Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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/T WAS HIS NIGHT...
Bob Hope told intimacies about Gainesville and the UF thought
not known by outsiders in his Arnold Air Society benefit show
for Dollars for Scholars. (Alligator Staff Photo by Nick Arroyo.)
See pages 10 and 11 for more pictures of the Bob Hope Show.
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GOLDEN SPOKE HERE
Harry Golden, noted author and editor of the Carolina Israelite,
L in University Auditorium at 8 p.m. Friday night. Golden has
been 6 proclaimed the gadfly of the South for his thought-proyoking
Deen piuv-i roncerning the racial issues.
ToflCtofroverage of Goldens speech, see page 16 of
todays paper. (Alligator Staff 1-ho.o by Nick Arroyo.)

The Florida
Alligator

Vol. 58, No. 127

Hope Hits Hot Issues
In Floridas 'Garage

By 808 MENAKER
Alligator Staff Writer
My kind of town, Gainesville
is my kind of town, sang Bob
Hope Saturday night in Florida
Gym.
Its debatable whether Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville is Bob Hopes kind of town,
but Saturday the audience was all
his.
Approximately 8,000 persons
jammed Florida Gym to see the
world famous comedian and three
other acts. Hope, honorary na national
tional national president of Arnold Air
Society, appeared here for Dollars
for Scholars, sponsored by UFs
Dale Mabry chapter of the Society.
What a garage this is, said
Hope, referring to Florida Gym.
Its like a giant erector set.
What time do they let the bats
out?
They wanted me to do two
shows, but I couldnt, he said.
With all the ferns around the
stage, they must have expected
me to die here.
I really came down here be because
cause because President (J. Wayne) Reitz
wants me to try out for editor of
The Alligator, he quipped.
Thats a real secure job -about
as secure as being president of
Russia.
Hope flew down from Raleigh,
N. C., where he did a show at
North Carolina State Friday, in
golfer Arnold Palmers private jet.
He arrived late at the Gainesville
Airport because of strong head headwind.
wind. headwind.
We were flying into a 125 mph
wind. Im used to strong wind,
he said. And Ive met a lot of
politicians.
Hope mentioned he was a little
leery about his police escort go going
ing going through red lights on the way
to the University Inn, where he
stayed.
It was a real interesting
drive, he said. Like playing
leap frog with Mack trucks.
At the airport, Hope was met
by local dignitaries, including
Mayor Jim Richardson, who pre presented
sented presented Hope with the key to the
city.
It was very nice of Mayor
Richardson to meet me at the air airport,
port, airport, he quipped. He gave me
the key to the bus station wash washroom
room washroom and a dime.
Before swinging south, the
comedian was in Washington, D.C.,
where President Lyndon Johnson
presented him with a USO award
for entertaining U. S. soldiers
overseas.
I had a lot of material about
LBJ, said Hope. I didnt think
he would show up, but he was
there. He took my ribbing in good
spirit.
The ski-nosed comic kidded
Seminole photographer Bob Elli Ellison
son Ellison about using a long telephoto
lens.
Youll get nothing but nostril
shots, he said. It'll look like

University of Florida

you were shooting pictures of the
Holland Tunnel.
That reminds me of the time
I was supposed to be on the cover
of Life Magazine, he commented.
The photographer got mad at me
and I ended up on the cover of
Field and Stream with a phea pheasant
sant pheasant in my mouth.
You have a helluva football
team here, he said. You fellas
almost pulled it out in the Sugar
Bowl. I know the feeling of losing.
Ive been with the Los Angeles
Rams for many years.

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...AND HE ENTERTAINED TOO

Yes, I believe I am a direct de decendant
cendant decendant of man, said J. Fred
Muggs before a packed Florida Gym

Scholars Book Wins

Steve Gardner, 1965 Dollars for
Scholars chairman, announced Sa Saturday
turday Saturday that the programs scrap scrapbook
book scrapbook was awarded first prize in a
statewide contest sponsored by the
A. P. Phillips Advertising Co. of
Orlando. The award was given for
the depiction of one extra curri curricular
cular curricular campus activity.
Gardner and secretary Candy
Hampton compiled the 28-page
book which included clippings and
photographs of the campaign on
campus last fall
Gardner said the scrapbook was
divided into three categories
An Ideal, Ideas, and A Reality.
This covered the origin of Dollars
for Scholars, the planning for the

Monday, April 4, 1966

Hope teased singer Iris Faith
about the perfume she was wear wearing.
ing. wearing. When she said she was wear wearing
ing wearing Evening in Paris,* Hope
replied he was wearing a popular
local perfume, Afternoon in Mi Micanopy.
canopy. Micanopy.
In addition to Miss Faith, other
performers included singer-dan singer-dancer
cer singer-dancer Peggy Womack and world worldfamous
famous worldfamous chimpanzee J. Fred Muggs.
According to Cadet Col. Alan
Wright, who made the introduc introductions,
tions, introductions, Muggs took the GREs and
(See TOWN, Page 9)

Saturday night. Muggs entertained
with his almost human antics as a
member of the Bob Hope Troupe.

campaigning and the events of the
campaign.
Loaded Lighter!
Robin Rittgers, 2UC, brother of
U F defensive end Rex Rittgers, was
shot in the leg by a friend with a
cigarette lighter.
John Gibson, 2UC, told officials
that he picked up what he thought
to be a cigarette lighter in the
shape of a small pistol The light lighter
er lighter accidently discharged and the
bullet lodged in the thigh of Ritt Rittgers
gers Rittgers left leg.
Deputy Sheriff A. B. Congleton
said, Rittgers is in good shape,
but its a good thing Gibson didnt
try to light a cigarette.



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 4, 1966

u^>Ri
International
LABOR WINS . Final results in the British general elections
showed Saturday that the incumbent Labor Party had won 363 seats
in the 630-seat House of Commons, a majority of 97. The final
breakdown was: Labor 363, Conservative, 353, Liberal, 12, and
Republican Party, 1.
A-
POPE OPENS HOLY WEEK . Pope Paul VI, with a special bless blessing
ing blessing of the palms symbolizing Christs triumphant entry into Jerusalem,
Sunday opened the Holy Week of traditional mourning and joy that
climaxes on Easter. The Pontiff, with 21 cardinals and hundreds of
other prelates in attendance, bestowed the traditional blessing under
the Michelangelo fresco of The Last Judgment in the Sistine Chapel.
He then distributed the palm fronds to the group and they formed a
procession out of the chapel and down to huge St. Peters Basilica.
LE MANS CRASH ... American racer Walter
Hansgen was reported still in critical condition
Sunday at the U. S. Military Hospital in Orleans,
France following injuries received in a crash
at the Le Mans course Saturday. Hansgen, 45
year old father of two from Far Hollow N. J.,
lost control of his Ford 7 liter auto during pre preliminary
liminary preliminary trials for the 24 hour sports car race
at Le Mans. Rescue workers had to cut Hans Hansgen
gen Hansgen out of his smashed car. He suffered mul multiple
tiple multiple fractures to both arms and legs, skull
s and chest.
National
ATTORNEY HAS NEW EVIDENCE ... An attorney for 13 of the
14 alleged Ku Klux Klansmen arrested by the FBI in the death of
Negro leader Vernon Dahmer said over the weekend he had new
evidence which exonerated his clients. Travis Buckley of Louin,
Miss., said he had uncovered evidence which satisfied him that he
knew those responsible for the death of the local civil rights worker
in nearby Forrest County. He did not elaborate except to say that
none of the 13 persons represented by him were among those re responsible
sponsible responsible for the death.
EISENHOWER WONT RUN .. Dr. Milton
S. Eisenhower denied Sunday a report that he
was planning to retire as president of Johns
Hopkins University to run for the U. S. Senate
in 1965. A spokesman for Eisenhower said that
the younger brother of the former president
has given no thought whatsoever to the possi possibility
bility possibility of running for elective office. A report
appearing Sunday in the Baltimore News-
American said Eisenhower would soon
announce his retirement from the university,
effective June, 1967, and seek the Senate seat
of Daniel B. Brewster, D-Md., on the Repub Republican
lican Republican ticket.
Florida
SERVICES HELD . . Funeral services for Rep. George Stone,
speaker-designate of the 1967 Florida House, took place at 3 p.m.
Sunday in Walnut Hill, Fla. and Atmore, Ala. Stone was killed Friday
in a two-car collision near Pensacola. Burial will be in the Walnut
Hill Baptist Church cemetery. Gov. Haydon Burns was expected to be
among the state officials attending the funeral. Stone, who would have
been 43 April 19, is survived by his widow, two sons and three daugh daughters.
ters. daughters. The veteran legislator was thrown from his car it struck
another vehicle in the suburb of Brent.
FIREFIGHTERS /STAND BY ~ . Twenty-five state and federal
park service firefighters were standing by to go into action today if
early morning winds cause a smoldering fire in the Everglades to
flare up again. The fire, which blackened from 1,500 to 2,000 acres
of the Everglades National Park Friday, started along the side of a
road which runs from Florida City to Flamingo. Authorities said they
think it was touched off by a careless smoker who flipped a cigarette
from his car window.
The FlorMa Alligator reserve's the right to regulate the typographical tone ol all advertiserrtnt ants
to revise or turn awey copy which tt cons id- jectionabie.
NO POSITION 6 GUARANTEED, though C 'osltlon will be given ihenever possible.
The Florid* Alligator will no consider ?nts of payment for any advertisement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(I) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more thar. one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to rwi several times. Notices lor correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the tni-crsiiy <>l FlorlJj and Is
jjy, times weekly except during May, June, and July when It Is published s* ml-weekl). Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator Ls entered as second class
matter at Ike Uidled States Pojl Office at Gainesville.
.. .. _

Russias Luna
10 In Orbit?
JODRELL BANK, England (l'PI)
-- British radio astronomer Sir
Bernard Lovell said Sunday night
he believed the Soviet Union had
succeeded in placing Luna 10 in
orbit around the moon.
Lovell made the assertion alter
tuning in his giant 250-foot di diameter
ameter diameter radio telescope to the moon
shortly after it rose above the
landscape in England.
The director of the Jodrell Bank
Observatory, emerged at 7:23 p.m.
1:23 p.m. EST and told reporters:
v
Our opinion is that the probe
is orbiting around the moon, but
we are unable to speculate on the
altitude at the moment.
At present the frequency is
beautiful. It is moving away from
us around the side of the moon.
At the time of the statement by
Sir Bernard, there had been no
announcement from Moscow about
the latest moon probe since it was
launched last Thursday Soviet
sources bad said, however, it was
expected that Luna 10 was aimed
lor a moon orbit.

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NOTICE
Applications Are Now Being Accepted For
EDITOR and MANAGING EDITOR of
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR for the
Summer Trimester
Applications Are Due By 2:30 pm, April 6
In The Board of Student Publications Office,
R. 9, Florida Union. Applicants Must Be
Available For Interview APRIL 7, 1966.



