Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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PROMISES OF WAUBURG
There to get those first rays of sun are these three UF lovlies.
Baring their navals to the cold north winds, Helen Kast (lUC), Pam
Skinner (3PE) and Christy Geisman (lUC) are confident that the tans
are soon to come.
NO PRESSURE
Reitz Explains
Gator Decision

President J. Wayne Reitz last
night clarified his statements con concerning
cerning concerning his naming Drex Dobson
acting Alligator editor Wednesday.
Dr. Reitz said he had no desire
to avoid controversial issues.
He feels there has not been a
balanced presentation of student
news in The Alligator this tri trimester.
mester. trimester. His decision, he said, was
influenced in part by student lead leaders'
ers' leaders' claims that their organiza organizations
tions organizations have been slighted in news
coverage.
When asked why his action was
apparently so sudden, and only
five issues of The Alligator re remained
mained remained to be published, Reitz said
the situation was cumulative and
reached a point where action
was required.
I just did not believe since the
total situation had reached a crisis
stage, there was reason in continu continuing
ing continuing the editorial staff of the paper
at that time, Reitz commented.
The incident involving the Blue
Key tapping session last Friday
night was only a part of a total
pattern, Reitz said.
Reitz denied the Blue Key inci incident
dent incident was a catalyst for the action
which resulted in his naming Dob Dobson
son Dobson acting editor.
Combination of circumstances,
including those presented by stud student
ent student leaders was responsible for my
decisions Reitz said. Therewas
no one incident involved in my
decision.
Reitz said absolutely no outside
pressure was imposed by anyone
in his decision in naming Dobson
and his call for opening the sum mer
trimester elections for Alligator
editor again.

Ex~Editors
Speak Out
Former editors Benny Cason,
Andy Moor and Yvette Cardozo
attacked the new editorship of The
Alligator yesterday, claiming in inaccuracies
accuracies inaccuracies and suppression of let letters
ters letters to the editor in their behalf.
The three dismissed editors,
who received statewide newspaper
attention yesterday also said they
plan to appeal their removal.
Miss Cardozo asked students to
compare the fact that this is
getting statewide coverage with
what they are being fed in The
Alligator.
She criticized the fact that no
letters to the editor were printed
yesterday on the controversy, al although
though although she said she had seen
copies of about 20 letters to the
editor in our favor. We're still
waiting to see some of them in
The Alligator, she said.
Moor said the three former
editors are going to see an at attorney
torney attorney today to get advice ap appealing
pealing appealing their dismissal.
They continued to attack the
procedure by which they were re removed.
moved. removed.
Cason saying that he was ter terribly
ribly terribly disappointed in President
J. Wayne Reitz as a person, and
Miss Cardozo saying that We can
refute any one of those seven points
on the petition or we could, if
we were given the chance before
Reitz.
There is still the fact, said
Miss Cardozo, That thatso-call thatso-call(See
(See thatso-call(See Ex-editors, Page 12)

The Florida
a
Alligator
. .' ... - ;.'': / ' t-
Vol. 58, No. 126 University of Florida April 1, 1966

$4,000 ESTIMATED PROFIT
Hope Show Means
/Money For Scholars

By EUNICE TALL
Alligator Staff Writer
The campus has been awaiting
the arrival of Bob Hope for the
past few weeks but Maj. Alton
Hardy of Air Force ROTC says
he doesnt know exactly when the
famed performer will be in Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville.
The well-publicized perfor performance
mance performance will begin in Florida Gym
at 8:15 p.m. Saturday where more
than 8,000 persons will witness the
show sponsored by the Arnold Air
Society.
Maj. Hardy indicated that stu students
dents students are welcome to greet Hope
when he arrives at the Gainesville
Airport sometime Saturday.
As a result of the performance
an estimated $4,000 in profits will
be presented to the Dollars for
Scholars program at the UF which
enables students to attend school
on national defense loans.
Hope will arrive in Gainesville
following a similar performance
tonight in Raleigh, N. C., at North
Carolina State.
*
A long-time supporter of the
Air Force and its ROTC programs,
Hope has been honorary president
of the Arnold Air Society (A AS)
national organization for several
years. Last year the UF organi organization
zation organization prepared a bid to obtain
Hope for this performance.
Because Hope was available for
only one show and because of in intense
tense intense public interest, seating has
been arranged to accommodate the
audience in Florida Gym. The stage
will be located in the center of the
gym floor with seating arranged
completely around it. The center
stage will place everyone close
enough for good viewing of the
entertainment.
No reserved seats were sold,
but each ticket is marked for de designated
signated designated sections within the gym.
Seating within that area is on a
first come, first served basis.
Doors will open at 7:15 p.m.
Holders of all $4 and $3 tickets
are asked to use the entrance on
the east side of the gym while all
$2 ticket holders will enter through
the main doors at the front of the
gym.
Several supporting acts will ac accompany
company accompany Hope. Peggy Womack will
bring an entirely new concept of
dancing to the local audience.
Singer Iris Faith will entertain
with her own interpretations of a
variety of popular songs. J. Fred
Muggs, the Champ Chimp of
NBCs Today show fame, will
provide 15 minutes of entertain entertainment.
ment. entertainment.
The twelve-piece Joe Pace Band
of Daytona Beach will provide mu music
sic music for all the acts.

% Mtfr jg||||||§
808 HOPE ...AND FELLOW TROOPER

Special Day Os Fools
Practical jokers, today is your day April Fool's.
This is the day for playing jokes on friends. Typical is sending
a friend on a fool's errand.
The origins of the practices of the day are obscure. The occasion
is observed almost universally throughout Christiandom. Generally
the custom is traced back to the old custom in France (16th centuary)
of paying formal calls on April 1, one week after New Years Day,
according to the Julian calendar.
When the old calendar was replaced by the Gregorian in 1562
mock calls continued to be paid on April 1 as a joke.
Widespread observance of April Fool's Day began in England in
the 18th century. In Scotland, the making of April fools is called
hunting the gowk (cuckoo). The person made a fool of in France
is called the April tish.
In Mexico the day is celebrated December 28 and is cheifly noted
for the custom that objects borrowed on this day do not have to be
returned.
From ancient times India has had its spring festival of Huli,
ending April 1, in which tricks and pranks play a large part.

Premier
Performance
Os Oratorio
The premiere performance of
UF Humanities Professor Didier
Graeffes oratorio, Moses in the
Desert, will be conducted Sunday
at 4 p.m. in University Auditorium.
The performance is a major
undertaking on several counts, ac according
cording according to Reid Poole, Depart Department
ment Department of Music chairman.
The composition is more than an
hour in length and cast in three
acts, Poole said. It includes 95
separate musical numbers.
Dr. Graeffe has not only com composed
posed composed the music but has also
written the text.
The setting emphasized the dra dramatic
matic dramatic impact of the text rather than
the lyrical or traditional choral
values, according to Poole. The
work is characterized by dramatic
recitative and emphasis on motoric
(See Graeffe.. Page 12)

i
|9HH *" j jyjrjMjl
HARRY GOLDEN
Journalist
Speaks Out
Harry Golden, national syndicat syndicated
ed syndicated columnist and Carolina Israel Israelite
ite Israelite editor, will speak here tom tomorrow
orrow tomorrow at 8:30 p.m. in University
Auditorium.
The Phi Beta Kappa chapter on
(See Golden, Page 12)



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 1, 1966

X jKjjjdgMMm
WmjL
International
SAIGON DEMONSTRATIONS . Anti-government and anti-Ameri anti-American
can anti-American demonstrations by Buddhist students took a sharp turn toward
neutralism today. A crowd of 2,000 surging through the streets of
Saigon put independence from U. S. influence above the fight against
the Viet Cong. The students held symbolic executions of leaders
in the ruling military junta, called the government of Premier Nguyen
Cao Ky a lackely to the Americans and charged that American G.l.s
have turned our women into prostitutes and bar girls.
SUKARNO ORDERS PURGE . President Sukarno today ordered a
complete purge of Communists from all government departments
throughout Indonesia. Radio Jakarta said the order was signed by army
chief Lt. Gen. Sukharto for the President. Todays order, he explained,
was to intensify and coordinate the purge of the government and make
it clean from all elements of the counter-revolutionary ex-PKI Commu Communist
nist Communist party and its mass organizations.
RUSSIANS LAUNCH SHIP . .Russia tonight
launched a new unmanned spaceship in an at attempt
tempt attempt to put the first satellite into orbit around
the moon. The blastoff of Luna 10 came almost
two months after history's first successful
landing on the moon's surface. The official
news agency Tass announced the Luna 10
launching at 1:47 p.m. Moscow time, 6:47p.m.
EST.
National
HOUSE SUBCOMMITTEE APPROVES BILL ... A House government
operations subcommittee has approved a bill to give the public access
to nearly all government records not involving national security. The
action Wednesday meant a showdown with President Johnson over the
so-called freedom of information bill could occur sometime this
spring. It has been rumored that Johnson might veto the bill on objec objections
tions objections that it would cause more problems than it solves.
SANDERS WONT RUN . Gov. Carl E. Sanders said Wednesday
that he would not be a candidate against Sen. Richard B. Russell,
D-Ga., in the Democratic primary this summer. Sanders, 40, said that
Russell has served Georgia with dignity in time of war, peace and
again war and deserves reelection to the seat he has held since 1933.
Sanders, prohibited by law from succeeding himself as governor, was
rumored to be strongly considering opposing Russell because of the
senators health. Russell, 68, was incapacitated for several months
in 1965 with emphysema, but Sanders said he is now in excellent
health.
CHINA POLICY MUST CHANGE . The
Senate Foreign Relations Committee Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday wound up its in-depth hearings on China
with testimony from Prof. Hans J. Morgenthau
that the U. S. must either change its contain containment
ment containment policy toward China or be ready to go to
war. Morgenthau a leading critic of U. S. po policy
licy policy in Viet Nam, said the United States must
accept the fact of Chinese predominance on the
Asian mainland or be prepared to do more than
it is now doing.
Florida
REFUGEES RESCUED . A Norwegian tanker rescued 17 draft-age
Cuban refugees adrift in a small boat in the Yucatan Channel and head headed
ed headed for Houston, Tex., with them, the Coast Guard reported. The Coast
Guard said the Norwegian tanker Caribe was expected to deposit the
young refugees in Houston Friday.
COURT POSTPONES SUIT ... A federal court here has postponed
a hearing on a suit by the City of Miami to have the Florida Last Coast
Railway put into receivership. The city had asked that the strike strikeplagued
plagued strikeplagued railroad be placed into other hands for alleged failure to abide
by the conditions under which it was allowed to emerge from receiver receivership
ship receivership several years ago. No new hearing date was announced by the
court Wednesday.
" ~~
The Florida Alllfxtor reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisements and
to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO PdJITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement Involving typo typoj
j typoj graphical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
| (1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida AUlgator will not be responsible for more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices lor correction must be given before neat insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of ihc University of Florida ind is
published five times weekly except during May, June, and July when tt Is published s ml-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of tlielr authors. The Alligator is entered as second class
matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

