Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
M A I
- Imil ..
* l" 11 "'-^gP ll
CIRCLE K COLLECTS FOR VIET NAM
American fighting men in Viet Nam will have more news, magazines
and paperback books to read il UF students contribute to the UK's
Circle K drive for literature beginning today and ending April l>.
This drive is sponsored to show the American soldier in Viet Nam
that the UF students are sincerely interested in America's efforts in
Viet Nam.
Circle K members al>ove (from left) Ed Bunch, drive chairman
Rodney McGalliard and Steve Cole pack tx>xes with magazines which
will go to American men in Viet Nam.
The magazines are being collected in both men and womens dorms
by floor representatives and resident assistants. Some dorms have
already begun collecting materials.
Articles can also be brought to the Florida Union and deposited at
the Information Desk. *.
CircleK members, who expect large participation will be collecting
all contributions on April 6 and will begin to package them. They hope
to have then) in the air by April.
The magazines will he shipped by the Air Force from Orlando to
San Francisco where they will be sent to Viet Nam.

Dollars For Scholars
Gets Game Proceeds

A second Orange and Blue
Spring football game will l>e played
Saturday at 2 p.m., Head Coach
Ray Graves announced today.
Admission for students will be
by II) card while others will be
charged a $1 fee. All proceeds
for the game will be donated to
Dollars for Scholars.
This will mark the first time that
two spring games have been played.
However, it will bean annual affair
from now on with the proceeds all
going to the Dollars for Scholars
drive.

ROTC REVIEW SET FOR SATURDAY

The annual ROTC Graduate Re Review
view Review for 1966 will take place Sat Saturday
urday Saturday on the upper drill field be beginning
ginning beginning at 10:30 a.m.
The reviewing officer will be
Maj. General Robert P. Hollis, US
Army Ret. and a UP faculty mem member
ber member of the College of Engineering
at the U of F.
All units of the Army and Air
Force ROTC combined will be
reviewed along with special units

The first Orange and Blue Game
of 1966 was played two weeks ago
with the Orange coming out on
top in a thriller, 33-28.
Kay Stephenson and Larry Rent/.,
the teams second-and third string
quarterbacks, put on a top-notch
aerial display in the first game.
Stephenson guided Hie Orange
down the field in the last two
minutes for the victory with Larry
Smith catching the touchdown pass.
The rematch will give Rent/
and Co. a chance to even the score.

including Angel Flight, Army
Sweethearts, Gator Raiders, Gator
Guard, Gator Sabres and the Air
Forces Billy Mitchell Drill Team.
The special event of the day will
be the arrival of a combat armed
helicopter, HITB, utilized in Viet
Nam. The pilot and crew are four
former UF students. The helicop helicopter
ter helicopter and entire review will be
opened for public inspection.

The Florida
Alligator
Vol. 58 No. 124 University of Florida Wednesday March 30, 1966

FALL EDITOR ELECTIONS TABLED

Editor Cason Fired;
Moor Named Head

The Board of Student Publi Publications
cations Publications in a special electoral
session Tuesday night fired Benny
Cason as editor of The Alligator
and appointed Andy Moor former
editorial director) editor for the
remainder of the term.
The board also decided not to
rescind the appointments of Andy
Moor and Yvette Cardozo as sum summer
mer summer editor and managing editor.
The meeting had originally been
(ailed to elect a fall editor and
managing editor,. This election,
however, has Ive: postponed in indefinitely.
definitely. indefinitely.
c
A petition was submitted stating
seven points of dissatisfaction with
this trimesters Alligator and pro proposing
posing proposing the firing of Editor Cason
and rescinding of election of Moor
and Miss Cardozo as summer edi editor
tor editor and managing editor.
Tlie seven points were:
The Alligator coverage and
edi : 'd comments regarding the
Hi- Department, Vice Presi
deni Robert Mautz, and Dean of
Arts and Sciences, Ralph E. Page.
Inaccuracy in reporting e
vents concerning the dismissal of
Gay Welborn and reiharks leading
to the belief of dishonesty of Busi Business
ness Business Manac r William E. Elmore.
Cons a and unprofessional
harrassment of State Governmen Governmental
tal Governmental officials and friends of the
University of Florida.
Unwarranted rudeness both
privately and in print regarding
University of Florida Administra Administrative
tive Administrative officials.
Childish antics and irrespon irresponsible
sible irresponsible conduct unbecoming a student
in such a leadership position re regarding
garding regarding incidents last F riday night
and early Saturday morning at the
Florida Blue Key hipping session.
Use of the students news newspaper
paper newspaper as a personal vehicle for
individual dislikes and vendettas.
Wanton lack of editorial re responsibility
sponsibility responsibility for accuracy in cover coverage
age coverage of the Infirmary.
Representatives of a dozen cam campus

? 66 Alumni Fund Drive Set

The UF Alumni Association
launches its 1066 Loyalty Fund
drive here Friday with a special
kickoff breakfast in the Holiday
Inn at 7:30 a.m.
Some 42 clubs throughout
Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, New
York and Washington, D.C., are
seeking to reach or surpass a
8174,000 goal.
Alumni Association President
Stephen OConnell of Tallahassee,
Loyalty Fund Chairman William
Lantaif of Miami and University-
President J. Wayne Reitz will
join Alachua County Loyalty Fund
Chairman Perry McGriff Jr. and

pus campus organizations attended an open
session of the board to give their
views of Alligator publications this
trimester.
Among the groups represented
were Mortar Board, Women Stu Students
dents Students Association, Lyceum Coun Council,
cil, Council, Florida Blue Key, Benton

1 .ay.
ARMY SWEETHEARTS SHAPE UP
Army ROTC Sweethearts Ann White fleft), Peg Itabinovitz, .Judy
Silver and Linda Feldman heed the command Dress, Itight during
the ROTC drill periods on Wednesdays and Thursdays.

