Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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SHES MINE ALL MINE
Marshall Breeze takes the agresslve role with Sheila Beakes in the
tonights Florida Players Production Take Her, Shes Mine.
Opening night curtain time for the Players presentation is 7:30
p.m. tonight.
The play is a modern take off of the trials and tribulations of a
teenage girl going to college for the first time.
Starring in the lead roles as Molly Michaelson and her harried
father, Frank, are Carolyn Sadler and Mike Doyle. Directing the show,
which is being put on by the graduate drama students, is Robert
Mardis.
Student tickets may be obtained free at either the Florida Union
ticket booth or the Norman Hall Auditorium ticket booth with presenta presentation
tion presentation of blue student I.D. cards. General Admission is 85?.
The production will be presented at 7:30 p.m. on April 0 and April
7 and at 8 p.m. April 1,2, 8 and 9.
Variety Band Presents
Jazz Concert Tonight
UF*s award-winning Variety Band will present its 16th annual jazz
concert tonight in University Auditorium at 8:15.
The Variety Band, under the direction of Robert E. Foster, assistant
director of bands, has been selected as one of the six top college
jazz bands in the nation. This weekend the Variety Band will compete
with five other finalists at the Mobile, Ala., Jazz Festival.
The concert will feature special arrangements of new and classic
jazz tunes by top arrangers, arranged especially for the Gator Var Variety
iety Variety Band. Both of the Variety Bands will perform. The Number Two
Variety Band is set to go with a swinging arrangement of That
Was The Week That Was while the Number One group will feature,
Basies April In Paris, Misty, and Kisses
Sweeter Than Wine.
Highlighting the program will be the presentation of the VBls three
contest numbers, Summertime, featuring Mike Berke, tenor sax
soloist, Small Fry, arranged by Terence Small, member of the
UFs music faculty, and a new tune Aroarin Borealis.
Admission is free of charge. The public is invited.

Student Leaders Air Views

Ten student leaders who petitioned Tuesday night
for a review of Alligator elections and suspension
of editor Benny Cason have also voiced general
support for President Reitzs directive naming Dob Dobson
son Dobson acting editor yesterday.
Only several of the ten students who attended the
Tuesday night meeting at which Cason was suspended
had any reservations about Reitzs going past the
Board to suspend Andy Moor and lvette Cardozo.
The group, contacted by telephone last night, includes
two presidents of the student body, the present Chan Chancellor
cellor Chancellor of the Honor Court and the presidents of IFC
and Panhellenic Council.
Jane Kimbrell, president of Women Students As Association,
sociation, Association, said, "I feel that President Reitz was not
wrong in overriding the Boards decision (to suspend
Cason but to retain Moor), and I support his action
fully.
Miss Kimbrell said she felt that the Board of
Student Publications was wrong in suspending Benny
Cason without suspending Andy Moor and Yvette
Cardozo because these people were as much at fault
as Cason.

SG President Buddy Jacobs said Dr. Reitz did
what had to be done in light of the situation.
Jacobs felt that The Alligator has not been re reflecting
flecting reflecting the ideas, goals and examples that students
want in their newspaper. Many students, he said,
had come to him to express a desire to get The
Alligator back to the students.
At the Tuesday Board meeting, Jacobs said, The
Alligator got a fair hearing.
Chip Block, president-elect of Florida Blue Key,
supported the acts of the Board of Publications and
of President Reitz all the way. I stand behind it
now and I think the right thing was done, he said.
Block said, regarding the petition that precipi precipitated
tated precipitated the upheaval Tuesday night, I joined with a
group of student leaders in expressing views 1 think
are held by most of the student body that The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator was not being run in away that represented
our university well.
Former Student Body President Bruce Culpepper
said he definitely supports President Reitzs action
all the way.
(See LEADERS, Page 9)

I The Florida
I Alligator I
I VoL 58, No. 124 University of Florida Thursday, March 31, 1966 I

MOOR REPLACED AS EDITOR
Reitz Names Dobson
Acting Gator Editor

UF President J. Wayne Reitz
named Drex Dobson, former Alli Alligator
gator Alligator Managing Editor, as acting
editor of The Alligator to replace
Benny Cason who was suspended
by the Board of Student Publica Publications
tions Publications Tuesday night.
In a letter to the Board of Stu Student
dent Student Publications Chairman John
V. Webb, Reitz said he had given
much thought to the leadership of
The Alligator and found a failure
of students responsible for the
publication of The Alligator to
exercise and accept the respon responsibilities
sibilities responsibilities with which they have been
charged.
The text of Reitzs letter is
printed on page 9.
Student leaders asked in a pe petition
tition petition to the Board Tuesday night
for the suspension of Cason and
the re-opening of nominations for
the summer term editorships.
*' ~ Student leaders who signed t*>e
' petition were: Lynn Wolly, Mortar
Board president; Herb Schwartz,
Honor Court chancellor; Buddy Ja Jacobs,
cobs, Jacobs, Sudent Body president; Jane
Kimbrell, Women Students Asso Association
ciation Association president; Bruce Culpep Culpepper,
per, Culpepper, past Student Body president;
Bruce Starling, Florida Blue Key
president; Clyde Taylor, Inter
Fraternity Council*president; Chip
Block, Florida Blue Key president presidentelect;
elect; presidentelect; Susan Bartley, Panhellenic
Council president; and John Darl Darlson,
son, Darlson, Student Body treasurer.
In naming Dobson editor, in ef effect,
fect, effect, Reitz rejected Alligator Edi Editorial
torial Editorial Director Andy Moor from
taking over the editorship. Moor
had been appointed by the Board
of Student Publications to fill Ca Casons
sons Casons unexpired term.
Reitz also directed the Board
to ask for additional applications
for the positions of editor and
managing editor of The Alligator
for the upcoming spring trimes trimester.
ter. trimester. Moor and Yvette Cardozo,

both Board members, had been
named previously to the post.
This action does not involve
the question of freedom of the
press, Dr. Reitz said. Rather,
it results from failure of Alli Alligator
gator Alligator leadership to exercise and
accept the responsibilities with
which they have been charged.

Former Editors Speak

The action of the Board of
Student Publications and Dr. Reitz
is clearly a violation of freedom of
the press, academic freedom and
student freedom, former Editor
Benny Cason said.
I am personally disappointed in
Dr. Reitz* actions, but Im not
really surprised. When the pres pressure
sure pressure gets great enough, I guess a
person will do anything.
The campus should know that
Dr. Reitz rigged the Board of
Student Publications meeting, and
was giving orders to Board Chair Chairman
man Chairman John Webb. The orders were

B
j*
JjX
***.
ITS NOT A, FROG!
You may have trouble deciding what this energetic UF student is
doing . but, hes not a frog on a biology table that's for sure. Our
staff photographer, Nick Arroyo, just happened by the Florida Pool
this week and caught this student in the air" as he dove off the diving
board. It's a sign of spring?

The fact that student leaders
in large numbers have expressed
great dissatisfaction over the man manner
ner manner in which The Alligator has
handled news and editorial mater materials
ials materials this trimester is ample tes testimony
timony testimony that the paper has not
(See DOBSON, Page 9)

in forms of notes brought into the
meeting by Bruce Culpepper and
given to Buddy Jacobs and Webb.
The worst thing about the fir firing
ing firing was not the firing itself, but
the way in which it was done. It
was more like a kangaroo court courtcompletely
completely courtcompletely unbelievable to anyone
who wasnt an eyewitness.
I do believe the truth will win
out in the end, and when it does
come out Dr. Reitz, Dean Hale,
John Webb and several others are
going to be highly embarrassed,
Cason concluded.
(See FORMER, Page 9)



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March SI, 96

_________
' 1 t I I J ; --^^^;s: v: ;^-^:-^^-
International
PAKISTAN WELCOMES REDS . Communist Chinese chairman
Lit ShacCti roc a Red rase petal welcome ir Karachi Wednesday
tcwarc the eat of a state visit sc enthusiastically received that Pak Pakistan
istan Pakistan felt it necessary tc say it hi ary chancre ir relations
wiii the Uniter States. A crowd estimated to somber 10,000 turned out
to meet Lit ir 9N-beere-r beat at Karcbi airport vfcee be flew ir from
the provincial capital of Lahore.

ACCIDENT CAUSES KICT . A miner truck accident involving a
UE. Marine and a Vietnamese driver sparked ar anti-American
demonstration Wednesday. Student leaders demanded that President
Johnson apologize within 4? hours for the alleged beating of the Viet Vietnamese
namese Vietnamese by the Marine and for interfering' ir Vietnamese domestic
affairs. Mere than 2,0N0 students defied Premier Nguyen Car Kv**
stem warning against demonstrations.
BOMB ROBOT READY ... .4 CVS. -Vary
underwater robot croft was readied Wednesday
to help retrieve c hydrogen bomb lost in the
Jan. 17 crash of a 852 The CLRY cable cablecontrolled
controlled cablecontrolled underwater research vehicle was
airlifted into the area to assist in the mas massive
sive massive recovery operations for the Id megaton
bomb now lying on a 30-degree slope about
2.200 feet below the surface. The one-ton un unmanned
manned unmanned less el uas expected to be the decisive
factor in hitherto unsuccessful operations to
lid the missing nuclear device.
National
rJK CITES AI'TC SAFETY . Set- Sober: F. Kennedy, C-N.Y.,
Wednesday called on the federal government to coerce ante manu manufacturers
facturers manufacturers tc take steps tc reduce neaths caused by the impact of
passengers against dashboards, windshields anc steering wheels.
Describing the seconn collision' that occurs -when passengers strike
suet objects after an ante crash occurs, Kennedy told the Senate
Commerce Committee, Thus is the erase, that kills: this is the crash
that permanent!: injures.."
MILITARY MANPOWER FEY FAX ED . The combined strength
of the military forces on March 1 was 2,555,N2 men, an increase of
S.5 r l'£s over Feb. 1, the Defense Department repented Wednesday.
The new figure was let,NO! above the strength planned before' the
buiidtg for the Vietnamese crisis was ordered last summer. Present
goals call for a further increase of 1 Nr,ool men. The strength by
services on Marti I was 1,124,5!£ in the Army 7S!,00! in the Navy,
225,* 8; in the Mann* Corps ann £41,542 in the Air Forte.
FAMISE HELP PROPOSED . President
Johnson proposed Wednesday that the United
States send 3.5 million more tons of wheat
to famine-stricken India. He called on other
nations to match the amount as enact of in international
ternational international mercy. Johnson sent a special
message to the House and Senate asking for
congressional endorsement of his action. The
need for the wheat was one of the subjects
discussed between Johnson and Mrs. Indira
Gandhi.
Florida
CHURCH FRAUD ... A federal judge issued a restraining order'
Wednesday against a Miami Reach church arc its officers on grounds of
government charges of fraud and false representations in the issuing of
514 million worth of bonds by the church. Judge David W. Dyer issued
the temperary order ann scheduler a hearing for .April 5 or. the Securi Securities
ties Securities ann Eimange Com missioc request for a permanent injunction
against the Collegiate Baptist Church, Inc., of Muni Beach.
NOTICE! NOTICE! NOTICE! NOTICE! NOTICE! I
THE LAST ISSUE OF THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR*
FOR THIS TRIVESTER WILL 5E 6. PLEASE*
PLACE VQUR CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING EE'CRE*
2:30 sr- ON AP?IL 5. TFe Florioc Alllocfor. I
m tiapww wUE mr m hr mm nan cm ndrrr st -t
* r Mb. Vacc sr ar.-y.-M mo. ke * jasr-eo.
T* f~ T JuUJCaTC* js Dk WCkS m. semmn nt *: .mm a F! tons. tc s