Investigation Begins

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) -- With
State Purchasing Commission Di Director
rector Director Ralph Siller still behind the
wheel of his free Ford, a special
Cabinet committee began an inves investigation
tigation investigation Wednesday ot conflict of
interest situations among state
employes.
The committee, headed by Atty.
Gen. Earl Faircloth, expressed
hope the probe would lead to a adoption
doption adoption of a strong code of ethics
to govern state workers.
It was a car, a courtesy vehicle
Wilson, Labor
LONDON (UPI) -- Prime Min Minister
ister Minister Harold Wilsons Labor party
surged into a powerful and ap apparently
parently apparently unbeatable lead in the Brit British
ish British general election Thursday
night.
As swelling returns showed a
strong popular voting swing in favor
of Labor, the British Broadcasting
Corporation said Labor had won.
The Conservatives can not con conceivably
ceivably conceivably win now, BBV said.
A popular vote swing appeared
to be developing in favor of Labor
that could give it a majority of
120 to 130 parliamentary seats.
The British Press Associations
computer predicted Labor would
win an overall margin of 157
parliamentary seats.
The first result reported was
from Cheltenham, a traditional
Exotic Regimen
OXFORD, England (UPI) Uni University
versity University students at this famed
English university town were re reported
ported reported buying up Indian music
records because the exotic music
helps them concentrate on their
studies.
I Gator Ads Just Kill Me!
J
Jim
o
La Brec*
says...
ou get so much more fori
your life insurance dollars from
College Life's famous policy,
THE BENEFACTOR, because
College Life insures only college
men and college men are preferred
risks. Let me tell you more.??
*JIM LA BREC
1105 W. University Ave.
Suite 4
Gainesville, Fla
Tel. 378-2476
representing
THE COLLEGE LI HE
INSURANCE COMPANY
OF AMERICA
. . the only Company seilmg
exclusively to College Men

Jim

loaned to Siller by the Ford Motor
Co. for personal and business use,
that touched off the Cabinet probe.
Siller said Wednesday that he
was still using the auto and that
he had been given no instructions
by any Cabinet officer regarding it.
When asked if he submitted mi mileage
leage mileage reimbursement requests on
the car, Siller refused to answer.
The state pays 10 cents a mile for
gas, oil, wear and depreciation on
employes personal cars when they
are used for state business.
Win Majority
Conservative stronghold which the
Conservatives held. But the pop popular
ular popular voting figures showed a loss
of 2.8 per cent from the vote in
the last election.
Other early results showed
Conservatives holding traditionally
Conservative seats but by reduced
popular vote precentages. Labor
retained Laborite strongholds by
sharply increased percentages.

CESSNA
IS HERE!
NEW MODERN
Ask For Steve While
At The Big Hangar'
At GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL AIRPOR T

I Attention All Students:
FORUMS
COMMITTEE
Questionnaire
In order to get some idea of whom you would like to hear
address our campus, we of the Forums Committee of the
Florida Union Board, would like you to complete the following
questionnaire. The 50 speakers who poll the most votes will
receive letters from the Forums Committee inquiring as to
their availability, costs, etc. Our final selection of speakers
for the next years program will be made with as close regard
to this list as possible. Thank you,
1/ Jack Zucker,
____ Chairman, Forums Committee
The Three Speakers I Would Like To Hear On
Our Campus (in order of preference)
The Topic I Would Like To Hear Debated On
Our Campus I
The Professors And/Or Instructors I Would Most
Like To Hear Address Our Campus (in order
of preference)
l._
TURN in AT THE FLORIDA 1
JJN^ON^NFORMAT^Ot^ESjJ

The question will be asked Sin er
in a hearing before the committee
possibly late next week, Faircloth
said. The other committee mem members
bers members are Secretary of State Tom
Adams and Comptroller Fred 0
Dickinson.^
- They will also look into a report
the head of a frim that has done
business with the state holds a
low-interest mortgage on Sillers
home, and into other reports of
courtesy cars being used by em employes
ployes employes of other state agencies.
Huge discounts with
the International
Student ID Card.
Student ships for
lively, informative
crossings.
The ID card "ill save you 60% on air travel ,n
Europe and Israel Same huge savrngs on hotels
admissions, meals, trains. A must for travelers
Student ships offer language classes art ter
tures international discussion forums and an the
fun of a low-cost student crossing to Europe
Can you afford not to write for details
Write: Dept. CO, U S. National Student Associate
265 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 10016



NOTICE
STAFF AND FACULTY OF U OF F
t
''W 4 '
' a ,\ *' *-
LIFE SAVINGS INSURANCE
v
an insurance on the life of shareholders in the
Campus Credit Union has been added to ser services
vices services available to members. -
LIFE SAVINGS INSURANCE
- matches every dollar a member saves with a
dollar of life insurance up to the $2,000 maxi maximum
mum maximum providing the member is able to perform
the usual duties of his livelihood and is within r
the age limits when his savings are deposited.
LIFE SAVINGS INSURANCE
i age requirements follow:
All savings up to $2,000 deposited by members
in satisfactory health until age 55 and over 6
months are insured 100 per cent. 'The per percentage
centage percentage is reduced below age 6 months and
above age 55 according to this schedule
Below 6 months 25 per cent
From 55 through 59 75 per cent
From 60 through 64 50 per cent
* &
From 65 through 69 25 per cent
LIFE SAVINGS INSURANCE
' x
Example: SSOO saved by a member who is 54
will be insured 100 per cent as long as he
, leaves it in the Credit Union, and as long as
the Credit Union keeps its insurance policy
in force Money deposited after member
reaches 55 will be insured on the sliding scale.
. . . p
The Board of Directors has added this hidden dividend as an incentive
"' ; ' l; j
.. i. , \
for members to save on a regular basis.
Initial deposits are limited to SI,OOO jlk
and monthly deposits limited to SIOO per account mm
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

Friday, April 1, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

[, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 1, 1966

aptitude
'VJt uch noted commentators and critics as Jacques
U Barzun, Clark Kern and Paul Goodman have
made frequent attempts to isolate and analyze various
conditions and trends in American higher education.
They speak of publish or perish, academic freedom,
teaching machines, free universities, and multi multiversities.'
versities.' multiversities.' But they, and hosts of others, have
virtually ignored a force which is subtly, yet radi radically,
cally, radically, altering the course of American Colleges,
high schools, and students. This is the Educational
Testing Service. Headquartered in Princeton, New
Jersey, the ETS silently molds opinions and futures,
determines policies and programs to a frightening
degree.
Promulgator of such multifarious products as
SATs, GREs, Law Boards, Medical School Ad Admission
mission Admission Tests, National Teachers Exams, and
IBM-knows what else, ETS holds in its multiple multiplechoiced
choiced multiplechoiced hands an incredible and awesome ability to
determine the educational future of millions of high
school and college graduates.
From the Ivy League to Stanford, from Chicago to
UT to Rice, university catalogues inform prospective
undergraduate and graduate students that the criteria
for admission will be some combination of academic
record, letters of recommendation, and scores on
some set of nationwide, ETS-administered tests
(please have two copies of your test scores sent to
the Admissions Office immediately). The only major
educational institution to decide that they are more
competent than a computer to decide on the qualifi qualifications
cations qualifications of admission candidates is, strangely enough,
the gargantuan University of California system.
ETS claims that its results provide a standard
method of evaluation for students from different
schools and different parts of the country. They go
further to say that students who do best on their
exams will wind up with the best academic records
-- implying that to ignore College Boards or Gradu Graduate
ate Graduate Records is to invite disaster in the form of
admitting students whose qualifications are somehow
imcomplete and who are very likely to perform
poorly once admitted.
Well and good. Certainly some method of com comparing
paring comparing applicants from different areas is needed.
And certainly no university wants to admit students
who will not do well. But we seriously question the
ability of ETS products to accomplish these tasks
successfully. And the side effects of the heavy weight
given the test scores by admission directors are
both unfortunate and undesirable.
The aptitude sections of both the College Boards
and Graduate Records are blatantly misconceived
and misnamed. The concept that any kind of mul multiple-choice
tiple-choice multiple-choice test could provide an accurate indication
of an individuals aptitude in any area strains the
imagination. Several college seniors majoring in
either mathematics or engineering have told us that
the GRE math aptitude covers not so much
aptitude as it does trickery.
. CyxbiDg the power and influence of ETS is vitally
necessary if the individual is to retain any semblance
of importance in American higher education. At best
the tests provide a convenience for admissions
directors. At worst they assume a mystical, god-like
authority over the aspirations of American students
-- capable in one three-hour session of enhancing
or destroying the future of an individual at his chosen
institution.
-- The Rice Thresher
*
new faces
frt ithin the last 24 hours, there has been a sudden
lii influx of bright, anxious faces flowing in and out
of The Alligator offices. Most of them are very
enthusiastic, eager to do anything they can to help
get the paper out.
Will they stay around next year, or will they
be five-day wonders, disappearing when The
Alligator ceases publication next Wednesday-- never
to be seen again'.'
In the past we have had people coming down to
work, but it seemed that most of them just couldnt
get interested. Maybe it was our fault, and maybe
it was theirs. The point is this: cliquish or not--
there were no more than nine or ten people coming
down to the Florida Union basement five nights a
week to get the paper out.
This is wrong. The Alligator is the students
paper, and as such it should represent a wider
segment of the student body, in staff as well as
in coverage.
With a larger staff, we would be able to give
more attention to some of the groups who feel
they were neglected in the past. This doesnt
mean The Alligator will become a glorified Orange
and Blue Bulletin.
We will continue to step on toes when they need
to be stepped on-- whether it concerns the adminis administration
tration administration or the campus in general, but we will try
to be responsible __ responsible as the voice of
the students.
Its your paper. You, the UF student. We need
your help and support down in the caverns of the
Florida Union -- help for the future.

