the three stu students
dents students were fired.
A letter to the President re reprinted
printed reprinted on page five of the 30
March Alligator indicates that
Mr. Ed Ball, a Florida citizen,
was displeased with the rerun by
the campus paper of a St. Peters Petersburg
burg Petersburg Times editorial in which that
citizen was criticized. Whether
or not this is an instance of poli political
tical political interference in University
affairs is not at issue here. The
point is that for knowing of this
and other similar episodes the
community is not in a position to
dismiss the possibility that the
students were fired because under
them the Alligator was given o over
ver over to the legitimate reporting and
discussion of local and state-wide
issues in which the actions of the
University administration or State
Government officials and citizens
were questionable.

BOOTS
HATS Cl
SHIRTS U9V
JACKETS |flKr
Mens And
Womens irSBB WS jx
mm
At the Gainesville Livestock Market
5001 N.W. 13th St.

Tuesday, April 5, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

If this is so the community must
remember that even though the
three students are gone the follow following
ing following remain before the public
forum:
1. Shall the State Budget Com Commission
mission Commission control the disbursal of
funds to the State Universities?
Is there political interference with
the Universities?
2. Is the loss of faculty at the
University great enough to warrant
a close look at University posture
on such matters as academic free freedom?
dom? freedom?
3. Was the University adminis administration
tration administration justified in dismissing cer certain
tain certain faculty members?
4. Shall Haydon Burns continue
in his present position as Gover Governor
nor Governor of the State of Florida?
5. Is student freedom obstructed
by agents of the administration in
the University?
6. Is student government really
playing an effective role in meet meeting
ing meeting students needs?
7. Were the Board of Student
Publications and the President of
the University of Florida justified
in their dismissal of three Alli Alligator
gator Alligator staffers and may the opin opinions
ions opinions of student leaders betaken
by the President as a true assay
of student opinion in such matters?
It is up to future staff members
of The Florida Alligator to keep
this forum open. It is the respon responsibility
sibility responsibility of the community, The
Gainesville Sun included, to do
their job if these replacements fail.
Karl R. Gildersleeve, 7 AS

Page 5



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
1960, 50 x 10, 2bedroom TRAIL TRAILER.
ER. TRAILER. One bedroom now with built-in
desk and shelves. Front kitchen,
washing machine, A/C. Best offer,
must sell. 378-2776 after 6. (A (A---128-2t-p).
--128-2t-p). (A---128-2t-p).
1965 SUZUKI 50cc. 2,500 miles.
Blue, 4 speed, mint condition,
windshield. For quick sale, $lB5.
Ph. 376-9351 after 7 p.m. Phil,
Rm. 225. (A-128-2t-p).
650 BSA, lacquer paint, rolled and
pleated seal, new chrome fenders,
tires and tag. $425. Jim Fried Friedlander,
lander, Friedlander, 376-9872. (A-128-2t-p).
BRIDGESTONE SPORT 60 cycle,
1966, just like new with only 75
miles, only $265, call 378-4552
after 6 p.m. (A-128-2t-p).
STEREO LAFAVETTE, 24 watt
amp. Garrad changer, speaker
system. SIOO. Call Ron, 376-1871.
(A-128-2t-c).
TRAILER FOR SALE. 32 x B.
Ideal for married couple or va vacation
cation vacation home. $650. Call 372-3787
between 6 & 7 p.m. (A-128-2t-c).
1964 MERCURY I,OOOOUTBOARD
(100 hp). Good condition. Never
been in salt water. 376-4980. (A (A---128-2t-c).
--128-2t-c). (A---128-2t-c).
FRENCH PROVINCIAL bedroom
suite. 5-piece set, SIOO. Floral
pattern sofa with two matching
chairs, SSO. Call 378-2089 after 5.
(A-128-2t- nc).
10 x 46 TRAILER with washing
machine. SSOO equity. Assume pay payments
ments payments of $56.91 per month. Call
2-0384 after 5 p.m. week days,
anytime weekends. (A-128-2t-c).
HOUSE TRAILER, 8 x 30. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Archer Rd. Vil Village,
lage, Village, lot Chi 18. SBOO. 376-4409.
After 5:30 p.m. (A-128-2t-c).
1956 GENERAL TRAILER. 27x 8
with 25 x 8 cabana and awnings.
Very good condition. A real bar bargain
gain bargain for $950. Archer Rd. Trailer
Village, lot Beta 10. (A-127-3t-p).
WEDDING DRESS, complete with
all accessories. Very reasonable,
at once, call 378-4580 after sp.m.
(A-126-3t-p).
BRAND NEW ADMIRAL A/C,1500
BTU. $lB5. Call 372-6821 after 5
or 376-3211, ext. 5501 before4:3o.
(A-127-3t-c).
1963, 23 ADMIRAL CONSOLE
TV. Like new. $125. Call Charlie
Brown or Bill Macklem, 376-9328
or 376-9138. (A-127-3t-c).
LEAVING COUNTRY. Must sell
66 A-H SPRITE, 3,000 mi., 4 mo.
old. Above $1,400. Also 007 Attache
case with a stereo and 3 band
radio. $135. Call 378-1770. (A (A---1
--1- (A---1 st c).
NIKON BINOC microscope. 4 ob objectives,
jectives, objectives, 2 sets of oculars. S4OO.
Joe Onne, 376-3211 and page, or
376-4364 after 6. (A-l 26-4 t-c).
TSuperb, Mis
Magnificent!" y||||i DF I
I HIUISI
I APLUS COLOR HIT 1
I KIRK RICK/1 RP
I DOUGLAS HARRIS
THE HEROES
OFTELE/MARK