Viet Cong Regiment
Battles Outnumbered
Force Os U.S. Troops

SAIGON UPI A North. Viet Vietnamese
namese Vietnamese regimen: Wednesday
pounce:: on Ist Air Cavalry troops
whe tried tc sweep back into the
Chu Pong Mountain battleground
area. They pinned down the Amer Americans
icans Americans in fierce hand-'So-hand com combat,
bat, combat, shot down at least five VS.
helicopters and surrounded one
IKS. uni: -bat was outnumbered
more than 1C to- 1.
Well after nightfall Wednesday,
troops of a Ist Cavalry recon reconnaissance
naissance reconnaissance unit that had dropped
into the middle of the Communist
regiment were repo net fighting
for their lives at the base of the
m ountain, which was the scene of
the bitterest barae of the war last
November.
Ir addition to the five cavalry
helicopters shot down-one of them
a bag Chinook- several other chop choppers
pers choppers were badly shot up but man managed
aged managed tc limp back to base. One of
the helicopters flipped over on its
back after being downed, and all
four crewmen were killed.
In action else-a he re in South
Viet Nam, IKS. military spokes spokesmen
men spokesmen reported three more Amer American
ican American aircraft downed by Commu Communist
nist Communist fire-two helicopters and an
Air Force FIDO Supersabre
trough: down NO miles soutwest
of Saigon.
As the heavy new fighting flar-
FBI Arrests
Draft Dodgers
NEW YORK (UPI) -- The FBI
began a roundup of 38 youths and
fathers Wednesday on charges of
dodging the draft by paying as much
as SS,COC for bogus .Air Force Re Reserve
serve Reserve credentials.
It was the biggest roundup of
draft dodgers in the FBls history.
Federal agents announced the
arrest of 33 of the indicted men
within, hours after raids began at
dawn at homes in the New York
area. Five more arrests were ex expected
pected expected later.
Thirty-one men, including seven
fathers, were arraigned in Brook Brooklyn
lyn Brooklyn Federal Court Wednesday
afternoon. Two others were ar arrested
rested arrested outside the jurisdiction of
the court, one in Washington and
one ir. Georcia.
Teenagers Claim
Kidnaping Info
SURSICF, Fla. v UPr Two
teenage informers, possibly lured
by a growing reward, stepped for forward
ward forward Wednesday claiming they had
information about the gunpoint kid kidnaping
naping kidnaping of 18-year-old Danny Gold Goldman.
man. Goldman.
One vorth with a Cuban accent
valued into the police station to
offer his help. He was rushed to
the fashionable Aaron Goldman
n;me for interrogation by FBI
agents. He was never seen leaving
but was apparently taken out a
rear entrance.
A second youth, neatly dressed
in corduroy slacks and sport shirt
and with well groomed hair, walked
casually up to a sergeant on guard
in front of the canal-side home
vhere the FBI has set up its com command
mand command pest shortly after 8 p.m,
I have some information that
might help, he told Sgt. Morton
Arno. The officer talked with the
boy out of hearing of newsmen and
then took him inside.
The bey came out a few minute-*
later and walked off. He would only
say that his first name was
Richard.

ed, political unrest tinged with
anti- American feeling continued
in South Vietnamese cities. In Da
Nang Wednesday, more than 2,000
students, defying Premier Nguyen
Cao K> J s stern warning against
demonstrations* surrounded an
American billet and charged the
U. 5. was hampering their drive to
have the ruling military junta step
down in favor of a civilian govern government.
ment. government. They demanded that Presi President
dent President Johnson apologize for in interfering
terfering interfering in Vietnamese domestic
affairs.

I THE BOOK-OF-THE-MONTH CLUB |
AND
THE COLLEGE ENGUSH ASSOCIATION
ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
The Tirst Annual
Book-of-the-Month Club
Writing Tellowship
Vrogram
The program will consist of four fourteen
teen fourteen fellowships of S3OOO each to be
awarded to seniors during the aca academic
demic academic year 1966-67, which coincides
with the fortieth anniversary of the
Book-of-the-Month Ciub.-
For complete details, see a member of
your English Department or write to:
DR. DONALD SEARS, DIRECTOR
BOOK-OF-THE-MONTH CLUB
WRITING FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM
c/o COLLEGE ENGUSH ASSOCIATION
HOWARD UNIVERSITY
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001
Thinking About
Learning To Fly?
Attend
Ground School At
CASSLLS IN THE AIR
Nrw ( latte* Beginning NOW Easiest
wuy lo ptm the written exam for your
I livutn Piloi't | |cense.
CAM 372-6351
I OR IULL DETAILS
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Iwiy l AINI WII l l MUNICIPAL AIRPORT
WALDO ROAD
a

1-19 Copies, UK ea.^
Over, 9C
Copies Made While You Walt
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WTEK
QU IK-SAVE
IMP W, UNIVERSITY AYE.
iGator Melt



Burns Asks For Quality

By MIKE MALAGHAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Governor Burns called for a
realistic quality foundation pro program,
gram, program, in an address to the John
Marshall Bar Association at a
noon luncheon yesterday at the
Holiday Inn.
H£.explained that the Minimum
Foundation Program for public ed education
ucation education was established in 1947.

tM. v/ /O
TO ALL STUDENTS and UNIVERSITY
PERSONNEL
Wife T7fi fr m\ ** LVKC
u(tm mam hi ll:30am-2:00pm
jmTi f apctEDIA dinner
4:3opm-8:00pm
V V 1212 N. Main St (G^ P V I I N L G LE
m (4 minutes from campus) center)

Ell ST BANK
OtXXf? ?*<** /?
KSgjjto^MwL^tiiigwSSOiifiSanTwTSgiMt' Sint CI
ti >: &? as nun mml
Other travelers checks
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rr
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Other leading travelers checks, like First checks,you don't have to worry. There are more
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But if you think all travelers checks are alike, First National City travelers checks come from
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But, if you lose First National City travelers They cost just one cent per dollar.
First National City Bank Travelers Checks
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MEM BLN f it ER* i £F' t>lT INJL'RANCE CORPORATION

It is no more responsive to to todays
days todays needs than would be a 1947
automobile, Burns declared.
Burns listed tats review, teach teachers'
ers' teachers' salaries and political control
of universities as part of the pro program
gram program for quality education.
The candidate for re-election to
the states highest office explained
The minimum starting salary for
teachers shall be $5,000. Burns

said he would insist on this figure
because collet-- graduates in any
other field setile for no less.
Burns called for legislation to
remove operation of the state's
colleges and universities as far
away frem the cabinet as is legally
possible.
The go /ernor also called for a
teacher/p apil ratio of 25-1 in the
classroom, technical and voca vocational
tional vocational education to supply the needs
of space age industry in Florida
and provide better education for
pre-school children.
At a reception in the Burns
headquarters earlier in the day,
the governor lauded the decision
to switch to the quarter svstem.
Apr
A Unique Coffee House
WHEN IN JACKSONVILLE
FOR GOOD
ENTERTAINMENT
- FOLK MUSIC
- COMEDY COMEDY

I ir* I C' JP \
mM/' 3 / M
* f J
BH s W B
m b
* r m ...
lj|| ....;:.
v\i:^''..i''r>! | ( | jfl| : fl|
RECEIVES AWARD
David Jenkins, right, a junior In UFs College of
Engineering, is shown receiving a S4OO scholarship award from the
American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers during a
recent banquet at Bartow. Jenkins is the son of Mr. dipd Mrs. M. C.
Jenkins of Eaton Park, near Bartow. Robert Saunders,"second from
left, past chairman of the AIME's Florida Section, made the pre presentation.
sentation. presentation. Charles Chapman, left, a representative of the Virginla-
Carolina Chemical Company, coordinated the banquet.
Cabinet Investigates Conflict
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) -- A Cabinet committee headed by Atty. Gen.
Earl Faircloth said today it will investigate any conflict of interest
situation involving state employes, be it house mortgages, cars or
food."
The committee, named by Gov.. Haydon Burns, held its first meet meeting
ing meeting today and said it will direct its initial efforts to probing the use
for business and pleasure of a free courtesy car by Ralph Siller, who
is in charge of state purchasing.
This practice has all the earmarks of impropriety and a definite
conflict of interest, said Secretary of State Tom Adams.

Irregulars Os
Fine Quality
Towels Bedspreads
Carpet Ends
Sport Duck*Blankets
First Quality
Throw Rugs*Carpets*Sheets
HENDERSONS
MILL STORE
Only 1 Hour From UF
FISH AND SHOP
, U.S. 19, Crystal River

2nd ANNUAL FLA. UNION
JAMAICA TRIP
7 Days, 6 Nights wm M mm
Between Trimesters I
Leave Miami Apr. 23 I J J
Return Apr. 29, 1966 ***o
INCLUDES:
Round Trip BWIA Jet Hotel With Meals
Tour Os Kingston Trip To Ochos Rios
Trip To Negril Beach Montego Bay
Ist Class Train Trip Across Jamaica
ANYONE IS ELIGIBLE. Form A Party!
Information, Deposit Fla. Un. 315. Ext. 2741

Thursday, March 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Siller will be directed to reply
to the letter no later than Mon Monday.
day. Monday. Then the committee will set
its first public hearing with Siller
and probably a representative of
the Ford Motor Co., requested to
testify.
Falrcloth and Adams both said
they hope the longe- range result
of the investigation will be agood,
strong code of ethics governing
the conduct of state officers and
employes.
The third member of the inves investigating
tigating investigating committee, Comptroller
Fred O. Dickinson, sent his assis assistant,
tant, assistant, Burrell Mawhinney, to repre represent
sent represent him at the first meeting.
Adams and Faircloth voted to get
off a letter to Siller on Thursday,
pinpointing specific matters to
which they want full details con concerning
cerning concerning the use of the luxury Ford
Motor Co. car which has been pro provided
vided provided to him for the past several
years, with a new one every time
the models change.