The Florida. Alligator
'j\ AlapuSj. Ii Out PtwMi Tltt TwA

" Sleepy, You Are Getting Sleepy You
Saw Nothing In The Skies"
Dr. Robert
Hutchins
TT' he Watts area of Los Angeles is a hell-hole, a desert, a morass
W in which thousands of unemployed Negroes are hopelessly floun floundering.
dering. floundering.
Everybody knows this. Everybody knows that nothing has been done
about it. Whatever happens in the rest of the country to income or
employment or education or training does not happen in Watts. It is a
good guess that at least 25 per cent of the male inhabitants of Watts
over the age of 16 are not at work and not in school.
These people know all about the American Dream, and they know they
have no part in it. They can form a distinct impression of the more
vulgar and garish aspects of the American Way of Life, and they know
that even these are denied them.
When we reflect on the light and trivial causes that have provoked
revolutions elsewhere, we must be surprised at the self-restraint, or
the apathy, or the sufferers in Watts. They might be expected to keep
the place in continuous turmoil.
When an outbreak does occur in Watts, the governor talks of main maintaining
taining maintaining law and order, the mayor speaks of an overpowering show of
force and the television commentators say the political future of both
of them depends on the effectiveness with which they repress violence
in the neighborhood. Meanwhile, the police inspector in charge refers
to .unruly elements as the enemy and to his men as troops.
The most remarkable statement on the latest disorders in Watts
came from John A. McCone, chairman of the governor's committee
that investigated the riots of last August. He blamed everything on the
Negroes and their leaders. He said the Negro community had failed to
accept its full measure of responsibility as law-abiding members
of the larger community and the leadership had not been con constructive.
structive. constructive.
The McCone report was mild enough. If all of its recommendations
had been instantly carried out, they would have amounted to little
more than a gesture of good will, an expression of intention to try to
find out how to do something about jobs, education and the police.
Nothing was said about the massive attack on unemployment, povert\
and ignorance that must be made if the people of Watts are to have
the opportunities that most white Americans take as a matter of course.
Almost none of the recommendations of the McCone report have
been carried out. The people of Watts have nothing to look forward to.
It is lnpocritical tor those who are responsible fern the conditions in
Watts to blame desperate people for showing their despair.
Copyright 1066, Los Angeles Times
gators fair

Editor:
I had heard rumors that the bas basketball
ketball basketball team had been having daily
practice since the end of basket basketball
ball basketball season. Until last Wednesday
I had just accepted this as a rumor.
But on March 23, I was in the
gym from 3 until 5 and saw the
whole team there working out under
the close supervision of Coach
Norm Sloan. They were practic practicing
ing practicing when I arrived and were still

practicing when I left.
I was under the impression that
according to SEC rules, there is to
be no supervised practice after the
end of basketball season and that
the penalty would resit]' m dh dhletic
letic dhletic probation of the school in involved.
volved. involved. Am I mistaken about this
ruling or perhaps lias Coach Sloan
been misinformed?'*
A c oncerned Gator Fan

his reply I
Editor:
I want to reply to the many people who have asked H
my reasons for supporting removal of Benny Cason I
as Alligator Editor. This letter is meant to serve I
that purpose. Neither the University Powerstruc- I
ture' the campus politicians, nor outside pressure I
influenced my opinion that Mr. Cason should be H
removed. I feel that my opinion and decision as a I
member of the Board of Student Publications Elec- I
toral Board was a matter of self determination I
dictated by my own knowledge and reason. S
More specifically I based my decision and opinion
on the episode of Friday, March 25. During the I
course of that eventing Mr. Cason exhibited his |
irresponsibility by sending Yvette Cardozo into the I
private and secret Blue Key tapping session. Mr. |
Cason and Andy Moor waited outside in Mr. Casons I
car while Miss Cardozo proceeded to cause a dis- I
turbance by refusing to leave. The Alligator I
editorial staff then adjourned to the Schooner Room I
where they were elaborating on what they considered I
to be the noteworthy accomplishment. Mr. Cason, I
Miss Cardozo and Mr. Moor had such great fun at I
this sport that they then sent back for a second
try two other students one of whom was an Alligator I
photographer armed with a camera and flash bulbs. I
Placing this episode in the abstract it seems like I
a silly reason to suspend the editor of a newspaper, II
and indeed it would have if it were not for the I
relevent factors. Mr. Cason and I have often I
discussed the rights and privileges of students. M
Among these discussed was the right of privacy. I
Privacy applies to groups as well as individuals. I
Mr. Cason was and is well aware that several I
members of Florida Blue Key have been a potent I
force for the recognition of the dignity of students I
as members of a community rather than as mere I
charges of an omnipotent university. Yet, Mr. I
Cason saw absolutely nothing wrong in violating the 1
privacy of a group that deserved to have its pri- I
vate session respected. I
The opinion I formed earlier mellowed into firm- I
ness when a staff writer for The Alligator wrote I
a story describing and criticizing the events of I
March 25th and which story Mr. Cason refused to 1
run for reasons best known to him self. It is arguably 1
excusable to err, but to err and refuse to apologize I
or make amends is to me an indication of immaturity
and irresponsibieity, especially of a person in an
office of expected dignity and integrity. The acts of
Mr. Cason of March 25th and the manner in which they
were done formed the basis of my opinion of his
irresponsibility.
I did not, and do not, agree with the other alleg allegations
ations allegations stated in the petition for removal, I believe
the editorial standiards of The Alligator for this
trimester have been acceptable and the paper
generally of a provocative tone. My action was
based on what, in my considered judgment, were
defensible motives honestly arrived at. I have in
no way abandoned the liberal political orientation
which I brought to my office as Chancellor, but
neither will I allow political liberalism to turn into
suffranee for irresponsible actions.
Herbert T. Schwartz,
Chancellor, Honor Court,
critic
Editor:
In a recent editorial The Alligator advanced the
idea that for a student to be dismissed from the
university while under indictment for a state crime
would be placing him in double jeopardy. That is
positively absurd!
The freedom from double jeopardy is an ole
common law right which was incorporated into
r the Fifth Ammendment of the Constitution of the
United States. It says, .. nor shall any person
be subject for the same offense to be twice put
in jeopardy of life or limb; ... In the Florida
Constitution section 12 of the Declaration of Rights
says, No person shall be subject to be twice put in
jeopardy for the same offense, .
F rom the above citations I would like to make
the following points:
1. Expulsion lrom an academic institution is
not being placed in jeopardy of life or limb.
A person is not held to be placed in jeopardy
until his trial has progressed to the point where ne
actually confuonts the jury.
3. The situation of the state punishing the student
and the University punishing him is analogous r 0
the situation in U. S. vs. Lanza, 2GO U. S. 377
(1!>22) where the Supreme Court rulled that the
state and the national government may BOTH try
a man for the same criminal act.
In the future The Alligator w'ould advance the
welfare of the student body by forgetting about the
absurdity of double jeopardy and continuing to
advocate some more reasonable requests such as
a clarification of exactly what constitutes b
havior unbecoming a student of the University of
Florida. A statement of this nature establishes
absolutely no uidelines for the student and allows
the Faculty Discipline Committee to define it i n
the broadest terms.
Michael Dodson,



law prof has his say

Editor:

It was with deep regret that I
read of the dismissal of Mr. Benny
Cason as editor of The Florida
Alligator, and the subsequent re removal
moval removal by Dr. Retiz of Mr. Andy
Moor and Miss Yvette Cardozo.
Certainly there are circumstances
under which students should be dis dismissed
missed dismissed from responsible campus
positions, but the reasons given
(at least points 1,3, 4,6, and7)
for the dismissals sound like some something
thing something out of a handbook for total totalitarian
itarian totalitarian dictators ( ... harrass harrassment
ment harrassment of State Governmental of officials
ficials officials and friends of the Univer University
sity University of Florida.*' Is this a news newspaper
paper newspaper or a student activity sheet?
If the latter, at least be clear
about it!)
If an editor criticizes the power
structure or friends of the pow power
er power it has always seemed to me
that such criticism where actual
malice could not be found should
be protected under the First
Amendment to the United States
Constitution, see for example, New
York Times v. Sullivan, 376 U. S.
255 (1964). (Ah, but there Igo
waving the Constitution around
like a flag, forgive me, I forgot
we were all a part of an academic
community and annoying cases like
Sullivan shouldnt be tossed obout
in such a reckless manner.)
I think that the dismissal of Mr.
Cason and his staff, if for the
reasons given in points 1,3, 4,
6 and 7, at least indicates two
things: 1. the administration will
not tolerate student criticism of
administrative policy or of political
or non political figures who have
it within their power to rock the
universitys boat. (See for ex example,
ample, example, the letter to Dr. Reitz
from G. W. Karelas in the March
30 edition of The Alligator.)
This would seem to be true, at
least where the student doing the
criticizing is in a position of cam campus
pus campus leadership. 2. That those mem members
bers members of the faculty and student body
Improperly Sober
KALAMAZOO, Mich. (UPI)
Paul Lipford, 42, told a jury Fri Friday
day Friday he should be acquitted of ma malicious
licious malicious destruction charges filed
after he drove his truck through
a meat plant wall. After all, he
explained, he was drunk. The jury
found Lipford guilty.

I A University
L, O
|S v S
In 10
d M **
w 4 ?
i
i e i
8' Shop 6
I Dial Either Number And Then Just Relax
I Theres Some Mighty Fine Eating On Its Way

who advocate sitting down and
reasoning 7 together in order to se secure
cure secure orderly change fail to recog recognize
nize recognize that although some reforms
come about In this manner, there
are circumstances which no amount
of sitting and talking will change,

squelch the infidels

Editor:
Andy Moor is sending out appeals on Gainesville radio station
WDVH for students to write letters supporting the previous editors
of The Alligator. Well, here is a student thoroughly agreeing with
Dr. Reitz'decision to fire the editors. If anybody wants to under understand
stand understand my position, he has only to go back and read the Alligator issue
of Feb. 3, 1966, and observe the slanderous tune of a sports column
by Andy Moor (with Benny Cason guilty of allowing its publication).
It appears that Andy Moors definition of freedom of the press
is freedom to publish whatever He (capital mine) wants.
Best wishes to Drex Dobson for a mature and responsible student
newspaper.
Bruno lachia
clarification
Editor:
The Board of International Activities would like to clarify some
points mentioned in the Editorial of March 28ths Alligator.
The BIA would like to give credit to Bill Chiara, who has been
serving as Secretary of International Affairs this year, but would like
to clarify that this post serves as a link of communications between
the Board of International Activies and Student Government, and that
the policies credited to Mr. Chiara originated and were planned
by the BIA. To be more specific the International House has been
the work of a group of people over a long period of time and no
specific individual should be credited with the project except the
student body president, Buddy Jacobs, who was the first to take
action on the project.
The next point that should be clarified is that the Spanish Conver Conversation
sation Conversation Group was set up by the BIA two years ago. The weekly
international column in The Alligator was originated before the
present Secretary of International Affairs took office. As for the
BIA donating the $159 to WUS and Dollars for Scholars, the plan
was orininated and voted on by the members of the Board of Inter
national Activities and that was when the Secretary first heard of the
proposal.
Hani Masir, Chairman
Board of International Affairs