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Monday, April 4, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

THE SUPREMES
BILLY VAUGHN
STAN GETZ
PETER NERO

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 4, 1966

ALLIGATOR
OPINION
tired American
j| am a tired American.
Im tired of being called the ugly American.
Im tired of having the world panhandlers use my
country as a whipping boy 365 days a year.
I am a tired American weary of having Amer American
ican American embassies and information centers stoned,
burned, and sacked by mobs operating under orders
from dictators who preach peace and breed con conflict
flict conflict ...
I am a tired American -- choked up to here on this
business of trying to intimidate our Government by
placard, picket line, and sit-ins by the hordes of dirty
unwashed who rush to man the barricades against the
forces of law, order, and decency.
I am a tired American weary of the beatniks who
say they would have the right to determine what laws
of the land they are willing to obey.
I am a tired American fed up with the mobs of
scabby-faced, long-haired youths and short-haired
girls who claim they represent the new wave of
America and who sneer at the old-fashioned virtues
of honesty, integrity, and morality on which America
grew to greatness.
I am a tired American weary unto death of
having my tax dollars go to dictators who play both
sides against the middle with threats of what will
happen if we cut off the golden stream of dollars.
I am a tired American -- nauseated by the lazy
do-nothings who wouldnt take a job if you drove
them to and from work in a Rolls Royce .
I am a tired* American who is getting madder
by the minute at the filth peddlers who have launched
Americans in an obscenity race, who try to foist on
us the belief that filth is an integral part of cul culture
ture culture ... J
I am a tired American -- weary of the bearded
bums who tramp the picket lines and the sitins --
who prefer Chinese Communism to capitalism who
see no evil in Castro, but sneer at President Johnson
as a threat to peace.
I am a tired American who has lost all patience
with that civil rights group which is showing propa propaganda
ganda propaganda movies on college campuses from coast to
coast movies denouncing the United States, movies
made in Communist China.
I am a tired American -- who |s angered by the
self-righteous breastbeater critics of America, at
home and abroad, who set impossible yardsticks for
the United States, but who never apply the same
standards to the French, the British, the Russians,
the Chinese.
I am a tired American -- who resents the pimply pimplyfaced
faced pimplyfaced beatniks who try to represent Americans as the
bad guys on the black horses.
I am a tired American sickened by the slack slackjawed
jawed slackjawed bigots who wrap themselves in bedsheets in the
dead of night and roam the countryside looking for
innocent victims.
I am a tired American -- who dislikes clergymen
who have made a career out of integration causes,
yet send their own children to private schools.
I am a tired American who resents those who
try to peddle the belief in schools and colleges that
capitalism is a dirty word and that free enterprise
and private initiative are only synonyms for greed.
They say they hate capitalism, but they are always
right at the head of the line demanding their share
of the American way of life.
I am a tired American -- who gets more than a
little bit weary of the clique in our State Department
which chooses to regard a policy of timidity as pru prudent
dent prudent the same group which subscribes to a no nowin
win nowin policy in Viet Nam.
I am a tired American -- real tired of those who
are trying to sell me the belief that America is not
the greatest nation in all the world a generous
hearted nation --a nation dedicated to the policy
of trying to help the have-nots achieve some of
the good things that our system of free enterprise
brought about.
I am an American -- who gets a lump in his throat
when he hears the Star Spangled Banner and who
holds back tears when he hears those chilling high
notes of the brassy trumpet when Old Glory reaches
the top of the flag pole.
I am a tired American -- who wants to start
snapping at those phony high priests who want
us to bow down and worship their false idols and
who seek to destroy the belief that America is the
land of the free and the home of the brave.
I am a tired American -- who thanks a merciful
Lord that he was lucky to be born an American
citizen a nation under God, with truly mercy and
justice for all.
Alan Mclntosh
Publisher, The Rock County Herald
Luverne, Minn.

The Florida, Alligator
'A hou PtwMi Plm Tlu TuA

And finally, Doctor, I faced the awful fact that Im the only
college professor who hasnt the slightest idea what to do about
Viet Nam.
6-
Dr. Robert
Hutchins
3n the United States the restraints on the bureaucracy are legis legislative
lative legislative inquiries and judicial proceedings. Both are cumbersome,
protracted and largely ineffective.
The legislature cannot easily discover whether the administration
is efficient or whether it is carrying out the legislative intent.
The citizen cannot obtain redress for injustices committed by an
administrative officer or agency without exhausing his administra administrative
tive administrative remedies, a process in every sense exhausting.
When he does get into court he has the burden of showing that the
administrative action complained of is arbitrary and unreasonable,
not merely unfair. The delays and expense of litigation are notorious.
A poor man, no matter how patient, has little chance of prevailing
against the bureaucracy, so little that few poor men are willing to
tangle with it.
We live in a bureaucratic culture, and there is not much chance
that our children or grandchildren will live in any other. Bureaucracy
is an inevitable concomitant of large-scale organization.
With computers multiplying at the present rate, all bureaucracies,
private and public, will become more and more impersonal. Anybody
who has tried to argue with a computer about a bill knows there is
nothing in it but frustration; the computer keeps sending back the bill
getting more and more imperious with each mail.
Then there is the generality of any law. No legislature can possibly
foresee every contingency. It tries to lay down a rule that can apply
in as many cases as it can think of; but it cannot think of them all.
In the old days the courts of equity intervened to relax the rigid
requirements of the common law in cases of individual hardship.
But as Dickens showed in his tale of the Circumlocution Office
equity hardened over the centuries, and it is now, when it is ad administered
ministered administered by the same court that decides common law cases, open
to most of the criticisms, including expense and delay, that apply to
all judicial proceedings.
The efflorescence of administration, then, raises the question of how
the legislature is to make sure the bureaucracy is carrying out the
legislative will and doing it efficiently; and the question of how the
citizen is to cope with maladministration. Almost every country other
than the United States has developed some means of answering these
questions.
One of the most promising of these attempts is that of Israel, which
is trying to answer both questions through one officer, the comptroller.
present incumbent, Dr. I. E. Nebenzahl, gave an account of his
progress the other day at the Center for the Study of Democratic
Institutions.
He reports to the legislature on the expenditure of every penny of
public money, commenting on the efficiency as well as the legality of
the outlay. At the same time he handles 3,000 complaints a year from
citizens about the treatment they have received from government.
Dr. Nebenzahl insisted that his strength lay in the fact that he has
no power. All he can do about maladministration is to make it public
together with his opinion of such misconduct. His standing is such his
observations almost always bring about correction of the abuses he
condemns.
The United States could use 51 Nebenzahls.
(Copyright 1966, Los Angeles Times)

MIKE MALAGHAN s I
Campusl
Perspective 1

What has the SGs Legislative Council done this I
year?
This reporter asked that question last week in I
Tuesdays Perspective column. A number of Legis- I
lative members have asked me just what I meant I
while pointing out accomplishments of the council I
since the elections. I
Legislative Council has fulfilled its traditional I
obligations. The budget committee has done a fine I
job in compiling next years budget for presentation I
to Leg Council this coming Tuesday. I
The Leg Council has passed on the usual number I
of special requests. It has written President Lyndon I
Johnspn to obtain assurance Cape Kennedy isnt losing I
the Titan 111 complex. I
Fred Breeze is working hard to develop aproduc- I
tive committee system. Absences will be handled I
with greater vigilence. I
What the question at hand is: What has Leg I
Council done relative to its potential? What has been I
accomplished of real substance? I
A chasm cant be leaped in two jumps. Legislative I
Council cant move at its current pace and live up to I
an assumed great potential and responsibility. I
Os course to detract without substitution is not the I
answer. So, here are avenues of service Leg Council I
could provide. I
Currently most activity in student government is I
initiated and completed by the administrative branch.
This absorption of power by the executive is the
result of legislative neglect.
This columnist asks the legislature to review the
platforms of all parties, visit their constituents,and"
develop ideas of their own and transfer those ideas
into legislation. ~
In other words, develop a legislative program.
There are times in all levels of government where
the executive branch either doesnt work or makes
mistakes. Most executive branches are subject to
legislative review.
It is time Student Governments Leg Council pro provided
vided provided a balance in government by reviewing a cabinet
officer when he fails to perform.
The only method an uncharted organization can
obtain money by is through special requests. This
is an unstable procedure and, unnecessary.
Leg Council could either allow these uncharted
organizations to make budget requests annually with
other organizations or require such organizations
to become chartered.
Organizations that receive SG money are seldom
audited. Leg Council can ask these organizations to
provide records justifying expenditure of student
money.
Leg Council members, once elected, rarely revisit
the people who put them in office. Since Leg Council
members dont usuallystandfor reelection, the mem- (
bers dont have to be answerable. It is time to make
the Council important enough to require members to
seek out their constituents in a bid for reelection.
These are basic advances into new areas. There
are more. This columnist will be glad to talk to any
member of Leg Council to explain his views further.
Leg Council is doing an adequate job. But, is ade adequate
quate adequate the only heights it can reach?
a triumph?
Editor:
It seems as though the conservative elements have
triumphed in another battle with freedom of expres expression.
sion. expression. The recent petition for removal of Benny Cason
as editor of The Alligator which was
Florida Blue Key, that wonderfully elite groupVf
decision-makers, illustrates that organizations de desire
sire desire to dominate student affairs. Casons removal
can be viewed as a pragmatic elimination of a poten potential
tial potential threat by Blue Key and its friends throughout
the state.
Wednesdays Alligator said the most general com complaint
plaint complaint was inadequate coverage of campus-wide
events. Actually, The Alligator has done an excellent
job of upholding the standard of plastering happy hoys
and pretty girls all over its pages. More than ade adequate
quate adequate coverage was given to important campus event
such as Derby Day, Harolds Club and other vital
functions of the University.
Casons removal is just another symptom of the
political domination of the educational process and
encroachment upon freedom of expression at this
university. It seems that the UF is doomed to bear
an ugly stigma of anti-intellectualism, despite ear earnest
nest earnest effort by many to change this condition. But at
the heart of the matter, of course, is the general
apathy which pervades this campus, automaticall}
stifling any attempt to effect a change.
In light of the total picture, it becomes increasingly
difficult not to just sit back and quietly smile.
William Goldberg
Paul Grossman



fetffer

CWE might PRIVIM6 a
HOME TO EVEWIM6
COCKTAIIO,! W/V5
SUPPEMLV STRUCK" f/rt
THfSOUSH THE ff-
WIMPSHIEEP BV u
THE RAHS OF FI
me sou- moo) LJL

AMP MV SO) 6MQ
'All THE OTHER -/m
CACVISS ARE /aM
600 P AT FIXIM6 tSSSMk
THIIX6, M3OVE
GOT FI M66RS
iim CtAWS!

student leaders speak
April 1, 1966
Editor:
The Florida Alligator is one of many student activities on the
campus of the UF. As such, it is financed and operated by students
and should be responsive to their needs, interests and views.
Student leaders on the campus have been increasingly concerned
with inconsistent news coverage and lack of objectivity. We pe petitioned
titioned petitioned President J. Wayne Reitz to remove the then current
Alligator leadership, including the current editor and the managing
editor for the summer Alligator. Our purpose was to seek re responsible,
sponsible, responsible, comprehensive coverage of all campus activities.
Dr. Reitz, in response to this plea from the elected leaders of
the student body and student organizations throughout the campus,
dealt with this completely internal University matter. As President
of the University, Dr. Reitz is responsible for all student activi activities,
ties, activities, and, therefore, acted under his authority as delegated by the
Board of Regents and as set forth in the Charter of the Board of
Student Publications.
We initiated and now support this action wholeheartedly.
(signed)
Buddy Jacobs, President of the Student Body
Fred Breeze, Vice President of the Student Body
Herb Schwartz, Chancellor, Honor Court
John Darlson, reasurer, Student Body
Jane Kimbrell, President, W.S.A.
Irene Minkoff, President, Womens Inter-Hall
Chip Block, President, Florida Blue Key
Bruce Starling, Past President, Florida Blue Key
Bruce Culpepper, Past President, Student Body
Bob Imholte, President, Mens Inter-Hall
Bud Robison, President, John Marshall Bar Association
Larry Tyree, President, Fla. Union Board of Student Activities
Bill Slippy, President, Benton Engineering Council
Ron LaFace, Past President, Florida Blue Key
Dennis McGillicuddy, Past Editor-in-Chief of the Law Review
Joel Sachs, Past Chancellor, Honor Court
Jake Dyal, Past Chancellor, Honor Court
Rutledge R. Liles, President, Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity
Dan Carlton, Chairman, Mayors Council
Charles Maloy, Past President, Inter Fraternity Council
David West, Past Editor, Florida Alligator
Beth Kraselsky, Editor of the Seminole
Nel Laughon, Editor-elect of the Seminole
Harry Meshaw, Attorney General, Honor Court
act now limited quantity
ONLY 14 LEFT OUT OF 93
FOR SALE F ctoar
2 BEDROOMS
AND BATH no hidden extras
COMPLETE HOMES Financing Available
Perfect For Lake, Beach, Forest
COME PREPARED TO BUY
Arcn ,p Fr IN free delivery to your lot
AI f?J!fTpY IN Within 50 Miles of Gainesville
rISg MID-STATE ENGINEERS, INC.
MOVING P. O. 14491 Univ. Station
378-2151 Sales Office 13th Street & S.W. Bth Ave.