Page 3



Page 4

~ The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 31, 1966

on the Gator
changes
Alligator Editor Benny Cason has been sus suspended.
pended. suspended. Summer Editor Andy Moor and Summer
Managing Editor Yvette Cardozo have, in effect, been
denied their seats for the summer.
Who did this? Why?
Probably no person has all the answers. We have
been told by some that it was a political move by
Florida Blue Key, men's leadership honorary. We
doubt this was the major cause, as did highly re respected
spected respected journalism professor H. G. Buddy* Davis
at Tuesday night*s Board of Student Publications
meeting.
We have been told that people who didnt get what
news they wanted in the paper were the main
backers of the move. We have also heard that a force forceful
ful forceful body of student leaders sought for and urged the
resultant shifting of editors.
Students from all areas of leadership, ranging from
the president of the Womens Student Association,
Benton Engineering Society to the president of the
Student Body, pushed for the result.
The Board of Student Publications removed Editor
Cason and President J. Wayne Reitz named Drex
Dobson acting Alligator editor.
But why? Once again, nobody can have all the
answers, nor can it be said that the answers can be
the same for all who voiced their interests.
Perhaps for an all-encompassing phrase, one
might try . . failure of students responsible for
the publication of The Alligator to exercise and
accept the responsibilities with which they have been
charged as noted by Dr. Reitz in his letter. Or
perhaps, another suggestion offered is that a minority
had assumed control of the newspaper.
The small minority, composed of Editor Benny
Cason, Executive Director Andy Moor and Executive
Editor Yvette Cardozo, admittedly raised some con controversy
troversy controversy on the campus a lot of it good and some
of it not so good.
Its fine when there is genuine controversy on
campus. Genuine controversy deserves to be printed,
especially when it concerns the student body. But
when some have to go out and make their own news,
it is wrong, as the small minority did Friday
night at the Florida Blue Key tapping session. Per Perhaps
haps Perhaps this is one of the reasons for Dr. Reitz action
yesterday.
The people who Dr. Reitz recognized as represen representative
tative representative student leadership sought his counsel and that
of the Board of Student Publications. The decision
to shuffle the editors was dealt with by the Board and
Dr. Reitz.
But, will the UFs student newspaper be truly
aided?
Did it aid The Alligator to suspend Benny Cason?
We wont belabor the matter, but merely point to
the Board of Student Publications meeting which heard
testimony. Obviously, the Board thought it would be
of aid.
Perhaps it will or will not. That remains to be
seen.
Encumbent upon these student leaders who were
aware of their positions of responsibility is the job
of helping to rebuild The Alligator.
They wanted a change for their student newspaper.
If this change is to be successful, its up to them
primarily to help their newspaper by channeling
responsible, interested faces and minds to the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union basement.
This summer new faces will probably assume con control
trol control of The Alligator. Also, a full-time editorial
adviser will be added.
In essence, the next year will be a building year
and a year of changes. Those who yelled for a change
in leadership and direction of their newspaper will
have to work with and for The Alligator
Or perhaps these unpleasant occurrences which
came about will all have been in vain.
The Alligator appreciates the concern of Dr. Reitz
over the student leaders requests and hopes this
action will be the best thing for the university news newspaper.
paper. newspaper.
a worthy cause
This weekend will be one of great interest and
benefit to the University community, students and
faculty alike.
Saturday afternoon, the Orange and Blue squads
square off again at Florida Field -- with the pro proceeds
ceeds proceeds going to a worthy cause, Dollars for Scholars.
That evening, the Arnold Air Society brings Bob
Hope to the UF campus with the proceeds also
going to Dollars for Scholars.
In case you didnt know, Dollars for Scholars is
a program whereby the federal government gives
the UF nine dollars for every dollar the univer university
sity university raises.
This weekend should be interesting --a great
football game and a great entertainer.
Its your chance to help needy students and have
a good time doing it. This weekend can be a great
success.
Its up to you.

The Florida, Allig tor
'A Mbfty Ia Ou
"Nasty Gash You've Got There"
SPEAKING OUT
By MANUEL J. GARCIA-RUBIO
(Editors Note: Garcia-Rubio, 2UC, is a Cuban refugee who speaks
out on Communism today.)
As one who has suffered the effects of Communism very closely, I
would like to bring out two points which I believe have been missed by
the great majority of people in the United States.
First, according to current line of thought in this country,
Communists are those who proclaim to be so and that have a Party
membership card to prove the fact. Never forget that is like an ice iceberg:
berg: iceberg: one-third above water and twu-thirds under water, and that
those two-thirds are the ones that can really cause damage. These
are the ones that infiltrate and subvert movements by very subtle
plans of take over and control. These underground members obtain
enough control to plan and carry out ideas which group members
might think their own.
Communist propaganda is a marvel of our times. These able dis distorters
torters distorters of truth use to their advantage social unrest and political
instability. They will go as far as creating their own disturbances
if these will favor the overall plan. In Cuba for example, Communism
tried to capitalize on racial differences. It failed in this, and to cover
up for their mistake, the government made it extremely hard for
Negroes to leave the country, thereby creating the impression that
Negroes were happy to remain behind in the tortured island.
There are however a few instance of which I am more informed.
In Venezuela the Reds (under Castros auspices) are maintaining
guerrilla-type action, against an established freely elected government
The same holds true for Colombia. Since these so-called popular
movements' lack popular support, Communists have been forced to
use outlaws and other antisocial elements already at war with society.
The use of such well meaning phrases is as old as the doctrine
itself. This is the tactic they use to bring over to their side well
intentioned people who have not considered the issues thoroughly
This worked out fine in the case of Chinas Red takeover; many
important people who considered themselves well informed gave
moral support to Mao and companions on the basis that they were
well intentioned agrarian reformers. We can see the same type
phrases in use today, phrases such as Indigenous Revolutions
Freedom from Tyranny, Nationalist Liberation, and a host of
other well-sounding slogans.
The above brings to light the second issue. This applies to the
l nited States as a nation involved in international affairs. In a nutshell
definition we will call it fair play; American are forever willing to
play the game according to the rule and are apt to take many adver
saries on their word.
A promise given bv a Communist is however a very relative con
cept. As such it can be changed or disregarded almost at the same
time it is given. No free nation is secure on the word of Russia or
China. Their main objective is the expansion of their ideology either
by deceit or by forceful take-over. ei
The reader might think that this country will forever be immunp
to forceful take-over (under present conditions), but it is surely wide
open to large scale infiltration and demoralization. Latin \ meri 6
and the rest of the world are faced with a more direct menace and ?
Communism is not detained, the United States might become an is! h
in a Communist world. Then it will be too late to do anything but,
remain in an inferior defensive position.
How, where and when Communism is to be brought to a halt I
to experts in the field of international politics. I can only trust thtfTn
will be done before it is too late. 11

\IIKE MALAGHA \ I
Campus 1
Perspective
Last Wednesdays column on the dorms failure I
to send representatives to SGs meeting on educa- I
tional forums created a real storm among the I
womens areas. I
The list of officers in the girls dorms were those I
elected but not installed. Some presidents had as- 1
sumed authority while others were still letting their 1
predeccessors keep charge. |
Another point: Some of the girls didnt receive
notice of the meeting until a few hours before the
meeting actually commenced.
Judy Moore, president of Rawlings, was kind
enough to explain the governmental structure of the
Womens Student Association.
The executive committee of WSA is composed of
eight elected officers and the Secretary of Women's
Affairs in SG. This years president is Jane Kim Kimbrell,
brell, Kimbrell, Chi Omega.
The officers, usually sorority controlled because
they get out the vote, meet bi-weekly, to act as a
steering, agenda and nominations board.
The legislative branch is the WSA Council, com composed
posed composed of elected representatives from the living
areas. This council has 28 members, one from each
of the 13 sororities, one from each of the 13 dorm
sections, one from off-campus housing and one from
interhall.
This council legislates all the rules that pertain
to undergraduate single girls.
These rules, in theory, apply to girls living off offcampus.
campus. offcampus. In practice, they dont.
The residence halls have their own interhall com committees
mittees committees composed of dorm presidents. They discuss
and recommend, but have no authoritative powers.
However, this interhall council is usually the most
meaningful organization to the rank and file in the
dorms.
It is here that problems and solutions are worked
out for the various dorms.
Jennings is experimenting with a centralized sys system.
tem. system. They have one president for all three sections.
If they are successful in ironing out communication
bugs, other dorms may follow.
Yulee Area has a president for each section, but
they have their own interhall council to coordinate
the efforts of the area.
Broward has four presidents and no central co coordination.
ordination. coordination. In fact, they even have two resident
counselors from housing. The presidents do work
together for some projects such as Homecoming.
Rawlings has two presidents who usually work
close together on an informal basis.
A structure, such as in Broward, causes prob problems
lems problems that affect the area as a whole. For instance,
in a meeting affecting Broward outside their area,
four girls must be in attendance or else part of the
girls would go unrepresented.
There is talk that the girls may keep their pres presidents
idents presidents internally, but elect one person to be in
charge of foreign affairs. For instance, the pres presidents
idents presidents may elect one of their own to serve the whole
area externally and coordinate the internal effoi s
on such matters as usage of the recreation facilities.
Some of the girls dorms over the years have built
special relationships with some of the mens dorms.
Rawlings works closely with the men of Hume in
events like Homecoming and the Hume Hawaiian.
Mallory girls are the little sisters of Tolbert.
The WSA Council is currently giving its rules a
careful scrutiny. Major changes probably will take
place in the fall of 1967 to coincide with the quarter
system.
Late permits for freshmen, more lates for the
sophomores and juniors, less restrictions on girls
who are over 21, and more representation for ofi oficampus
campus oficampus housing are areas under consideration by
the girls legislative body.

A word to
our readers
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Accepts
All Letters To The Editor. Due To
Space Limitations, However, We Are
Unable To Print Letters Exceeding 350
Words. All Letters Must Be Signed.
Names Will Be Withheld Upon Request
The Editors Reserve The Right To Select
Or Reject Letters For Publication.



mmfeifjer Thursday, March 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator, Page 5
* f '***
II NATIONAL ONB. >Ht p&orpiVS TO OCR tkt > QufeVCN 'll
m m&T&f amaiaip WWlMN^~Mieuce in rs3Swu,m.il=l TWO:/mr ;ii
g* TOfiK U 0 AUSOBR 12?
88 )M nn^ 0)& TO' (tt)T . WOTA6/.e 88
VC i Mi(^y^pa)il^ W 6
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gg toes wo adswfr to -A _tv wews t top? wo answer to' wjpbtr g. peeKSKiL for wow amp gg
gg QUESTION TWO. THtVRF FUST atM g, gesr = QUKriOS THReE- THEVIC ~jLtl hASTCH £ K FAST U WHAT TH' 88
!

Editor:
In the article written by Van
McKenzie headed Blood Bank
Needs More Pro Donors which
appeared in The Alligator Monday,
certain statements were made
which seriously compromise the
donor program of our Blood Bank
operation. I am sure it was un unintentional
intentional unintentional and resulted from some
misunderstanding. Nevertheless,
the general impact of the article
was just the opposite to the philos philosophy
ophy philosophy of the Blood Bank.
The statement that the hospital
prefers professional donors . .
Is just not the case. There has
been a certain dependence on pro professional
fessional professional donors beginning with the
opening of the blood bank some
years ago for emergencies and
open heart surgery. However, we
have been making efforts to re reduce
duce reduce the proportion of profession professionally
ally professionally donated units used In the Health
Center as a matter of policy. We
hope to reduce our professional
donor activity to a bare minimum.
It is stated that professional
blood donors and their families are
insured of a blood supply from the
hospital in case of emergency.
This is just not factually correct, j
and constitutes the most serious
of the statements in the article.
Professional donors are not in insured
sured insured under any blood plan. It
should be obvious what the impact
of such a statement would have
on our donors who give blood for
blood assurance plans without a
fee. Few would donate voluntarily
or for a blood assurance plan
while professional donors were re receiving
ceiving receiving the same benefits plus an
inconvenience fee. The statement
is a misrepresentation to the pro professional
fessional professional donors as well.
A specific request was made to
avoid any mention of the actual
fee, yet it appeared anyway. This
fee is subject to change at any
time. It is an inconvenience fee
made to insure the appearance of
a donor of specific blood type in the
blood bank at a specific time. Any
donor failing to respond to our

misunderstanding
cleared up

request without good reason is
automatically dropped from our
call list. The point is that most
of our voluntary donors are quite
sensitive about professional donor
activity and we sincerely wish to
avoid alienation of their humani humanitarian
tarian humanitarian motivation.
The so-called plea for more
professional donors stems from
the fact that most students on the
professional donor list are not on
campus during the summer while
others change addresses and tele telephones
phones telephones during the summer term.
We would only request that we be
notified of changes of addresses
and telephone numbers. Others who
wish placed on the professional
donor list should contact the Blood
Bank.
Although unintentional, the
article has placed our blood pro procurement
curement procurement efforts in serious jeo jeopardy
pardy jeopardy and misrepresents our
policy and philosophy at a time

V LOOK
-A-Ison oun salc
~J COMING SOON

Ift
BROWSE SHOP
'

when we are making efforts to
expand our voluntary donor activ activity.
ity. activity.
It would be most helpful to us if
a statement were printed clarify clarifying
ing clarifying the Blood Banks policy an d
correcting the factual content of
the article. I feel confident that
Mr. McKenzie could prepare a
second article in such away as
to cause no embarrassment to
himself or to the Alligator. I
would only request that Mr. Mc-
Kenzie or any other member of
your staff meet with me before the
preparation of any additional arti articles.
cles. articles.
Sincerely,
Reginald M. Lambert, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Pathology
Director, Blood Bank
(Editors Note: We appreciate Dr.
Lamberts letter and appreciate
the clearing up of the misunder misunderstandings
standings misunderstandings which the article cre created).
ated). created).