CESSNA
IS HERE!
NEW MODERN
Ask For Steve White
At The Big Hangar
At GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL AIRPOR T
Waldo Road

as the Board of Student Publications
learned.
I guess its all a matter of
internal dynamics, so why am I
acting so surprised?
Fletcher N. Baldwin, Jr.
Associate Professor of Law

The Alligator regrets it.cannot print
letters over 500 words long. Letters
must be signed, with writer's address.
ft
ft jfi. <
*.
1 Bl||;
;>: ttgip
B.
JS|
ftftftftftHftft
/./IS?* ^VsV>"v?, 7 / ''' . / ; JR.y!^?^'Sfcfe 4 M"' :^>'i
'
. fl 1 (HU
". j 9
masculine
... thats the kind of aroma she likes be- (pb)
ing close to. The aroma of Old Spice. / \
Crisp, tangy, persuasive. Old Spice ... / \
unmistakably the after shave lotion for / \
the untamed male. Try it soon...shes / \
waiting. 1.25 & 2.00
.. .that's th way it is
with Old Spice
@/tfaspice
SHULTON
fi .- o

Friday, April 1, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
Conn-Constellation TROM TROMBONE.
BONE. TROMBONE. Brand new condition, new
condition, new case, Bach 7 mouth mouthpiece
piece mouthpiece Included. Come and try it.
Call 372-9145 and ask for Eric.
(A-126-2t-p).
NIKON BINOC microscope. 4 ob objectives,
jectives, objectives, 2 sets of oculars. S4OO.
Joe Onne, 376-3211 and page, or
376-4364 after 6. (A-126-4t-c).
WEDDING DRESS, complete with
all accessories. Very reasonable,
at once, call 378-4580 after sp.m.
(A-l 26-3 t-p).
LEAVING COUNTRY. Must sell
66 A-H SPRITE, 3,000 mi., 4 mo.
old. Above $1,400. Also 007 Attache
case with a stereo and 3 band
radio. $135. Call 378-1770. (A (A---1
--1- (A---1 st-c).
I "ONE OF 1
THE BEST" I
- Life Magazine g
_ "Sensational!... I
= A Strong And I
s Stinging I
| Picture!" |
== Bosley Crowther,
== N. Y. Times SE
§§ "Pictorialiy g
g Powerful, s
H Cinematically g
| Exciting!" g
3 Archer Winsten, ==
= N. Y. Post s
I "A Loud, Long, g
Powerful B
Cry Os I
Outrage!"
- Judith Crist, g
Herald Tribune g
"A shocker!" -Time Magazine
'i'ibMKp I' iftl) bR^ 1
rVNorfcf
-3-5-7-9 =
rwwfe) I
fi SUN
1 TUES
t&LWWWVIWViVBBW
H B or m ww.' Ir Th Fo>wt
br irvuNosuKC akutacawa
*A rare phet (f Wni ait" -NT Ttmt
r*T

for sale |
GRETSCH Tennessean Elctric
Guitar. One yr. old. Hard case,
S3OO. Call Bernie, 372-7672. (A (A---125-2t-c).
--125-2t-c). (A---125-2t-c).
1965 HONDA 305 Staler Hawk. Less
than 4,300 miles with luggage rack
and saddle bags. Call Bob Ellison
at 376-2320 or call 376-4995 and
leave message. Also have 4x5
Omega enlarger. (A-125-ts-c).
8* x 45*, Two Bedroom HOUSE
TRAILER. Call 376-9005 after
5:30 p.m., or see at Town and
Country Trailer Court, lot T-3.
(A-l 25-ts-c).

Last 2 Days Elizabeth Hartman
f 'n "THE GROUP" J
In Color At 1:00-3:40-6:30-9:20
a will Neva (otqn JRH4^
1 who dusqcd r \
% into b* nit Rg i^^g,^ Ekn | 1
\ JEW 1
f uWrakl, II jLmR 1
..
a 1111 \
f ill toaB oobpBoobi! I
\M ft Wetarf
(BMGITTI BAUDOT IAHNE MOREAU nttaM UiPiVf /
V REORGE HAMILTON
At 1:00-3:10-5:20-7:35-9:45

I
COLOR HITS I
m 2400 Hawthorn* Rood-Rt. 20'Hon* FIU-Soll\ Z rr "t"' FUN I

, The Florida Alligator, Friday^Aprl^^966

Page 6

for sale
1965 HONDA 50. Electric starter,
windshield. $220 or best offer.
2,100 miles, 90 mpg. Call Harvey
at 378-3360. (A-125-3t-c).
OFFICE CHAIR Swivel Chair
with adjustable back, arm rest,
foam rubber seat, retailed for
$75 selling for S3O. Call Robin
at 376-8918. (A-125-3t-c). I
BOAT, 18 Larson Fiberglass,
walk thru windshield, 75 hp. Evin Evinrude
rude Evinrude motor, electric starter and
lift, many extras. Murray tilt trail trailer.
er. trailer. 1419 NE 23rd Blvd. (A-125-
2t-c).

for sale
1963 A-H MARK D. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. No reasonable offer re refused.
fused. refused. See at 306 NE 6th St. Call
376-9991 after 7; before 7, 372-
2528. (A- 22-st-c).
1956 GENERAL TRAILER. 27x8
with 25x8 cabana and awnings.
Very good condition. A real bar bargain
gain bargain for $950. Archer Road Village,
lot: Beta 10. (A-122-st-p).
NEW PUBLISHED 2 Vol. Set. Web Websters
sters Websters 20th Century Dictionary.
Brand new, still In box. Coat
$42.50. S3O firm. 378-3197. (A (A---1
--1 (A---1 22-st-c).

THE CENTER 1
LIVING ROOM COMFORT JUST FOR YOU!
OPENING APRIL 7th TICKETS ON SALE
FLORIDA THEATRE BOX OFFICE
TfffOfrtSC IS ON.,
fc Vf'' MARLON Y ~
r Q* [COLOR ||
2:00-4:21
gjfinfTM i if

for sale I
AIR FORCE ROTC C ADET- A
plete mess dress uniform*
40, trousers 34 x n See M
SW 3rd Ave. In evening <*
2t-p). V |
8 x 33* HOUSE TRAILERS
8 x 25 cabana. Good condl
Roomy closet and storage si
Includes washing machine. M
Call 378-1300 after 6 pm|
124-3 t-p). I
1964 BSA Lightning Rocket, 6l
Excellent condition. Cash or t|
$895. Call Dave Heney, 372-1
(A-108-ts-c). 1

fcsl3
| LAST TIMES TONIGHT
I JEAN HONOR SIAN
I SEBER6 BLACKMAN GARRISON
Meryyn Le Roys production of
| Moment toMomM
I Jounce CaRMCR, HUNTEAt*toouct
I DKxVaNDYKe ES9HR
I Elkp SoMMgR, EES7SI
Awie DiCKfKSON MuW;W
H so stamimc
Em MeRMaN mmSaSi
AS MADAME COCO" ...... ]
SATURDAY ONLY! 1
Johnwqnein
f DONOVAN'S
gator ads /



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I for sale
BEAT THE HEAT An ADMIRAL
window air conditioner will help.
Good condition, less than two yrs.
Old $75. Call 378-2089 after 5.
(A-l 24-tf-nc).
TRAILER, 50xl0, 2 BR, front
kitchen, washing machine, A/C,
1 bedroom now with built-in desk
and shelves. Sell to best offer.
378-2776 after 6. (A-122-st-p).
MUST SELL OR RENT. One bed bedroom
room bedroom mobile home, carpeted,
A/C, all electric, fully equipped,
natural paneling throughout, ideal
bachelor quarters. Loaded with
character.: Location D-l Town
& Country Trailer Park. Contact
Dave Fagen, Rm. 218 C Architec Architecture
ture Architecture Bldg, or Ph. 376-7395. Be Between
tween Between 5 & 7 p.m. or after 10:30
p.m. (A-123-4t-p).

I Thinking About
I Learning To Fly?
I Attend
I Ground School At
I CASSELS IN THE AIR
I New Classes Beginning NOW Easiest
I way to pass the written exam for your
I Private Pilot's License.
I CALL 372-6351
I FOR FULL DETAILS
I
I CASSELS IN THE AIR
I municipal airport
I WALDO ROAD

1
j Join me as an 'j
f / / Airline Stewardess %jjj^
/ PARIS... LONDON... ROME... TOKYO 1
/ If these world Capitals sound exciting to you .. I jHv
/ why not join the big wide wonderful world of \ wdjSK
j Pan Am as a Flight Stewardess.
Pan American World Airways needs girls to fly to Europe, Latin }J
America, Africa, Asia, and the Far East. m
Qualifications: Must be single; age 21 thru 26; height 53 to 58;
weight 110 to 138 pounds; well proportioned; attractive.
Must have good health and vision without glasses. Must have knowledge
of a foreign langua|e. /
' If you meet the above qualifications, interviews will be held on campus
April 5, 1966. Contact the Placement Office, Bldg. H, or phone 376-
3261, ext. 2351, for an appointment.
( K w PAIV AMERICAN
WORLD'S MOST EXPERIENCED AIRLINE W
5- " ; >

| for sale |
STUDENTS ONLY. Brand new
Admiral Air Conditioners, un unredeemed
redeemed unredeemed on lay-away (all sizes).
Pick up payment with nothing down.
Sudden Service Fuel Oil Co., au authorized
thorized authorized Admiral Dealer. Ph. 376-
4404. (A-118-l Qt-c).
SPRING WARDROBE Sizes 8,
9, 10. Sportswear and cocktail
dresses. Specials on a 3-piece
Kimberley suit; Jeune Liegue
dress and White Stag bermudas.
376-5616. (A-121-ts-c).
1964, 54 x 10 ARMOR MOBILE
HOME. 2 bedroom, A/C, electric
kitchen, free lot rent for one yr.,
10 mins, from campus, small a amount
mount amount of equity. Take over pay payment
ment payment of $58.63 per month. 466-
3213, after 5. (A-124-st-c).