for sale
1965 HONDA 305 Super Hawk. Less
than 4,300 miles with luggage rack
and saddle bags. Call Bob Ellison
at 376-2320 or call 376-4995 and
leave message. Also have 4x5
Omega enlarger. #A-125-tf-c).
8* x 45*, Two Bedroom HOUSE
TRAILER. Call 376-9005 after
5:30 p.m., or see at Town and
Country Trailer Court, lot T-3.
(A-l 25-ts-c).
SPRING WARDROBE -- Sizes 8,
9, 10. Sportswear and cocktail
dresses. Specials on a 3-piece
Kimberley suit; Jeune Liegue
dress and White Stag bermudas.
376-5616. (A-121-ts-c).
1964, 54 x 10 ARMOR MOBILE
HOME. 2 bedroom, A/C, electric
kitchen, free lot rent for one yr.,
10 mins, from campus, small a amount
mount amount of equity. Take over pay payment
ment payment of $58.63 per month. 466-
3213, after 5. (A-124-st-c).
for rent
TWO BEDROOM A/C apt. with car carport
port carport and storage. SIOO/mo. Tel.
8-3712, 804 Depot Ave., 3 blocks
from Norman. (B-l 28-2 t-p).
BE HAPPY BE COOL. Yearly
rental. Student family preferred.
One and two bedroom mobile home.
S6O $75 mo., or will sell under
liberal terms. Shaded roof, cabana,
swimming and A/C. 2 miles from
campus. Also some part-time work
available. H. B. Williams, phone in
a.m. or after 6, 376-3322.(8-128-
2t-p).
.
ONLY $45 A MONTH for large one
bedroom apt. for Summer Term.
Furnished. Quiet area. Inquire up upstairs
stairs upstairs at 905 NW 12th Ave. (B (B---128-2t-p).
--128-2t-p). (B---128-2t-p).
AIR CONDITIONED, 3 bedroom
house near campus. Available May
Ist for Summer Tri. sllO per
month. Call Charlie Mayo, 376-
4664. (B-128-2t-c).
ONE BEDROOM furnished apt.
A/C, TV antenna, S9O a month
including water, 4401 SW 13th St.
378-3358. (B-128-2t-c).
FOR RENT Ist of May, 1964
2-bedroom mobile home. Ideal for
student. Call Mrs. Bryan after
5:30 at 466-3300. (B-128-2t-c).
MODERN A/C furnished house
trailer for student. Near campus.
S7O/mo. 376-8063. (B- 128-2 t-c).
rB
Jj -Hw Wgjga
1 tonite COLOR
THRU THUR £ T j 1
I Ttiinr 'ofan" HAvjy
IrlHSli*
I Mllflll DOROTHY
log., pn
#2"coTora^s3o
I m m& ms.
IWRIRf) Mcunp
I UWiWU DKMiUr
caecum
I NmXCMIa

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Page 6

'-i
for rent
c 3
RENT, LARGE COOL, 4 bedroom
modern home in quiet neighbor neighborhood
hood neighborhood for summer. 8 min. to cam campus.
pus. campus. Call 8-3337 after 4. SIOO
monthly. (B-128-2t-c).
THREE BEDROOM, 2 bath house.
Six min. from campus. Partially
furnished. Ideal for 3 or 4 students
for Summer and/or Fall. sllO,
maybe less. Call ?-8668. (B-128-
2t-c).
4 MAN APT. for rent close to
campus. A/C, $27.50 a month per
person or will sublease. Call 378-
2246. (B- 28-2 t-c).
TWO ROOM efficiency apt. $55 a
month or sls credit on rent for
light yard work (S4O). Call 2-8840
after 5:30 or on weekends. (B (B---128-2t-c).
--128-2t-c). (B---128-2t-c).
A/C ROOM, single occupancy,
coeds only. Share kitchen and
living area, washer, drier. $35 a
month. Call 2-8840 after 5:30 or
on weekends. (B- 28-2 t-c).
SUMMER STUDENTS (2). Apt. for
Summer Term. Colonial Manor.
slls per month, pool. Call 378-
4848 weekdays after 4 p.m. (B (B---128-2t-c).
--128-2t-c). (B---128-2t-c).
ROOM FOR RENT in private home
for mature male student for Spring
Trimester. Separate entrance, li linen
nen linen and maid service. 376-5360.
(B-121-ts-c).
[
SJ\ARKLING modern air condition conditioned
ed conditioned 2 bedroom furnished apartment.
Available April 26th. Reserve now.
No lease. SIOO for two, slls for
three. 3314 NW 21st St. 376-0894.
(B-129-lt-c).
COMPLETELY FURNISHED du duplex
plex duplex apt. Available for Spring Tri.
Neat, spacious, A/C, 2 BR, 3blocks
from campus. Compare at sllO
monthly (includes water). Call 376-
6482 after 5 p.m. or weekends.
(B-126-4t-p).
AVAILABLE MAY Ist. 1 apt. for
4 students, 2 blocks from campus.
Air conditioners, $l2O per student
for summer semester. 1918 NW
Ist Ave. Call 372-3572. (B-117-
lOt-c).
NICE COOL QUIET ROOM in pri private
vate private home. All modern conven conveniences.
iences. conveniences. Call 376-5368; 376-2100.
202 NW 12th Terr. (B-125-st-c).
| TUpfcow 375-2434 | f
<3 | Hill I
I ffly.iii I
MARA!
I EMM BARDOT I
I INK MOREAU I
I GEORGE HAMUON I

for rent
AVAILABLE NOW. 1 bedroom mo modern
dern modern A/C apt. Near Univ. and Med Medical
ical Medical Center. Adults only, no pets,
lease required. S9O. Ph. 372-3488
or 376-4360. (B-126-4t-c).
AVAILABLE APRIL Ist. 2 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, A/C house trailer. S7O per
month. Browns Trailer Park, lot
10. Ph. 378-2863. Mrs. Wrighter.
(B-l 264 t c).
QUIET CLEAN modern 3 bedroom
duplex, kitchen unfurnished. 5
miles from downtown. $75 a month.
Call 372-2648 or 376-5849. (B (B---126-4t-c).
--126-4t-c). (B---126-4t-c).
VILLAGE 34, SECOND EDITION.
Located near Univ. Golf Course.
328 SW 34th St. -24 new 1 bedroom
apt. units, furnished and air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Available April Ist. Rent
SIOO per month. See Resident Man Managers
agers Managers Apt. on premises after 5
p.m. Lou Schilling, apt. 10. Man Managed
aged Managed Ernest Tew Realty Inc. 376-
6461. (B-108-ts-c).
ATTRACTIVE ROOM in modern
home. Ideal for student who needs
a quiet, pleasant place to study.
372-7883. (B-123-ts-c).
AIR CONDITIONED APTS. For
Summer. Suitable for 2 or 3, $l3O $l3O-for
-for $l3O-for A or B Term. Suitable
for 3 or 4, SIBO per Term. Call
376-8990, 8 a.m.- 5p.m.,0r 7p.m.
- 10 p.m. Also renting for fall.
(B-l 15-ts-c).
COMFORTABLY FURNISHED one
bedroom duplex apt. Ideal for mar married
ried married couple. SBS a month includes
water. Available after exams. Call
372-7223. (B-124-3t-c).
FURNISHED APTS. Two bedroom
furnished apts. Available end of
April. Special low summer rates.
Right near campus. Suitable for
up to 4 students. Call Mrs. Jones,
376-5636. (B-120-ts-c).
THSC-TCes"
rare pjict of film or!"
2:30-4:30-6:30-8:30
-WE D.
BEST
FOREIGN FILM OF
THE YEAR!
£ MOf THE S