'
Thursday, March 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

I NOTICE I
I This Trimester's Publication Os The FLORIDA I
I ALLIGATOR Will Cease On Weds., April 6. I
NOTICE
I Applications Are Now Being Accepted For
i
I EDITOR and MANAGING EDITOR of
I THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR for the
I Summer Trimester
1 Applications Are Due By 2:30 pm, April 6
I In The Board of Student Publications Office,
I R. 9, Florida Union. Applicants Must Be
I Available For Interview APRIL 7, 1966.
The Browse Shop I
A STILLNESS AT APPOMATTOX Bruce Cotton I
GRADUATE RECORD EXAM I
IONIC ALIPHATIC REACTIONS ..William Saunders I
CROSS CREEK Marjorie Rawlings I
THE YEARLING Marjorie Rawlings I
THE SUN ALSO RISES Ernest Hemingway I
INSIDE EUROPE TODAY John Gunther I
HARD COVER I
20,000 WORDS Leslie I
ABSTRACT ALGEBRA Deskins I
SOLID CIRCUITS AND I
MICROMINIATURIZATION Drummer!
Store Hours 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. I
Saturday 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 I
Compus Shop & Bookstore |

Page 5



IGATOR CLASSIFIEDS!

for sale
GRETSCH Electric
Guitar. One yr. old. Hard case,
S3OO. Call Bernie, 372-7672. (A (A---125-2t-c).
--125-2t-c). (A---125-2t-c).
1965 HONDA 305 Super Hawk. Less
than 4,300 miles with luggage rack
and saddle bags. Call Bob Ellison
at 376-2320 or call 376-4995 and
leave message. Also have 4*5
Omega enlarger. (A-125-ts-c).
1964 SKYLINE MOBILE HOME.
10 x 55'. Two bedrooms, 372-
6353 or 372-2783. (A- 25- t-c).
8 x 45', Two Bedroom HOUSE
TRAILER. Call 376-9005 after
5:30 p.m. or see at Town and
Country Trailer Court, lot T-3.
(A-125-ts-c).
1965 HONDA 50. Electric starter,
windshield. $220 or best offer.
2,100 miles, 90 mpg. Call Harvey
at, 378-3360. (A-125-3t-c).
OFFICE CHAIR -- Swivel chair
with adjustable back, arm rest,
foam rubber seat. Retailed for
$75 selling for S3O. Call Robin
at 376-8918. (A-125-3t-c).
LEAVING COUNTRY, must sell
66 A-H SPRITE, 3,000 mi., 4 mo.
old. Above S4OO. Also 007 Attache
Case with a stereo and 3 band
radio, $135. Call 378-1770. (A (A---1
--1- (A---1 st-c).
BOAT, 18 Larson Fiberglass,
walk thru windshield, 75 hp. Evin Evinrude
rude Evinrude motor, electric starter and
lift, many extras. Murray tilt trail trail-34.
-34. trail-34. 1419 NE 23rd Blvd. (A-125-
2t-c).
AIR FORCE ROTC CADET: Com Complete
plete Complete mess dress uniform, coat
40, trousers 34 x 31. See at 118
SW 3rd Ave. in evening. (A-125-
2t-p).
1 'I
1964 HONDA Super 50. Excellent
condition, blue and white, $145.
Call Wayne, 376-3379. (A-124-
3t-c).
LIKE NEW, only 6 months old.
10' x 48', 2 bedroom TRAILER.
MUST SELL. Call 376-7708 after
5 p.m. (A-124-3t-p).
1964, 54' x 10 ARMOR MOBILE
HOME. 2 bedroom, A/C, electric
kitchen, free lot rent for one yr.,
10 min. from campus, small a amount
mount amount of equity. Take over pay payment
ment payment of $58.63 per month. £66-
3213, after 5. (A-124-st-c).
8' x 33 HOUSE TRAILER with
8 x 25* cabana. Good condition.
Roomy closet and storage space.
Includes washing machine. $llOO.
Call 378-1300 after 6 p.m. (A (A---124-3t-p).
--124-3t-p). (A---124-3t-p).
1962 TRIUMPH 650 cc. Excellent
condition, fast, reliable, good en engine,
gine, engine, tires, upholstery. $525. Call
378-2125. (A-121-st-c).
1964 BSA Lightning Rocket, 650 cc.
Excellent condition. Cash or trade.
$895. Call Dave Heney, 372-6938.
(A-108-ts-c).
panaiP
I CHi jgjilllO*l tij
JEAN SEBERG
HONOR BLACKMAN
SEANGmiSON-*vgj|
Plus Color Hit
1 "THE ART OF LOVE" |

for sale
BEAT THE HEAT An ADMIRAL
window air 'conditioner will help.
Good condition, less than two yrs.
old. $75. Call 378-2089 after 5.
(A-124-tf-nc).
FRAMUS BASS and Case, 2 months
old. Excellent condition. Must sell.
Contact Jeff, 372-9285. (A- 24-
2t-p).
STUDENTS ONLY. Brand new
Admiral Air Conditioners, un unredeemed
redeemed unredeemed on lay-away (all sizes).
Pick up payment with nothing down.
Sudden'Service Fuel Oil Co., au authorized
thorized authorized Admiral Dealer. Ph. 376-
4404. (A-118-10t-c).
SPRING WARDROBE Sizes 8,
9, 10. Sportswear and cocktail
dresses. Specials on a 3-piece
Kimberley suit; Jeune Liegue
dress and White Stage bermudas.
376-5616. (A-121-ts-c).
53 x 10 GREAT LAKES Mobile
Home. 2 bedrooms, central heat
and air conditioning, 4 yrs. old.
$3500. Call 372-0034. (A-123-
st-c).
1963 A-H MARK H. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. No reasonable offer refused.
See at 306 NE 6th St. Call 376-
9991 after 7; before 7, 372-2528.
(A-122-st-c).
1956 GENERAL TRAILER. 27x8
with 25x8' cabana and awnings.
Very good condition. A real bar bargain
gain bargain for $950. Archer Road Village,
lot: Beta 10. (A-122-st-p).
NEW PUBLISHED 2 Vol. Set. Web Websters
sters Websters 20th Century Dictionary.
Brand new, still in box. Coat
$42.50. S3O firm. 378-3197. (A (A---122-st-c).
--122-st-c). (A---122-st-c).
TRAILER, 50* x 10, 2 BR, front
kitchen, washing machine, A/C,
1 bedroom now with built-in desk
and shelves. Sell to best offer.
378-2776 after 6. (A-122-st-p).
MUST SELL OR RENT. One bed bedroom
room bedroom mobile home, carpeted,
A/C, all electric, fully equipped,
natural paneling throughout, ideal
bachelor quarters. Loaded with
character. Location D-l Town
& Country Trailer Park. Contact
Dave Fagen, Rm. 218 C Architec Architecture
ture Architecture Bldg, or Ph. 376-7395. Be Between
tween Between 5 & 7 p.m. or after 10:30
p.m. (A-123-4t-p).
AVAILABLE MAY Ist. 1 apt. for
4 students, 2 blocks from campus.
Air conditioners, $l2O per student
for summer semester. 1918 NW
Ist Ave. Call 372-3572. (B-117-
lOt-c).
I* 3* 5* 7* 9
/thru \
/ SfrfUDff/X
m
rmXK'TATII IN

-*

. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 31, 1966_

Page 6

for, rent
SEX makes no difference; its still
only $35 per person for this spa spacious
cious spacious apt. for 4. Two bedroom,
furnished, A/C, swimming pool,
available May Ist, finished lease
through Aug. 378-3092. (B-124-
3t-c).
HOUSE, S9O, 2 blocks from cam campus.
pus. campus. Available April 27th and thru
Fall and Winter, 376-6671. (B (B---125-3t-c).
--125-3t-c). (B---125-3t-c).
HOUSE FOR RENT. 4 mos. (April
- Aug.), 3 bedrooms,4-1/2 baths.
1 block from campus. Contact Mrs.
Moeller, 376-4471. (B-125-3t-p).
COOL ROOM for Summer Tri.
5 blocks from campus. $25/per $25/person,
son, $25/person, male/month. Private bath.
Call Paul, 378-4059.(8-125-2t-p).
DOUBLE AND SINGLE ROOMS
for men for third trimester. Pri Private
vate Private entrance, private bath, re refrigerator,
frigerator, refrigerator, reasonable rate. 3
blocks from campus. Call 372-
8929 after 3 p.m. 327 NW 15th Terr.
(B-125-st-c).
NICE COOL QUIET ROOM in pri private
vate private home. All modern conven conveniences.
iences. conveniences. Call 376-5368; 376-2100.
202 NW 12th Terr. (B-125-st-c).
CLOSE TO CAMPUS. Largfe 2bed 2bedroom
room 2bedroom furnished apt. Available for
summer trimester at reduced rate.
912 SW 6th Ave. 372-7989. (B (B---125-2t-c).
--125-2t-c). (B---125-2t-c).
FURNISHED SEMI-DUPLEX.
Three rooms, very nice, shower
bath, private yard, barbecue grill,
electricity and hot water included.
Nice location. $75. 814 NE 11th
Ave. 372-2191 after 5:30 weekday.
(B-125-lt-c).
SPARKLING MODERN air condi conditioned
tioned conditioned 2 bedroom furnished apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Available April 26th. Re Reserve
serve Reserve now. No lease. SIOO for two.
slls for three. 3314 NW 21st St.
376-0894. (B-125-2t-c).
CHOICE ONE BEDROOM fumish fumished
ed fumished apt. A/C, available April 25th.
Horne's Apts. Ph. 372-2436. (B (B---121-ts-c).
--121-ts-c). (B---121-ts-c).
MODERN ONE BEDROOM APT.
available April 22nd. Furnished.
A/C, three blocks from campus.
S9O/mo. 376-9893. (B-123-3t-p).
nQ2S
Lljww 4 *. wnm
Last Times 2 C hits*
M,nfycrM EDWARDG ANN
McQUEEN ROBINSONMARGRETiV'*!
KARL MALDEN-lUESDAYWELD ,*<&§
. A MART IN RMISOHOFF PRODUCTION -its?
H!SEEBEEHif7
'MEIEOCOLOR } jj
ELIZABETH TAYLOR MpHin
RICHARD BURTON TIPM
EVA MARIE SAINT

1 for rent |
MODERN SPLIT LEVEL APT. Sky
lighting with upstairs bedroom,
walk-in closet, 2 blocks from cam campus,
pus, campus, large kitchen with washing
machine, A/C, reduced summer
rates. 378-4064. (B-125-ts-c).
VILLAGE PARK-APT. A/C, pool,
2 bedroom for summer. Suitable
for 2-3-4 occupants. Call 378-
4886. (B-125-3t-c).
VILLAGE 34, SECOND EDITION.
Located near Univ. Golf Course.
328 SW 34th St. 24 new 1 bedroom
apt. units, furnished and air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Available April Ist. Rent
SIOO per month. See Resident Man Manager's
ager's Manager's Apt. on premises after 5
p.m. Lou Schilling, apt. 10. Man Managed
aged Managed Ernest Tew Realty Inc. 376-
6461. (B-108-ts-c).