University Relations Dean Alan
Robertson in giving short talks
about the 1966 program during the
breakfast.
All county contributors to last
years Loyalty Fund have been in invited
vited invited to the free breakfast, accord according
ing according to Dr. Frank Adams, dean of
men and chairman for the event.
Reservations must be confirmed
with Dean Adams (University Ext.
2263 or 372-9567) by noon Thurs Thursday.
day. Thursday.
April will be Loyalty Fund
Month in Alact&ia County.' Mc-
Griff said. We hope to raise 20
per cent of the overall goal

Engineering Society, various so sororities
rorities sororities and Student Government
officials.
The major complaint from the
campus organizations revolved a around
round around a complaint of little or no
coverage of campus events
throughout the campus.

This is a significant increase over
our 1005 commitment but we feel
the opportunity exists in Alachua
County to meet that amount.
The drive last year produced
$129,723 from B,9locontributors.
A lachua County accounted for 1,022
donors and sl3,B42second high highest
est highest total in the state behind the
Jacksonville club.
McGriff cited the Alachua po potential
tential potential of 2,464 alumni and last
years average gift of $14.56 to the
fund as principal reasons why he
believes the $35,000 goal is
realistic.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 30, 1966

|T- ¥,
K WORLD HHi
International
WILSON APPEALS . Prime Minister Harold Wilson appealed to
his supporters Tuesday not to risk an upset defeat for his ruling Labor
party by neglecting to vote Thursday. Opinion polls predicted Labor
was heading toward a landslide victory. Wilson warned that the fore forecasts
casts forecasts weredsensational. He said the reports ol a Labor majority
of up to 200 seats in the 630-seat House of Commons might lead
complacent socialists to leave the job of voting to others -- with
disastrous results.
REJECTS BAN PROPOSAL ... A new Soviet disarmament negoti negotiator
ator negotiator Thursday rejected U. S. proposals for a treaty banning the further
spread of nuclear weapons. In his maiden speech before the 17-nation
Geneva Disarmament Conference, Soviet representative Alexei A.
Roshchin made it clear that the Kremlin is prepared to negotiate a
ban on the spread of nuclear weapons only on its own terms. Roshchin
replaced longtime Soviet disarmament negotiator Semyon T. Tsarapkin
at the talks.
LEATHERNECK' ACTION . Communist
troops retreating under a U. S. Marine assualt
inflicted moderate casualties on thk Americans
in a hit-and-run attack before fleeing into
mountains 330 miles northeast of Saigon, it
was reported Tuesday The fighting was part
of a Leatherneck action called Operation
Indiana near Quang Ngai city. The Marines
previously killed 43 Viet Cong in ground
fighting and estimated another 40 died from
air strikes.
National
LIVING COST INCREASES . The cost of living took a giant step
upward in February, the consumer price index rising one-half of one
per cent, the Labor Department reported Tuesday. The department
blamed higher food prices especially for fresh vegetables, meats
and poultry for three-fourths of the F ebruary increase. The jump
was the greatest for any month since last June, when the index also
advanced one-half of one per cent. It was the biggest jump for any
F'eburary since 1951, when living costs rose seven-tenths of one
per cent.
K LANS MEN SOUGHT . F'BI agents and state investigators in
Hattiesburg, Miss., sought the leader of the most militant and secre secretive
tive secretive Ku Klux Klan group in the nation on charges of violating civil
rights statutes. The fugitive, Sam Holloway Bowers Jr., 41, was
presumed armed and dangerous, but there was speculation among
authorities that he might surrender voluntarily. Bowers, owner of an
amusement company at Laurel, last was seen late Sunday night enter entering
ing entering a case owned by a Klansman.
CALLS FOR UFO INQUIRY . House
Republican leader Gerald R. Ford Tuesday
formally asked for a congressional investi investigation
gation investigation of UFO reports. Ford, who first
suggested last weekend that an inquiry by
Congress was in order sent letters to chair chairman
man chairman of the House Armed Services and Sjxice
Committees asking one or the other to conduct
a public hearing. He said he had received
numerous telegrams supporting his suggestion
for an investigation of sightings of UFO's.
Florida
CAMPAIGN EXPENSES REVEALED . Gov. Haydon Burns has
spent more than a quarter of a million dollars so far in his campaign
to be reelected to office. In the weekly financial reports filed with the
secretary of states office Monday the governor listed total spending
of $250,974 against collections of $307,200 to date. Miami Mayor
Robert King High, one of Burns three Democratic opponents for the
May 3 primary, reported total spending to date of $46,726 and re receipts
ceipts receipts of $54,113.
POPULATION FUSE . The population of Florida rose 55.4 per
cent in the decade that ended last July 1, the State Health Department
reported Tuesday. The population in 1965 was 5,805,000, compared
w'ith 3,670,000 in 1955. Health officials said the difference between
births and deaths accounted for about one-third of the increase and the
remainder was due to people moving to Florida from other states.

The Florid* Alligator reserve* the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertiaerrt nt- and
to revise or turn away copy which tt considers objectionable.
NO PdJITION E GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement irvolv-.og typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more thar one incorrect insertion of an adverttsetT rnt ~
scheduled to run several limes. Notices lor correction must be given before neat insertion.
TIC FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official stud nt newspaper of ihc l tnvpr v ly >1 Florida _nd i>
published five times weekly eacept during May, Juni, and Jut) when It Is published s mi-weekly OnJ
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator is entered as second class
sa'.tt-i at the United Stales Post Offu e at Galimsvllle.