Friday, April 1, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

for sale
53 x 10 GREAT LAKES Mobile
Home. 2 bedroom, central heat
and air conditioning, 4 yrs. old.
$3500. Call 372-0034. (A-123-
st-c).
LIKE NEW, only 6 months old.
10 x 48, 2 bedroom TRAILER.
MUST SELL. Call 376-7708 after
5 p.m. (A-124-3t-p).
for rent
COMPLETELY FURNISHED du duplex
plex duplex apt. Available for Spring Tri.
Neat, spacious, A/C, 2 BR, 3 blocks
from campus. Compare at sllO
monthly (includes water). Call 376-
6482 after 5 p.m. or weekends.
(B-126-4t-p).
TWO BEDROOM APT. Close to
campus. Perfect for 4. Ideal for
adding personal touch. $125.1016-
1/2 SW 4th Ave. Call 372-6123.
(B-126-lt-p).
AVAILABLE NOW. 1 bedroom mo modern
dern modern A/C apt. Near Univ. and Med Medical
ical Medical Center. Adults only, no pets,
lease required. S9O. Ph. 372-3488
or 376-4360. (B-126-4t-c).
AVAILABLE APRIL Ist. 2 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, A/C house trailer. S7O per
month. Browns Trailer Park, lot
10. Ph. 378-2863. Mrs. Wrighter.
(B-126-4t-c).
QUIET CLEAN modern 3 bedroom
duplex, kitchen unfurnished. 5
miles from downtown. $75 a month.
Call 372-2648 or 376-5849. (B (B---126-4t-c).
--126-4t-c). (B---126-4t-c).
AVAILABLE MAY Ist. 1 apt. for
4 students, 2 blocks from campus.
Air conditioners, $l2O per student
for summer semester. 1918 NW
Ist Ave. Call 372-3572. (B-117-
lOt-c).
UJuiA/
rentals
llmurrjiig
1620 W. Uniy. Ave.

Page 7

for rent
HOUSE. S9O, 2 blocks from cam campus.
pus. campus. Available April 27th and thru
Fall and Winter. 376-6671. (B (B---125-3t-c).
--125-3t-c). (B---125-3t-c).
HOUSE FOR RENT. 4 mos. (April
- Aug.), 3 bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths.
1 block from campus. Contact Mrs.
Moeller, 376-4471. (B-125-3t-p).
COOL ROOM for Summer Tri.
5 blocks from campus. $25/per $25/person,
son, $25/person, male/month. Private bath.
Call Paul, 378-4059.(8-125-2t-p).
NICE COOL QUIET ROOM in pri private
vate private home. All modern conven conveniences.
iences. conveniences. Call 376-5368; 376-2100.
202 NW 12th Terr. (B-125-st-c).
CLOSE TO CAMPUS. Large 2 bed bedroom
room bedroom furnished apt. Available for
summer trimester at reduced rate.
912 SW 6th Ave. 372-7989. (B (B---125-2t-c).
--125-2t-c). (B---125-2t-c).
SPARKLING MODERN air condi conditioned
tioned conditioned 2 bedroom furnished apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Available April 26th. Re Reserve
serve Reserve now. No lease. SIOO for two.
slls for three. 3314 NW 21st St.
376-0894. (B-125-2t-c).
CHOICE ONE BEDROOM furnish furnished
ed furnished apt. A/C, available April 25th.
Horne's Apts. Ph. 372-2436. (B (B---121-ts-c).
--121-ts-c). (B---121-ts-c).
MODERN SPLIT LEVEL APT.Sky
lighting with upstairs bedroom,
walk-in closet, 2 blocks from cam campus,
pus, campus, large kitchen with washing
machine. A/C, reduced summer
rates. 378-4064. (B-125-ts-c).
VILLAGE PARK APT. A/C, pool,
2 bedroom for summer. Suitable
for 2-3-4 occupants. Call 378-
4886. (B-125-3t-c).
VILLAGE 34, SECOND EDITION.
Located near Univ. Golf Course.
328 SW 34th St. 24 new 1 bedroom
apt. units, furnished and air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Available April Ist. Rent
SIOO per month. See Resident Man Manager's
ager's Manager's Apt. on premises after 5
p.m. Lou Schilling, apt. 10. Man Managed
aged Managed Ernest Tew Realty Inc. 376-
6461. (B-108-ts-c).

for rent
k
-
SEX makes no difference; it's still
only $35 per person for this spa spacious
cious spacious apt. for 4. Two bedroom,
furnished, A/C, swimming pool,
available May Ist, finished lease
through Aug. 378-3092. (B-124-
3t-c).
DOUBLE AND SINGLE ROOMS
for men for third trimester. Pri Private
vate Private entrance, private bath, re refrigerator,
frigerator, refrigerator, reasonable rate, 3
blocks from campus. Call 372-
8929 after 3 p.m. 327 NW 15th Terr.
(B-l 25- st-c).
ONE BEDROOM split level apt.
Studio type, A/C, sublease for
Spring Tri. 1824 NW 3rd Place,
Apt. 22. 378-3584. (B- 26-3 t-c).
FURNISHED APTS. Two bedroom
furnished apts. Available end of
April. Special low summer rates.
Right near campus. Suitable for
up to 4 students. Call Mrs. Jones,
376-5636. (B-120-ts-c).
APT, FOR RENT. B" Term,
Village Park. Air conditioned.
S4O mo. for 4 or 2, less than
mile. Ph. 378-4165. (B-124-3t-p).
ONE BEDROOM furnished A/C apt.
Take over lease at reduced rates;
transportation needed. 378-4635.
(B-124-3t-c).
THREE BEDROOM HOUSE. Cool
during summer, completely fur furnished,
nished, furnished, wall-to-wall carpeting,
TV aerial, S3OO for entire tri trimester.
mester. trimester. Call 372-5508. (B-124-
3t-c).
TWO BEDROOM completely fur furnished,
nished, furnished, kitchen equipped apts. 1/2
block from Law School. 1238-A,
B, C, SW Ist Ave. (B-124-3t-c).
LARGE ONE BEDROOM APT.,
walking distance to campus.
Available beginning Spring Tri.
1604 NW 3rd Place. Call 378-
3042. (B-124-3t-c).
COMFORTABLY FURNISHED one
bedroom duplex apt. Ideal for mar married
ried married couple. SBS a month Includes
water. Available after exams. Call
372-7223. (B-124-3t-c).
ONE BEDROOM furnished apts.
Air conditioned, near Univ. Ph.
372-9569. (B-123-4t-c).
AIR CONDITIONED APTS. For
Summer. Suitable for 2 or 3, $l3O $l3O-for
-for $l3O-for A or B Term. Suitable
for 3 or 4, SIBO per Term. Call
376-8990, 8 a.m.- 5p.m.,0r 7p.m.
- 10 p.m. Also renting for fall.
(B-115-ts-c).
MODERN ONE BEDROOM APT.
2 or 3 people, 3 blocks from cam campus,
pus, campus, furnished, including washing
machine. A/C. Call 378-1530. (B (B---121-ts-c).
--121-ts-c). (B---121-ts-c).
ATTRACTIVE ROOM in modern
home. Ideal for student who needs
a quiet, pleasant place to study.
372-7883. (B-123-ts-c).
wanted
WANTED: Ride to Detroit, Mich.
Anytime after April 16th. Will pay
your entire gas bill. Call Dave
Peace. 372-9352. (C-126-st-p).
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES to
share two bedroom apt. for Spring
Trimester. 4 blocks from campus,
A/C. $29 per month. Call 378-3132.
(C-124- st-p).
NEED 3 FEMALE ROOMMATES
to share high-rise apt. for summer
trimester. Special rate for sum summer.
mer. summer. Call 378-1406. (C-122-3t-c).



The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 1, 1966

Bf;' M>.Mfc, ** W*s H
£'}'[ . s / Birff&.f >', .jW
1 v ,-s %£3& : Br \>*
luMTlS^Kg.
K a i|
Three examples of what dons the beachside at Camp Wauburg are
these three young ladies Helen Kast, 2UC, Pam Skinner, 3PE, and
Christy Geisman, lUC.
Camp Wauburg.-
Secluded Spot

camp Wauburg, located south on
Highway 441 from the UF campus,
offers something for everybody
Located by and named for Lake
Vauburg the Camp offers such
activities as swimming, sunning,
canoeing. The Camp is also the
home of the Gator Ski Club and
he UF Sailing Club, which meet
ff tdarly to enjoy the lake and
ts facilities
Admission is by student iden idenification
ification idenification card and faculty and staff
xay also use the facilities Student
tovemment provides free bus
ransportation over the weekend
nth regular stops scheduled at
oints all over campus

BoSB '
" Sir ? ~||| ? x
Cj j.. : IB jjat HHiL
.H HL I
teHH>Ji Vi . iii imiHii if- >wHk
&& WfJ< -9 r**r
& w#vv3^B\
Robert Wilson, SPH, has the weight ad advantage
vantage advantage on his side as he keeps Carol Sewell,
3PH, suspended in the air.

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wnos chicken? This photo photographer
grapher photographer dared Tom Jackson,
Dartmouth student down hey e for
vacation to jump in the water.
Theresa McCaughan 2VC, oc
cepted the predicament on the con
dition that Jackson join her. Re
suit? Two chilly people. Student
reported water temperature in t
low 60s.



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, wa ,-.-.. v- S rT *P> ;'**
M lW^Jt>fcrfrw^B 9 *^&Js atfc~
Getting away from the
masses of humanity on the
beach are these two univer university
sity university students who have all the
wind they need to move their
boat around the lake.
k *.'*& J .*K.
,/^H
. i HL £
PIS#:. ;
fIHnHV :T
m&mm*MMtik bBP
, 'm "wiiiia, BBk
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, WfmL £&& *9stlffiF
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if
Capitalism! It looks like Eddie Keig, 9, is
mixing business with pleasure. Actually £/ifl£
book you see belongs to his dad Professor
Norman Keig f assistant professor of eco- \
nomics.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| wanted
ROOM FOR RENT in private home
for mature male student for Spring
Trimester. Separate entrance, li linen
nen linen and maid service. 376-5360.
(C-121-ts-c).
NEED 3 COED ROOMMATES for
Summer. Private bedrooms.
Transportation needed to quiet
neighborhood, large yard. Call
378-3337 anytime. S2O/mo. (C (C---1
--1- (C---1
TWO MALE ROOMMATES for
Summer Trimester. 3 bedroom,
A/C, furnished, private lot. $37.50
a month, share utilities. Call 378-
2157. (C-126-lt-c).
CHALLENGED BY AN INTEREST INTERESTING
ING INTERESTING SOCIAL EXPERIENCE IN IS ISRAEL?
RAEL? ISRAEL? Todays frontiers are being
opened as much by the dedicated as
by the adventurous. In Israel you
can reap the very personal bene benefits
fits benefits of being both. Through Sherut
Laam you can find yourself ful fulfillment
fillment fulfillment volunteering your know knowledge
ledge knowledge and skills, in education, so social
cial social work and health services; or
by participating in an exciting so social
cial social experience in communal living
in a Kibbutz for a year's time. The
fourth group of volunteers is sche scheduled
duled scheduled to leave in June 1966, for a
year of voluntary service in the
Kibbutz or immigrant centers in
development areas. For the most
challenging experience of a life lifetime,
time, lifetime, call or write today for full
information. Sherut Laam, 515
Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 10022.
(C-126-lt-p).
WANTED: One male roommate for
Summer Trimester. Furnished, 2
bedroom, A/C apt. 2 blocks from
Law School. Call 372-0854. (C (C---126-4t-c).
--126-4t-c). (C---126-4t-c).
MALE ROOMATE to share 2 bed bedroom
room bedroom apt. 3 blocks from campus.
Call 378-358 '. (C-l 26-3 t-c).
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT. Coun Counsellors
sellors Counsellors wranglers wanted for
large Eastern Boys Ranch. Horse Horsemanship
manship Horsemanship required. Work with boys
age 8-16. For more information,
378-4840 during week. (C-117-
lOt-c).
LIFE GUARDS WANTED, 3 or 4
to work in Atlanta, Ga. Start April
30th, WSI preferred. 378-4423. (C (C---1
--1- (C---1 2t-c).
FEMALE WANTED to share home.
Must have own transportation. S4O
a month. Call 372-7186. (C-124-
Bt-c).
WANTED an individual 21 or older
who needs a FREE RIDE to Chica Chicago.
go. Chicago. Leave April 20-22. Call 372-
9464. Rm. 1046.,(C-124-3t-c).
NEED 3 ROOMMATES for Sum Summer.
mer. Summer. Private bedrooms. Trans Transportation
portation Transportation needed to quiet modern
neighborhood. Large yard. Call
378-3337 anytime. S2O/mo. (C (C---123-3t-c).
--123-3t-c). (C---123-3t-c).
NEED MALE ROOMMATE to
share modern A/C apt. with three
others for Spring Tri. $125 for
Tri. Call 378-3240. (C-123-st-c).
NEED ONE FEMALE ROOMMATE
to share large furnished apt. for
summer tri. One block behind Nor Norman
man Norman Hall. Ph. 376-4589. $45 a
month. (C-124-2t-c).
WANTED ONE FEMALE ROOM ROOMMATE
MATE ROOMMATE to share split level apt.,
1824 NW 3rd Place. $35 monthly.
April Ist Aug. Air conditioned.
378-1278; 378-2068. (C-!24-3t-c).