I STARTS GAINESVILLE THEATRE I
I FRIDAY 20- 2400 HAWTHORN! ROAD
THE CENTER
GRAND OPENING THURSDAY APRIL 7
THE TROUBLE WITH ANGELS"
TICKETS ON SALE FLORIDA THEATRE BOX OFFICE
He was B| jpi s
the night
man in .^
mwiuwibranm
DOORS OPEN 1:45
[ J IIJ *J I |T.V FEATURES 2:00
4:21 6:42 9:03

for rent
Yours
for Summer. 2 bedroom, 2blocks
from a, screen porch, muni munificent
ficent munificent kitchen, furnished. 1813
NW 2nd Ave. SBS-90. (B-123-
3t-p).
FURNISHED APTS. Two bedroom
furnished apts. Available end of
April. Special low summer rates
Right near campus. Suitable for
up to 4 students. Call Mrs. Jones
376-5636. (B-120-ts-c).
Toamol Ilian
(jj Us -RENTALS
§hnp
|i^JniYjA^e I____^ 1 ____^



I6ATOR CLASSIFIEDS!

| for rent |
APT. FOR RENT. B Term,
Village Park. Air conditioned.
S4O mo. for 4 or 2, less than
mile. Ph. 378-4165. (B-*24-3t-p).
ONE BEDROOM furnished A/C apt.
Take over lease at reduced rates;
transportation needed. -378-4635.
(B-124-3t-c).
THREE BEDROOM HOUSE. Cdol
during summer, completely fur furnished,
nished, furnished, wall-to-wall carpeting,
TV aerial. S3OO for entire tri trimester.
mester. trimester. Call 372-5508. (B-124-
3t-c).
SEX MAKES NO DIFFERENCE.
It's still only $35 per person for
this spacious apt. for 2. Two bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, furnished, A/C, swimming
pool, available May Ist, furnished
lease through Aug. 378-3092. (B (B---1
--1- (B---1 3t-c).
TWO BEDROOM completely fur furnished,
nished, furnished, kitchen equipped apts. 1/2
block from Law School, 1238-A,
B, C, SW Ist Ave. (B-124-3t-c).
LARGE ONE BEDROOM APT.,
walking distance to campus.
Available beginning Spring Tri.
1604 NW 3rd Place. Call 378-
3042. (B-124-3t-c).
COMFORTABLY FURNISHED one
bedroom duplex apt. Ideal for mar married
ried married couple. SBS a month includes
water. Available after exams. Call
372-7223. (B-124-3t-c).
ONE BEDROOM furnished apts.
Air conditioned, near Univ. Ph.
372-9569. (B-123-4t-c).

=n I SOS!
ggSL 0m SHAVING EVERY
DAYISSUCHA
H F f1 OGH-DRAG!
3,4 \ WHAT CAN SAVE
MY TENDER,
I \\ { \beautiful skin?
If youve never used an electric shaver before, the Norelco'Flip-
Too is a great way to find out the eas.er side of JMkl
shaving Us roC blades Voice whiskers off. Never cut or mdb
They won* hurt you. Neither will the price which -about the Ji?
same as a year's supply of razor blades and shave crea J W Wm.
PS It you wantto spend a littlemore, get the Norelco Speeds! aver ,s*p'
30 (at right). 35% closer shavers. Fromshave to
deaTaboutany Norelca-you cant get stung!
- Norelco 7b* Close Shove | NjwWN>wYoiMOOI7
1966 North American PhiliptCowponyJn^^^^^^

| for rent
FURNISHED APT. for rent, avail available
able available April- Ist. Can accomodate
3 or 4 students, $lO5 monthly, 219
NW 3rd Ave. Call 372-5746. (B (B---121-st-c).
--121-st-c). (B---121-st-c).
AIR CONDITIONED APTS. For
Summer. Suitable for 2 or 3, $l3O $l3O-for
-for $l3O-for A or B Term. Suitable
for 3 or 4, SIBO per Term. Call
376-8990, 8 a.m. 5p.m., or 7 p.m.
- 10 p.m. Also renting for fall.
(B-115-ts-c).
I 1.l 1.1 I ! N..1 I
MODERN ONE BEDROOM APT.,
2 or 3 people. 3 blocks from cam campus,
pus, campus, furnished, including washing
machine. A/C. Call 378-1530. (B (B---121-ts-c).
--121-ts-c). (B---121-ts-c).
APT. IN COLONIAL MANOR for
Spring Trimester for 2 people.
Call 378-3748. (B-123-3t-c).
ATTRACTIVE ROOM in modern
home. Ideal for student who needs
a quiet, pleasant place to study.
372-7883. (B-123-ts-c).
MODERN SPLIT LEVEL APT.
A/C, kitchen, washing machine,
furnished. Reduced summer
rates. 3 blocks from campus.
1824 NW 3rd Place. 376-2349.
(B-123-3t-c).
wanted
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES to
share two bedroom apt. for Spring
Trimester. 4 blocks from campus,
A/C. $29 per month. Call 378-3132.
(C-124-st-p).

Thursday, March 3N, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

wanted
NEED 3 FEMALE ROOMMATES
to share high-rise apt. for summer
trimester. Special rate for sum summer.
mer. summer. Call 378-1406. (C-122-3t-c).
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT. Coun CounseUors
seUors CounseUors -- wranglers wanted for
large Eastern Boys'Ranch. Horse Horsemanship
manship Horsemanship required. Work with boys
age 8-16. For more information,
378-4840 during week. (C-117-
lOt-c).
NEED 3 ROOMMATES for Sum Summer.
mer. Summer. Private bedrooms. Trans Transportation
portation Transportation needed to quiet modern
neighborhood. Large yard. Call
378-3337' anytime. S2O/mo. (C (C---1
--1- (C---1 3t-c).
NEED MALE ROOMMATE to
share modern A/C apt. with three
others for Spring Tri. $125 for
Tri. Call 378-3240.(C-123-st-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATES for A&B
or just B Term to share new
modern A/C 2 bedroom apt. in
Village Park. Ph. Arlene at 378-
3003. (C-123-3t-c).
EXCEPTIONAL 2 female
roommates to share 3 bedroom
house with one graduate student.
Sun deck, carpeted, washing
machine, fireplace. Near cam campus.
pus. campus. $37 per month. 378-2152
mornings. (C-123-3t-c).
WANTED: Two riders to Washing Washington,
ton, Washington, D.C. Leaving April 17th, re returning
turning returning on April 24th. $17.50 each
way. 1965 Mercury. Call 372-3974.
(C-121-st-nc).

Page 7

| wanted [
NEED ONE FEMALE ROOMMATE
to share large furnished apt. for
summer tri. One block behind Nor Norman
man Norman Hall. Ph. 378-4589. $45 month.
(C-124-3t-c).
WANTED ONE FEMALE ROOM ROOMMATE
MATE ROOMMATE to share split level apt.,
1824 NW 3rd Place. $35 monthly.
April Ist Aug. Air conditioned.
378-1278; 378-2068. (C-124-3t-c).
LIFE GUARDS WANTED, 3 or 4
to work in Atlanta, Ga. Start April
30th, WSI preferred. 378-4423. (C (C---124-2t-c).
--124-2t-c). (C---124-2t-c).
FEMALE WANTED to share home.
Must have own transportation. S4O
a month. Call 372-7186. (C-124-
Bt-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE for A Term
to share 2 bedroom apt. at Village
Park with balcony overlooking
pool. $53 a month. Call 378-3752.
(C-124-2t-c).
RIDER WANTED to and from At Atlanta.
lanta. Atlanta. Leave Friday, return Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday. Share expenses. Ph. 378- 3213.
(C-124-2t-c).
WANTED: CYCLE HELMET
WITH FACE SHIELD. Tel: 376-
3569. (C-123-3t-p).
WANTED an individual 21 or older
who needs a FREE RIDE to Chica Chicago.
go. Chicago. Leave April 20-22. Call 372-
9464, Rm.1046.(C-124-3t-c).
help wanted
AIRLINE STEWARDESS for Pan
American World Airways. Campus
interviews Tuesday, April sth.
Contact Placement Office, Bldg. H.
Ext. 2351, for appointment. (E (E---125-3t-c).
--125-3t-c). (E---125-3t-c).
MAN AND WIFE student to oper operate
ate operate popular motel for the month of
May 1966. Motel experience neces necessary.
sary. necessary. Call 376-4667 for interview.
(E-125-ts-c).
MALE HELP WANTED. Beef boner
needed. Part or fulltime. Apply at
McCallum Wholesale, 504 NW Bth
Ave. (E- 25-st-c). >
WAITRESS WANTED. Must te 21.
Work 3 hr. lunch shift. SeeMjs.
Druash. Apply Schooner Room,
1222 W. Univ. Ave. (E-l 19-st-c).
NEED EXTRA CASH. Local com company
pany company needs several students or
faculty members who would like
to earn from SSO to SIOO per week
part time.Call372-7811,9-10a.m.
for further information. (E-124-
ts-c).
WAITER WANTED. Must be 21.
No experience necessary. Ph. 376-
9335, from 9-12a.m.(E-124-tf-c).
- - - ---
FULLER BRUSH CO. needs stu student
dent student representative in Diamond
Village, Flavet m and Schucht.
Can be worked in off hrs. with
average of $2.00 per hr. in earn earnings.
ings. earnings. Also need part or full time
help for other areas of Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. Write to H. Silver, 1028
Clearwater Dr., Daytona Beach,
Fla. (E-117-ts-c).
RECENT COLLEGE GRAD, with
background in Biology and exper experimental
imental experimental Psychology seeks perma permanent
nent permanent position. Call 372-2165. (E (E---124-4t-c).
--124-4t-c). (E---124-4t-c).
autos |
1964 BLUE MG-MIDGET. Radio
and heater, luggage rack. Call
376-3561. (G-123-ts-c).

autos I
MUST SELL 1961 RENAULT.
Needs repairs, priced according accordingly,
ly, accordingly, recent paint, 3 new tires, looks
good. Call evenings and weekend,
378-1400. (G-125- 2t-p).
1964 CORVAIR Spyder Turvo Turvocharged,
charged, Turvocharged, 150 hp, 4 speed, full
instrumentation, wooden steering
wheel, radio, excellent condition.
378-3305. (G-125-2t-p).
Good Used 1955 DODGE. Ideal stu student
dent student car. Good interior, 4 new
tires. Asking S2OO, but will listen
to reason. Call 378-1907 this week,
after 9 p.m. (G-126-3t-p).
1954 CHEVROLET, Belair, 4 door,
stick, radio, 2 spares, original
owner. See and make offer. Ext.
2811; 372-5510 after 5. (G-125-
3t-p).
1963 RENAULT DAUPHINE. Fair
condition, good tires, red, 32 mpg.
$99. Call 372-1078. (G-125-lt-c).
MUST SELL 1962 RAMBLER. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Severe financial
need. Highest offer. Call 378-4296.
(G-124-3t-c).
1959 BLACK CHEVROLET CONV.
Good condition, 1 owner, factory
348 cc, high performance, 335 hp,
4-speed transmission. Positra Positration.
tion. Positration. $875. 372-7130.(G-124-3t-c).
services
JUNIOR COED seeks regular
afternoon or evening babysitting
job for Term A. Regular rates.
References if desired. Julie, 372-
9348. (M-125-3t-p).
WEE FOLKS NURSERY SCHOOL.
Two locations to serve you. 616
NW 9th Ave. uptown, phone
372-4525 and 2706 SW 34th St.
near Archer Rd and Medical Cen Center,
ter, Center, phone 372-5466. By hour, day,
week or month. (M-124-Bt-c).
NOW OPENING. Teddy Bear
Nursery. 3 departments, com completed
pleted completed infant dept. Planned
program for children over 3.
Central heating aCnd air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Ph. 376-0917. 1214-P/2T
NW 4th St. (M-116-ts-c),
lost-found
FOUND In Silverman's ladles
dept., silver bracelet. Owner may
call 378-1611 and identify. (L (L---1
--1- (L---1 2t-c).
real estate
GOING TO BE IN GAINESVILLE
a while? S6OO down, $75 per month monthwill
will monthwill make you the owner of a fur furnished
nished furnished 2 bedroom home. Located
in NW section. Call 376-8032 for
more information. (I-123-3t-c).
personal
I WANT
GIRL. Box 12797 Univ. Station.
(J-123-3t-p).
HARV, Sebring was great, Daytona
was fine, but certainly not worth
2 yrs. of good times. Woobs. (J (J---1
--1- (J---1 t-p).
ABSTRACTIONS of pussycats, ani animal
mal animal crackers, teddy bears, and
Phenwick . Ten more years and
you're thirty. Happy Birthday,
Pooh . CJS. (J- 1 25-it-p).