'INFLATION MUST STOP

LBJ Warns Os Tax Hike

WASHINGTON (UPI) -- Presi President
dent President Johnson said Tuesday tie would
rather recommend a tax increase
of 5 per cent to 7 per cent than
to let inflation drive down the value
of the dollar.
The President said at an im impromptu
promptu impromptu news conference, how however,
ever, however, that lie had made no decision
on whether to urge higher taxes.
Well take whatever action is
needed, Johnson said.
He expressed doubt that federal
spending could be reduced much
and said that Congress probably
would add $1 billion to his budget
rather than cut that amount.
The President answered ques questions

Junta Flees Ecuador
Amid Rioting Students

QUITO, Ecuador (UPI) -- Ecua Ecuadors
dors Ecuadors three-man military junta re resigned
signed resigned Tuesday and fled the city,
apparently for exile abroad.
Student mobs tried to seize the
presidential palace but were turned
back by the palace guard. Mobs
swarmed through the streets call calling
ing calling for death for junta members.
Tension gripped the city and busi business
ness business houses closed.
Eight persons were killed in
week-long rioting in half a dozen
cities. Many were wounded and
scores arrested.
The fall of the junta was an announced
nounced announced in a communique by heads
of the armed forces who said they
would turn over constitutional rule
immediately to a provisional
president to be selected by politi political
cal political party leaders^
Political sources said Clemente
Yerovi Indaburo, a former cabinet
meml vi, would probably be select selected.
ed. selected. He is a former economy min minister
ister minister and chief of the national plan planning
ning planning board.
Bankers Son
Still Missing
SURESIDE, Fla. (UPI) The
ransom price for young Danny
Goldman, a nice boy with a flair
for electronics, was presumed to
have doubled|to $50,000 today after
an all-night vigil failed to pro produce
duce produce any contact with the youths
kidnaper.
The husky gunman who abducted
the 18-year-old son of Mr. and
Mrs. Aron Goldman before dawn
Monday warned that if $25,000
ransom money was notin his hands
by 6 a.m. today, the price would
double.
We have had no contact whatso whatsoever
ever whatsoever with the kidnaper, 1 an FBI
spokesman said early Tuesday.
We have no choice but to assume
the ransom price has doubled.
Huge discounts with
the International
Student ID Card.
Student ships for
lively, informative
crossings.
The 10 card will save you 60% on air travel in
Europe and Israel Same huge savings on hotels
admissions, meals, trains A must for travelers
Student ships offer language classes, art lec lectures,
tures, lectures, international discussion forums and all the
fun of a low-cost student crossing to Europe
Can yau afford not to write for details?
Write: Dept. CO. U S National Student Association
265 Madison Ave New York, N Y 10016

tions questions from White House fellows --
one year interns in government
jobs -- during a party in the state
dining room.
Johnson spoke against a back background
ground background of rising call> h> econo economists
mists economists for a tax inn ease this year
to fight inflation.
\t one pout, Johnson dismissed
the inflation discussion as a jab
and added: Were going to be here
doing pretty well when this infla inflation
tion inflation binge is over. 1
But he also* said that if prices
keep going up this year, he ob obviously
viously obviously would have to seek a tax
measure.

Resignation of the junta and flight
of its members, Rear Adm. Ramon
Castro Jijon, and Generals Luis
Cabrera Sevilla and Marcos Gan Gandara
dara Gandara Enriquez, came suddely
after a week of anti-government
rioting and bloodshed as demon demonstrators
strators demonstrators demanded a return to
civilian rule.
The junta had Iven in office
since July, 1963 when it toppled
then President Carlos J. Arose Arosemena.
mena. Arosemena.

I Attention All Students: I
FORUMS
I COMMITTEE
I Questionnaire |
I I In order to get some idea of whom you would like to hear 1
II address our campus, we of the Forums Committee of the I
1 1 f lorida Union Board, would like you to complete the following I
I Questionnaire. The 50 speakers who poll the most votes will I
I rece i'e letters from the Forums Committee inquiring as to I
j I le r availability, costs, etc. Our final selection of speakers 1
II for nex years program will be made with as close regard I
to this list as possible. Thank you I
II is Jack Zucker, I
I ______ Chairman, Forums Committee I
| The Three Speakers I Would Like To Hear On J :
II ur Campus (in order of preference) I
I The Topic I Would Like To Hear Debated On I
I Our Campus I
II The Professors And Or Instructors I Would Most I
I Like To Hear Address Our Campus (in order I
I P re^e rence) I
|l turn IN AT THE FLORIDA I
I^njo^hnformatjo^deskJ

His remarks came withii, i loUr
after the Labor Department rv
ported living costs rose one- half f
1 per cent in February bi
gest increase for the month in is
years to a new' peak.
The President said he did not
like to recommend a tax increase
especially in an election year when
voters might retaliate against con congressmen
gressmen congressmen who vote for it.
But he said he would much rather
recommend, and he felt Congress
would rather approve, a modest
tax increase -- five -- six
seven per cent corporate and
personal -o f our tax bill than to
see inflation and the value of the
dollar go down.'
The President said he has three
broad choices -- controls on prices
and wages; reduction in federal
spending of $5 billion or more, or
a tax increase of So to $lO billion.
HILLEL
FOUNDATION
PASSOVER SEDERS
April 4 and 5
Call Hillel Foundat on
For Information
And Reservations
2-2900



Miss SuzAnnHull Reigns As 1966 Miss Gainesville

A UF coed, who plans to join
the Peace Corps and visit Africa,
has been crowned Miss Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville for 1966.
She is 20-year-old Suz Ann Hull.
Miss Hull (36-22-35 1/2) with
thrown eyes and dark hair, won over
11 other girls for the title and the
right to enter the Miss Florida
contest at Sarasota in June.
The contest didnt make me
nervous, but when they announced

H Hr Wk
March 30 tk/ia April ]
9AM U SPM
J ;
at
J.Hillis Miller Health Center
2nd Floor m front 0 f Auditorium
i '.' .' ~
SPONSORED BY
'-* '* r J.
Heaftk Ce*cte/i BMIeAtoAC

that I was one of the three finalist
my heart started to pound. Just be before
fore before they said I was the winner,
my Heart was pounding so hard I
thought it was going to come out of
my body, she said.
Miss Hull is a junior majoring
in English. She plans to teach high
school English for the government
in Europe.
But first, after graduating, she
plans to join the Peace Corps and

hopes to be sent to Africa.
I guess Africa has always
seemed dark and mysterious to me.
Actually Africa is one of the better
places I can go to have an oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to teach high school English
while in the Peace Corps, she
said.
Miss Hull said she did not view
joining the Peace Corps as a duty
but rather a responsibility to share
with other people.