help wanted
CONTROLLER. Men to train for
controller assignments which offer
excellent opportunity for those
qualified. Age 25-38. College edu education,
cation, education, major in Business Admin,
or accounting. Experience would
be advantageous, but not absolute absolutely
ly absolutely essential. Many outstanding em employee
ployee employee benefits. Apply Personnel
Dept., Sears, Roebuck and Co.,
1420 NW 23rd Blvd. (E-126-4t-c).
AIRLINE STEWARDESS for Pan
American World Airways. Campus
interviews Tuesday, April sth.
Contact Placement Office, Bldg. H.
Ext. 2351, for appointment. (E (E---1
--1- (E---1 3t-c).
MAN AND WIFE student to oper operate
ate operate popular motel for the month of
May 1966. Motel experience neces necessary.
sary. necessary. Call 376-4667 for interview.
(E-125-ts-c).
MALE HELP WANTED. Beef boner
needed. Part or fulltime. Apply at
McCallum Wholesale, 504 NW Bth
Ave. (E-125-st-c).
WAITRESS WANTED. Must be 21.
Work 3 hr. lunch shift. See Mrs.
Druash. Apply Schooner Room,
1222 W. Univ. Ave. (E-119-st-c).
WAITER WANTED. Must be 21.
No experience necessary. Ph. 37f>-
9335, from 9-l2a.m.(E-l 24-ts-c).
FULLER BRUSH CO. needs stu student
dent student representative in Diamond
Village, Flavet m and Schucht.
Can be worked in off hrs. with
average of $2.00 per hr. in earn earnings.
ings. earnings. Also need part or full time
help for other areas of Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. Write to H. Silver, 1028
Clearwater Dr., Daytona Beach,
Fla. (E-l 17-ts-c).

ll'
._ i
T//£ GOLF JACKET
... cr~ ; 1
-. by LONDON FOG
Leave it to London Fog to do right by the golfer. First youll
note the famous London Fog sense of style, classic, simply yet
tastefully cut, with clever touches like the convertible English
collar that buttons up for rough weather. Second, youll exper experience
ience experience the London Fog practicality, pure Calibre Cloth (65% Dacron/
35% Cotton) that wards off the wind, sheds rain, and washes in a
wink -- unconditionally.
gs iitmmm
225 West University Avenue

WIA T M
Os 0I S

Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 1, 1966

help wanted
NEED EXTRA CASH? Local com company
pany company needs several students or
faculty members who would like
to earn from SSO to SIOO per week
part time.Call372-7811,9-10a.m.
for further information. *'E-124-
ts-c).
autos
1964 BLUE MG-MIDGET. Radio
and heater, luggage rack. Call
376-3561. (G-l 23-ts-c).
19@4 ENGLISH FORD. New battery,
5 new recaps, 1966 license plate,
in very good condition. S9OO. Diane
Walser, 372-9394. (G-126-3t-p).
MUST SELL 1961 RENAULT.
Needs repairs, priced according accordingly,
ly, accordingly, recent paint, 3 new tires, looks
good. Call evenings and weekend,
378-1400. (G-125-2t-r>).
1964 CORVAIR Spyder Turvo Turvocharged,
charged, Turvocharged, 150 hp, 4 speed, full
instrumentation, wooden steering
wheel, radio, excellent condition.
378-3305. (G-l 25-2 t-p).
Good Used 1955 DODGE. Ideal stu student
dent student car. Good interior. 4 new
tires. Asking S2OO, but will listen
to reason. Call 378-1907 this weeL,
after 9 p.m. (G-126-3t-p).
1954 CHEVROLET, Belair 4 door,
stick, radio, 2 spares, original
owner. See and make offer. Ext.
2811; 37 -5510 after 5. (G-125-
3t-p).
MUST SELL 1962 RAMBLER. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Severe financial
need. Highest offer. Call 378-4296.
(G-124-3t-c).

autos
1959 BLACK CHEVROLET CONV.
Good condition, 1 owner, factory
348 cc, high performance, 335 hp,
4-speed transmission. Positra Positration.
tion. Positration. $875. 372-7130.(G-124-3t-c).
services
*
HORSE HAVEN RIDING SCHOOL.
Group and private instruction.
Hunt, seat and jumping. Excellent
pasture for your horse. Call 376-
0367 or 376-3494. Look for sign
6 miles west on Newberry Rd.
opposite store. (M-105-ltf-c).
JUNIOR COED seeks regular
afternoon or evening babysitting
job for Term A. Regular rates.
References if desired. Julie, 372-
9348. (M-125-3t-p).
WEE FOLKS NURSERY SCHOOL.
Two locations to serve you. 616
NW 9th Ave. * uptown, phone
372-4525 and 2706 SW 34th St.
near Archer Rd. and Medical Cen Center,
ter, Center, phone 372-5466. By hour, day,
week or month. (M-124-Bt-c).
NOW OPENING. Teddy Bear
Nursery. 3 departments, com completed
pleted completed infant dept. Planned
program for children over 3.
Central heating and air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Ph. 376-0917. 1214-1/2
NW 4th St. (M-116-ts-c).
lost-found
FOUND In Silvermans ladies
dept., silver bracelet. Owner may
call 378-1611 and identify. (L (L-
- (L-

Don't just sit there,
Wallace Middendorp.
Make a noise. Or drink
What did you do a
when Joe (Boxcar)
Brkczpmluj was W #
the
football team just
because he flunked f i
six out of four of
did you do, Wallace
Middendorp 9
And when the *StSIKimSESSSS£SSSSSS9W
school newspaper's WALLACE MIDDENDORP SAT HERE
editors resigned in
protest because The Chancellor wouldn't allow the
publication of certain salacious portions of
"Night In a Girl's Dormitory"
you just sat, didn't you 9
You've made a mockery of your
life, Wallace Middendorp!
You're a vegetable.
Protest, Wallace Middendorp.
Take a stand. Make a noise!
Or drink Sprite, the noisy soft
Open a bottle "of Sprite at
the next campus speak-out. Let
it fizz and bubble to the
Let its lusty carbonation
echo through the halls of ivy.
Let its tart, tingling
exuberance infect the crowd
with excitement.
Do these things, Wallace
Middendorp. Do these things,
SPRITE. SO TART and what big corporation is
and TINGLING. going to hire you 9
IE-JUST COULDN'T

lost-found
LOST Men's prescription glass glasses,
es, glasses, black frames -- hard, dark
blue carrying case with light blue
tape on front. Call 378-4445.(L 378-4445.(L---126-lt-p).
--126-lt-p). 378-4445.(L---126-lt-p).
t
: real estate
MARRIED STUDENT, why pay
rent? 3 bedroom, 1 bath, large
shady fenced backyard. Close to
Univ., swimming, golf. $12,900
with low down, 121 NW 25th St.
372-7715 for appointment with
owner. (I-119-ltf-c).
LOOKING FOR INTERESTING
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT?
Interesting summer jobs are available in
the following areas: National Parks, Mari Maritime
time Maritime Work, Federal Aviation Agency, Bureau
of Land Management, Geological Survey,
National Bureau of Standards, Agricultural
Research Service, Soil Conservation Serv Service,
ice, Service, Forestry Service, Bureau of Public
Roads, Post Office, Public Health Service,
The Smithsonian Institution, Youth Camps,
and many other areas.
For our 16-page brochure on how to apply
to whom, and hints that could help you
land the summer job you are looking for,
mail the attached coupon and SI.OO to
THE CROLEE COMPANY, THREE PARKWAY
CENTER, 875 GREENTREE ROAD, PITTS PITTSBURGH,
BURGH, PITTSBURGH, PA. 15220.
I 1
J Name ; \
| Address
I City ; I
j State Zip
I I



Orange

Campus Calendar

PLEASE TURN IN ALL ITEMS FOR CAMPUS CALENDAR TO THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS OFFICE, FLA. UNION

NAVY RECRJITING: Today, 9-5 p.m., FU 123.
PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM: Today, 4p.m., Bless Aud.,
Dr. Joseph G. Hirschberg, Unlv. of Miami, Appli Applications
cations Applications of Interferometry to Plasma Physics Diag Diagnostics.*
nostics.* Diagnostics.*
FLORIDA CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: Today, 7 p.m.,
FU 116. Business meeting.
UF CHESS CLUB:,.Today, 7 p.m., FU 215.
MURPHREE-JENNINGS SOCIAL: Today, 8 p.m.,
Jennings Rec Room. The Playboys,* Everyone in invited,
vited, invited, no charge.
FLORIDA PLAYERS: Today and Sat., April 2, 8
p.m., Norman Hall Aud. Ticket Sales: Today noon
to 4:30 p.m., FU Box Office; 5:30 p.m. curtain,
Norman Hall Aud. Sat., 3 p.m. to curtain, Norman
Hall Aud. Presentation: Take Her, Shes Mine.
OUTDOOR MOVIE: Today, East side of Broward
Hall. Double Feature: The Mouse That Roared.