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 31, 1966

Jr
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UF FOLK DANCERS
Folk dancers Claudia Doddington and John Ross perform a Scottish
folk dance in the Presbyterian Student Center. The UF sponsors a
Folk Dancing Club and all interested students are urged to call the
Center for further information.
College Gives Fellowships
John Whatley of Tampa and James R. Fountain Jr. of New York
were named today as first recipients of $2,500 Business Associates
graduate study fellowships in the UFs College of Business Adminis Administration
tration Administration by Dean Donald J. Hart.
The 10-month fellowships, awarded on the basis of the students
overall records, undergraduate grades, Graduate Record Examination
standing and letters of recommendation, will take effect during the
1966 fall trimester.
Business Associates was formed in 1965 to provide expansion of
current and proposed programs in the College of Business Adminis Administration
tration Administration and to give assistance to Florida firms with their own activi activities.
ties. activities. Dr. Robert Cline, professor of insurance, serves as director
of the Business Associates group which now includes 45 members
from throughout Florida.
Whatley, 21, a starting tackle for Floridas Sugar Bowl football
squad last year, has a 3.7 overall average during his career at the
University.
Fountain, 28, attended Palm Beach Junior College for two years
before enrolling here in Feburary, 1962. He completed his require requirements
ments requirements for a bachelors degree in business administration in Decem December,
ber, December, 1963, graduating with honors. Fountain ranked fourth in a class
of 71 with his 3.2 upper division average.
He has been employed by the CPA firm of Arthur Young & Company
in New York City since January, 1964, and currently resides at 137-05
Franklin Ave., Flushing, L.1., N. Y.

ouR HoM£'BaK! £ I>|
MsA§na: I
m Hir & The I
wholf campus I
Carmattella's I
;/' I
; 706 West University Avenue 1

I Pt A Cl .
I $5 95
I / HAND MADE
I IN HAITI
I I Calling all pierced ears!
I HUMOR LINGERIE
I DECOR NOVELTIES
I 'Close in for the way out
II NW6thSKAtl6thAve^^^^^^|

Minority Groups
4
Want Definition

By MARY ANN WATERMOLEN
Alligator Staff Writer
Last weeks open panel discus discussion
sion discussion with the leaders of Freedom
Party and Student Government re revealed
vealed revealed a problem which has never
before confronted the men of
Tigert.
The minority faction on campus
is demanding that every minor is issue
sue issue be strictly defined, stated
Dean of Student Affairs Lester
Hale. This in itself is an impos impossible
sible impossible thing. In order to specify the
limits and bounds of free speech,
it would take a lawyer,
The group of freedom speakers
has made several requests to in insure
sure insure what they term individual
freedom of choice and rights.
One of the biggest issues in recent
months has been to establish a
specific free speech area much like
that established at Berkeley.
This was tried at Florida State
last year and only lasted four
days, Hale continued. After this
period, the freedom group moved
outside their designated area and
set up shope elsewhere on campus.
This is our greatest objection
to the group, said Hale. They
constantly appear to misrepresent
the facts and distort the true pic picture
ture picture of the issues. We in Tigert
f WE GOT
I SO BIG
'CAUSE WE
CHARGE SO LITTLE
r rent a car from 7^
COMO-CAM
-T 9
pw ptwMti a wtfa
We feature Valiants & other
CHRYSLER-built cars. Gas Gasoilinsuranceall
oilinsuranceall Gasoilinsuranceall included!
PHONE 376-3644

are sincerely concerned with the
rights of the students on our cam campus,
pus, campus, but not the irresponsible
rights or the unconstitutional
rights.
It was at the recommendation of
the Student Affairs Committee, a
branch of Student Government, that
the area was not set aside.
Major steps are being taken to
arrive at what position the Univer University
sity University will take on future issues,
Hale concluded.
TB^T
-'Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co.

<*>
1. Is it true youre planning 2. How are you going to guarantee
to get engaged? security to your family when
, youre married?
I m on the brink
of giving Jane my I have a rich aunt,
Beethoven sweatshirt. you know.
3. What about money for your 4. Whod pay off your mortgage
childrens education? if you should die?
My Uncle Henry is You never can tell,
very fond of me. Every time I help
He owns a steel mill. an old man across the
, street I give him
my name and address
in case he doesnt
have anyone to leave
his money to.
5.1 know something that can 6. Living Insurance from
help you meet almost all Equitable can. It can even
your financial needs. give you a lifetime income
And be independent, too. when you retire.
Nothing can do all that. I wonder if Uncle Henry
has it?
For information about Living Insurance, see The Man from Equitable.
For career opportunities at Equitable, see your Placement Officer, or
write: Patrick Scollard, Manpower Development Division.
The EQUITABLE Life Assurance Society of the United States
Home Office: 1285 Ave. of the Americai, New York, N. Y. 10019 1965
An Equal Opportunity Employer
\

Shoe Repair Shop!
I HEELS ATTACHED I
I 5 MINS. I
I SOLES ATTACHED I
I 15 MINS. I
I At 2 Locations I
I CAROLYN PLAZA I
I FR 6-0315 I
I 101 N. Main St. I
I Opp. Ist Nat'l Bank I



V
Leaders'
Views
(From Page I)
He said a small group of people Involved in the recent moves
have surrounded The Alligator and run the entire paper. I dont
feel The Alligator was a newspaper which the majority of stu students
dents students could be proud.
Culpepper expressed hope the changes will lead to a clean
slate of many students going into The Alligator staff with different
backgrounds and different interests. In the future I hope we will
see a portrayal of all the activities going on on this campus, many
of which have been shunned by The Alligator.
IFC President Clyde Taylor complained about Alligator cover coverage
age coverage of news events, but expressed a no comment to questions
about President Reitzs action in removing Moor and Cardozo
yesterday. ~
Taylor said he signed the petition only to obtain a review"
of faulty Alligator news policies, and that he didnt know enough
about the personnel removals to comment on them.
Inadequate coverage on a lot of events, plus the amount of
complaints, he said, justified anything to improve the situation.
However, Taylor said he was disappointed that President Reitz
felt he had to take the matter out of the hands of the Board of
Publications.
Lynn Wolly, Mortar Board president, said that the petition
which she signed, took the place of other action which Mortar
Board had planned for some time.
The select womens honorary, she said, had been trying to get
on the Student Publications agenda to complain about dissatisfac dissatisfaction
tion dissatisfaction with The Alligator. Miss Wolly had no comment on Reitzs
suspension of Moor and Miss Cardozo after the Board had failed
to move against them.
The President of the University is responsible to the entire
university community for the welfare and interests of students
and faculty alike, SG treasurer John Darlson said. He said the
situation on The Alligator had reached a point where those in
responsible positions werent conducting themselves in the best
interests of the university and deserved to be removed.
They (the fired staff) arent entitled to any more continuity
in office than any other SG worker or UF employe who is be bestowed
stowed bestowed with responsibility, he added.
The basic problem is what type of newspaper the students
wanted. As an SG official, I can attest to the fact there has been
a great deal of dissatisfaction with the content of the paper.
There was a lack of student newsand after all, The Alligator
is a student paper, Darlson added.
What Dr. Reitz did was unprecedented, but it was done with
the best interests of the students in mind. The Alligator is the
voice of the students, not an autonomous voice for the adminis administration
tration administration or of two or three members of the staff. There has to be
a balancing effect.
Chancellor of the Honor Court Herb Schwartz said he favored
the suspension of Cason, Moor and Cardozo on the basis of their
attempted invasion of the privacy of last Friday nights Blue Key
tap session.
Their acts Friday night were totally irresponsible and un unwarranted
warranted unwarranted and that alone was sufficient, Schwartz said.
The head of the honor system pointed out that protection of
privacy is precisely what he has advocated most strongly for
students all trimester.
As to Casons editorship, Schwartz had no complaints. Whether
some of their facts were well founded or not is something for the
readers to decide, he said. Schwartz said he signed the petition
to remove Cason in support of only one point, the invasion of Blue
Keys tapping session privacy.
Schwartz backed Reitzs suspension of Moor and Cardozo
reluctantly. As for Yvette and Andy, as long as we were
going to fire Benny, we had just as well have cleaned house and
start all over again, he said.
Schwartz said if Dr. Reitz it in his responsibility to do it, Im
not going to disagree, although Im abstractly opposed to adminis administrative
trative administrative fiat in student affairs. Im notgoingto question his motives
or his actions.
Susan Bartley, president of Panhellenic Council, said she fully
supported the position of the Board of Student Publications and
President Reitz.
I sincerely hope that these actions will cause The Alligator
to have a greater support of the student body.
Florida Blue Key President Bruce Starling stated, I support
the President 100 per cent on his decisive action.
I thijik that the lack of competence existing in the leadership!
of the Florida Alligator has forced Dr. Reitz to take such dras drastic
tic drastic steps.

Former Editors Speak
(From Page I)

We leave reluctantly because
we were thrown out, Yvette Car Cardozo
dozo Cardozo said.
The Board of Student Publica Publications,
tions, Publications, which twice voted in our
confidence, was overrulled by
President Reitz when he termin terminated
ated terminated the position of Andy Moor as
interim and summer editor and
myself as summer managing edi editor.
tor. editor.
We all asked him to confront
us and show us point by point why
he fired us, she said.
Id like to know why I was fired

without being confronted with any
charge after being given a vote
of confidence and instated into the
editors position by the Board of
Student Publications Tuesday
night, Andy Moor, former Alliga Alligator
tor Alligator editorial director, said.
I would also like to know why
Dr. Reitz never so much as called
me or had the courtesy to mail
me a letter as to why I was fired.
Moor said, Im very disap disappointed
pointed disappointed in the actions of Dr. Reitz
who The Alligator has always con considered
sidered considered a friend in the past.