Wednesday, March 30, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Only when we work and share
things with other people can we
think of having unity and peace
between nations,* she said.
Selection of Miss Gainesville
was based on beauty, personality,
talent and poise.
For her talent Miss Hull did a
modern jazz dance.
She said she has been taking
dancing lessons since grade seven
and has studied Russian ballet,
which she disliked as a young
girl, tap and modem jazz. She
attended a dance masters conven convention
tion convention in Miami where she saw top
dancers from all parts of the coun country.
try. country.
She is also very interested in
playing the guitar and studying
folk ballads. She started playing
the guitar about two years ago and
has stuck with it. Among her fa favorites
vorites favorites is the style of Bob Dylan.
Miss Hull phoned home to her
parents Dr. and Mrs. John Hull
in Daytona after the contest Sat Saturday
urday Saturday night and told them she
had won.
My mother was waiting by the
phone and was very happy, she
said.
In addition to receiving an 18
inch trophy, she will receive a
$l5O scholarship and a complete
wardrobe to wear to the Miss
Florida contest at Sarasota in June.
If Miss Hull wins the Miss Florida
contest she will enter the Miss
America Pageant in September.
The new queen is a member of
Delta Delta Delta sorority and was
1965 Military Ball Queen as well
as Miss International Beauty Queen
for 1965.

IftHjjim]
ml vyuvJ Aiaj/WM
) APARTMENTS (
f SPECIAL SUMMER RATES I
j AVAILABLE APRIL Ist. \
1 Landscaped Roof Garden /
i Gas Fired Grills (
1 Two Balconies Per Apartment r
) Rent Includes Partial Utilities (
i Occupancy Up To Four /
l Sun Deck Stylish Furniture V
\ Appliances By )
GENERAL ELECTRIC j
HIGH RISE LUXURY {
AT DORMITORY RATES (
Office Hours 3:30-6 PM Weekends 10 AM-6 PM 1
I 207 N.W. 17th STREET j
\ next to University Post Office /
( _376-7534_ \

mtgk
H '- iB.. -<'
MISS HULL
Honorary Taps
17 Members
Six UF undergraduates and three
graduates were initiated Thursday
into Beta Gamma Sigma, scholastic
honorary for business administra administration
tion administration and economics students.
The students are Betty C. Brain,
Richard L. Fletcher, Thomas C.
Hayslip, Jerry W. Lee, Lawrence
S. Rich, Julia O. Robbins, Levis
D. McCullers, Colin P. Murphy and
Oliver G. Wood Jr.
Guest speaker at the spring in initiation
itiation initiation ceremony was Ur. Joseph
A. Boyd of Radiation, Inc., Mel Melbourne.
bourne. Melbourne. He was initiated as an
honorary member.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 30, 1966

no eddy today
Today's editorial, written
earlier in the day by Editor Benny
Cason, had to be removed from
the paper since he was fired last
night in an Electoral Session of
the Board of Student Publications.
Because it was 11 p o m when
the meeting adjourned, a new
editorial could not be written.

Tlie Florida Alligator
'J\ h Out PtuMt PJu* On Ttoft

"Oops! Sorry About That, Ralph"
.
open letter to bike thief
Dear Thief:
Byway of a degression, I should like to praise my fellow members
of the University Community, in general, on the decreasing number of
REPORTED thefts of bicycles on the campus. In the last four years
this trend has been persistent. The figures of the campus police show
that in 1962 a total of 411 bicycles were reported stolen; in 1963, 233;
in 1964, 211; in 1965, 156.
I realize that in your warped world this seems impossible but
there may be several mitigating circumstances. INTER ALIA, one can
postulate the futility of reporting it (only 31 per cent of stolen bicycles
in the total of the four years have been recovered in the police statis statistics).
tics). statistics). In your special case, the non-reporting of a re-stolen bicycle
(naturally, the turn-over velocity in this category is unknown) is
pertinent.
However this may be, I would like to give you a few hints as to the
peculiarities and faults of my beloved VELO which you so unkindly
kidnapped Friday, March 25, from in front of the International Center
Building AE.
First, a description is in order, so that your compatriots in crime
may rest easily knowing that I dont refer to them. My five-year-old
companion is an English Hercules/Currier, red with shiny chrome
fenders. Her rear deck is very sturdy and has a matching pair of
baskets. Up front is a clamp deck. She has a headlight (two-beam),
dented on the right side; the rear light is a pretty red. The (birth)
registration number is 19839NG and her Gainesville tag reads 17812.
She is thoroughly housebroken and should not be left out of doors
(because of her rheumatic joints and depredations of a wild youth).
The left pedal comes loose about once a week (the largest wrench
in the travel bag applied liberally does wonders). Once a month use
the oil, in the bag, to grease up her front and rear axles (its an
old habit from her carousing and she has quite a capacity')
Shes used to a walk of 46 blocks daily ( we lived together 23 blocks
from campus).
In sum, unkind thief, treat her as an equal (she is NOT human) and
all will be well. If you should want to return her because of her demands
and nagging, I will accept her with open arms. If anyone should see her
or you my Robin-the-Hood, please call 376-2430 nights, or ext
days. Or leave her at the library or Peabody and let our mutual attrac attraction
tion attraction bring us together.
Yours truly,
Linus F. Upson, 4AS
tear up those streets
Editor:
Granted we need such vehicular curtains as University Avenue or
U. S. 441, but there are cases in which these strips become mere acts
of appeasement toward the automobile.
Most students retain cars on campus not for transportation to class
but rather for metropolitan jaunts, and since most campus travel has
been banned many campus roads have become more parking lots fit
seems strange that amid the cries for new parking spaces the three
new lots between the Fine Arts complex and the Hub are seldom filled )
These statements lead me to one conclusion; There is a feasible
need to reassign the cars parking around the Plaza of the Americas
to the new parking lots and tear up the roads that cut through the
center of the campus. This would also recover some lost land and
reduce the irritation oi crossing so many streets. a
-John Maruniak, 3AR