AW I 6REUO
BOCY HAIR, "sp
TOIWTEP EAfe, m.
aovgw h oom, f)|
AW A TAIL
11$

AMP MV UTILE
aRL SAW/M
wime to ftfMi
HAVE THE MV /Ml
FATHER OM M (Ig rMI
BLOCK LOU OE
, DIFFERENT 7 y*\w\

Editor:
I was extremely unhappy to read
about the firing of one of the few
really good invigorating editors
The Alligator has had. Benny Cason
was rocking the boat granted--
but exactly what IS the function of
an editor?
To sit passively by while The
Alligator slowly turns into a ve vehicle
hicle vehicle used primarily to praise the
powers-that-be? If so, then Student
Publications should hire Engineer Engineerings

What do the pros go for? McGregors golf jacket. Active. Unwrinkled. Because its per permanent
manent permanent press fabric of Dacron polyester and cotton from Galey & Lord. A Division of
Burlington Industries. For your nearest retailecwrite us at 1407 Broadway, New York 18.
Galey Lor/

AMP I THOU6HT
AT MST! IT-7 iHe s&aL
reap met amp mfh
turn fear secretiy / f*>\\
MIM&EP lOITH /ft! /\\
mm: u 1 f u
ARRIVE? HOME-

she speaks, too

ings Engineerings robot who can be remote
controlled.
Clara Mae Marcotte, 7ED

SPECIAL! MONDAY & TUESDAY ONLY!
Req. sl.lO Box Dinner
COMPLETE DINNER IN-^nk
CLUDES. 3 pieces of
Chicken, French Fries, JLr
Slow or Grnvy ond Pltij 'gfjjaf
NO SUBSTITUTIONS.
COL. SANDERS T
AVAILABLE AT *?..??
Kentucky fried thicken
214 N.W. 13th St. 207 N.E. 16th Ave.
Phone 376-6472 Phone 378-2959

Monday, April 4. 1966, The Florida Alligator,

WHCRe MV WlfF
6AIR*VOUR
punbrs oxr
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'Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co.

Page 5



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for rent
C-C iC? C£ i T FT3E3REEZZ m m;
; m; ji -r'anw V:r ThA
tgaomw. AC,: ri, : Tu;iX3
trim rancHH i- m:
gr.nriity run: uses witstr lil
2-4*12 after I j*.n_ :r w^.^nr??-
A"* AILaE 1 £ MAT Is. 1 tCr_ i;r
4 srigiencx. 1 iuutxs iran airnpis airnpis*
* airnpis* _r tnmflxamgga, III'I yex sno-or
t\z suntt: semssaHr."CF2f N~v
*-
- X-t.
* 3*2Tf. netrieiir n<:-
nem 2 ic.r_ m hic M*et M*ettta_
tta_ M*ettta_ I-emer Aaute hilt, hi phs,
-ease reinx-e-i. -7. Eh. "2- I* :
: r id- >:*:,. =-_ ---t
- *r~ -*. E_E t_r PT~ 1 ir_ I Te* :-
. £. 1 rouse m ei Id per
r. ;nci_ -r.r.'i ~ri ec Etam. nr
II Pi_ ri-iMi J£-s_ moraer.
E-. 2Ste*
COET 71iA5 -nontn I s*ss£ranra
ntpusn, mines uJinnsiijg. I
r _~ee frit: X-'v-iniw-. ri 1 sr.cn.
'-i_ h 2-2 u tc 2*75-5145 e e-125U4t-<.
-125U4t-<. e-125U4t-<.
nice : x: yo.M _i -n -n---xt
--xt- -n---xt *~, soitri tn*E*es&-
ii h£>**; r>u2'jt
id 5* 2ka 7T. S-lIC-It-T...
' 3C6-I sZISOiM .miis .miis-4-t
-4-t .miis-4-t tph -VC, xra£ac> April ICcl.
rxnr'i Apts Pl B B-1
-1 B-1 ii tji
CliAil EAJE3I ACT. .A C,
i !;T SCC Uhl. ~.t^
C: 1-24 vc-n-pa/xe. Cad Id Id-4A.
4A. Id-4A. £-123-2-n:j.
VILLAGE 24, SECCNC EDTT3CJC.
I XSJLtfiT. Z*AZ CUT*. 2k, If CO JSfe.
11- T* >fct 3c 34 i*ev 1 i."xn
apt. ir-, izrzzscjf*: aut air -xc -xc:iv.oefi
:iv.oefi -xc:iv.oefi A.aianie April Ist. itet
X noc*. See ?iiKr
Apt. oc punish ifjer 5
p.m./Ix-t Schilling, apt. 10. Wa>
3ug*fi Errest lev P-ealr# lac. 376-
£461. 'B-io^tf-c;.
AITRAC II V£ ROOM In modern
sorae. Ideal for student wiac reeds
a quiet, pleasant place to study.
372-7335. (B-123-ts-c).
AIR CONDITIONED APTS. For
Summer. Suitable for 2 or 3, $l3O $l3O-for
-for $l3O-for A or B Term. Suitable
for 3 or 4, SIBO per Term. Call
376-89E0, 8 a.ro.- 5 p.m. p or 7p.m.
- 10 p.m. Also renting for fall.
(B-l l>-tf-c).
COMFORTABLY FURNISHED one
bedroom duplex apt. Ideal for mar married
ried married couple. SBS a month includes
water. Available after exams. Call
372-7223. (B-124-3t-c).
ONE BEDROOM split level apt.
Studio type, A/C, sublease for
Spring Tri. 1824 NW 3rd Place,
Apt. 22. 378-3584. (B- 26-3 t-c).
A Unique Coffee House
WHEN IN JACKSONVILLE
FOR GOOD
ENTERTAINMENT
- FOLK MUSIC
- COMEDY

for rent
FTxyHEIEZZ A?'T2. Tv- ( ie*or:*;)i!
iunuKiHK. ices. *.enr n:
-irC. iaena. j:v sun Tits
Eltcir Tear nirmjiie Emacie- jzc
1C i: iTTlOiiTIli-. 2i_l .'lllfcf.
Id- Tc.IH. 3- I'ltfn.
ILH as nraarfstcit x "r sc_
:uij i:i.T zurS jersin xur in:?
m:*is icm j:c a Tan Te-nnam,
rurmsieii-. I, i-o nnig to:
r* iilac-e Va. _ic. Snusie*!
nr-ifign Id-K IST. £-134-
3-3 rCZ UL Tl'-31E 3tl<: CL
.lie nii jnr n:_r: Tinesatc. 3tt 3ttttt.4
ttt.4 3ttttt.4 "Ttn.:iL-4 prriiiiir :s"i. r~
ni -tcsaur r-ikr-.aai-ji ra.4. I
To.; r :a_r.;;>uf. 3i 2".-
:
3- 3T- 7r- i
7C rJC3 3E23 r>.V* t *~.\ ~rmrt
Co:c rxms furusie'x, iea_r ua_i
-irt-Ar: AIC Tun -.3A 3 Alii
i-iATiGraniri- ahi 3'igie:- Id-
-.d-it-T
AZE 3-3 N2X T33N 333 irT. miaiT'e
son. 3 sugA ur me xnent. 4* AC
fcmsaefl, TT iimna t JTf, 3
luicxs fram ?d-:d*i tf tf*a:
*a: tf*a: AY. E-l l'"- i-i.
AH. 4 atgSreCXfr 3 Ia7
t3rgj, uKirra. A 3, ; net cr v>
Aisc ia-* 3 sedracm tpa
Pa_ rt- 3:13- 3. E-13% !r-<
CAEGE CrTCEC EC*3 M, 13* xl2
; rrraie iJcuc- xrii stops:, .tt'-v .tt'-v---ties
--ties .tt'-v---ties cr. decs iac3ice* a ?i_ 173-
21 >1 or ni-KAI. E-ir-Y-t
EC*i W 2sr naie sricenr i nn nn>res
>res nn>res ii lev ir.me. ET- 371FT" 4
1 ;.r. ir wsest.siuis. E-12C-
H-c>.
CAEC-E 3NE EEDET.CM roien
ape. Mcoen ctaiaHc arc linmrs.
3 marie iir 2 :r 2 sr xe'cs 4
biotks txtsm axpis. Ter? reason reasonably
ably reasonably price-a. Call 2CI-HBS ar?-
rlme. (B-127-2t-c;-.
SUBLET APT., in Univ. Gardens
beginning April 25th. Pool, A/C,
all electric kitchen, 2 BR, walk-in
closets. 376-1724 anytime. $155/
mo. (B-127-3t-p).
ROOM IN APT. Available immedi immediately
ately immediately for Summer Tri. Call Sheri
at 378-1161. (B-127-3t-p).
HOUSE. S9O, 2 blocks from cam campus.
pus. campus. Available April 27th and thru
Fall and Winter. 376-6671. (B (B---125-3t-c).
--125-3t-c). (B---125-3t-c).
HOUSE FOR RENT. 4 mos. (April
- Aug.), 3 bedrooms, 1-1/7 baths.
1 block from campus. Contact Mrs.
Moeller, 376-4471. (B-125-3t-p).
Ysuperb. Chill
I Mdgmficentr ydp
I JLJOOB
I PLUS COLOR HIT HITKIRK
KIRK HITKIRK RICH/IRLD
DOUGLAS HARRIS
THE HERPES
I OF TELE/MARK

d rncu3i f.irgHSC, ICuniay, 4, 1373

Page 6

j wanted 1
V *_>TE37 ruos u Iic:i3
Axxn-ne iCirX *r~_ lien *C2 pa*
3x>ir- Aitiri ps nX. 3-a_ r-i'-s
E'-FAISr 1: I-.
TTJC EEKaCE EtI'IMMATES ~
f .iaxs ~v: :*eii': it icn. ::r iprtis
TuneSfe.*. 4 :Q: i. I F3l lei T.Knr~ 3AC :3; .
ETC 13 EiE ?E_ T :: in 3 10-S
liflT i-TO s*TRA IT-: 323 C*
*< j?_2' : dEC lie ir.o.r r rsislct
:*t*3r.*:-Ti. A 3 apt. tkeks frem
C.iv Enio*:-. 3.aC _3- 3E "4. C C-3
-3 C-3 3--r,I-l
£3IOCE£ EVGLGYMENT. Coun CouniTiCirrs
iTiCirrs CouniTiCirrs vtli Ars wanted for
s_rrs Easnsm E:ys raoci. Horse Horsen.msnu
n.msnu Horsen.msnu rs*sxzr-en : n: with boys
14 41 1. E: r ncre ms crir ation,
--61-&1 niniE week. C-117-
I X-:
7 E WaCEI WJLSTLZ i: share borne.
Misr na :-wi irmspc nation S4O
a -n.irro. 3aC 7"3-71 i. C-124-
- -
MEC MALE BCOMMATE to
snare xoTtrt a C K r -. wi three
stes iir Tri. $125 for
Tm 3a_ HI-134-3, C-123- st-c).
TANTECi Paters fre-m Chicago to
3-utef ii-r i:r te esk of August.
V; it April 3Tad, call 375-4973.
Ii CSacagc after April ;3rd, call
*T3-:::i. C-ITT-St-nc
E EMAC E RO3MMATE to share
Pan'e, ozae t*e*lroom du du"kx
"kx du"kx ajx_ Ine tl:ci behind Norman.
1 -'H SW Are. 273-3553. $45 mo.
37-It-p
ANTIC: riders to Chicago area.
13 a_c,. Friday, April 2 nd.
Stratgtt through, S2O. CaU Emil
at 3234 Hume, 37 9464.
k-p
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share Colonial Manor Apt. dur during
ing during A term. Call Barbara at 378-
4505. (C-127-3t-c).
2 SENIORS want one male room roommate
mate roommate Summer or B Term only.
A/C, 1 2 block off campus, car carpeting.
peting. carpeting. $37 plus utilities. 376-8159
(C-127-2t-c).
rswianjuu
2 C 2£ R
~"^hjjAiTDlsNE^§ijr~
DARN c
OH raw
colort900
StHJdRA MflN ML
WWTORD BtSKOP
MgHns J>