Administrative Notices To Students, Faculty Sc Staff

STUDENTS
GRE APPLICATION DEADLINE: Deadline date for
receipt of applications for the Graduate Record Ex Examination
amination Examination to be given April 23 is April 8. Booklets
on the GRE may be obtained from 235 Tigert.
r
NEW FORM FOR REGISTRATION: Registration pro procedures
cedures procedures will be simplified by the use of a new, single singlesheet
sheet singlesheet form for student information. This form will be become
come become a permanent record, eliminating the use of
several data cards previously used each registration
period. The new data form will be used for the first
time during registration for spring trimester.
SCHEDULE CHANGES: Several changes in the
course schedule for the spring trimester are to be
noted by students in privileged registration which
begins Monday. The changes will be announced by the
Registrars Office. Students should check the revised
schedule before completing registration procedures.
JOBS AVAILABLE NOW: The Student Employment
Office announced that there are many part-time jobs
now available. The jobs will continue through the
spring trimester. These jobs are part of the Work-
Study Program and are limited to students whose
parents are in the low-income group. For informa information,
tion, information, contact the Student Employment Office, 124
Tigert. students are needed to begin work immedi immediately.
ately. immediately.

General Notices

RESIDENCE FOR RENT: The University golf course
residence will be available for rental on June 1, 1966.
This is a two bedroom, one bath home; two rooms are
air conditioned. Call Perry C. Moore, 2131, for an
appointment. Rent, SIOO per month.
UNIFORMS FOR RESALE: The Military Department
will resell Air Force khaki uniforms on April 4. items
include short sleeve shirts at $1 each; trousers,
$1.50 a pair; and low quarter black shoes at $3 per
pair, sizes 9-12.
COBOL COURSE PLANNED: A COBOL (Common
Business Oriented Language) course in programming
will be given April 25-29. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.. by the

CASH
CONSOLIDATE BILLS
TRAVEL EXPENCE
$25 S6OC
Marion Finance Company Inc.
222 W- University Ave

TAXES DUE
*

8 p.m.: That Touch of Mink, 9:40 p.m. 509 per
couple or 509 single. Bring your own blanket. Also
being shown at MSB Aud., 6 p.m., 7:35 p.m., 9:15 p.m.,
& 10:45 p.m.
LECTURE: Today, 8:15 p.m., Univ. Aud. Harry
Golden, What Is The American Way Os Life? Co Cosponsored
sponsored Cosponsored by Phi Beta Kappa and University College.
Public invited.
DELTA PHI EPSILON: Sat., Apr. 2,10 a.m., FU 116.
AG ECONOMICS CLUB: Sat., Apr. 2, 10 a.m., Beta
Field. Softball game between students and faculty
followed by picnic.
CHILDRENS MOVIE: Sat., Apr. 2, 2 p.m., MSB
Aud., Adventures of Tom Sawyer.
MOVIE: Sat., Apr. 2,7 & 9 p.m., MSB Aud., The
Pride and the Passion.
808 HOPE PERFORMANCE: Sat., Apr. 2, 8:15
p.m., Fla. Gym.

SPANISH EXAMINATION: The Foreign Language
Reading Knowledge Examination in Spanish and func functional
tional functional knowledge for graduate students will be held
Saturday, April 2, 10 a.m. to 12 noon in 18 Anderson
Hall.
GRADUATION INVITATIONS AND ANNOUNCE_
MENTS ARE AT THE HUB.
APPLY FOR SUMMER EMPLOYEES: The Central
Employment Center is receiving applications from
students seeking summer employment. All depart departments
ments departments interested in employing student workers during
the summer months should send in their requisition
as soon as possible.
FACULTY AND STAFF
FULBRIGHT-HAYS AWARDS: Announcement of Ful Fulbright-Hays
bright-Hays Fulbright-Hays awards for faculty members for research
and lecturing in Europe, Africa, the Near East, South
and East Asia, the Pacific, the Far East and Latin*
America during the 1967-68 academic year are now
available for reference at the office of Faculty Ful Fulbright
bright Fulbright Adviser Col. G. A. Farris, International Cen Center,
ter, Center, Bldg. AE. Col. Farris does not distribute the
application forms, which are supplied to individuals
by the Committee on International Exchange of Per Persons,

University Computing Center. Registration forms are
available in the March issue of Bits and Pieces. Fur Furthere
there Furthere information may be obtained from R. E. Jacobs.
Administrative Assistant. Computing Center.
SIGHT CONSERVATION PROGRAM: The Sorop Soroptimist
timist Soroptimist Club of Gainesville is sponsoring a program
on the function of the North Florida Eye Bank, to be
held April 7, at 8 p.m., in the Medical Sciences
Building. The program, Windows in the Darkness,
will include a special film concerning the functions
of the Eye Bank and a panel discussion. The public

and

BLUE BULLETIN
. i

.
Friday, April 1, 1966, The Florida Alligator, ;

ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE.

LATIN AMERICAN CLUB: Sun., Apr. 3, 10:45 a.m.,
FU Social Room.
DUPLICATE BRIDGE TOURNAMENT: Sun., Apr. 3,
1:30 p.m., FU 215. UF students, faculty and staff only.
Master points given. 259 per person.
ORATORIO: Sun., Apr. 3, 4p.m., Univ. Aud. Moses
In The Desert, by Didier Graeffe. University Choir,
Choral Union and University Symphony Orchestra di directed
rected directed by Edward Troupin.
UNIVERSITY LIBERAL FORUM: Sun., Apr. 3, 7:30
p.m., FU Johnson Lounge. Dr. Theron Nunez, Ass*t
Professor of Anthropology, will lead a discussion
on Man Views His Death.
FU INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE: Anyone inter interested
ested interested in becoming a host for foreign students may
apply at FU 315.

sons, Persons, 2101 Constitution Ave. N.W., Washington, D. C.
On requesc the committee also will provide separate
lists of awards in American studies, anthropology,
area studies, biochemistry, biology and agriculture,
business administration, chemistry, earth sciences,
economics, education, engineering, home economics,
law, mass communications, mathematics, medical
sciences, physics, political science, psychology, social

work and sociology. Deadline for research awards is
June 1, while persons interested in lectureships should.
apply before May 1 if possible.
XEROX MACHINE INVOICES: Due to the lack of
complete information being shown on Xerox Corpor Corporation
ation Corporation monthly invoices, an increasing number of dis discrepancies
crepancies discrepancies are being found dating back to July, 1965,
and possibly earlier. Each department having a Xerox
Copy Machine is assigned a customer number and
machine serial number for the type machine being
used. There is no complete listing showing these num numbers
bers numbers assigned to departments. In order to correlate
all Xerox Machine details, it is requested that each
department using a Xerox Machine submit a memor memorandum
andum memorandum containing the following information to Frank
Jackson, Supervisor, Document Processing, 23 Tigert
Hall: customer number, machine model, serial num number
ber number and location.

Is invited to the program. For additional information
concerning the Eye Bank and programs for groups,
call the Eye Bank at the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center, 376-3211.
REVIVAL SERVICES: North Central Baptist Church
is having revival services each evening at 7:30 through
Sunday. The church is located at the corner of 14th
Ave. and 4th St., NW. Dr. C. Y. Dossey, associate
director of the Evangelism Home Mission Board of
the Southern Baptist Convention, is presenting the
services.

LOANS
short till payday
BUYING SECOND CAR
525-S6OO
M m >n ] in.nice Company Inc.

Page 11



Page 12

Florida Alligator, Friday, April 1, 1966

Ex-Editors
Speak Out
(From Page 1)
ed petition at least the copy
we saw was not signed. Also
the fact that a few of the girls
who were in there to testify
against us (at the Tuesday meeting
of the Board of Student Publica Publications)
tions) Publications) didnt even know what they
were in there for.
They seemed very surprised to
find out the reason that they were
asked to talk that we were
going to be fired.
Statewide coverage of the affair,
said Cason, has already had some
effect and its going to have a
lot more.
My aim in pressing an appeal is
correcting injustice, he said.
We are going about this in a
dignified and principled manner,
Cason said, because we feel that
there is a great deal involved.
Graeffes Work
(From Page I)
rhythms and percussion, he said.
The performing forces include
the University Choir, Choral Union
and the Symphony Orchestra dir directed
ected directed by Edward Troupin.
Soloists are Guy B. Webb, bass
baritone; Julianne Belger, sop soprano;
rano; soprano; Lenore Beirbaum, alto;
Charles D. McDonell, tenor and
Gerald Langford, bass.
Much credit is due to Edward
Troupin for his preparation and
creation of this first performance
of the composition and to Dr.
El wood Keister, who prepared the
chorus, Poole said.
It is a credit to the university
that such an ambitious premiere
performance can be mounted, he
said.
Florida Union
Exhibits Collages
Collages by Anne Orling will go
on public exhibition at the UF April
1 in the North Wing Gallery of the
Florida Union.
Miss Orling has paintings in the
permanent collection of the United
Nations and is currently on the
staff of the North Shore Committee
Art Center in New York.
Her paper collages placed first
in Hofstra University and Hofstra
Museum showings and were nom nominated
inated nominated for the Ford Foundation
Grant at the Silvermine Guild.
OUR
SAN DW7 Lt£S
Are fiT
po* (\ klhtfr
0 o o
CarmanelUs
7 706 W. University Ave.

Golden Speaks Tonight
(From Page 1)

campus is sponsoring the journal journalists
ists journalists talk on what is the American
Way of Life.
During his 20 year career as a
journalist, Golden has appeared
frequently on television. He has
written profusely in newspapers
and is widely read and recognized
C GATOR ADS \
V ARE DREAMY \J

Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship
OF GAI NESVILLE
Speaker: Mr. Stanley West
Subject: Our Search For Meaning
11 a.m ~ Sunday, April 3 Room 324, Florida Union
EVERYONE INVITED

> .is HB9
< §|§
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for his syndicated comments on
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Among Goldens best selling
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1-19 Copies, I0 Over, 9 Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
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SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
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1620 W, UNIVERSITY AYE.