SPEAKING OUT
By RON SPENCER
Former Managing Editor
-he Let Freedom Ring crowd and tlieii
C/ counterparts in local John Birch cells, Min ute
man groups and the more chauvinistic of \he pt;
organizations have been among those in the fore
front of the self-righteous nationalists decrving th<
failure of segments of the American populace to bi
resolute in the Vietnamese crisis.
The protestors, the so-called Vietniks, th<
self-immolators, the sign-carriers, the draft-can
burners, the dissatisfied youth and even the few Arm'
veterans who protest the present stance of the U. s
in Viet Nam have received the brunt of the attac
from the patriotic right. And, depending on yourow
viewpoint, this attack should not be ignored as th
absurd rumblings of the radical fringe. For, thos
who said Barry was wrong and bombing was immora
and America had no business escalating wars l
far-off lands have now begun singing a differen
tune. It's a great deal more like the Marine Hymn
And if we accept the major premise that we shoul
be in Viet Nam a premise that seems inevitabl
though unpleasant then we must also question hoi
resolute Americans are in pursuing our cours
there. There can be little doubt that the grumblin
at home does little to help the haggard soldiers o
the battlefield.
But, many of those who refuse to praise America
present effort in Viet Nam are those who sincerel
question just how resolute the Johnson Administra
tion really is. The Johnson Administration continue
to follow a get tough policy and escalation con
tinues, however gradual it may seem. The troo
figures rise. Most probably it means that mor
American troops will be hurried to the Land of th
Jungle Swamp to engage with the dimunitive yelkr
man.
Now, pardon my failure to believe in those tiling
which we should all perhaps believe in; that is
pardon my heresy. Also, pardon the resemblanc
to the MacArthur theory that, if we fight, the ide
should be to win. Never mind the fact that this i
the Nuclear Age and that destruction is only a singe
tip away. Victory is still not that elusive a concei
that it must be cast away. If we commit ourselve
to action in Viet Nam, then it should be to the en
of victory, fully realizing that the definition of vie
tory is not perhaps the same as it once was
That is where resolution, or the lack thereof
enters. Some Americans who would normally be i
the forefront of those supporting the curbing <
communist aggression in Southeast Asia cannot son
themselves to support the present action of tl
Administration, which at best is irresolute, wobbl
so flexible that it seems queasy.
Inane little questions such as will we or will v
not bomb Hanoi and Haiphong (the chief port citie;
and destroy the Russian-built missile sites have y
to be answered affirmatively. Also, the U. S. joir
the British in applying an embargo against the re
calcitrant Southern Rhodesians, whose Afrikant
confederates who seemingly seek independence f(
all the wrong reasons, yet the U. S. still allows i
so-called allies to continue supplying the Nor
Vietnamese through the port of Haiphong. SuggeJ
tions from World War II veterans of the Indo-Chir
front have offered the suggestion that America sir
a few ships in the Haiphong harbor, thus chokir
the natural channel. Such an action in World war
choked off Japanese commerce to the huge po;
city for some 18 months. But we do not mov
Is merely that the Johnson Administration is :
strongly desirous of pursuing a policy of peace whi
at the same time curbing all Viet Cong and Vie
namese-supported aggression that the result is
times an undefinable ambiguity?
This may be the answer, and if so, it mere
demonstrates that the Administration itself is UI
certain of what policy it is pursuing. The contlnui
commitment of American troops, in a fashion sim
lar to Korea, is not the panacea that will cure t
Vietnamese woes.
Neither are such apurious devices as bombi
supply routes in a land where infiltration to a for
trained in guerrilla warfare is as easy as playi
football is to most American youths. And with t
privileged sanctuaries of Hanoi and Haiphong stan
ing in rough similarity to the Yalu Bridges in t
Korean standoff, this again explains much of t
confusion present that looks like irresolution.
So, if you are one who protests against protester
one who criticizes many Americans' lack of res<
lution, then also question the apparent lack of r
solution by the government itself. There are ma
citizens who never could and never will understai
Korea and who will not be able to understand a ion
drawn-out holding action in South Viet Nam whi
takes its toll in lives. Perhaps these persons ha
simply been unable to comprehend the growl
sophistication of modern warfare and are bogg
down in archaic concepts of victory." Perha
they just cannot see the modern complexities of
contained style of warfare.
But on the other hand, perhaps they see all i
well the irresolute nature of our present polish
and simply cannot rise to the occasion of res
lutely upholding a policy of irresolution.



(EDITORS NOTE: The following letter is a
copy of one sent Dr. J. Wayne Reitz, objecting
to a recent Alligator reprint of a St. Petersburg
Times editorial. We run this letter in order
that the pro-Ball side might be heard, but'our
stance on the Bank Holding Act -- which IS the
issue and our prerogative to reprint, with
attribution, editorials from other newspapers
remain unchanged.)
Dear Dr. Reitz:
At this moment I am disturbed about the direct,
unjustified attack on Mr. Ed Ball, head trustee of
the Nemours Foundation, by a transplanted editorial
which appeared in the March 25 issue of The
Alligator. As you know, the University of Florida
is a beneficiary to the tune of $75,000 for a full
professorship for handicapped children entitled
The A. I. DuPont Professorship. This position is
presently filled by Dr. William B. Wiel Jr., asso associate
ciate associate professor of pediatrics in the College of
Medicine.
The original editorial, entitled Balls Blunder,
appeared in the St. Petersburg Times on March
23, 1966. It was reprinted verbatim by Mr. Benny
Cason in The Alligator of March 25, 1966, under
the title . . and on Mr. Ball. Why did Mr.
Cason exemplify the fable of the dog in the manger
biting the hand that fed him? There was nothing
original other than the title to the transplanted
editorial. What was he trying to achieve with this
type of yellow journalism?
I have no right to criticize his freedom of press,
but I do object to his casting innuendoes at a proven
friend of the University of Florida through the re reprinting
printing reprinting of a slanted editorial from the crusading
Poynters St. Petersburg Times.
Mr. Ball is very disturbed about this. You may
remember not only the solicited gift of $75,000 to
your University of Florida Medical School for the
help of handicapped children of all Florida citizens,
but also a recent gift from Mr. Ball of $75,000 for
the purchase of books for the new Law School
Library at Florida State University in Tallahassee.
He has not only given to the University of Florida,
but to others to the tune of $29,711,444.99 for
charitable and educational purposes.
The reprinting and the circulation thereby of the
March 25th editorial . . and on Mr. Ball,
appears to be the work of a groundling or an in ingrate.
grate. ingrate. I know that Mr. Ball and his sister, Mrs.
Jesse Ball DuPont, are wise enough to read between
the lines of the editorial and to see the ulterior
motives in its authorship and its reproduction; they
need only consider its source. However, an apology
may be in order to these proven friends of your
institution even though the subject of the editorial
has the benevolence to continue his friendship and
interest in your institution and the other educational
institutions of Florida.
Actually, Dr. Reitz, we citizens want the students
of the University of Florida to get the best education