for rent
DOUBLE AND SINGLE ROOMS
for men for third trimester. Pri Private
vate Private entrance, private bath, re refrigerator,
frigerator, refrigerator, reasonable rate, 3
blocks from campus. Call 372-
8929 after 3 p.m. 327 NW 15th Terr.
(B- 125-st-c).
FURNISHED RENTALS. Ground
floor 2 rooms furnished, near main
library and Univ. P. 0., A/C and
refrigerators. And Duplex. 376-
6494. (B-127-3t-c).
FURNISHED APT., 1101 SW sth
Ave. 4 bedroom, 2 baths, very
clean, central A/C, 5 men or wo women.
men. women. Also have 1 bedroom apt.
Ph. 376-2892. (B-127-3t-c).
LARGE DIVIDED ROOM,-12 x 22,
private entrance and shower, utili utilities
ties utilities and linens included. Ph. 372-
3191 or 372-8903. (B-127-3t-c).
ROOM for male student all privi privileges
leges privileges in new home. Ph. 378-4774
after 6 p.m. or weekends. (B-127-
3t-c).
ONE BEDROOM split level apt.
Studio type, A/C, sublease for
Spring Tri. 1824 NW 3rd Place,
Apt. 22. 378-3584. (B- 26-3 t-c).
LARGE ONE BEDROOM modern
apt. Modern kitchen and furniture.
Suitable for 2 or 3 students. 4
blocks from campus. Very reason reasonably
ably reasonably priced. Call 372-9685 any anytime.
time. anytime. (B-l 27-3 t-c).
< T o'.r.(c( Uicat
(JJjp .RENTALS
llnturrjatiij
THE CENTER
ROCKING CHAIR TWIN
OPENING THURSDAY
Hayley Mills
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liiMiUiflfli 2:00-4:25
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COLUMBIA PICTURFS presents
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GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for rent
SUBLET APT., in Univ. Gardens
b6§innin? April 25th. Pool, A/C,
all electric kitchen, 2 BR, walk-in
closets. 376-1724 anytime. $155/
mo. (B-127-3t-p).
ROOM IN APT. Available immedi immediately
ately immediately for Summer Tri. Call Sheri
at 378-1161. (B-127-3t-p).
TWO BEDROOM HOUSE available
Summer Tri. 3 miles from campus.
slls per month. 4 males or 3 fe females.
males. females. Quiet, ideal for studying.
378-4371. (B-128-2t-c).
wanted
WANTED: One male roommate for
Summer Trimester. Furnished, 2
bedroom, A/C apt. 2 blocks from
Law School. Call 372-0854. (C (C---1
--1- (C---1 <
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT. Coun Counsellors
sellors Counsellors wranglers wanted for
large Eastern Boys Ranch. Horse Horsemanship
manship Horsemanship required. Work with boys
age 8-16. For more information,
378-4840 during week. (C-117-
lOt-c).
-
FEMALE WANTED to share home.
Must have own transportation. S4O
a month. Call 372-7186. (C-l 24-
Bt-c).
WANTED: Riders to Chicago area.
10 a.m. Friday, April 2 nd.
Straight through, S2O. Call Emil
at 1034 Hume, 372-9464. (C-127-
3t-p).
-
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share Colonial Manor Apt. dur during
ing during A term. Call Barbara at 378-
4505. (C-127-3t-c).
2 SENIORS want one male room roommate
mate roommate Summer or B Term only.
A/C, 1/2 block off campus, car carpeting.
peting. carpeting. $37 plus utilities. 376-8159.
(C-127-2t-c).
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES to
share two bedroom apt. for Spring
Trimester. 4 blocks from campus,
A/C. $29 per month. Call 378-3132.
(C-124 stp).
MALE ROOMMATE to share 2 bed bedroom
room bedroom apt. 3 blocks from campus.
Call 378-3582. (C-126-3t-c).
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE (S)
or will sublease Danish Modern
Wood-paneled apt. for summer tri.
Near shopping center, A/C, patio.
Call 376-1463. (C-127-3t-c).
WANTED DRAPERIES sales per person
son person part-time, full time or com commission
mission commission work. Top salary. 109 W.
Univ. Ave. Gilbergs Fabrics. (C (C---1
--1- (C---1 3t-c).
WANT TO BUY student desk, chair
and bookcase. Call 378-4774 after
6 P.m. or weekends. (C-127-3t-c).
PROFESSOR WANTS good furnish furnished
ed furnished but unequipped 8' x 40 mobile
home for beach house. Send note to
1015 NW 3rd Ave. (C-127-3t-c).
ROOMMATE (S) to share luxurious
brand new?bedroom apt. in Village
Park with senior and law student
beginning Summer Tri. Completely
carpeted and A/C, swimming pool.
Call 378-3335 after 7p.m.(C-127-
3t-c).
WANTED: Riders to New Orleans
who are interested in working
there during Summer months. Call
376-5826; ask for Steve. (C-127-
tf-nc).