- J Dv ~
o
1 REITZ S LETTER university of Florida I
I Gainesville. 32603 I
v m
lornci OF THE president March 30, 1966
.
gUffi a Bs|t
Bl p IS
H i* jljH
I Dear Professor Webb: 1
I After giving much and study to the current situation 1
I concerning the editorial leadership of the Alligator, I have concluded 1
I that decisive action must be taken. 1
I The problem before us is not a question of freedom of the press. 1
I Rather, it is the result of the failure of students responsible for the I
I publication of the Alligator to exercise and accept the responsibilities I
I with which they have been charged. 1
1 The fact that student leaders in large numbers have expressed 1
I great dissatisfaction over the manner in which the Alligator has handled I
I news and editorial materials this trimester is ample testimony that the I
I Alligator, a student newspaper, has not in fact represented the students. 1
I This broad expression of dissatisfaction indicates the need to have a 1
I student newspaper which encourages differences in viewpoint but recognizes 1
I the obligation of accurate news coverage and an editorial policy which 1
I reflects the best Interests of the students and the University community. 1
I Therefore, as President, I have taken the following action:
I First, lam directing the Board of Student Publications to reopen 1
I the editorship and managing editorship for the summer trimester and to |
I invite additional applications. 1
I Second, I am naming, effective at once,Drex Dobson as acting editor I
I of the Alligator to complete this winter trimester. He in turn shall have I
I the authority to name the acting managing editor. Since Drex has served asfl
I a very capable managing editor, I know he brings to the editor position thel
I experience and sound judgment that is required.
I Sincerely yours, 1
- I
I Wayne Reitz I
I President 1
I Professor John Webb 1
Chairman, Board of Student Publications
I 322 Stadium |

'U.S. To Destroy Chinas Central Power

By JUSTINE HARTMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Brig. Gen. Hugh Hester charged
that the U. J. government intends
to destroy the central power of
China by pursuing their interven intervention
tion intervention in Viet Nam last week in a
speech sponsored by the Student
Peace Union and the Gainesville
Committee to End the War in Viet
Nam.
The principles of maintaining
the neutrality and independence of
the South Vietnamese are an ide ideological
ological ideological guise for aggression,
Hester contended.
He feels that the neutrality of
these people were guaranteed by
the Geneva Treaty. Therefore, the
U.S. has no right to suppose their
rights in danger.
Hester charged that the war in
Viet Nam is illegal on three counts.
In addition to being unconstitu unconstitutional,
tional, unconstitutional, the war violates the United
Nations Charter which prohibits
the waging of unilateral war except
in self-defense. Noobjective stu student
dent student of international relations
would say that the Vietnamese are
invading the United States or have
any prospect of it, Hester said.
By the provision of the Geneva
Treaty Viet Nam was declared one
country. It was decided that elec elections
tions elections would be held under inter international
national international supervision. Since the
United States pledged non-inter non-interference
ference non-interference in this treaty, this is the
third count on which the war is
illegal, according to Hester.
No one can say that the North
Vietnamese are aggressors. Since

Viet Nam is one country, tliey would
then be aggressors against them themselves,
selves, themselves, Hester contended. He
said, If Ho Chi Minh is an ag aggressor,
gressor, aggressor, then Lincoln in his at attempt
tempt attempt to reunify the nation was an
aggressor.
The U.S. would not tolerate the
presence of a Soviet stooge in the
Canadian government nor will
China tolerate the presence of an
implacable foe on its border, said
Hester, who feels a war with china
is the inevitable result of our pre present
sent present policy in Viet Nam.
If the U.S. crosses the 17th
parallel, the Chinese people and
government will be convinced that
we are there to destroy them and
they will fight, he said.
Hester advocates withdrawal
which he believes will do more
than anything to enhance the pre prestige
stige prestige of the U.S. on the interna international
tional international scene.

Dobson Named
(From Page I)

represented the students, Dr.
Reitz said.
This broad expression of dis dissatisfaction
satisfaction dissatisfaction indicates the need to
have a student newspaper which
encourages differences in view viewpoint
point viewpoint but recognizes the obligation
of accurate news coverage and an
editorial policy which reflects the
best interest of the students and
the university community.
In announcing Dobson's appoint appointment,
ment, appointment, Dr. Reitz cited the new act acting
ing acting editor as a capable managing
editor, adding that he will give the

Thursday, March 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

If the U.S. withdrew support
from its stooge in South Viet Nam,
the country would be united again,
he concluded.
Discussing his mission on cam campus,
pus, campus, Hester said, If a society
is free, its citizens must be free
to enquire, to learn, to challenge.
It is in the essence of freedom to
discuss problems. The man who
holds the highest office in a free
society must be questioned. Those
who believe he is wrong must say
so without being called unpatriotic.
The unpatriotic citizen is the one
who obeys the government knowing
that it is wrong.
Hester retired from the Army in
1951 after 34 years of service. He
is a graduate of the U.S. Espionage
and Counter-Espionage Schools.
After retirement, he did graduate
work for three years in interna international
tional international relations at U. of Pennsyl Pennsylvania.
vania. Pennsylvania.

editors position the experience
and sound judgment it requires.
Moor and Miss Cardozo left The
Alligator offices after learning that
Dobson had been named acting edi editor.
tor. editor.
Several Alligator staffers walk walked
ed walked out of the editorial offices when
they learned of President Reitz's
decision.
Board Chairman John Webb said,
"The Board is given its authority
by Dr. Reitz and it must act in the
best interests of the university.

Page 9



Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 31, 1966

Art Sale
Set Today
Interested UF personnel and
students will have an opportunity
to examine and purchase original
prints by modern and old master
artists. A sales representative
from the Ferdinand Roten Galler Galleries
ies Galleries of Baltimore, Maryland, Mr.
Anthony Marsiglia, will be at the
UFs College of Architecture and
Fine Arts, 302 C, from 9:30 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. today.
On view will be approximately
500 original etchings, lithographs
and woodcuts by such artists as
Picasso, Chagall, Lautrec, Renoir,
Rouault, Goya, Piranesi, Baskin
and many others. There will also
be a selection of outstanding
manuscript pages from works of
the 13th 15th centuries.
Established in 1932 and now one
of the largest American print deal dealers,
ers, dealers, Roten Galleries has been
sending representatives to show
their original graphic art collec collections
tions collections to museums, colleges, and
collectors for many years.
Original prints are impressions
on fine paper taken from plates,
woodblocks or lithograph stones
prepared by the artist and hand handprinted
printed handprinted by him or under his super supervision.
vision. supervision. No photo-mechanical pro process
cess process is employed as in reproduc reproductions
tions reproductions of paintings.
Original prints are usually
limited in number and often the
modern print is signed by the ar artist.
tist. artist. Prices for items of the collec collection
tion collection to be displayed range from
$5 to $2,000, with the majority in
the under SIOO range. All works
are for sale and purchases maybe
charged or paid for over a three threemonth
month threemonth period. Visitors to the ex exhibition
hibition exhibition are under no obligation to
purchase any of the works to be
shown.
Coeds Organize
Pinstriper Group
Thirty-four coeds have entered
the halls of the student health ser service
vice service as Infirmary Pinstripers.
The group was organized by Wo Women
men Women Student's Association with the
help of Dr. William Hall and Mrs.
Margaret Mizelle of the infirmary
staff.
Their duties are to speed up
service by helping doctors and
nurses with time-consuming tasks.
This includes sterilizing instru instruments,
ments, instruments, making unused beds, and
taking patients to x-ray and labs.
They also assist in in-patients
as they enter or are discharged
from the infirmary. The Pin Pinstripers
stripers Pinstripers plan to start a magazine
rack for the main floor and hope
to obtain pictures to brighten stu students'
dents' students' rooms. Visiting patients and
running errands are other ser services.
vices. services.
Those girls chosen for this tri trimester
mester trimester as Pinstripers are Susan
Bateman, Cathy Bills, Jane Boggs,
Linda Cody, Anita Cooper, Sara
Davis, Vicki Frees, Ingrid Gold Goldstrom,
strom, Goldstrom, Judi Harris, Jackie Ben Benning,
ning, Benning, Linda Horn, Nancy Hurley.
Mary Beth Kane, Carol Ann La Lacock,
cock, Lacock, Cathy Lamb, Rochelle Ler Lerner,
ner, Lerner, Ginny Lipscomb, Lynne
McCarron, Rhonda McMullen,
Wanda Nee!, Becky Pierce, Bar Barbara
bara Barbara Rogers.
Judy Rosenberger, Chris Scheck,
Kay Seligman, Beverly Shea, Di Diana
ana Diana Sollner, Sandee Stephens, Mary
Wallace, Nettie Werner, Susan
Whitney, Beth Wilson, and Sharon
Yoder.
Serving as new co-chairmen for
the group will be Rhonda McMullen
and Judy Rosenberger.

NINTH CENTURY STATUE
This bronze statue of Vishnu was cast during the 9th century in
South India. This part of an exhibition of Miniatures and Small
Sculptures of India is beginning in the University Gallery April 10
at 3 p.m. This bronze is part of a collection of Dr. Arthur Funk, a
humanities instructor.
UF Photography Winner
To Go With Mademoiselle

Anna Marie Winset, a senior in
the UF's Department of Art, has
been named first place winner in
Mademoiselle magazines annual
college photography competition
for women.
Miss Winset will receive an a a-of
-of a-of $250 and one of her winning
photographs will appear in Made Mademoiselles
moiselles Mademoiselles August issue, according
to Eugene E. Grissom, chairman of
the Department of Art at the Uni University.
versity. University.
Cheryl Barns, a December grad graduate
uate graduate of the University, was one of
six students in the United States to

ED ABBOTT, 1965 graduate of
the University of Florida and
presently with Abbott, Bitter
and Associates Life Insurance
Consultants, will be in
Gainesville on April 2 and
3,1966.
The purpose of his visit is:
1 To discuss the recent G. I. BIN with
x
veterans and its possible applications
in developing a life insurance estate;
and
**
2. To talk with professional and medical
graduate students concerning their
estate accumulation and conservation.
If you fit into either of those
categories, please join Ed
for coffee and donuts on
Saturday, April 2, at 10:30
A.M. in Room 215 of the
Florida Union.
Abbott, Bitter and Associates
FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MIAMI, FLORIDA

receive honorable mention in the
contest, considered one of the na nations
tions nations top photography competi competitions
tions competitions for college women.
Miss Winset is the second UF
student to place first in the national
competition. Last years award
went to Shirley Wisser, with Gail
Baum of the university receiving
honorable mention;
All four students have studied
or are currently studying photo photography
graphy photography under the direction of Jerry
Uelsmann, assistant professor of
art at the university.