wanted
c
WANTED ONE FEMALE ROOM ROOMMATE
MATE ROOMMATE to share split level apt.,
N a 3rd Place. 535 monthly,
April Ist -- Aug. Air conditioned.
2 1278. 37--3068. X- 124-3 t-c).
NEEE ONE FEMALE ROOMMATE
to share large furnished apt. for
s _rr rr.er tri. One block behind Nor Norrr
rr Norrr an Hall. Ph. 373-4539. $45 month.
C-i :4- 3t-c;.
male ROOM NLA. TE to share 2 bed bedroom
room bedroom apt. 3 blocks from campus.
Call 378-3582. (C-126-3t-c>.
NEED FEMALE ROOM NLA TE S)
or will sublease Danish Modern
Vcod-paneled apt. for summer tri.
Near shopping center, A/ C, patio.
Call 376-1463. (C-127-3t-c).
WANTED DR-APERIES sales per person
son person part-time, full time or com commission
mission commission work. Top salary. 109 W.
Univ. Ave. Gilbert's Fabrics. (C (C---127-3t-c).
--127-3t-c). (C---127-3t-c).
WANT TO BUY student desk, chair
and bookcase. Call 378-4774 after
6 p.m. or weekends. (C-127-3t-c).
PROFESSOR WANTS good furnish furnished
ed furnished but unequipped 8 x 40* mobile
home for beach house. Send note to
1015 NW 3rd Ave. (C-127-3t-c).
WANTED: Riders to New Orleans
who are interested in working
there during Summer months. Call
376-5826; ask for Steve. (C-127-
tf-nc).
ROOMMATE (S) to share luxurious
brand new 2 bedroom apt. in Village
Park with senior and law student
beginning Summer Tri. Completely
carpeted and A/C, swimming pool.
Call 378-3335 after 7p.m. (C-127-
3t-c).
"
lost-found
LOST Brown wallet, second floor
of Main Library. Important ID's
and other documents. Reward.
Contact E. Rodriguez, 376-9229.
(L-127-2t-p).
personal
TODAY ITS 2 AND 2. Thats nice.
Lets hope itll be 8 and 8 in Tan Tandem.
dem. Tandem. (signed'' OUCH. (J-l 27-1 t-p).
THE CENTER'
ROCKING CHAIR TWIN
OPENING THURSDAY
HAYLEY MILLS
THE TROUBLE WITH
ANGELS TICKETS
A breathless J
explosive story j v
of today,,.
MARLON dP
BRANDO U

services I
JLNIOR COED seeks
afternoon or evening babysitting
job for Term. A. Regular rateS
References if desired. Julie,
9348. (M-I 25-3 t-p). I
WEE FOLKS NURSERY SCHOOL J
Two locations to serve you. 6lfl
NW 9th Ave. -- uptown, phonj
37_-4020 and 2706 SW c4th Stl
near Archer Rd. and MedicalCen-B
ter, phone 372-5466. By hour, day,l
week or month. (M-124-Bt-c *1
NOW OPENING. Tedd;. Bear!
Nursery. 3 departments, com-l
pletei infart dept. Planned!
program for children over 3I
Central heating and air con-1
ditioned. Ph. 376-0917. 1214-1/J
NW 4th St. (M-116-ts-c I
trade |
WANT TO TRADE new AI mi rail
A/C. 1500 BTU. Used 15 days; fori
working used refrigerator and|
washing machine. Call 372-6821|
after 5 or 376-3211, ext. 5501 be-|
fore 4:30. (D-127-3t-c). I
jy¥¥7| 1
AuiMl
11 AVI
I 'M
I WjP. iu |
MtfiAl
| mtm I
I JEANE MOREAU I
I ffllgjM I
"thri^Tues"
X
W, at 1 *3*s*7 & 9
-iff rnmmmmm
-NY. T,mt_
jj i
r#r |
ROAD RUNNER
2:30-4:30-6:30-8:30
-WED.-
BEST
FOREIGN FILM OF
THE YEAR!
j@v*
(Worm 1



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I for sale

1956 GENERAL TRAILER. 27x 8
with 25 x 8 cabana and awnings.
Very good condition. A real bar bargain
gain bargain for $950. Archer Rd. Trailer
Village, lot Beta 10. (A-127-3t-p).
WEDDING DRESS, complete with
all accessories. Very reasonable,
at once, call 378-4580 after sp.m!
(A-126-3t-p).
Conn-Constellation TROM TROMBONE.
BONE. TROMBONE. Brand new condition, new
case, Bach 7 mouthpiece included.
Come and try it. Call 372-9145 and
ask for Eric. (A-126- t-p).
i
BRAND NEW. Never worn Jeune
Leique sleeveless linen dress,
cranberry red, size 14. Paid $23.
Will sell for sls. 378-3493. (A (A---127-1
--127-1 (A---127-1 t-p).
BRAND NEW ADMIRAL A/C, 1500
BTU. $lB5. Call 372-6821 after 5
or 376-3211, ext. 5501 before4:3o.
(A-127-3t-c).
1963, 23" ADMIRAL CONSOLE
TV. Like new. $125. Call Charlie
Brown or Bill Macklem, 376-9328
or 376-9138. (A-127-3t-c).
LEAVING COUNTRY. Must sell
66 A-H SPRITE, 3,000 mi., 4 mo.
old. Above $1,400. Also 007 Attache
case with a stereo and 3 band
radio. $135. Call 378-1770. (A (A---125-st-c).
--125-st-c). (A---125-st-c).
NIKON BINOC microscope. 4 ob objectives,
jectives, objectives, 2 sets of oculars. S4OO.
Joe Onne, 376-3211 and page, or
376-4364 after 6. (A-l 26-4 t-c).
1965 HONDA 305 Super Hawk. Less
than 4,300 miles with luggage rack
and saddle bags. Call Bob Ellison
at 376-2320 or call 376-4995 and
leave message. Also have 4x5
Omega enlarger. (A-125-ts-c).
53 x 10 GREAT LAKES Mobile
Home. 2 bedroom, central heat
and air conditioning, 4 yrs. old.
$3500. Call 372-0034. (A-123-
st-c). __________
8 x 45, Two Bedroom HOUSE
TRAILER. Call 376-9005 after
5:30 p.m., or see at Town and
Country Trailer Court, lot T-3.
(A-l 25-ts-c).

I Dont Waste Another I
I Summer! I
I Learn to fly at I
I CASSELS IN THE AIR I
I at the Municipal Airport /I
I SPECIAL $5 INTRODUCTORY
I FLIGHT LESSON TO SHOW
1 YOU HOW EASY IT IS
I TO DRIVE THROUGH THE SKY
I Special Summer Discounts
I Available NOW
Ol CASSELS IN THE AIR
GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL AIRPORT
/ WALDO ROAD

e>
for sale
1965 HONDA 50. Electric starter,
windshield. $220 or best offer.
2,100 miles, 90 mpg. Call Harvey
at 378-3360. (A-125-3t-c).

OFFICE CHAIR Swivel Chair
with adjustable back, arm rest,
foam rubber seat, retailed for
$75 selling for S3O. Call Robin
at 376-8918. (A-l 25-3 t-c).
BEAT THE HEAT An ADMIRAL
window air conditioner will help.
Good condition, less than two yrs.
old $75. Call 378-2089 after 5.
(A-l 24-tf-nc).
STUDENTS ONLY. Brand new
Admiral Air Conditioners, un unredeemed
redeemed unredeemed on lay-away(all sizes).
Pick up payment with nothing down.
Sudden Service Fuel Oil Co., au authorized
thorized authorized Admiral Dealer. Ph. 376-
4404. (A-118-lOt- c).
SPRING WARDROBE Sizes 8,
9, 10. Sportswear and cocktail
dresses. Specials on a 3-piece
Kimberley suit; Jeune Liegue
dress and White Stag bermudas.
376-5616. (A-121-ts-c).
&
1964, 54' x 10 ARMOR MOBILE
HOME. 2 bedroom, A/C, electric
kitchen, free lot rent for one yr.,
10 mins, from campus, small a a-of
-of a-of equity. Take over pay payment
ment payment of $58.63 per month. 466-
3213, after 5. (A-124-st-c)
autos
1964 ENGLISH FORD. New battery,
5 new recaps, 1966 license plate,
in very good condition. S9OO. Diane
Walser, 372-9394. (G-126-3t-p).
Good Used 1955 DODGE. Ideal stu student
dent student car. Good interior. 4 new
tires. Asking S2OO, but will listen
to reason. Call 378-1907 this week,
after 9 p.m. (G-126-3t-p).
1954 CHEVROLET, Belair 4 door,
stick, radio, 2 spares, original
owner. See and make offer. Ext.
2811; 37 -5510 after 5. (G-125-
3t-p).

Monday, April 4, 1966, The Florida Alligator/

autos
I I
1959 T-BIRD in top condition. $750
or S3OO and take over payments.
Call 378-2888 days and 372-5067
after 5:30. (G-127-3t-c5.
1959 FORD, 2 door, 6 cyl., stick
shift. Rebuilt motor in 1965, radio
and heater. Reasonably priced.
Call 376-7878 between 8-5. (G (G--
- (G--
1952 CHEVY. Runs great. $75 or
best offer. Can be seen at 1030 SW
7th Ave. 378-2688. (G-127-lt-c).
1964 VW. Radio and heater, 2 new
tires, good condition. Call 378-
4346 from 6 p.m. to 1 a.m. (G (G---127-3t-c).
--127-3t-c). (G---127-3t-c).
1959 PEUGEOT 403. Good tires,
clean inside and out. $125 or best
offer. Call 372-6230.(G-127-2t-p).
1958 CHEVROLET,Biscayne, V-8,
good mechanical condition, $325.
Call 376-9039. (G-127-3t-p).
1964 BLUE MG-MIDGET. Radio
and heater, luggage rack. Call
376-3561. (G-123-ts-c).
jOTICE! NOTICE! NOTICFj

Z THE LAST ISSUE S
uj -
u z
i= OF THE O
O
FLORIDA
UJ -7
u z
£ ALLIGATOR §
Z n
_. rn
£ FOR THE TRIMESTER
P O
o WILL BE
u APRIL 6 Z
i= O

Z n
!n
V DEADLINE FOR Z
P O
9 FOR CLASSIFIED n
_. m
UJ V
y. ADVERTISING g
O
IS 2:30 APRIL 5
U z
P o
o
7! NOTICE! NOTICE!NO D

Lv.s mott X.) JituL
jr CARIBBEAN TK jRBSjCi
L mediterranean Jf travel 1
I (( AIR AND X.
STEAM*?; P TICKETS.
Iff# INDEPEI* DENT O S
I ESCORTED TRAVEL
P>*AUTO RMTAI AND
1 r RCH se
R LD
(((( ) TRAVEL
808 W. University Ave. Phone 376-4641
* Y mmmmm

Page 7

jhelp wanted
WAITER WANTED. Must be 21.
No experience necessary. Ph. 376-
9335, from 9-12 a.m.(E- 24-ts-c).
FULLER BRUSH CO. needs stu student
dent student representative in Diamond
Village, Flavet 111 and Schucht.
Can be worked in off hrs. with
average of $2.00 per hr. in earn earnings.
ings. earnings. Also need part or full time
help for other areas of Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. Write to H. Silver, 1028
Clearwater Dr., Daytona Beach,
Fla. (E-117-ts-c).
MAN AND WIFE student to oper operate
ate operate popular motel for the month of
May 1966. Motel experience neces necessary.
sary. necessary. Call 376-4667 for interview.
(E-125-ts-c).
MALE HELP WANTED. Beef boner
needed. Part or fulltime. Apply at
McCallum Wholesale, 504 NW Bth
Ave. (E-125-st-c).
WAITRESS WANTED. Must be 21.
Work 3 hr. lunch shift. See Mrs.
Druash. Apply Schooner Room,
1222 W. Univ. Ave. (E-119-st-c).
CONTROLLER. Men to train for
controller assignments which offer
excellent opportunity for those
qualified. Age 25-38. College edu education,
cation, education, major in Business Admin,
or accounting. Experience would
be advantageous, but not absolute absolutely
ly absolutely essential. Many outstanding em employee
ployee employee benefits. Apply Personnel
Dept., Sears, Roebuck and Co.,
1420 NW 23rd Blvd. (E-126-4t-c).
AIRLINE STEWARDESS for Pan
American World Airways. Campus
interviews Tuesday, April sth.
Contact Placement Office, Bldg. H.
Ext. 2 351, for appointment. (E (E---125-3t-c).
--125-3t-c). (E---125-3t-c).
NEED EXTRA CASH? Local com company
pany company needs several students or
faculty members who would like
to earn from SSO to SIOO per week
part time.Call372-7811,9-10a.m.
for further information. (E-124-
ts-c). ... ...
RECENT COLLEGE GRAD with
background in Biology and exper experimental
imental experimental Psychology seeks perma permanent
nent permanent position. Call 372-2165. (E (E---124-4t-c).
--124-4t-c). (E---124-4t-c).