wanted
MALE ROOMMATE (2) for French
Quarter starting Sept. Luxury 2
story apt. living, furnished, 2 miles
from campus. Call Bob, 376-4776.
(Cl2B2tp).
FEMALE ROOMMATE for A Term
to share two bedroom apt. at Vil Village
lage Village Park with balcony overlooking
pool. s4oper month. Call 378-3752.
(C-128-2t-nc).
THREE MALE ROOMMATES to
share 2 bedroom Univ. Gardens
apt. during Fall and Winter Tri Trimesters.
mesters. Trimesters. Call Jack Vaughn, 372-
9111. (C-128-2t-p).
RIDER TO CONNECTICUT. Leav Leaving
ing Leaving the 23rd. Driving experience
necessary. Call Tom at 376-9209.
(C-128-2t-p).
WANTED 2 female roommates for
Rummer. Large, comfortable 2
apt., Bth Ave. Rent $25
a month. Ph, 376-0523. (C-128-
2t-c).
ROOMMATE WANTED for Sum Summer
mer Summer Session, male. Preferrably
over 21. Large apt: Large living
room, kitchen, bathroom, private
bedroom. $35. Come check or call
372-6614. Youll like. 301 NW 2nd
St. (C-128-2t-c).
FOURTH FEMALE to share a Vil Village
lage Village Park, 2 bedroom apt. now
through Spring Tri. with terrace
that overlooks pool. S4O monthly monthlyplus
plus monthlyplus utilities. 8-3065. (C-128-
2t-c).
NEED TWO RIDERS to Pompano.
Leave Friday morning at 12. 378-
4013. (C-128-lt-c).
TWO MALE ROOMATES for
Summer Tri. 3 bedroom, A/C,
furnished, private lot. $37.50,
share utilities. Call 378-2157. (C (C---128-2t-c).
--128-2t-c). (C---128-2t-c).
WANTED: A roommate for Colon Colonial
ial Colonial Manor starting in the Fall.
Call David, 378-4973. (C-128-
2t-nc).
ONE OR TWO FEMALE room roommates
mates roommates for Spring Tri. 2 bedroom,
A/C, brick apt. 2 blocks from
campus. $32.50 each. 372-5617.
(C-128-2t-c).
help wanted
MEN OR WOMEN STUDENTS.
Apply now for part time employ employment
ment employment A and B Terms. Longs Cafe Cafeteria.
teria. Cafeteria. (E-128-2t-p).
WANTED Mimeo-Duplicator
Operator. 15-20 hrs. per week.
Apply Rm. 108 Fla. Union. Start
Today. (E-128-2t-c).
THING Oriented? No. People
Oriented? Si! National recruiter
for the YWCA will be on campus
Thurs., April 7th for interviews.
Contact Placement Office, Bldg. H.
Ext. 2351 for appointment. (E-128-
2t-c).
WAITER WANTED. Must be 21.
No experience necessary. Ph. 376-
9335, from 9-12a.m.(E- 24-ts-c).
FULLER BRUSH CO. needs stu student
dent student representative in Diamond
Village, Flavet HI and Schucht.
Can be worked in off hrs. with
average of $2.00 per hr. in earn earnings.
ings. earnings. Also need part or full time
help for other areas of Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. Write to H. Silver, 1028
Clearwater Dr., Daytona Beach,
Fla. (E-l 17-ts-c).

Tuesday, April 5, The Florida Alligator,

help wanted
MAN AND WIFE student to oper operate
ate operate popular motel for the month of
May 1966. Motel experience neces necessary.
sary. necessary. Call 376-4667 for interview.
(E-125-ts-c).
_i m
MALE HELP WANTED. Beef boner
needed. Part or fulltime. Apply at
McCallum JVholesale, 504 NW Bth
Ave. (E-125-st-c).
WAITRESS WANTED. Must be 21.
Work 3 hr. lunch shift. See Mrs.
Druash. Apply Schooner Room,
1222 W. Univ. Ave. (E-119-st-c).
CONTROLLER. Men to train for
controller assignments which offer
excellent opportunity for those
qualified. Age 25-38. College edu education,
cation, education, major in Business Admin,
or accounting. Experience would
be advantageous, but not absolute absolutely
ly absolutely essential. Many outstanding em employee
ployee employee benefits. Apply Personne 1
Dept., Sears, Roebuck and Co.,
1420 NW 23rd Blvd. (E-126-4t-c).
NEED EXTRA CASH? Local com company
pany company needs several students or
faculty members who would like
to earn from SSO to SIOO per week
part time.Call372-7811,9-10a.m.
for further information. (E-124-
ts-c).
RECENT COLLEGE GRAD with
background in Biology and exper experimental
imental experimental Psychology seeks perma permanent
nent permanent position. Call 372-2165. (E (E---124-4t-c).
--124-4t-c). (E---124-4t-c).
autos

1959 T-BIRD in top condition. $750
or S3OO and take over payments.
Call 378-2888 days and 372-5067
after 5:30. (G-127-3t-c).

BE OUT IN FRONT
* Ijl I
OF THINGS...
e ;
Ge£ wiffc tae winner The Florida Alligator.
It comes in first every time with all the action
each morning in pictures, stories, and adver advertisements
tisements advertisements all served to a winning audience that
knows how to read and react . and how to
patronize the many advertisers who make it
all possible


Page 7

autos
1959 FORD, 2 door, 6 cyl., stick
shift. Rebuilt motor in 1965, radio
and heater. Reasonably priced.
Call 376-7878 between 8-5. (G (G---127-3t-c).
--127-3t-c). (G---127-3t-c).
1964 ENGLISH FORD. New battery,
5 new recaps, 1966 license plate,
in very good condition. S9OO. Diane
Walser, 372-9394. (G-126-3t-p).
1959 PEUGEOT 403' Good tires,
clean inside and out. $125 or best,
offer. Call 372-6230.(G-l 27-2 t-p).
1958 CHEVROLET, Biscayne, V-8,
good mechanical condition, $325.
Call 376-9039. (G-127-3t-p).
- -*
1964 BLUE MG-MIDGET. Radio
and heater, luggage rack. Call
376-3561. (G-123-ts-c).
trade
WANT TO TRADE new Admiral
A/C. 1500 BTU. Used 15 days; for
working used refrigerator and
washing machine. Call 372-6821
after 5 or 376-3211, ext. 5501 be before
fore before 4:30. (D-127-3t-c).
personal
WILL THE GIRL who saw a red
and green object in the sky Satur Saturday
day Saturday night in the Plaza of the Amer Amercas
cas Amercas please call 6-2896. (Jl2B (Jl2Blost-found
lost-found
LOST One pair of ladies glasses
in white case from Beckums Op Opticians.
ticians. Opticians. Lost Saturday night be between
tween between McCarty Hall and the Gym.
Phone 372-0581. (L-128-2t-nc).