1 8-1486 8-1487 I
Fastest delivery in town! I
University Sandwich Stiop|

in Mr. Balls defense

possible and have freedom of the press. The least
we can expect is for persons in position to select
editorials for reproduction in The Alligator to
present both sides of the picture.
It is contributions like Mr. Balls of the Nemours
Foundation that help oil the wheels of the machinery
of your great University of Florida.
Respectfully yours,
G. W. Karelas, M.D.
Newberry
where were thev?
r, t/
Editor:
While thousands marched in Americas streets
last Saturday to call for an end to the war in Viet
Nam, The Florida Alligator and The Gainesville
Sun slept.
They tossed in their fretful sleep while marchers
filed down University Avenue in the heart of Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. Did they think that by withholding such infor information
mation information from their pages, the events of that day
would go unnoticed?
It almost seems possible that the Editors of our
local news media entered into some foul collusion
in order to muffle the realities of our times. One
tiling is certain: Far more injury has been inflicted
on all men and women by the criminal withholding
of news than even the dissolute croaking of hecklers
yelling Commie and Coward.
I shall leave it to those in the Social Sciences to
analyze the VIOLENT SILENCE imposed by the
voices of censorship here in Gainesville and else elsewhere,
where, elsewhere, but for all of our sakes, lets pull The
Alligators head out of the sand and rip the clouds
away from The Sun.
A worldwide voice cried out last Saturday to
END THE KILLING.
Marshall Rosenthal
a captive reader
Editor:
I can no longer pick up The Alligator on my way
to class, although I do receive random copies. Do
you have a six-month subscription? If not, a year
will be excellent.
I am teaching school here, on a high school level,
and we have used some of your recent editorials
while discussing the reapportionment of the state.
They coincide with my ideas, if not the officials.
Thanks for your help.
A reader in your captive audience.
(EDITORS NOTE: We do not ordinarily publish
subscription requests, but the above was somewhat
rare: A censored letter written on an official letter
form of the Florida Division of Corrections, and
mailed from a cell block in Florida State Prison,
Raiford.)

Wednesday, March 30, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

; V jfl ,_
jgii n i iriWniWK :v:^',::^^WH^^^^^^g^ > f *n
'^SvyMOQHBMM^^--^^v.wJQwMjl^'&.. ,fli l -Jfc-;.y &§r v?s' '£'Y/'- r 'i>'f'£'-, .^ki-vj/-'>
-\v'\ .<^Sb(fc.
wJ t .n| fIK
dH raff /
HONDA
Closer to class. Closer to the fraternity house.
And a lot closer to the opposite sex. Honda
offers you all these advantages plus economy:
price, upkeep and insurance are all
low. Why not join the crowd?
' o t.
Free Brochure: Write American Honda Motor Co., Inc.
Department C-4, Box 50, Gardena, California 1966 AHM

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 30, 1966

GUT
with
9 mpiwlM J lsw
b|i -iJ £r jtffl hhOkSh Au AumM|'
mM|' AumM|' on ;
the

' MffslinS'H B^B
ml Ji
K W m
K 1 if

tfol. 11l

college of I]
>eeking fame
lis invention]
10, or so the j

Washington have it. While a
itudent here Hermann Fox fre-'
juently showed signs of budding
anH hv his splf.nasspssing.

r J-Mll lIV UIUI 11V lIIA 1; 111
WBMj IMMate .. ' > y-:v. s?.> *- r M .law 1,
- .:'' j <* :>*:. ;. >:>* utzkv *
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afgti ;iK 4 HHtt aw <.. v *?/.?.!
< -. h ; t.*s>*:
9K IpHnV 3l . "* I*' ?
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lege career and go to California
where his experiments were be
- :r,nf TXMftnnr the SUITI SUITI

The Florid

strait's

himself a wife
lure appears on

jerry's

prance. The
inference with
I News Paper
piloted below,
lerve to bring
If comradeship
vs tlwv:o wm/v

0. H. S. DEFEATS SCRUBS.
The Duval High School team
has come and gone but the) 7 left
[a lesson to the bunch of Scrubs
;who tackled them Friday night
The High School boys had beau-

tiful team work and were. >
' tainly accurate when it can j
| depositing the ball in the ba j
They-were fast and strong :
bunch of little fellows,
score stood 26 to 12 in Du |
favor at the close of the gan j
The Scrubs had had no ]
tice and did not expect to I
but thought they would takt I
vantage of the fact that the J
i sonville boys were here to J

IS., and so gave therti a

Jnade by D. H. S. wet
s
I __ 1
I I
I Pace is visitino- the. rl

* WV/V lkJ V lolling 11IC V.
ty agents in Jackson and T:
counties.

Concerning the war Mr. Ii

Qrt ff 1 m

llt was early perceived by]
v experts and eminent 1
ional authorities that ]

was no avenne of retreat!
middle course left for the 1
gerent states of the Old vj

I nis war is a natural causation
arising out of the nature of things.
In an endeavor to reach a com-
I prehensive understanding of the

University of Florida, Gainesville,

Weve Come A1

record bar

FINAL ARRANGE
FOR]
: Dales Set for the Dei]
| ud Farr Lits, Teacl

lip" 1 I
I
Hafw
>* 9|SgHHHfID ; I

On the twenty-si]
the Farr Literati
meet the Agnl
The Amcihnrall

ttators.
pd the
Ith no
lof the

j
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I
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Jr IBk
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tropical 1



la Alligator

orida, Friday, January, 29, 1915

ENTS
BITES MADE
t Between Aggies
js and Engineers.