I SALES
I
i t

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0
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K
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Use
Gator
Ads



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator. Monday. April 4, 1966

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NO MORE WAITING ...
The University Pool Is now open weekdays from 3 to 6:30
p.m. to all UF students. Spring is here, so don't wait.

Debate Set
Resolved: That the National Li Liberation
beration Liberation Front should be formally
included in negotiating a settlement
of the Viet Nam conflict.
UF Debate Society is sponsoring
the last dialogue of the year Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, at 8 p.m. in the Florida Union
social room.
Speaking for the affirmative
team are John DeLancett, Flor Floridas
idas Floridas most traveled debater this
year and Mark Fowler, who rep represented
resented represented Florida in the Harvard
University Tournament this year.
Debating for the negative Har Harvard
vard Harvard squad are Jack Norton, pres president
ident president of the Harvard Debate Coun Council,
cil, Council, and Don Burnett, Jr.

HilWiii.iU'ill |11 1. IM 'MM'.il I 111 ; ri "
* vtf. '; _. "^j;.
more people twice than any other van line
When families seek you out for their second move, you must have
handled their first move right. # T. .A V
Why not let the big experience of Allied Van Lines, the worlds 1 #
largest mover, work for you? For free estimates-and friendly I
advicejust phone us, your local Allied representative. m C.\
SECURITY Hr-;
TRANSFER & STORAGE, Inc. loZZ^
1040 $. MAIN PHONE 376-2666

STEAK NIGHT
Monday, sto 9 p.m.
J2fc& 12 oz. CHOICE
mm T-BONE
Steak Served With French
2 310 S.W. 13th St. Fries, Cole Slaw, Hot Rolls
- and Butter.
1505 N.W. 13th St. s j69

STUDENT FINANCIAL AID
'Almost A Big Business Here

By NUKE DOWLING
Alligator Staff Writer
Financial aid is almost a hie
business on the IF campus
according to Daniel B. Wilder, stu student
dent student financial aid officer.
More than T,900 students are
receiving either loans or scholar scholarships
ships scholarships administered by the Student
Financial Aid Office in Tigert Hall.
Wilder, who is responsible for
the administration of the loans and
scholarships to students, explained
there are three types of financial
aid available to students.
Through Wilders office, student
part-time employment can be
sought. Under this program a stu student
dent student works for the university where
he is needed by the various depart departments,
ments, departments, etc.
A second course of action for a
student seeking financial assis assistance
tance assistance is a loan program. Wilder
said there were three loan pro programs
grams programs administered by his office.
The National Defense Education
Act (NDEA) Loan is made available
to students who meet the criteria
established by the federal govern government.
ment. government. To qualify for this program a
student must be in good academic
standing (2.0 or better) and be
willing to pay the money oack after
graduation.
Wilder stressed that a NDEA
loan is available to all academic
fields and not just to those in sci science,
ence, science, math or education.
Originally, when the act was
passed in 1958, it was aimed at
these fields. Now that require requirement
ment requirement has been lifted, Wilder
stated.
The NDEA Loan is still very
attractive to teachers because of
the payback clause, he said. He
stated teachers are required to

pav back only 90 per cent of the
original loan if they teach a year
and SO per cent if they teach for
two years;- this continues at 10
per cent off the original loan for
each year the teacher teaches up
to a maximum of 50 per cent for
five years of teaching.
Wilders office has awarded ap approximately
proximately approximately 1,200 NDEA loans this
year for a total of just under $l $l
- $l More than 1,500 students
applied for this loan, but 300 were
dropped because they applied late,
failed to fill out forms correctly,
or did not qualify.
Wilder stressed the applications
must be made during the period
November 1 to March 1 of each
year.
-The Florida State Scholarship
(FSS) Loan is another loan pro program
gram program administered through Wil Wilder's
der's Wilder's office. The word Scholar Scholarship
ship Scholarship is a misnomer according to
Wilder because this program is
a loan, not a scholarship.
The money used for this loan
comes from the tax payers of
Florida and is appropriated by the
legislature. There are three types
of loans available under this pro program.
gram. program. Either a one-trimester loan

/ <*4*4**
ENGAGE-ABLES
go for
Ke en s akrp^*

And, for good reasons . like
smart styling to enhance the
center diamond . guaranteed
perfect (or replacement as-'
J ur0 d) a brilliant gem of
fine color and precise modern
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your ring assures lifetime satis satisactiorv-oelect
actiorv-oelect satisactiorv-oelect your very per personal
sonal personal Keepsake at your
keepsake Jeweler's store. Find
!? ln y lO X ellow pages under
Jewelers.

1
j HOW TO PLAN YOUR ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING"j
and Weddmn* W booklet, "How To Plan Your Engagement j
1 Aho d n eW ?-** full both for only 25c.
, o # ,end special offer of beautiful 44-page Bride s Book.
I 1 4'ima I
|
Oty
I thf State Zip j
. I f/( PIN GS, BOX 90, SYRACUSE, NEW YORKj

or a renewable loan f or two nr
three trimesters can be made
This trimester approximate,:
$65,000 has been loaned under the
FSS loan. This loan must he paid
back after graduation or upon ter
mination of studies whichever
comes first.
A long term loan primarily
for seniors in an emergency siti sitiation,
ation, sitiation, is the Long Term Loan,*'
stated Wilder. This program seeks
to help those seniors who through
some emergency reason find them themselves
selves themselves financially strapped for the
fees required by the university.
Wilder stated while these loans
are primarily for seniors, they
are available to other students on
a limited basis.
Scholarships are also available
to students on a more limited basis.
The grade requirement for scho scholarships
larships scholarships is 3.0 minimum. During
the present trimester the average
grade of a scholarship holder is
3.3.
Monies for the scholarship
programs come from alumni, stu student
dent student drives (Dollars for Scholars),
profits from concessions and pri private
vate private donations,* Wilder stated.

/y A
mcts moH (too. to isooo. m* iniaacid to
SNOW ((MITT or DCTAIL. TNAOI-NANK
A. N. TO N 0 COMPANY. INC., ISTAOIISMtO *



GRAND
OPENING!
I! iu ib Pll Sal.
SURPRISES
aBAiAAR
NW 6th St. at 16th Ave

rio
RrfM Yfea>\ TO ALL STUDENTS and UNIVERSITY
PERSONNEL
M
EHp * 9 9 1 l:3oam-2:oopm
4KI CAFETERIA DINNER
IV 4:3opm-8:00pm
V V 1212 N. Main St
(4 minutes from campus) center)

: s ... :
A PT SiSpiiSiil:
SUBR: EE # >JHA i^MWfrriliw
j ...
With this one exception,
GT&E holds the lead in remote control

We leave it up to the dexterity of
youth to manipulate slot cars. But
concede nothing to anyone in the
matter of making machines act as
they should without human inter intervention
vention intervention ... even if they re sepa separated
rated separated by hundreds of miles.
The lead is supplied by two of
GT&Es family of companies.
Automatic Electric manufactures
the control systems, and Lenkurt
Electric the equipment to trans transmit
mit transmit the control signals over wire

GENERALTELEPHONE&ELECTRONICS
DAVE NY 10017 GT&E SUBSIDIARIES General Telephone Operannp Cos, in 33 siaies GT&E Laboraiones GT&Elniemaiional General Telephone Dnedory Co. Sylvama Electric

(From Page 1)
got accepted at the UF.
The chimp, billed as the
worlds most intelligent perform performer,
er, performer, fingerpainted, played the
snare drum, and amused the audi audience
ence audience with his imitations of Ed
Sullivan, Jimmy Durante and
Jackie Gleason.

lines or microwave radio. In com combination,
bination, combination, the systems are used to
automate gas and oil pipelines,
electric utility complexes, and the
operations of railroads.
The Conitel 2000 supervis supervisory
ory supervisory and control systemnew from
Automatic Electric can report
the status of 180 devices in as lit little
tle little as .290 seconds.

My Kind Os Town

Wright gave special recognition
to two Air Force ROTC officers.
He cited Col. William N. BoazJr.,
professor of Aerospace Studies and
detachment commander, and Maj.
Alton D. Hardy, assistant profes professor
sor professor of Air Force ROTC, for their
outstanding work in bringing Hope
to the UF campus..
Towards the shows end, Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville merchant Chuck Ansell of the
Record Bar, presented Hope with
an award from the Jaycees for his
work overseas.
Student Body President Buddy
Jacobs gave him an award from
the UF student body for appearing
for Dollars for Scholars. For
every dollar you give us, LBJ is
giving us nine more, Jacobs said.
Gene Peek, chairman of Dollars
for Scholars, thanked Hope for his
XEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, 10y ea. 2U&
Over, 9£
Copies Made WTiile You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1820 W. UNIVERSITY AYE.

appearance, and Dcrnna Berger
made him an honorary member of
Florida Players by placing a large
metal screw around his neck.
What's yourproblem outside
of your hand bag? asked Hope, as
Arnold Airs new commander, Jim
Simmons, presented him with a
miniature live alligator. It looks
more like Crosbys pocketbook.
Ive been lucky, Hope said.
Ive received honorary degrees
from colleges I couldnt even get
into. I won an Oscar the year I
didnt make a picture, and the
BNai Brith gave me an award
for being a gentile.
These Arnold Air people are
really wonderful guys, he said.
One of these days Ill probably
see them on some of my travels.
Giving me an award for tra traveling
veling traveling is like giving Richard Bur Burton
ton Burton an award to stay home. Travel Traveling
ing Traveling overseas and entertaining the
boys is nothing but thrills.
Its rough over there. Its the
roughest war there is, he said.
These kids are walking right into
sniper fire. Theyre the greatest
Americans alive, and Im proud of
them.
There has never been a war

Lenkurts new Journal Data
, M f
Transmission transmits hotbox
information instantly" so railroad
controllers may stop trains before
costly accidents occur.
Automatic remote control is just
one of many ways GT&E is serv serving
ing serving the national interest. Our total
activities are covered in a booklet
you can obtain from your place placement
ment placement office, or by writing General
Telephone & Electronics, 730 Third
Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10017.

GEE

Monday, April 4, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

like this one, Hope continued.
If we pull out of Viet Nam, we
will have the same thing in other
countries.
Weve got to weigh our sys system
tem system against theirs. Just look at
Hungary, with two rows of barbed
wire surrounding the country, or
the Berlin Wall.
Weve got to throw everything
into the battle in Viet Nam and
end the war, he concluded.