lost-found
<0
LOST Beige All Stater" wo woman's
man's woman's raincoat in main cafeteria.
Great value. Call Judith Bunce,
Rm. 2240 Jennings, 2-1421. Re Reward
ward Reward offered. (L-128-2t-p).
FOUND Radio. Owner may claim
by stating area lost and describing.
Must pay for this ad. 372-5166 af after
ter after 6 p.m. (L-128-2t-p).
FOUND One pair of green con contact
tact contact lens in white Medical Center
case. Found in parking lot by Bldg.
I. Contact Sue-Ann Murray, 372-
9142. (L-128-lt-p).
LOST Miami Jackson Ring,
1962. Initial R. T. Near Village
Park pool. Call 2-3047. Reward.
(L-128-2t-p).
LOST Brown wallet, second floor
of Main Library. Important ID's
and other documents. Reward.
Contact E. Rodriguez, 376-9229.
(L-127-2t-p).
services
IN A HURRY? Passport and appli application
cation application photos. Call Westley, Roo Roosevelt
sevelt Roosevelt Studios. 372-0300. (M-128-
2t-c).
WEE FOLKS NURSERY SCHOOL.
Two locations to serve you. 616
NW 9th Ave. uptown, phone
372-4525 and 2706 SW 34th St.
near Archer Rd. and Medical Cen Center,
ter, Center, phone 372-5466. By hour, day,
week or month. (M-124-Bt-c).
NOW OPENING. Teddy Bear
Nursery. 3 departments, com completed
pleted completed infant dept. Planned
program for children over 3.
Central heating and air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Ph. 376-0917. 1214-1/2
NW 4th St. (M-116-ts-c).



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday. April 5. 1966

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FBK INITIATES HONORARY MEMBERS

Eight honorary members of UFs Blue Key student
leadership society were initiated here Thursday
evening at the groups annual initiation banquet.
From left are Dr. Frederick Hartmann, professor
of political science and director of the Institute of
International Relations; athletic director and head
football coach Ray Graves; Chip Block, president of
Blue Key; Harvey Pierce, consulting engineer from

New Bill To Cause Problems?

By KEN WILSON
Alligator Staff Writer
Since the end of the Korean
conflict, 3.5 million men have been
discharged from the United States
Armed Services and are eligible
to receive educational benefits un under
der under the new G. I. Bill. Os that
total, 4 per cent or 140,000 live in
Florida.
Miss Ann Jones, UF assistant
registrar, said the information
given by the Veterans Administra Administration
tion Administration didnt include any projections
about increased college enroll enrollment.
ment. enrollment.
She likened the situation to sit sitting
ting sitting on a keg of dynamite.
According to Miss Jones, there
has been no preparation to accom accommodate
modate accommodate a drastic increase in en enrollment.
rollment. enrollment.
Easily available money during
the past few years may have
.acted like preventive medicine.
Miss Jones said she felt that
many ex-service men were able
to get enough money to attend
college without aid of a G. I.
Bill. She noted that loans and
scholarships had been plentiful
recently.

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When families seek you out for their second move, you must have
handled their first move right. C All IED #
Why not let the big experience of Allied Van Lines, the worlds \ <- m
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1040 S. MAIN PHONE 376-2666

As reason for her opinion, Miss
Jones cited the fact that few let letters
ters letters had been received by her of office
fice office concerning the new bill.
Dr. Harold C. Riker, director
of housing for the university, said
he felt there was a distinct differ difference
ence difference between the situation right
after World War n and now.
He said that after World War

s
ACT NOWLIMITED QUANTITY
ONLY 14 LEFT OUT OF 93
FOR SALE F^ L PR \ CE
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MOVING p. o. 14491 Univ. Station
378-2151 Sales Office 13th Street & S.W. Bth Ave.
V \

Coral Gables; State Senator Ed Price, Bradenton;
James Wilson, past president of the Universitys
Alumni Association, Lake City; UF President J.
Wayne Reitz and Dr. Tony Cunha, chairman of the
Department of Animal Sciences.
Initiates not present were William Cross, assis assistant
tant assistant dean of men and Dr. Herbert Kaufmann, pro professor
fessor professor of ophthalmology in the College of Medicine.

II a great many men were dis discharged
charged discharged at one time who had noth nothing
ing nothing else to do but go to school.
Many of the men affected by
the new bill have already attended
school, are doing so now, or are
settled in jobs, he conjectured.
Dr. Riker said each university
would be effected differently and
would have to play it by ear.

Turlington Seeks
Speakership

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI)
State Reps. Robert Mann of Tampa
and Ralph Turlington of Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville announced Monday they will
go after the 1967 House speaker speakership,
ship, speakership, vacated by the untimely auto automobile
mobile automobile death of George Stone.
Rep. Fred Schultz of Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, a potential third candidate,
was reported by his wife to be
traveling. Mrs. Schultz said her
husband will make a statement
Tuesday about his plans.
Presiding over the first dras drastically
tically drastically reapportioned House ses session
sion session will be no easy job, veteran
members agree. It will have the
most freshman in Florida histroy
and will represent the first
modern-day session with urban re representatives
presentatives representatives in full control over
decades of rural domination.
Stone, who was killed in Pen Pensacola
sacola Pensacola Friday in an automobile
crash, had been selected by his
colleagues a year ago to be speak speaker
er speaker for the 1967 session and already
begun organization work.
Under the original time-tables
Mann and Schultz had already be begun
gun begun campaigns to nail down the
1969 speakership.
Turlington, although topping
both in legislative seniority, has
never actively sought the office,
third most powerful in state
government being second-in-line
for succession to the governor governorship.
ship. governorship.

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4 PIECES OF GOLDEN FRIED A
CHICKEN PLUS A LARGE L% \M V
ORDER OF FRENCH FRIES AND W f
ROLL .
RED,
jm a 'Ehm
1 2029 N.W. 13th STREET

But he said Monday he feels
that at a time like this, his long
experience would be valuable.