JLJ

Lt nf HoKotno I hnnrh sppttipH to havp crotten__ii_

ong Way Together

RMIIUI LIL.L.UIIU 11U11
of February started the Y men quickly
Society will threw several goals. It was dur durultural
ultural durultural Club. in £ this time that Pierce did his
'!lnh won the marvelous stunt of basket toss-

'a
i v,-
~ > y iV. i'-it >
< $ X Hi
-: v £ i
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r^gHjriH|
, . x ....
11 n/ y Ux IT

Jatiac

FLORIDA FIVE LOSES TO JAX Y.
The basket ball team returned
from their trip to Jacksonville,
Saturday at noon, where they
played the fast team of the Y. M.
C. A. Our five put up a magnif-

lt battle and would very like-

have con
ad not be
goal shd
small rig

team. The first half made
rida look like sure winners
the score stood at the end of
j first twenty minutes 18 to 8
I heir favor. They seemed to
e lost their pep tho during
I interval of rest, and the Jax

XXL XXX v
the Gainesville Graded and High
School visited the University
Saturday morning., for the our-

uie
y
la lalas
las lalas

e made eleven attempts
oal, each time being near
B ter of the court, and ten
Shots vent thru the basket.
I>f these were from diffi-

|gles. Tj
o registd
I the first
was 35 tl

j discouraged, tho, and
> after them again next
§&

I
B
jfty of five of the teachers
!te primary department of

Silverman's

house of travel

' \ "WKfi Jart ArT f
4 jppT fl l
Mr
JM a s '^v
fi jfl
I 8 * ,? rj, k
I

logical reasons; second, lor econ-

llSl
.j^SSEaE
HE ''ft'*-~~ *.

omic
gres:
May
ala
poin

Ht oai
the blool
nations i
ideal up

world. nuns mat nave
refused to cooperate have per perished
ished perished in the progress of the
centuries. Every dollar spent in

the destri

with intt
hearts as
in dark,
dreadful
ed the Sci
opportun
advances
The id
changed
i sTromrui

Wednesday, March 30, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

campus Sc career shop

i*l ,W| tpj a,g^S^jLJlfcj^yjyifcj^l
r r kj yyp
, HBL
, |K Jj|

No. 16

[NTS
Spoke
Chris
poke
said
ught
that
Bio-

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
1962 VESPA 125 cc. Easy to drive.
$125. Call 378-4424. Also 1958,
damaged NORTON, $135 and 1958
VESPA, S3O. (A-124-It-c).
1964 HONDA Super 50. Excellent
condition, blue and white, $145.
Call Wayne, 376-3379. (A-124-
3t-c).
LIKE NEW, only 6 months old.
10* x 48, 2 bedroom TRAILER.
MUST SELL. Call 376-7708 after
5 p.m. (A-l 24-3 t-p).
1964, 54' x 10 ARMOR MOBILE
HOME. 2 bedroom, A/C, electric
kitchen, free lot rent for one yr.,
10 min. from campus, small a amount
mount amount of equity. Take over pay payment
ment payment of $58.63 per month. 466-
3213, after 5. (A-124-st-c).
8 x 33 HOUSE TRAILER with
8* x 25 cabana. Good condition.
Roomy closet and storage space.
Includes washing machine. $llOO.
Call 378-1300 after 6 p.m. (A (A---124-3t-p).
--124-3t-p). (A---124-3t-p).
FOR SALE 4 Bob Hope tickets
$2.00 each. Call John House, 372-
9285. (A-l 24-lt-p).
BEAT THE HEAT An ADMIRAL
window air conditioner will help.
Good condition, less than two yrs.
old. $75. Call 378-2089 after 5.
(A-124-tf-nc).
FRAMUS BASS and Case, 2 months
old. Excellent condition. Must sell.
Contact Jeff, 372-9285. (A- 24-
2t-p).
STUDENTS ONLY. Brand new
Admiral Air Conditioners, un unredeemed
redeemed unredeemed on lay-away (all sizes).
Pick up payment with nothing down.
Sudden Service Fuel Oil Co., au authorized
thorized authorized Admiral Dealer. Ph. 376-
4404. (A-118-10t-c).
1964 BSA Lightning Rocket, 650 cc.
Excellent condition. Cash or trade.
$895. Call Dave Heney, 372-6938.
(A-108-ts-c).
1962 TRIUMPH 650 cc. Excellent
condition, fast, reliable, good en engine,
gine, engine, tires, upholstery. $525. Call
378-2125. (A-121-st-c).
SPRING WARDROBE Sizes 8,
9, 10. Sportswear and cocktail
dresses. Specials on a 3-piece
Kimberley suit; Jeune Liegue
dress and White Stage bermudas.
376-5616. (A-121-ts-c).
MUST SELL. 1962 LAMBRETTA
scooter 125 cc. Excellent condi condition.
tion. condition. $125. German Shepherd pup puppy,
py, puppy, pure breed, very lovable. SSO.
Bob, 378-3764. (A-120-3t-c).
53' x 10 GREAT LAKES Mobile
Home. 2 bedrooms, central heat
and air conditioning, 4 yrs. old.
$3500. Call 372-0034. (A-123-
st-c).
1963 A-H MARK n. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. No reasonable offer refused.
See at 306 NE 6th St. Call 376-
9991 after 7; before 7, 372-2528.
(A-122-st-c).

IBi^Sl^it23^S3r^^^l \
cm^.*^ijAW
* iiii ( %i 4 % t y, 4 *\* , *,j* 4 /,* *
* .' ,' * ,*.**'' % * *"'