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The UF Variety Jazz Band under
the direction of Robert E. Foster,
leaves today to compete with five
other college jazz bands at the

CESSNA
IS HERE!
NEW MODERN
Ask For Steve White
At The Big Hangar
At GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL AIRPOR T
Wa! do Road

HONEYED HORN

Mobile Jazz Festival, Mobile, Ala Alabama.
bama. Alabama.
The winning jazz band will be
selected by a panel of judges con-

Friday, April 1, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

sisting of Leonard Feather, Jerry
Gray, Bandleader and Arranger;
John Hammond, Director of Tal Talent
ent Talent Acquisition Columbia Re Records;
cords; Records; Skitch Henderson, NBC Te Television
levision Television Music Director; Dan Mor Morganstern,
ganstern, Morganstern, Down Beat Editor;
George Wein, Musician and New Newport
port Newport Festival Promoter and Father
George Wiskirchen, Veteran Edu Educator
cator Educator and Jazz Judge.
The winning band will appear at
A1 Hirts Club in New Orleans and
at the Newport Jazz Festival. The
band will be seen on several na nationally
tionally nationally broadcast television
shows, including the A1 Hirt Show,
the Arthur Godfrey Show, and the
Tonight Show.
The three day festival, hosted by
Spring Hill College, will be the
largest and finest collegiate music
event in the nation. Between
25,000 and 32,000 people will see
the musicians and vocalists per perform
form perform during the two- day event.
DR. KEISTER
Spring Concert
Next Tuesday
The University Choir will pre present
sent present its annual Spring Concert
April 7, at 8:15 p.m. in Univer University
sity University Auditorium.
Spirituals, a Bach motet, a
Brahams composition and a sel selection
ection selection from Carmen are included
in the program by the 60 member
choir.
The choir will begin a 10-day
tour of the southeast on April 22.
Two of the cities they will visit
are Atlanta and New Orleans.
\sj~ |
A Unique Coffee House
WHEN IN JACKSONVILLE
FOR GOOD
K ENTERTAINMENT
- FOLK MUSIC
- COMEDY-

Page 13



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 1, 1966

1 1 ) £* wggm
TAKE HER, SHES PROTESTING
The Florida Players production of Take Her, Shes Mine is a comedy of a young girls growing growingpains
pains growingpains in her first year away at college. Here Molly, played by Carolyn Sadler, is going through a stage
of social consciousness and protest.
The production opens tonight in Norman Hall Auditorium.
(Photos by Gerald Jones.)

. }-;]^p ii %* bbhhhhhhhi hi|
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wbkksb£
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VALENTINO?
Mike Doyle, as Mollys father,
says he looks more like a man
with a towel on his head than
Rudolf Valentino.
Kathy Dittmar has the role of
Mollys mother in Players pro production
duction production of**Take Her,Shes Mine.

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Enclosed is $3 f] Cash Q Check Q MO
Please send my ID card to:
Name - Age
School
Address f
L -:^i:z.::iii^J

School

Registration Closes April 2

Very few students can meet the
requirements to register here, ac according
cording according to Mrs. Alma K. Bethea,
Alachua County supervisor of reg registration.
istration. registration.
Registration for the state elec election
tion election closes April 2. The first
party primary will be May 3, and
the second primary, May 24.
The hardest to meet is the re-
Student number,
Student body,
Your identity is barred,
From any
Recognition
Til you tear or bend
Your card! tkg
|kbcnt
ficard
v coffee house
Ft/ f Sat* At $
182*6 w. iVov. ave..
Open This Saturday
After Bob Hope Show!

quirement of planning to make
permanent domicile in the
county.
Mrs. Bethea questions students
carefully on this point. She stress stressed
ed stressed that a person may not register
if he is here for a special or
temporary purpose, such as go going
ing going to school.

I -/i.*, EASTER VALUES I
I 919 W. University % £
| Join the throng in a new spring ward- I
frobe . new colors . new styles I
... and greater satisfaction in feeling I
new for a new season.
186 Selected Suits I
All Season's Weights H
Reg. $47.50 to $85.00 I
Alterations Extra I
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Solids, Stripes & Plaids Poplin Weave H
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Tapered for the Slim Long Sleeves that H
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CHARGE 'ftJJpr # m MIN S SHOP OF SHOP
I 919 W. University Ave. Phone 372-1660 I

Alumni Flyers Visit Campus

-jr Mm
WALKER
JBBL
HATHCOCK

CESSNA
IS HERE!
NEW -MODERN
Ask For Sfeve While
At The Big Hangar
At GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL A|RPOR T
Wa'do Road
mmamam -- = -r- r

Four UF alumni will drop their
whirlybird on the upper drill field
Friday in a return visit to campus.
The four are Army flyers and
will arrive in a HUIB armed heli helicopter
copter helicopter which will be on display
on the upper drill field Saturday
morning.
The quartet is Maj. Austin W.
Hathcock (class of 54), Delray
Beach; Capt. Regis A. Schnupp
(55), Hialeah; Capt. Jack A. Wal Walker
ker Walker (57), Miami Shores and Ist
Lt. Dan H. Honeywell (64), Vero
Beach.
Walker and Hathcock have been
flying the longest, Walker being a
veteran of 680 combat missions in
Vietnam and having been awarded
the Distinguished Flying Cross
twice, Bronze Star, Army Com Commendation,
mendation, Commendation, Purple Heart twice and
Air Medal with 17 clusters.
Hathcock has served in both
South Korea and West Germany and
has logged over 3,000 hours fly flying
ing flying time.

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HONEYWELL



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'* ~ v >

44'U-

Football... Woodruff Style ROBERT SEGAL

It was quite a thrill for a seven-year-old
kid. He was on his way up old Highway 441
to attend his first college football game. The
year was 1952 and the game was between the
Gators of Florida under Head Coach Bob Wood Woodruff,
ruff, Woodruff, and the Miami Hurricanes under Andy
Gustafson.
The Gators were led that day by quarterback
Doug Dickey, now the head coach of the Tennessee
Yols, halfbacks Buford Long, later of the N. Y.
football Giants, ,J. Pappa Hall, the NCAA high
jump champion that year and fullback Rick
Ca'sares, whose name speaks for itself.
It was indeed a memorable afternoon for the
young boy as the Gators paraded up and down
the field and smashed Miami 43- G.
From that afternoon on, the boy was a con confirmed
firmed confirmed Gator fan. In the past 14 years he has
seen perhaps forty games in person and listened
to countless more on the radio. He was in
anguish through the years Bob Woodruff was the
head man. Woodruff was the man who patented
the third-down kick. To Bob Woodruff, offense
was just holding on to the ball before kicking.
Bob Woodruff was the man who took two of
the finest halfbacks to wear the Orange and
Blue, Jackie Simpson and Jim Roundtree and

Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co.

Netters Sweep Dolphins;
Face Presbyterian Today
The Gator natters swept all the singles and doubles to defeat
Jacksonville University, 9-0 yesterday. This win upped Florida's
season record to 15 wins and nine losses, with nine matches remain remaining
ing remaining on schedule.
Co-captain Rick Chice)/ playing true to form, won over Dale
Harrington, 6-3, 7-5. In other singles, Gators Ron Fick, John
Shipley, Bill Perrin, Russ Burr and Bill Belote scored wins. Florida
took the doubles matches behind the playing of Chace and Perrin
who won over Harrington and Richard King, 7-5, 6-4. Fick teamed
up with John Overmyer for the number two doubles win and Shipley
and Ron Cohen added the third.
Today, Florida plays Presbyterian at ?:30 and meets South Florida
Saturday. The undefeated freshman team plays Davis Island (Tampa)
today and St. Petersburg Tennis Club Saturday.
ira
> APARTMENTS (
} SPECIAL SUMMER RATES (
( AVAILABLE APRIL Ist. j
i Landscaped Roof Garden /
| Gas Fired Grills (
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J Rent Includes Partial Utilities (
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HIGH RISE LUXURY I
AT DORMITORY RATES j
Office Hours 3:30-6 PM Weekends 10 AM-6 PM 1
. 207 N.W. 17th STREET j
\ next University Post Office #

Friday, April 1, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

put them in seperate backflelds to add balance
to his team and wrecked his offense. Both went
on to play pro ball. Then thep^was.that memor memorable
able memorable night at Rice Stadium in Houston, Texas,
when the favored Gators with three minutes left
in the game, ran out the clock to preserve
a 13-13 tie. This was football Woodruff style.
This has been the story of the Florida Gators
for years, almost but not quite. They ran un undefeated
defeated undefeated LSU all over the field one year at
Baton Rouge and lost on a field goal 10-7.
They fumbled on Auburns one yard line to lose
to the undefeated Tigers 6-5.
The boy has grown and is now a junior at
UF. He has become a true Florida fan, the
eternal pessimist. He, or rather I, will be
at Florida Field Saturday afternoon to watch
the Gators, circa 1966, strut their stuff. There
seems to be a new attitude, a winning attitude,
prevading the practice field at this time.
However, come September, this writer knows
the Gators will probable knock off somebody they
have no business beating and in turn be upset
by a two touchdown underdog.
There will be that drive killing fumble or that
muffed TD pass. However, the Gator fans will
be there--they always come back for more.
Maybe next year will be different. Maybe.

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, April 1, 1966

Gridiron Tilt For Charity

Saturdays football scrimmage at UF will be the
most important single workout of the spring, accord according
ing according to head coach Ray Graves.
We will play this one with Southeastern Con Conference
ference Conference officials and as close to actual fall game
conditions as possible, says Graves. I think this
scrimmage will have a very definite bearing on just
who lines up where on opening day next fall.
Kickoff time has been moved up to 2 p.m., the
hou£ the Gators will kick off their 1966 season next
Sept. 17 against Northwestern in Gainesville.
This scrimmage will be played for the benefit
of Dollars for Scholars with adults admitted for
SI.OO and children for 50 cents. Students with ID
cards will be admitted free.
Students will get the ticket takers, print the

Bidding
On Nashua
NEW YORK Nashua was auctioned by closed
bid in 1955 following .the death
of owner William Woodward,
Jr., a syndicate headed by
Leslie Combs was successful
bidder, offering $1,251,200. The
$1,200 was tacked on to break
a tie if someone else decided
to go as high as $1.25 million.

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Do Your Meat Shopping at Winn-Dixie & Then
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CESSNA
IS HERE!
NEW MODERN
Ask For Steve White
At The Big Hangar
At GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL A|RPOR T
Waldo Road

tickets and receive all the profits, says Graves.
Kay Stephenson will quarterback the Orange team
and sophomore Larry Rentz the Blue. In the Orange-
Blue game two weeks ago Stephenson hit on 18
of 25 passes for 251 yards and guided his team from
behind to a 33 -28 victory. Winning TD came on a
pass to sophomore Larry Smith with 21 seconds
remaining.
Rentz, one of the most electrifying runners to hit
the Gator campus in many years, gained over 250
yards of total offense in leading the Blue team in
that game.
Blue hopes were bolstered by the return of line linebacker
backer linebacker Jack Card, who missed the first game. He
has had the finest spring of his career at Florida
and is a first string linebacker at this stage.

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