Hes Late
... v*r~
For His Date
By EUNICE TALL
~ Alligator Staff Writer
Bob Dollars for Scholars Hope
was one and one-half hours late
arriving in Gainesville Saturday
for his 8 p.m. .performance in
Florida Gym.
Im sorry folks, he told the
waiting crowd when his plane land landed
ed landed at 4 p.m., but you see I was
traveling in Arnold Palmers
plane, and being his plane it start started
ed started to a little around
Jacksonville. Palmer, one of the
top golfers and Hopes close friend,
loaned the star his new jet to fly
to Gainesville from Raleigh, N.C.,
where he had performed before
North Carolina State students Fri Friday
day Friday night.
Actually the flight was on time
but when the pilot learned Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville doesnt have jet fuel, he re returned
turned returned to Jacksonville to refuel.
Hope stepped off the jet t 6 a
clear, sunshining Florida day and
a cheering crowd of 300. Wearing
a double-breasted dark blazer, he
smiled at the fans and proceeded
through a receiving line.
He then stepped onto a small
podium set up on the air field, and
spoke informally to the town resi residents
dents residents and students.
Hope left Gainesville Sunday to
play golf in Clearwater before
continuing his southern lour.
Among the dignitaries welcom welcoming
ing welcoming him at the airport were Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Mayor Jim Richardson, UF
vice president and Mrs. Robert
Mautz, Chamber of Commerce
Executive Vice President and Mrs.
Billy Mitchell, Col William N.
Boaz Jr., professor of aerospace
studies, Buddy Jacobs, president
of the UF student body and his wife,
Julie, Cadet Col. Alan Wright of
the Arnold Air Society (AAS), Jim
Simmons, commander-elect of the
AAS, Dale Rubley, member of An Angel
gel Angel Flight, and Dr. Irvin Wein Weintraub,
traub, Weintraub, president of the Gainesville
Boys Club.
. f amanat VANTAGE
For Toaroamant Flay
. Approx. SMinhn Coat
ruii PROFECTEB 1
Far CM Hay M
Approx. Itrtaploy Coat
Tannla II M
Badminton W J
UMAMT MUITIJIY
For Rapvlor Ftiy
Approx, ttrtaftap Caat
Tonnla W M
r EadmlWtOH a a a a a $4

Page 9



Page 10

' The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 4, 1966

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silt? -IIIh m |By^Hra§li9p!iiiP~
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OFF FOR THE FRENCH
FOREIGN LEGION?
Well, when you dont have any hair, you have to
have a substitute/ said UF Vice President Robert
Mautz. In the hot sun Saturday afternoon waiting for
Bob Hope to arrive, Mautz did the most practical
thing so his head wouldnt get sunburned.

W Jmm
* .^LWLji * a|l| W '^MpPSM
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Alligator Staff Photos
By Nick Arroyo, Sam Johnston and Ron Sherman

A Day To Remember..,

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HOPE ARRIVES AT UNIVERSITY INIl |
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A LIVE GATOR FOR YOU
Mr. Hope, a pretty Angel Flight member sa>s.
UFs Dale Mabry Chapter of Arnold Air Society, o.
which Hope is national honorary president, pre presented
sented presented him with a golden Alligator for his coming
to the UF.



! kill
SKKKBBBbSB 'F?
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IRIS FAITH
. . sings her heart out and
enjoys it, too.


1966 Dollars For Scholars
Bob Hope Benefit Show
Sponsored By UFs Arnold Air Society

jfff i#| ;| \., *\i x.
81/ ~ n

m -35 £j
'FOR ORANGE JUICE ONLY ...
Student Body President Buddy Jacobs presents
Hope with a silver bowl in appreciation for his
participating in Arnold Air Society's benefit show
for the 1966 Dollars for Scholars drive.

/HP am 't \ "/t*

§ % -

Monday, April 4, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

4* f %
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HOW NICE IT IS
>
Donna Berger, Miss University
of Florida and a member of UFs
Angel Flight, presents Bob Hope
with an honorary membership in
Florida Players. He received a
golden screw, the sign of a Play Players
ers Players pledge.

Page 11



Page 12

:, The Florida Alligator. Monday, April 4, 1966

I
I
IFC DONATES TO CANCER CRUSADE

Clyde Taylor (right), IFC president,presents Har Harvey
vey Harvey Sharron, co-chairman of the Campus Cancer
Crusade, with a donation of $250 and 100 pints of
blood. The Crusade will last until this Saturday and
the campus gnal is $3,000.

'UFO Found By Gainesville Man

Numerous residents have re reported
ported reported seeing UFOs recently, but
Thomas H. Patton saw one land
in the NW section Sunday morning,
picked it up and turned it over to
the police. v
It turned out to be a five inch
by two foot section from the out outside
side outside structure of a military air aircraft.
craft. aircraft.
Lt. Col. James W. Bryant, UF
Army ROTC professor, identified
the section as a piece from a
HU-IB helicopter. The helicopter
according to Bryant had been in
town for several days on display
in connection with AFROTC acti activities
vities activities on campus. Throughout the
period it had made frequent flights
over the city and campus.
Bryant said the aircraft is now
at Ft. Rucker and officials are
choking to see why the. section
flew off.

4
f
Does
this f I
\ /
spot v___y
feel sticky?
f*
I' :
NEITHER DOES OLD SPICE STICK DEODORANT
Dries as it applies ... in seconds. And stays dry! Gives
you fast . comfortable . dependable deodorant
protection. Lasting protection you con trust Try it.
Old Spice Slick Deodorant for Men. 1.00 plus tax.

Patton and his wife said they
saw the object fall as Patton was
leaving for his office Sunday morn morning

ROTC REVIEW HELD SATURDAY

The UF Army and Air Force
Graduation Review was held Satur Saturday
day Saturday and was conducted by some
3,000 cadets.
Supervisory responsibility for
the reviews alternates between the
Army, which was in charge of this
second annual review, and the Air
Force.
The review had four purposes:
general recognition of all gradu graduating
ating graduating cadets; specific recognition
of certain cadets in the form of
awards and decorations; continu continuance
ance continuance of tradition; and expression
of appreciation for public and uni university
versity university support and interest in the

All the fraternities and sororities have been asked
to make their own contributions of any size, Sharron
said. These should be turned in to Bill Bryan in 128
Tigert Hall. Faculty and staff members have been
mailed their contribution cards, he said.

ing morning about 9:45. It came to earth
about two blocks from their home
at 211 NW 25th Street.

ROTC program.
The Air Force Harold E. Paul
Trophy was presented to President
J. Wayne Reitz by Col. William N.
Boaz Jr., professor of aerospace
studies. This trophy was won by
the Air Force Billy Mitchell Drill
Team at the Mardi Gras Parade
in New Orleans.
Dr. Reitz was also presented
with the National Sectional Inter Intercollegiate
collegiate Intercollegiate and International Tro Trophies
phies Trophies by Colonel Mitchell, pro professor
fessor professor of military science. These
trophies were won by the Armys
Gator Rifles for marksmanship in
February.

Leaders Support Reitz

Buddy Jacobs, Student Body
President, said Saturday the re removal
moval removal of two editors of the student
newspaper, The Alligator, had the
support of student leaders.
Jacobs said the students had been
concerned about inconsistent
news coverage and lack of objec objectivity
tivity objectivity and petitioned President
J. Wayne Reitz about it.
The Board of Student Publica Publications
tions Publications removed editor Benny Cason
and named Andy Moor acting edi editor
tor editor to succeed him Tuesday night.
Reitz named Drex Dobson acting
editor Wednesday afternoon.
Dobson was formerly Alligator
managing editor before being
named acting editor. We as stu students
dents students initiated and now support this
action wholeheartedly, said
Jacobs in a statement signed by a

BSH
ma*r I mm Warn I
A Mfftc ai cm aim
fill# H *wiwiw
cV av,tl!
K^-'
wtmrnm,^.
.. BEE
BARN
2029 N.W. 13th STREET

number of other student leaders.
The student leaders petition is
on page 5.
Wermont Speaks
Dr. Irv Wermont will deliver an
address on The Art of Cram CrammTng*
mTng* CrammTng* Thursday at 8:15 p.m. in
the University Auditorium.
Jack Zucker said Dr. Wermohts
speech is a Florida Union Forums
Committee presentation timed to
coincide with the approach of finals.
Wermont, author of Heres How
to Remember, is an educator and
lecturer at Emerson.



r Orange

Campus Calendar
PLEASE TURN IN ALL ITEMS FOR CAMPUS CALENDAR TO THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS OFFICE, FLA. UNION

STUDENTS FOR HIGH: Today and Tuesday, 9-5
p.m., Service Booth.
MURPHREE AREA HALL COUNCIL: Today, 8:45
p.m., FU 218.
ALPHA ZETA: Tues., April 5,7 p.m., 133 MCC.
Installation of officers.
UNIVERSITY DAMES: Tues., April 5, 7 p.m.,
Golf Country Club. PHT Banquet.
YOUNG REPUBLICANS: Tues., April 5, 7:30 p.m.,
FU 215. Delegates to Palm Beach convention to be

Administrative Notices
To Students, Faculty Sc Staff

STUDENTS
GRADUATE FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAMINATION:
The Graduate Foreign Language Examinations in Ger German,
man, German, French and Russian will NOT be held in Walker
Auditorium as scheduled. The examinations will be
given at 9:45 a.m. April 16 in the following locations:
French, Tigert 207; German and Russian, Tigert 208.
GRE APPLICATION DEADLINE: Deadline date for
receipt of applications for the Graduate Record Ex Examination
amination Examination to be given April 23 is April 8. Booklets
on the GRE may be obtained from 235 Tigert.
JOBS AVAILABLE NOW: The Student Employment
Office announced that there are many part-time jobs
now available. The jobs will continue through the
spring trimester. These jobs are part of the Work-
Study Program and are limited to students whose
parents are in the low-income group. For informa information,
tion, information, contact the Student Employment Office, 124
Tigert. Students are needed to begin work immedi immediately.
ately. immediately.

General Notices

RESIDENCE FOR RENT: The University golf course
residence will be available for rental on June 1, 1966.
- This is a two bedroom, one bath home; two rooms are
air conditioned. Call Perry C. Moore, 2131, for an
appointment. Rent, SIOO per month.
UNIFORMS FOR RESALE: The Military Department
will resell Air Force khaki uniforms on April 4. item
include short sleeve shirts at $1 each; trouse

[cash
CONSOLIDATE BILLS
TRAVEL EXPENCE
$25 5600
Marion Finance Company Inc-
B 222 W. TTnivprsitv Ave.

C
TAXES DUE

elected. Plans for fall trimester.
LEG COUNCIL: Tues., April 5, 7:30 p.m., FU Aud.
& FU 324.
ANNUAL FORMAL CONCERT OF UNIVERSITY
CHOIR: Tues., April 5, 8:15 p.m., Univ. Aud. Directed
by Elwood Keister.
SPANISH INTERNATIONAL DINNER: Thurs., April
7, 6 p.m., FU Social Room. Tickets sold until Tuesday
at FU 315 & International Center, $1.50 per person.
Native entertainment and display.

NEW FORM FOR REGISTRATION: Registration pro procedures
cedures procedures will be simplified by the use of a new, single singlesheet
sheet singlesheet form for student information. This form will be become
come become a permanent record, eliminating the use of
several data cards previously used each registration
period. The new data form will be used for the first
time during registration for spring trimester.
PHI ETA SIGMA INITIATIES: Please pick up your
initiation certificates in the office of the Dean of Men,
129 Tigert Hall. They will not be mailed out in individually.
dividually. individually.
GENERAL SCHOLARSHIP LOAN HOLDERS Pre Preparation
paration Preparation of Teachers: Students receiving assistance
for the Spring Trimester should obtain a note from the
scholarship section of the Student Serice Center in
order to complete them in time for registration for
the Spring Trimester.
STATE NURSING SCHOLARSHIP LOAN HOLDERS:
Students receiving assistance for the Spring Trimes Trimester
ter Trimester should obtain a note from the scholarship section
of the Student Service Center in order to complete
them in time for registration for the Spring Trimester.