HULLS
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& Supply
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Foreign Cars.
* 10,000-Mile or
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* Expertly Trained
Mechanics Here
To Serve You.
Member of
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Owners of America, Inc.
1314 S. Main St.
PH. 372-1497



I SPECIAL! MONDAY & TUESDAY ONLY!
I Rea. SI. IO Box Dinner
COMPLETE DINNER IN A \
CLUDES: 3 pieces of £ / \
I CHickcn, French Fries, Colc^p^K
1 Slow or Grnvy ond Poll s ST". 'lJTxI
NO SUBSTITUTIONS.
| COL. SANDERS \
I AVAILABLE AT V"*"
So Testy
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| 214 N.W. 13th St. 207 N.E. 16th Ave.
I Phone 376-6472 Phone 378-2959
111
I Dont Waste Another I
Summer! |
B ** H 9
I Learn to fly at I
CASSELS IN THE AIR I
at the Municipal Airport I
SPECIAL $5 INTRODUCTORY I
FLIGHT LESSON TO SHOW I
YOU HOW EASY IT IS I
I TO DRIVE THROUGH THE SKY I
Special Summer Discounts
Available NOW
CASSELS IN THE AIR
jIWT GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL AIRPORT
WALDO ROAD

PAY NO RENT
j B
Registering For 111-A But Not For 111-B K I
Returning., In September? I
Move In For 111-A, Move Out For 111-B But I
Leave Your Gear, Then Come Back In September I
PAY NO RENT
While Youre Gone In July And August I
PLUS Special Summer Rates During A-Term I
nmm
FOR INFORMATION, CALL 376-6720

t'.'.t'* 11
gQj| q |j w- r-o*
Construction Begun On New DX House

Joining the many areas of con construction
struction construction around campus, Six Fra Fraternity
ternity Fraternity Row was the site of a
groundbreaking ceremony for the
new Delta Chi Fraternity house
last Su r day.

GRAND
OPENING!
Thuis. In, -Xi 1
SURPRISES
NW Of;', St Nt I 6th AVO

After dedication ceremonies by
Dr. Delton Scudder of the Depart Department
ment Department of Religion, the shovel split
the land with a large group of
Delta Chi members and friends
looking on.
The modern white brick house,
designed by Michael Adams of
Gainesville, will be split level to
XEROX COPIES
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SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
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Tuesday, April 5, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

fit the sloping land. Norwood Hope
is the contractor.
The plans for the house include
a recreational living room for
parties and a two-level formal liv living
ing living room. The upper floating deck
will have a fire place and a color
TV-stero console.
One of the main features of the
house is the 75 man dining room.
This room will open to a split
level terrace.
The house, designed to sleep 40
men, will have 20 bedrooms con containing
taining containing built-in desks, closets and
beds. Present plans feature deck
beds above the desks for maximum
room space.
The upstairs \yill also include
a chapter room and library. Cen Central
tral Central air conditioning and heating
will be built into the new home.

Page 9



Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 5, 1966

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PREMIERE PERFORMANCE

The combined University Choir, Choral Union and
Symphony Orchestra were on stage in the University
Auditorium Sunday afternoon for the premiere per performance
formance performance of Moses In the Desert, and oratorio
by Didier Graeffe, humanities professor. Dr. Graeffe
composed the music and also wrote the text of

TOP STUDENT LEADERS
Miss Lundquist, Hauser Selected

By EUNICE TALL
Alligator Staff Writer
Kay Lundquist and Jim Hauser
were named the 1965-66s Student
Leaders of the Year recently at
the annual Student Leaders Ban Banquet
quet Banquet at the Hub.
The coveted awards, presented
by Dean of Student Affairs Lester
Hale, were the highlight of the
banquet sponsored by the Gator
Gras committee. Gainesville re representative
presentative representative Ralph Turlington was
the guest speaker.
In naming the outstanding stu students,

UF Delegates Seek
Arnold Air Headquarters

By JOHN PHIFER
Alligator Staff Writer
If you wanted to move national
headquarters of Arnold Air Society
(Air Force ROTC honorary) to the
UF, how would you do it?
Alan Wright, UF Arnold Air
Society Commander, plans to do
just that when he and 13 other
members are attending the so societys
cietys societys national conclave in Dallas,
Texas, April 3-7. With the bid for
national headquarters, the UF so society
ciety society will push Miami for the next
site of the conclave.
Wright said that all societies in
the Southeast have already pro promised
mised promised their support for the Miami
site. Free orange juice, brochures,
and a color slide presentation will
be used to help sell the Florida
site to the convention.

Shoe Repair Shop!
I HEELS ATTACHED I
I 5 MINS. I
I SOLES ATTACHED I
I 15 MINS. I
I At 2 Locations I
I CAROLYN PLAZA I
I FR 6-0315 I
I 101 N. Main St. I
I Opp. Ist Nat'l Bank I

dents, students, Dean Hale reviewed their
many achievements at the UF:
Miss Lundquist, he said, was
president of the Womens Stu Stuf
f Stuf 5fH
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flnwk If |||||j||Bp%; ;wtv. ijM|
aB 4 |g|gra& ilk wHi
LUNDQUIST HAUSER

Five coeds from Angel Flight
(Arnold Air Society auxiliary) in
Dallas are Joyce Schwartz, Angel
Flight commander; Nancy Calhoun,
executive officer; K. C. Jackson,
Marilyn Harrie and Gunilla
Empthen, a foreign exchange stu student
dent student from Sweden.
UF Arnold Air Society members
are Alan Wright, society comman commander;
der; commander; Jim Simmins, commander commanderelect;
elect; commanderelect; Alan Brown, Bill White, Bob
Gomez, Rick Thompson, Chuck
Heltsley, Bob Kranc and Bob
Crouch. Student Government is
paying part of the expenses while
the Air Fnrce is providing trans transportation.
portation. transportation.

BARBECUE!
v) PORK cn
BASKET W*
J With French Fries, Cole J
Slaw, and Toasted Bun.
special 7Q a 4IP,
\ Secularly/ £ \m cJLrd'
TODAY ONLY //TP I

which there were more than 95 separate musical
numbers. Following the two-hour performance a re reception
ception reception was held in the Florida Unions Bryan Lounge.
Soloists were Guy B. Webb, Lenore Bierbaum, C.
Durward McDonell, Mrs. Geraldine Graham, and
Gerald Langford. Edward Troupin conducted.

dents Association, former WSA
sophomore and junior representa representatives,
tives, representatives, cheerleader, orientation
group leader, undersecretary of
womens affairs in Student Govern Government,
ment, Government, member of Alpha Lambda
Delta (freshman honorary) and
Alpha Epsilon Delta (pre-med hon honorary)
orary) honorary) Legislative Council, Little
Sister of the Laurel, member of
Mortar Board, the Student Affairs
Committee, co-chairman of the
homecoming judges committee,
and vice president of Chi Omega
sorority.
A resident of Pensacola, Miss
Lundquist is a chemistry and pre premed
med premed major.
Dean Hale said Jim Hauser also
displayed an impressive list of
qualifications: president of Inter
Fraternity Council, former secre secretary
tary secretary of IFC, vice president, chap chaplain
lain chaplain and pledge class president
of Pi Lambda Phi fraternity, assis assistant
tant assistant technical director and staff
coordinator of orientation, Gator
Growl skit coordinator, Florida
Blue Key member, recipient of the
outstanding member of Legislative
Council, chairman of the off offcampus
campus offcampus housing and budget com committees
mittees committees in Legislative Council.
Hauser, a resident of Miami Beach,
has maintained a B average and
will graduate in April from the
College of Business. He will at attend
tend attend the UF Law School in Sep September.
tember. September.
Both students are members of
the UF Hall of Fame and Whos
Who in American Colleges and
Universities.