Campus-Wide
The first annual Arts and Crafts Festival of St. Augustine will be
held this weekend at the Plaza in St. Augustine Friday through Sunday.
The festival is sponsored by St. Augustine residents interested in
arts and crafts and will feature such items as paintings, sculpture,
weaving and ceramics for sale.
* *
Florida placed third i&tionally in the number of 1965 honors winners
in the nationwide Westinghouse Science Talent Search conducted annu annually
ally annually in high schools.
According to Dr. Luther A. Arnold, associate professor in the UF
College of Education and executive secretary of the Florida Foundation
for Future Scientists, Florida was surpassed only by New York and
Illinois, both states with significantly greater populations.
The Westinghouse Talent Search is conducted through the Foundation
for Future Scientists. Nineteen Florida students lO per cent of the
total number of national winners -- were honors winners last year.
* *
The Greek Council elected its new officers for 1966-1967.
The new president is Dave Wilson of Delta Upsilon fraternity;
vice president, Charlie Brown, Delta Tau Delta; secretary, Suzy
Owens, Delta Delta Delta; and treasurer, Kathy Lamb, Zeta Tau Alpha.
The new objectives of Greek Council are to increase religious
awareness among the fraternities and sororities, obtain qualified
speakers for fraternity and sorority discussions, and strengthen the
Greek service to both the University and the community.
* *
New officers were elected Sunday night at the Pi Lambda Phi
fraternity.
Soon to take office are: Jeff Blum, rex; Mike Segal, archon; Peter
Jonas, k.0.e.; Alan Paul, scribe; Mark Waldman, marshall; Artie
Ehrenkranz, pledgemaster; Brian Marshall, chaplin; and Alan Kan,
historian.
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Admissions Competitive In '67

Admission application to UF for
the 1967-68 term will be processed
on a competitive basis, rather than
a first come, first served ar arrangement.
rangement. arrangement.
Richard H. Whitehead, director

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( /l/ / J.HILUS MILLER -H e.
SPOHSOBJ) Hr
ni

of admissions and registration at
the University, said today the new
policy will give priority to appli-
cants whose potential on the basis
of their records indicates the
greatest likelihood of success and

the obtaining of maximum benefits
from the University.
Admission to the University in
the past has been primarily on the
date of receipt of the application,
provided that minimum require requirements

'^!vX*! M\v/! !v!v!v!v! Xv! X Xv!v
V 7,
| Whirlybird Here |
m
: ; : AU. S. Army HUIB armed ::
:: helicopter will visit the UF ::
>j campus Saturday, April 2, and ::
S will be on public display at the ::
:.: upper drill field on campus *:
:|: : from 9:30 a.m. until noon. The $:
;£ helicopter, popularly known as $:
S a Huey, will be flown to the ::;
:; campus by four University a- :&
:: lumni now serving with the ::
*: Army. The annual graduation :£
;: review of the combined Air ::
>: Force and Army ROTC units -x
v begins at 10:30 a.m.Saturday, ::
: The public is invited. *:
|s *.*.*,**.*.****

Thursday, March 31, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

ments requirements were met, Whitehead said.
He pointed out the University re received
ceived received 6,500 applications by the
Jan. 10 cutoff this year.
It is safe to assume we will
receive a minimum of 10,000 ap applications
plications applications for September, 1967,
he noted. Applications will be ac accepted
cepted accepted from Sept. 1, 1966, until
March 1, 1967.
The Universitys entering fresh freshman
man freshman class is limited to an en enrollment
rollment enrollment of 2,800. This limitation
does not affect the size of upper
division and professional schools,
however.
In order to maintain a specific
freshman enrollment, it has been
necessary to move from a calendar
cutoff date to control the size of
the class to a more selective pro process.
cess. process.
Out-of-state applications have
been evaluated for acceptance on
a competitive basis for a number
of years, Whitehead explained.
Students with superior secon secondary
dary secondary school records and test
scores will be able to apply for an
early decision by the University.

Students Placed
On Committees

Students are now being placed in
Constitutional Senate Committees.
Most of these committees have
been composed of faculty mem members
bers members who were appointed to the
position by UF President J. Wayne
Reitz. However, a few of the com committees
mittees committees did have student members.
In order to be placed on a com committee,
mittee, committee, Jacobs has to approve the
appointment. Then he sends a no-

Others will receive notification in
April following the March deadline
for filing applications.
This applies to the June and
September, 1967, admissions/ he
continued, not the entering class
of 1966 for which a cutoff date was
announced two months ago."
One reason for the limited fresh freshman
man freshman enrollment at the University,
Whitehead noted, is the availability
of community junior colleges and
other state universities in Florida.
The Board of Regents assigned
U F a role in the total state system
of higher education which demands
that the entering freshman class be
limited in number, he said.
Whitehead stressed the Univer University
sity University actually will not be in the
position of rejecting 7,200 students
and accepting 2,800. We would
expect to come up with a list of
about 4,500 students who meet all
our qualifications, based on the
past several years, he said.
From this group, we can ex expect
pect expect a considerable number to be
accepted by other schools as well,
thus yielding our class of 2,800
freshmen."

tice to Hale, who then approves
or rejects the appointment. If the
appointment is approved it then
goes to Reitz, who has the final
approval.
However, some students are on
committees by virtue of their of office.
fice. office.
These committees and the stu students
dents students on them are Academic Reg Regulations:
ulations: Regulations: Jacobs, and Bob Imholte,
secretary of academic affairs;
Campus Planning: Jack Scheck,
secretary of interior; Intercolle Intercollegiate
giate Intercollegiate Athletics: Treasurer John
Darlson, Bruce Starling, president
of Blue Key, Allen Trammell,
president of Athletic Council;
Board of Managers of Florida
Union: Bruce Rogow, secretary of
finance, Wayne Thomas, secretary
of organization, Larry Tyree,
president of Florida Union Board,
Dan McGovern, legislative council
representative, Joe Marinelli,
Florida Blue Key representative,
Louise Weadok, representative of
Mortar Board, Andy Moor, student (
publications, Skip Berg, represen representative
tative representative of Florida Union Board;
Student Financial Aid: Rogow; Stu Student
dent Student Housing: Gary Martin, com commissioner
missioner commissioner of on r campus housing,
Dan Meserve, secretary of mar married
ried married student affairs, Irene Minkoff,
president of women's interhall
council; Public Functions and Lec Lectures:
tures: Lectures: Imholt, Andrea Westman,
president of Lyceum Council, Jack
Zucker, chairman of Florida Union
forum committee, Clyde Taylor,
representative of 1.F.C., Susan
Bartley, Panhellenic representa representative,
tive, representative, Starling and a representative
from Mortar Board; Student Or Organizations
ganizations Organizations and Social Affairs:
Wayne Thomas, secretary of or organizations;
ganizations; organizations; Student Publications,
Moor, Yvette Cardozo, Fran Sni Snider;
der; Snider; Student Affairs: Jacobs, Star Starling,
ling, Starling, Lynn WoUy, president of Mor Mortar
tar Mortar Board, Jane Kimbrell, presi president
dent president of Women Students Associa Association,
tion, Association, Augie Schildbach, president
of Men's Interhall Council; Place Placement:
ment: Placement: Lewis Miles, secretary of
labor; Foreign Students: Bill Chi Chiara,
ara, Chiara, secretary of international af affairs,
fairs, affairs, Hani Masri, president of
1.8.A.; Traffic and Safety: Bill
Conor, chief justice of the traffic
court, Bill Sullivan, secretary of
traffic and safety; Schedules and
'Calendar:. Charles Shepnerd, ad administrative
ministrative administrative assistant to the pres president
ident president of the student body; Civil
Defense: Ed Koren, secretary of
mens affairs, and the secretary of
women's affairs; Discipline Com Committee:
mittee: Committee: Wayne McElroy.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday. March 31,1966

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BARF/ELD ON THE MOVE
Wayne Barfield picks up yardage in the March 21 Orange-Blue game.
The Orange won the game behind the strong right arm of quarterback
Kay Stephenson. Stephenson and Co. pulled the game out of the frying
pan in the final seconds of the game to edge a Larry Rentz-led Blue
team 33-28. Offensive Coach Ed Kensler is still convinced his Blue
team can beat the Orange, and the results will be obvious Saturday
afternoon, when the second lntersquad match is played.

$ ALL-CAMPUS £ I
£ HANDBALL TEAM £ I
£ Sami Shaya PKT £ I
x George Bant PLP £ I
£ Gene Kay PLP ';:*: I
£ Howard Kreps PLP £ I
£ Marty Stone TEP £
£ Joel Galpern AEP £
£ Carl Collins SX £
£ Frank Menke SX £
|:j: Ron Lally KS .£
£ Harry Fries PKP :£
£ Manny James PKP ;£
Amherst Tops
Gator Netters
Amherst College took a 5-4 de decision
cision decision from the Florida Gator ten tennis
nis tennis team yesterday. The turning
poiftt came in the number one
doubles match In which Gators
Rick Chace and Bill Perrin lost
to Paul Diamond and Kit Kaufman.
Floridas record now stands at
14 wins and nine losses.
In singles, Chace, Perrin, Ron
Fick, and Steve Gardner scored
wins.
The Baby Gators won their 15th
match of the season by defeating
Amhersts B-squad, JMf. Armi
Neely, Jamie Pressly, Steve Bee Beeland,
land, Beeland, Lee Steele, John Brunt, and
Charles White swept all the events.
Today, the varsity plays Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville University. The fresh freshmen
men freshmen take on Davis Island Tennis
Club Friday in their toughest match
of the season.

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GAME SATURDAY

Dissension Among Coaches
As Orange-Blue Go Again

Theres dissension among the
Florida football coaches.
The simmering controversy has
been brewing for nearly two weeks.
Offensive coach Ed Kensler still
isnt convinced his Blue team is
inferior to defensive boss Gene
Ellensons Orange squad. The
Orange, incidentally, scurried
from behind with 20 seconds re remaining
maining remaining March 19 to edge the Blue
33-28 in Floridas annual spring
game and since then coaches from
both teams have been verbally re reliving
living reliving the battle.
So to keep peace among the
staff head coach Ray Graves said
today he decided to let the two
teams conclude the final day of
spring drills with another contest
on Florida Field Saturday at 2:00
p.m.
Graves has also said the pro proceeds
ceeds proceeds from the rematch will go
to the Universitys Dollars for
Scholars committee and that
means Uncle Sam will match every
dollar paid or contributed with nine
dollars in federal money.
Admission for the game will be
one dollar for adults, 50 cents
for high school and children, with
Florida students admitted free.
The game is part and partial
of a weekend of entertainment
planned for the campus. Comedian
Bob Hope will give a performance
in the Florida Gym later in the
evening in conjunction with the
Dollars for Scholars drive.

As for the game, Graves indi indicated
cated indicated the same lineup would pre prevail
vail prevail as in the March 19 contest.
The Blue unit will be bolstered
however with the return of line linebacker
backer linebacker Jack Card who missed the
first game due to an injury. No
other personal changes have been
noted.
Kay Stephenson, Pensacola
quarterback, hit 18 out of 25 at attempts
tempts attempts two weeks ago leading the
Orange to a come from behind win.
Kensler, mastermind for the Blue

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I Attention All Students: I
II forums I
I COMMITTEE I
I I Questionnaire I
1 I In order to get some idea of whom you would like to hear 1
1 I address our campus, we of the Forums Committee of the I
11 Florida Union Board, would like you to complete the following |
I 1 questionnaire. The 50 speakers who poll the most votes will 1
1 I receive letters from the Forums Committee inquiring as to I
I I their availability, costs, etc. Our final selection of speakers I
I 1 for the next years program will be made with as close regard
I Ito this list as possible. __ Thank you, I j
II
11 [/ (y/ Jack Zucker, 1
I 1 Chairman, Forums Committee I
I 1 The Three Speakers I Would Like To Hear On If
I I Our Campus (in order of preference) ll
I |
I I The Topic I Would Like To Hear Debated On Jl
I I Our Campus 1
I I The Professors And/Or Instructors I Would Most 11
I I Like To Hear Address Our Campus (in order If
II of preference) IJ
I I TURN IN AT THE FLORIDA I
I I UNION INFORMATION DESK ||

team, was on the verge of winning
his first spring game since coming
to Florida when quarterback Larry
Rentz hit Richard Trapp in the end
zone with 1:25 left on the clock.
But Stephenson and his Orange
team roared back and capped the
spring fest with a seven-yard toss
to Tampas Larry Smith with only
20 seconds left in the game.
They cant do it again, Ken Kensler
sler Kensler swears.
And of course Gene Ellenson
swears they can.