$1.50 a pair; and low quarter black shoes at $3 per
pair, sizes 9-12.
EASTER EGG HUNT: The University of Florida
Dames will hold their annual Easter Egg Hunt at
2 p.m., Saturday, April 9, at the University Womens
stub (Perry House) on Newberry Road. Children ages
2 to 6 of University students, faculty and staff are
invited. Prizes will be awarded and refreshments
served. The hunt is sponsored by Agriculture Dames.

and

BLUE BULLETIN

Monday, April 4, 1966, The Florida Alligator, Page 13
ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE,
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE.

FLORIDA PLAYERS: Wed., April 6 & Thurs., April
7, curtain at 7:30 p.m. Fri. f April 8 & Sat., April 9,
curtain time at 8:00 p.m. Norman Hall Aud. Ticket
sale: Today and Tues., Noon to 4:30 p.m., FU Box
Office.
JAMIACA TOUR: April 23- 9. 2nd Annual FU Trip.
7 days 5165.00. $30.00 deposit at FU 315.
EUROPEAN TOUR: June 21 August 15. 8 weeks
5310.00. $125.00 deposit at FU 315.

FACULTY AND STAFF
APPLY FOR SUMMER EMPLOYEES: The Central
Employment Center is receiving applications from
students seeking summer employment. All depart departments
ments departments interested in employing student workers during
the summer months should send in their requisition
as soon as possible.
XEROX MACHINE INVOICES: Due to the lack of
complete information being shown on Xerox Corpor Corporation
ation Corporation monthly invoices, an increasing number of dis discrepancies
crepancies discrepancies are being found dating back to July,
and possibly earlier. Each department having a Xerox
Copy Machine is assigned a customer number* and
machine serial number* for the type machine being
used. There is no complete listing showing these num numbers
bers numbers assigned to departments. In order to correlate
all Xerox Machine details, it is requested that each
department using a Xerox Machine submit a memor memorandum
andum memorandum containing the following information to Frank
Jackson, Supervisor, Document Processing, 23Tigert
Hall: customer number, machine model, serial num number
ber number and location.

NEW NAVAL RESERVE UNIT: A new Naval Reserve
unit, which will drill one weekend each month, is being
established at NAS, Jacksonville. Pay billets are open
for four lieutenant commanders, line (1105), one
lieutenant commander, supply (3105), and four lieu lieutenants,
tenants, lieutenants, line (1105). Reserve officers interested in
these billets should contact Commander William
Spellman, U. S. Naval Reserve Training Center,
1800 N.E. Bth Ave., telephone 372-4838.

LOANS I
SHORT TILL PAYDAY
BUYING SECOND CAR
525-S6OO
Marion Finance Company Inc.
j FR G-5333



, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 4, 1966

Page 14

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PRESS COVERED THE NIGHT, TOO
With an eye out for news, the press was there. Mary Golden of the
Orlando Sentinel talks with senior education students Reid Farrow and
Carole Stone about the panelists' remarks at the PTA meeting.
(Alligator Photography By John
Thome, WUFT Film Director)

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PANELISTS HEAR STUDENTS COMPLAINTS

**Theres nothing at all to do in Ocala, com complained
plained complained teen-agers to Diane Blacker, panelist who
reported to parents that high school students want

teen centers.. They feared that recent termination
of dances there would lead to drinking since alco alcoholic
holic alcoholic beverages they found to be easily obtainable.

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Baptist minister J. C. Evans said of Bob Gallup
(right, standing), who reported teen-agers want more
sex education, He handled the subject with great

An Evening At Ocala

sensitivity.'' Gallup said one boy had told him he
was worried that since his parents never had men mentioned
tioned mentioned it that they didnt know about sex either.

By PAT WILKINSON
College of Education
If there is one thing UF secondary education seniors are learn learning
ing learning to do successfully it is to communicate with teenagers the
kind of students they will soon be teaching in the public schools ~
according to their College of Education professor, Dr. Betty Ruth
Ellis.
They proved it in Ocala last week, Dr. Ellis said, when 24 of them
visited the classrooms of 1,200 Ocala High School Students. While
teachers slipped quietly out of the room, the UFers and the OHSers
got acquainted.
What resulted was a rousing give-and-take sessionin which
an older generation often finds a communications barrier and
teenage concerns so revealing that Dr. Ellis* students took their
findings to Ruth Fohl, the school guidance counselor, and O. E.
Daugherty, Marion County Director of Instruction.
Miss Fohl and Daugherty backed up plans for a panel discussion
on Family Communication to be presented at the next PTA meet meeting
ing meeting by six of the 4ED students.
Support also came quickly from the Rev. J.C. Evarrs, PTA presi president
dent president and Ocala Baptist minister, who knows of the communication
potential of college people with teenagers through using them in his
church programs.
Attracted to the March 28 evening session were parents,
teachers, counselors, the press and a UF psychologist, Dr. Carl
Clarke, who is researching the problems of young people as they
enter college.
The panelists were Susan Bartley, Diane Blacker, Bob Gallup,
Pete Macchia and Bill Watson. Moderator was Sam Deitz.
The five problems presented of teenagers were: concern for
more sex education; a better understanding and respect for them as
budding adults; sympathy concerning grades; help In establishing
acceptable recreation programs and better communication in all
areas between them and parents.
The panelists later talked in groups with parents and teachers
to get their view points. Whatever the latter gained from the ses session,
sion, session, the panelists agree that they will bring with them into the
classroom as new teachers new insights about their pupils.
Other secondary education students of the vivacious Dr. Ellis
are finding their senior pre-professionai experiences far from
dull under her guidance. In each instance the age-old problem of
communication between adults and teenagers has been the emphasis
since Dr. Ellis arrival at the College of Education in 1965 from
Wayne State University, Detroit.
She has promoted a unique experiment by 70 seniors to be stu student
dent student aides at Bucholz and P. K. Yonge Schools. They are working
in three-week, one-hour dally sessions individually with 70 teen teenagers.
agers. teenagers.
They are discovering, Dr. Ellis said, that teaching is no simple
matter of technique and no two people learn alike.



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DR. EU/S DISCUSSES 'EVENING
Dr. Carl Clark, research psychologist at the UF Infirmary, discusses with Dr. Betty Ellis, secondary
education professor, Deitz, 4ED, moderator of the Family Comm unication panel discussion,
plans for further investigation of teen-age problems.
High School

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GUIDANCE COUNSELOR
*
TALKS ABOUT ISSUES
Dear Sissy, panelist Susan Bartley (left) read In a letter from
her younger sister, I enjoyed having you home last weekend ... it
was fun having* your sharp clothes to wear . and someone to listen
to me for a Change . . Miss Bartley,talks over the problems of
family communications with OHS counselor Ruth Fohl.

Monday, April 4, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 4, 1966

Page 16

EDITOR GOLDEN SAYS

'Hum or Helps Get To Issues'

By JUSTINE HARTMAN
Allisator Staff Writer
"If Jesus Christ were to put
Charlotte on his itinerary during
the Second Coming, Id be his
contact. First of all hed need a
good reporter, and hed want to
know what Presbyterians are.
So spoke editor Harry Golden,
a Jew from New Yorks east side,
who moved south to Charlotte,
N. C., where he writes about in integration
tegration integration in an all white com community.
munity. community. He feels that handling con controversial
troversial controversial issues with a little bit
of humor helps smooth out the
controversies.
Golden spoke Friday night in
University Auditorium. He is the
author of several books, among
them "America, America,* "For
Two Cents Plain, and is also the
editor and publisher of the Carolina
Israelite newspaper. Friday night
he spoke about the "American Way
of Life, and its promise for the
black man. The talk was sponsored
by Phi Beta Kappa.
If you want to fight communism,
impeach Earl Warren. Report your
neighbor as a heretic or subver subversive
sive subversive this is the way to destroy
the enemy within* urged by the
John Birchers, the Ku Klux Klan Klanners
ners Klanners and other pseudo-patriots.
These are simple solutions we are
handed simple solutions which
will destroy a civilization from
within, Golden said.
As politicians stand on their
platforms crying about government
usurpation of power and preaching
against federal aid to schools, they
know the south has been a federal
preserve for the last 40 years,
Golden said.
The good old American way of
life has changed with the shift from
an agricultural civilization to an
industrial one, with the movement
of the populace from rural areas
to the cities. Problems and chal challenges
lenges challenges without precedent present
themselves with every tick of the
clock.
"There was a time of the old
American way of life you could
run your railroad as you saw fit,
Golden said.
Then the government got into the
business as a referee. They count counted
ed counted employees and passed the min minimum
imum minimum wage and overtime laws.
This became the new way geared
to a new civilization.
"In my own lifetime, our entire
political lives revolved around the
sheriff, the county commissioner
and the precinct. The world was
infinite. When France was men mentioned,
tioned, mentioned, we thought of Joan of Arc,
said Golden.
Now men whose names we cant
pronounce in countries we dont
care to visit can do something
which would change our childrens
lives. "This new American way of
life necessitates total awareness
and involvement, he continued.
The American dream has not
changed, Golden said. It is the idea
of social mobility, an unstratified
society.
"In America, we can rise,
Golden said.
"The American dream is real
except for the black man, said
Golden. "We ask, Where will he
be satisfied, but he wants nothing
that is ours to give. He wants

nothing that wasnt his on the day
he was born.
The Negro has never sued for
rights on the basis of separate
but equal, according to Golden.
The idea of being separate is un unconstitutional.
constitutional. unconstitutional.
"If you gave the Negro schools
with gold door knobs but separate,
they would still be unequal,
Golden said. "What matters is to togetherness
getherness togetherness the exchange of
ideas.
He drew a parallel with the Jews
who survived and even produced
biblical scholars in the ghettos.
"There was really nothing until
the walls came down to enable
them to exchange ideas with the
surrounding society only then
was their Brandeis, or Einstein.
With the establishment of racial
segregation during 1896-1905 the
white man received a certificate
more valuable than money and the
certificate said, "You are super superior.
ior. superior.
With the passage of the Civil
Rights Bill in the mid-twentieth
century, this certificate has been
taken back, stated Golden.
Golden sees two stories asso associated
ciated associated with the social revolution
of the Negro in the south. The
first history is the victory of the
white Southerner, who will win
immediately and overwhelmingly
when the Negro truly obtains civil
rights. Golden sees this happening
even now.
"For 75 years the white South-

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erner has been watching the bus
to see if a Negro was going from
back to front. Sensitive, brilliant
whites have had to sit in Washing Washington
ton Washington airways with one eye on the bus.
The civil rights of the Negro will
mean the freedom of a political
society which no longer will watch
the bus or yell dehumanizing things
from windows, he said.
Golden said that in Negro free freedom
dom freedom the south will find the largest
untapped consumer market.
"Like all immigrants, the Negro
will begin to buy two of everything
he doesnt need, Golden said.
"The Negro not only wiU have
liberated the white South economi economically
cally economically and politically, but he will
have redeemed Protestant Chris Christianity;
tianity; Christianity; he showed it works, said
Golden.
This use of Christianity as a
weapon in a fight for social jus justice
tice justice is the second big story of
the Negros freedom. "The human
story is the same tonight as it was
2,000 years ago, said Golden.
"We have solved the principle of
aerodynamics the eagle uses and
the principle of friction the ser serpent
pent serpent uses, but the greatest mystery
of all is the mystery of human
kindness.
Golden said, "I like the words
of that fellow John in the Bible.
You know, he must have been a
straight shooter.
Golden quoted, "He who says he
loves God and hates his neighbor
is a liar.

1
§§§
' '' T _
.'. .7 ; - ..
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J> '- v _. '
o^*
-
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Will Be Distributed
'' s>
APRIL 15
Only To Those Who
HAVE ALREADY
Purchased Their Copy.
P/CK YOURS UP
AT THE
INFORMATION
BOOTH
ACROSS FROM THE HUB



fOR LOYALTY FUND

The University of Florida Alum Alumni
ni Alumni Association launched its 1966
Loyalty Fund drive in Alachua
County Friday, with $6,093 from
160 donors.
A statewide kickoff breakfast at
the Holiday Inn here provided the
occasion for the aggregate contri contributions,
butions, contributions, including 42 pledges of
SIOO or more from prospective
Century Club members in the
Alumni Association.