Jews Celebrate
Passover Holiday

Some 70(5,000 Jewish families
Monday night began observing the
Seder, a feast marking the start
of Passover.
Sitting at festive tables, they
poised the traditional Passover
question, "Why is this night dif different
ferent different from all other nights?"
The answer is supplied by read reading
ing reading the Haggadah containing the
story of the deliverance of the
Isrealites from bondage in Egypt
30 centuries ago.
Thousands of tourists come to
Israel for the Passover, while
many Israelis take time out at the
countrys numerous sanatoria,
rest homes and hotels.
Central feature of the Passover
is the matzoh-an unleavened flat
cake representing the hastily pro provided
vided provided bread the ancient Israelites
ate upon fleeing Egyptian bondage.
Matzohs alone will be eaten for
bread until the end of the Passover.
Set on the Seder tables Monday
night along with the matzohs were
a roast egg to recall the ancient

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GROUP THREE
PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISMENT
See Whats ew 1
The Browse Shop I
HELP! I'M A PRISONER I
IN A CHINESE BAKERY ..Alan King I
MY FAIR LADY Alan J. Lerner I
A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN Betty Smith I

SECRETS OF THE HEART .Kahil Gibran I
BOOKS THAT I
CHANGED THE WORLD Robert Downs I
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS V I
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THE CAMP FOLLOWERS GUIDE .... Niles Chignon I
QUANTUM THEORY I
PHOTOCHEMISTRY Pins I
MODERN DIGITAL COMPUTERS Skiko I
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M I
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 I
Compos Shop t Bookstore |

temple sacrifice, a roast lamb bone
to recall the sacrifice of the Pas Paschal
chal Paschal lamb on- the eve of the flight
from Egypt, bitter herbs to recall
the tears of Jewish mothers when
the Egyptians took their sons from
them, and charoses, a mixture of
apples, almonds, spices and wine,
to recall the mortar and bricks
the enslaved Jews made for the
pharoahs.
The Haggadah has been read at
the feast tables each year since
Moses led the tribes of Israel
across the Red Sea and into the
Promised Land.
Apply Now
If you are an undergraduate wo woman
man woman with a 2.5 overall average you
are qualified to receive a Pan Panhellenic
hellenic Panhellenic Scholarship for the fall and
winter trimester. Applications for
the 1966-67 scholarships are now
available in the Dean of Womens
office, 123 Tigert Hall.



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14

flj 4 f j
NO. 100 FOR BOOTERS
UF Soccer Club Coach Alan Moore is pictured here with the clubs
defensive ace Sami Shaya and offensive star Mario Level, after the
Club won the St. Petersburg Soccer championships last weekend. The
tourney win also marked the clubs 100th all-time victory.

Todays Sports Parade
By Milt Richman
UPI Sports Writer

AUGUSTA, Ga. (UPI) Frankly, Im beginning to wonder whether
anyone can win it.
Not the Masters, the pennants, I mean.
Every manager you talk to has some kind of problem or other
designed to place his club in the doubtful class and the more you
listen to the managers, the less you know about whos going to wind
up in the world series.
It wont be a nickel World Series, thats for sure, because inflation
has taken care of that. What I look for next fall is an $18.74 series.
That's the economy fare between Cincinnati and Cleveland and that
also happens to be my guarded pennant prediction.
Ive checked this out rather carefully with the Cincinnati people and
they say, fine, just make sure Cleveland shows up. Then I begin won wondering
dering wondering whether the Reds will.
GOOD BALANCE
Cincinnati and Cleveland are my choices for essentially the same
reason. I like their combination of pitching, hitting and speed, with
special emphasis on the pitching. Heres the way I think theyll finish:
American League: 1. Cleveland. 2. Detroit. 3. Minnesota.
4. Baltimore. 5. Chicago. 6. New York. 7. Washington. 8. Cal California.
ifornia. California. 9. Boston. 10. Kansas City.
National League: 1. Cincinnati. 2. Los Angeles. 3. San Fran Francisco.
cisco. Francisco. 4. Atlanta. 5. Pittsburgh. 6. Philadelphia. 7. St. Louis.
8. Houston. 9. Chicago. 10. New York.
No doubt the Reds will miss Frank Robinson, but Milt Pappas, Jack
Baldschun and rookie Tommy Helms should more than make up the
difference and where else have you ever seen a pitching staff which
starts with Jim Maloney, Sammy Ellis, Pappas, Jim OToole, Joe
Nuxhall and Joey Jay?
Now that Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdale have decided to play ball
with the boys, the Dodgers look 75 per cent better than they did a
week ago. I dont like their hitting, but then no one did last year, either.
Watch a kid right-hander named Don Sutton. He was the best young
pitcher I saw in Florida.
PITCHING PROBLEMS
The Giants and Braves miss getting the call because of their pitch pitching.
ing. pitching. The Braves can kill you with their bats, the only hitch being they
have to get the other side out, too.
Pittsburgh shapes up as the N.L. darkhorse and could cross the
wire first if some of the young pitchers turn out as good as advertised.
Even with Bill White added, something is missing in Philadelphia and
St. Louis may be a contender again in a couple of years, but not this
one.
Houstons hard-throwing kids should move the Astros up a notch
from last year. As for the Cubs, Leo Durocher knows all about
managing but he cant pitch.
The Mets have improved tremendously on offense and its too bad
they have no pitching. Wes Westrum is shooting to get them out of last
place. Thats like shooting for the moon.
Over in the American League, Cleveland would seem to have the
necessary pitching with such good-looking youngsters as Sam McDow McDowell,
ell, McDowell, Sonny Siebert and Steve Hargan plus ample hitting with Rocky
Colavito, Leon Wagner, Fred Whitfield, Chuck Hinton and Max Alvis.
They claim the Indians usually roll over and die if theyre in con contention
tention contention during August but I dont think theyll fold this time.
TIGER CHANCE
Detroits front-line pitching is of pennant caliber. The relievers
are another story, though. Still, if anyone can straighten out a pitching
staff, Charlie Dressen can. This could be the Tigers year.
If the Twins dont get the same kind of pitching they did last year,
they could be in trouble. Theyre still not sure about second base and
need someone to back up catcher Earl Battey.
Baltimore's pitching was once the cream of the league. It looks a
little curdled now.
Eddie Stanky could use a few more bats with the White Sox and the
Yankees dont look that much different than they did last year. Whos>
gonna do the pitching if Jim Bouton and A1 Downing cant?
Look for the Senators to move up, chiefly because they all break
their necks for Gil Hodges. A new ball park wont help the Angels
that much and although the Red Sox have some find looking kids, they
keep wandering off in all directions.
Then you take the As, and if you cant say something good about
someone, dont say anything.
teP/0
ESJotL. to ALL STUDENTS and UNIVERSITY
tefl PERSONNEL
LUNCH
CAFETERIA
1212 N. Main St " LE
(4 minutes from campus) CENTER)