Attend Sociology Meet

Four, faculty members of theUF
of Sociology and two
graduate students in the depart department
ment department will participate in a Southern
Sociological Society meeting at
New Orleans, La., April 7-9.
Dr. E. Wilbur Bock will read a
paper on the decline of the Negro
clergy and changes in religious
leadership in the United States in
, this century. He also will parti participate
cipate participate in a discussion on medical
sociology.
Dr. John B. Knox, a visiting pro professor
fessor professor from the University of Ten Tennessee,
nessee, Tennessee, will address society
concerning models of society and
the controversy in sociological
theory.
Dr. Irving L. Webber will pre present
sent present a paper on selectivity in mi migration
gration migration of the elderly to a mild
climate area based on research in
Pinellas County.
Acting as chairman of the ses sessions
sions sessions on problems of aging will be
Dr. Ruth E. Albrecht.
Two graduate students, Hsien Hsienjen
jen Hsienjen Chu and J. Selwyn Hollings Hollingsworth,
worth, Hollingsworth, will read their reports on
a cross-cultural study of the re relationship
lationship relationship between family types
and social stratification.
Other staff members and gradu graduate
ate graduate students plan to attend the
meeting which will draw sociolo sociologists
gists sociologists from states ranging from
Maryland to Texas. ~
DR. J. C. DICKINSON, director

of the Florida!
State Museum,
will outline fu future
ture future plans for
the museum on
Tuesday during
The Second
100 television
program over

WUFT(Channel 5) at 10 p.m. The
15-minute show is sponsored by
the Universitys Alumni Associ Association
ation Association and Florida Blue Key, leader leadership
ship leadership fraternity at the University.
UFS FLORIDA CHAP TER of Phi
Beta Kappa elected officers and
named new members who were
initiated April 1.
New officers of the group are
Dr. James R. Anderson, chair chairman
man chairman of the Department of Geo Geography,
graphy, Geography, president; Dr. Clement H.
Donovan, chairman of the Depart Department
ment Department of Economics, vice president;
Dr. Manning J. Dauer, chairman of
the Department of Political Sci Science,
ence, Science, historian; Dr. John V.
McQuitty, University Examiner,
treasurer; and Dr. Richard H.
Biers, Department of Religion,
secretary.
Initiates include the following
who will be graduated in April:
Michael L. Stratil, Kenneth W.
Allen, Donna Gay Jesse, Lynn Ra Rader
der Rader Cook, Judy Richardson Fink,
Donald W. Adams, Robert W. Es Eschenback,
chenback, Eschenback, Richard A. Secrist,
Michael A. Burke, Wendell Dan
Curtis, Beverly F. Zlotshewer,
Sandra E. Gregory, Louise W.
Weadock, Thomas E. Austin, Pat
Louise Keuning, Bruce N. Stewart,
James w. Pipkin Jr., George 4-
Lyrene, and Jorge Martinez.
Two other initiates were grad gradated
ated gradated in April, 1965, and one in
December, 1965: Charles S. Tullie,
& 9

Alumni Collect $6,093

fan
DICKINSON

Miami attorney William Lantaft,
chairman for the Loyalty Fund
campaign, challenged alumni lead leaders
ers leaders to emphasize three areas dur during
ing during the solicitation of $174,000
throughout the balance of 196 C.
We must strive for 500 mem members
bers members of the Century Club -a
sizeable increase over our 289
members last year, Lantaft said.
We must put renewed emphasis

Anne Chipley Hartman, Cornelia
V. Vbldhuisen, and John Boniface,
Jr.
Alumni initiates are: Lewis Ber Berner
ner Berner and Marshall Warren Nirem Niremberg.
berg. Niremberg.

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on obtaining pledges and support
from iliumni who have not
given before.
Finally, Lantaft stressed,
with a goal of $174,000as opposed
to the $129,000 we raised in 1965,
we must increase our gifts by
one-third. Our motto should be
lts 33 in 66, to come up with
this minimum amount neceksary
to maintain our rapidly growing
program.
Lantaff was joined at the speak speaking
ing speaking rostrum by University Rela Relations
tions Relations Dean Alan Robertson and
Alumni Association President
Stephen OConnell, both of whom
outlined specific aims of the
Loyalty Fund drive in line with
university needs and projects.
This is a year of significance
fo,r the Alumni Association,
OConnell said. We have never
reached 10,000 contributors and
this is a realistic goal in 1966.
There were 8,910 donors to the
Loyalty Fund last year and an
average gift of $14.56. Officials
hope the renewed bid for addition additional
al additional contributors will push the aver average
age average upward, although the national
mean is $44.14.

gJam
f GO, GO, WAYNE FOR 22'
UF President J. Wayne Reitz received a surprise anniversary
cake Friday during the kickoff breakfast for the University Alumni
Associations 1966 Loyalty Fund Drive. Dr. Reitz celebrated his 11th
anniversary as president of the university. Fred Clark, president o
the Alachua County Alumni Club, is shown at Dr. Reitz side.

Monday, April 4, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

t, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 4, 1966

- SfesHE
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ORANGE STRIKES FOR LONE TOUCHDOWN
Paul Ewaldsen catches a Kay Stephenson toss as Blue defender Bobby Downs Is outraced.

UF Sluggers
Top Bulldogs
Coach Dave Fullers baseball
team hit 16 times off five Georgia
pitchers Saturday to win 21-7.
Friday Georgia was on top of the
scoring winning 13 to 2.
Bruce Moore, Florida sedbfid
baseman, smashed two homers and
shortstop Dave Hodges and out outfielder
fielder outfielder Skip Lujack accounted for
two more to lead the Gators in
scoring Saturday. Moore and Hod Hodges
ges Hodges had four runs batted in with
Lujack getting three RBIs.
Florida totaled 16 runs in the
fourth, fifth, seventh and eighth
innings with five Gators crossing
the plate in the fifth inning. Kelly
Prior was credited with the win
giving up 12 hits ans six earned
runs.
Georgia was too much for the
Gators Friday getting three hom homers,
ers, homers, three doubles, and a triple
from four Gator pitchers. Ray
Rollyson went in during the fourth
inning apd was given the loss.
Friday and Saturday, the Gators
will host Auburn in two games at
Perry Field.
Frosh Netters
v
Drop Meet
3
Floridas freshman netters met
their match Friday when they
played Davis Island Tennis Club
(Tampa) losing 5-4. This loss was
the first of the season for Coach
M. B. Chafins team. Saturday,
Florida defeated St. Petersburg
Tennis Club, 5-2.
Coach Bill Potters varsity net netters
ters netters split their weekend matches
losing Friday to Presbyterian, 6- 3,
and shutting out South Florida, 9-0,
Saturday. The varsity now has a
record of 16 wins and 10 losses
with the freshmen 16-1 for the
season. Florida varsity plays Mid Middle
dle Middle Tennessee State Monday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. Both teams travel to Georgia
this weekend for matches with
Georgia Tech and Georgia.
Davis Island Tennis Club, home
of frosh netter Armi Neely, took
three singles and two doubles to
beat the Gators. Neely lost to
Fritz Schunk, 9-11, 6-3, 6-4 in
singles and Dick Schellenger and
Schunk defeated Neely and Steve
Beeland in doubles, 6-4, 6-1. Bee Beeland,
land, Beeland, Captain Jamie Pressly, and
Lee Steele won in singles with
Pressly-Steele taking a doubles
win.
Neely, Beeland, Steele and
Pressly took points in singles Sa Saturday
turday Saturday in St. Petersburg with
Pressly-Steele again winning in
doubles.

The Florida. pHHHH
Alligator
Stands For Believes In Will Work For
QUALITY EDUCATION & FUNDS
NECESSARY TO PROVIDE IT.
ELECT
FINLEY CANNON
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
GROUP THREE
~~ PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISMENT

I .... Join me as an 1 \
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NOTICE
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This Trimester's Publication Os The FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR Will Cease On Weds., April 6.



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Ends Meet In September

By DICK DENNIS
Alligator Staff Writer
Head Gator Coach Ray Graves
wont make- ends meet until Sep September,
tember, September, but Saturdays intra-squad
football game was highlighted by a
trio of players who might make
fans forget Charlie Casey.
Split end Paul Ewaldsen eluded
a staunch defense long enough to
snare a 27-yard TD pass from
spring standout Kay Stephenson and
give the Orange a 7-3 victory over
the Blue.
Ewaldsen led all receivers with
10 catches for 110 yards andaTD.
Speedy flankerback Richard
Trapp showed he should be ready
for big things in the fall. He
gathered in several passes, in including
cluding including one in which he raced to
the Blue 13-yard line.
Only a player of young Jim
Yarbroughs stature could have
made the leaping catch he per performed.
formed. performed. At 6-6, 235, the sophomore
should see p2nty of action at tight

RENTZ ON THE RUN
Larry chased by Orange defenders.

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end.
An estimated 2,000 paying fans
were on hand to witness a score scoreless
less scoreless first half of this first annual
Dollars for Scholars spring game.
Well-executed defensive maneu maneuvers
vers maneuvers kept in the spotlight for most
of the contest.
In the opening seconds of the
tilt, Gunnar Paulson recovered
a fumble for the Orange at the
Blue 39-yard line. Larry McQuinn
intercepted a Larry Rentz aerial
to set up an Orange field goal
attempt by Wayne Barfield.
Tom Hungerbuhler retaliated
with a Blue interception late in the
first half to set up a long field
goal effort by Dave Barnhart.
Two of the most exciting plays
of the first two quarters were
turned in by Graham McKeel and
Barfield, who are battling for the
starting fullback slot.
On third down with 17 yards to
go, Barfield burst through for a
bie: 35-yard gain to the Blue 22-

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Monday, April 4, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

yard line before being downed by
Downs (Bobby).
McKeel made a great effort on
a crowd-pleasing 16-yard recep reception
tion reception of a Stevenson strike to put
the Orange on the Blue 16-yard
line.
The Blue drew first blood in the
encounter. Driving the team from
his own 20-yard line, Rentz spear spearheaded
headed spearheaded the series with three
straight strikes to split end Mike
McCann. Barnhart made it 3-0 with
5:10 left in the quarter on a 24-
yard placement.
The Orange, led by Stevenson
and Ewaldsen, came right back
to score. On fourth down with three
yards to go, Ewaldsen set up the
winning toss with a gain to the 27-
yard line on a bullet pass over the
middle.
Orange tailback Larry Smith
powered his way for 58 yards on
on 21 carries. Rentz and fullback
Tom Christian paced the Blue with
32 yards rushing.

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Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 4, 1966

Like Night And Day

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Staff Writer
Well, weve seen the night and
day of it, said Gator head coach
Ray Graves following Saturdays
second Orange-Blue football clash.
Two weeks ago, the offense
took charge and over 50 points
were scored, continued Graves.
Today, however, the defense was
king.*
Though stating that much work
still has to be done, the Gator
mentor stated he was pleased with
the overall improvement of the
defensive play.
I think the boys played a lot
better defensive ball today than at
the start of spring practice, said
Graves.
In citing some of the star game
performers, Graves picked out de defensive

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fensive defensive tackle Don Giodano, cor cornerbacks
nerbacks cornerbacks Bobby Downs and Bill
Gasiford, and end Steve Ely.
Giordano is without a doubt
the most improved player weve
had this spring, stated Graves.
Hes shown a lot of desire and
a good hard-nosed attitude.
Expressing concern about alack
of experience on the team, Graves
said, As of now, it looks like
about 14 or 15 sophomores will
be starting on the varsity team
this fall
On the offensive side of the ball,
Graves credited end Paul Ewald Ewaldsen
sen Ewaldsen with turning in a good spring
practice.
Were counting on Ewaldsen,
(Larry) Smith, and (Richard) Trapp
to constitute our pass receiving
corps, said Graves.

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