Tuesday, April 5, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Tlxe Florida. Alligator

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Page 12

Enthusiam Is Part
Os Neelys Game
By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writer
Florida frosh netter Armistead (Armi) Neely went home Friday to
Tampa and Davis Island Tennis courts where he began his career a
decade ago. The homecoming wasnt too sweet, however, with Neely
losing in singles to Fritz Schunk, 9-11, 6-3, 6-4. The backbone of the
Baby Gators did not let this loss discourage him and led the team in
a win Saturday in St. Petersburg against the local club.
Neely, 19, has come up the ranks of tournament tennis, winning the
National Invitational (16 and under), the Canadian National Open and
the Florida State High School championship within recent years. He
was the recipient of the Stowe Award for sportsmanship at The
Nationals in 1964.
Neely has taken top honors in the Florida Yacht Club Invitational
(Jacksonville) and the Junior Dixie Invitational (Tampa), and has par participated
ticipated participated in the Orange, Sugar and Gator Bowl tournaments.

Presently, he ranks sixth na nationally
tionally nationally in 18 and under competi competition
tion competition and was number two nationally
while playing in the 16 and under
bracket.
The talented netter has been
playing in nationwide tourneys
since the age of 12 and has been
on the national junior circuit since
he was 14, playing throughout the
United States, Canada and Mexico.
While in high school, Neely played
for Henry B. Plant High (Tampa)
and was captain his senior year.
Officially graduating from junior
competition this year, Neely cap captured
tured captured the National Junior Indoor
Tennis crown in St. Louis over
Thanksgiving.
-t
n
Neely
He has been a member of the
Junior Davis Cup team for two
years and has represented this
country in international matches
in both Canada and Mexico. In
1964, Neely was one of six players
on the U. S. team which finished
second to Mexico and last year was
one of two players from the U. S.
to participate in a similar event
in Mexico.
On campus, Neely is a pledge of
Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity and
anticipates a career in law. Cur Currently
rently Currently maintaining a 2.7 average,
he chose this school because of its
proximity to home, and its great
enthusiasm for spring sports.
This enthusiasm is part of Flor Florida's
ida's Florida's number one freshman player,
who will again join the national tour
this summer before returning to
UF in the fall to be a Gator varsity
Better.
TSAIS'
Fidelity Unitm Life Insurance Co.

SPORTS

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I Heres what ROtC training and an officers commission will do for you:
It will qualify you to fulfill your military obligation as an officer.
You will learn to organize, motivate, and lead others.
You will develop leadership qualities that many college men miss self-discipline,
physical stamina, poise, bearing, the acceptance of responsibility and other qualities
that contribute to success in either a civilian or military career.
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age mileage for summer training.
The training and experience you will receive through Army ROTC will pay off for the
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You owe it to yourself to investigate this new important opportunity.
For complete information on the new Two-Year Army ROTC Program see the Professor
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IF YOU ARE 6000 EMOU6H TO BE A LEADER, DORT SETTLE FOR LESS!

6 Mobile 9 Agile And Hostile

808

In order to win in 1966, the Gators will have
to be, in the words of Florida A& M coach Jake
Gaither, mobile, agile and hostile.
The Gators lack the beef they have had in
previous campaigns, both offensively and de defensively.
fensively. defensively. To be a winner, the Gators will have
to be more in the mold of Bear Bryants Ala Alabama
bama Alabama teams light and fast, sacrificing size
for speed.
Gone from the Gators are such behemoths as
Larry Gagner, Barry Brown, Randy Jackson,
Mike Waxman, Ron Purcell, Lynn Mathews,
Larry Beckman and John Whatley.
Also gone are defensive aces Bruce Bennett
and Alan Trammell. Larry Rentz may take
Bennetts place, but right now Tom Hungerbuh Hungerbuhler,
ler, Hungerbuhler, Bobby Downs, and Bobby Adams look like
they can do a solid job in the secondary.
When you lose Charlie Casey, everybodys
All-America, youre hurting, no matter who
you may have. However, the Gators corps of
receivers should be pretty strong next year,
with Paul Ewaiasen, Richard Trapp and Larry
Smith as targets for Steve Spurriers aerial
bullets.

Menaker
SPOR TS EDITOR

In the backfield, the Gators look pretty strong.
They lost Jack Harper and Alan Poe from the
starting backfield, but the backfield looks like
the strongest spot in the Gators* armour.
Spurrier should be ready in September, de despite
spite despite an apparent dislike for spring practice.
He will be backed up by Kay Stephenson and
Larry Rentz, and thats pretty good insurance
for any football team.
Larry Smith, Harmon Wages, Wayne Barfield,
Tommy Glenn, Tommy Christian, and Marquis
Baeszler offer Ray Graves quite a potpourri
from which to pluck his starting backfield, and
its hard to tell who will start in the fall.
The Gators toughest opponents will be North
Carolina State, Miami, Auburn, Georgia and LSU.
Charlie Tate should field the best Hurricane
team in several years, and the Gators have to
play LSU at Baton Rouge, always a tough game.
Despite a rough schedule, the Gators will come
out 8-2, losing only to an upstart Miami team and
underdog North Carolina State, a team that came
on real strong towards the end of last year.