for sale
1956 GENERAL TRAILER. 27x8
with 25x8 cabana and awnings.
Very good condition. A real bar bargain
gain bargain for $950. Archer Road Village,
lot: Beta 10. (A-122-st-p).
NEW PUBLISHED 2 Vol. Set. Web Websters
sters Websters 20th Century Dictionary.
Brand new, still in box. Coat
$42.50. S3O firm. 378-3197. (A (A---122-st-c).
--122-st-c). (A---122-st-c).
TRAILER, 50 x 10, 2 BR, front
kitchen, washing machine, A/C,
1 bedroom now with built-in desk
and shelves. Sell to best offer.
378-2776 after 6. (A-122-st-p).
MUST SELL OR RENT. One bed bedroom
room bedroom mobile home, carpeted,
A/C, all electric, fully equipped,
natural paneling throughout, ideal
bachelor quarters. Loaded with
character. Location D-: Town
& Country Trailer Park. Contact
Dave Fagen, Rm. 218 C Architec Architecture
ture Architecture Bldg, or Ph. 376-7395. Be Between
tween Between 5 & 7 p.m. or after 10:30
p.m. (A-123-4t-p).
| for rent I
AVAILABLE SPRING Trimester.
1 bedroom studio apt. Suitable for
2 or 3. 3 blocks from campus,
a/c, washer. Low summer rates.
1824 NW 3rd Place, Apt. 23. Call
378-3104. (B-120-st-c).
Available SPRING TRIMESTER.
Large 2 bedroom, furnished apt.
Pool, air conditioned, usually
$ 140/mo., will lease for $l3O/mo.
376-2916. (B-122-3t-p).
VILLAGE 34, SECOND EDITION.
Located near Univ. Golf Course.
328 SW 34th St. 24 new 1 bedroom
apt. units, furnished and air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Available April Ist. Rent
SIOO per month. See Resident Man Managers
agers Managers Apt. on premises after 5
p.m. Lou Schilling, apt. 10. Man Managed
aged Managed Ernest Tew Realty Inc. 376-
6461. (B-108-ts-c).
1 BEDROOM Furnished Apt. $65
per month. Married couples only.
Available immediately. Call 378-
4798. (B-116-ts-c).
CHOICE ONE BEDROOM furnish furnished
ed furnished apt. A/C, available April 25th.
Hornes Apts. Ph. 372-2436. (B (B---121-ts-c).
--121-ts-c). (B---121-ts-c).
/ yii'Utiif 11
HOP *fr.lt HI *4WI
TOUZTE O COLOR
THRU 7F.VR & HITS
.1 SSL, EDWARD G. ANN-
MCQUEEN ROBINSONMARGREU^'**!
KARL MALDENIUESDAY WELD
. A MAPTIN RANSOHOff PRnnnCTItlM
iiil 3 lL*dlki*3uKr.TJLl
meirucolor rrm -v
W*" '
ELIZABETH TAYLOR
RICHARD BURTON
EVA MARIE SAINT

Page 8

>, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Marcfr 30, 1966

for rent
APT. FOR RENT. B Term,
Village Park. Air conditioned.
S4O mo. for 4 or 2, less than
mile. Ph. 378-4165. (B-124-3t-p).
ONE BEDROOM furnished A/C apt.
Take over lease at reduced rates;
transportation needed. 378-4635.
(B-124-3t-c).
THREE BEDROOM HOUSE. Cool
during summer, completely fur furnished,
nished, furnished, wall-to-wall carpeting,
TV aerial. S3OO for entire
mester. Call 372-5508. (B-124-
3t-c).
SEX MAKES NO DIFFERENCE.
Its still only $35 per person for
this spacious apt. for 2. Two bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, furnished, A/C, swimming
pool, available May Ist, furnished
lease through Aug. 378-3092. (B (B-
- (B- 124-3 t-c).
TWO BEDROOM completely fur furnished,
nished, furnished, kitchen equipped apts. 1/2
block from Law School, 1238-A,
B, C, SW Ist Ave. (B- 124-3 t-c).
LARGE ONE BEDROOM APT,,
walking distance to campus.
Available beginning Spring Tri.
1604 NW 3rd Place. Call 378-
3042. (B-124-3t-c).
COMFORTABLY FURNISHED one
bedroom duplex apt. Ideal for mar married
ried married couple. SBS a month includes
water. Available after exams. Call
372-7223. (B-124-3t-c).
AIR CONDITIONED HOUSES AND
APTS. Now leasing for Summer
and/or Fall. 3 or 4 students, male
or female. Call Charlie Mayo,
Town and Country Realty, 376-
4664 anytime. (B-114-ts-c).
AVAILABLE MAY Ist. 1 bedroom
modern a/c apt. Furnished, pool
privileges. 4 mins, to campus. I
Call 378-1579. (B-120-st-c).
PHANTASMAGORIC ALLY Yours j
for Summer. 2 bedroom, 2 blocks I
from Cl, screen porch, muni- j
ficent kitchen, furnished. 1813 j
NW 2nd Ave. SBS-90. (B-123- j
3t-p).

THE CENTER
LUXURY IN MOTION PICTURE ENTERTAINMENT COMES
TO GAINESVILLE THURSDAY APRIL 7. TICKETS
NOW ON SALE AT FLORIDA THEATRE BOX OFFICE
| M BRANDO t*F
I gee, .SMSP/£G£LS\\
WAMW*|i
| .innn, jiii jusi la
I MIRIAM HOPKINS IWIIU Hy[R ROBERI DUlfllil' RICHAfiO BRADFORD' HENRY KUll Ji
I O rM: /V ex, AfZ JP
*" Dean MartlrT^^v

for rent
FURNISHED APTS. Two bedroom
furnished apts. Available end of
April. Special low summer rates.
Right near campus. Suitable for
up to 4 students. Call Mrs. Jones,
376-5636. (B-120-ts-c).
MODERN ONE BEDROOM APT.
available April 22nd. Furnished.
A/C, three blocks from campus.
S9O/mo. 376-9893. (B-123-3t-p).
ONE BEDROOM furnished apts.
Air conditioned, near Univ. Ph.
372-9569. (B-L23-4t-c).
DUPLEX FOR RENT. One bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, furnished apt. Available
April Ist. $65 a month. 1241 SW
4th Ave. Ph. 376-5043. (B-123-
ts-c).
UNUSUALLY NICE furnished room
in private home. Central heat and
A/C. Call 372-7943. (B-122-ts-c).
APT. FOR RENT, 2 bedroom; all
electric; air conditioned; pool;
near campus. Spring Term. 372-
7157. (B-122-3t~p).

MODERN ONE BEDROOM APT.,
2 or 3 people. 3 blocks from cam campus,
pus, campus, furnished, including washing
machine. A/C. Call 378-1530. (B (B---121-ts-c).
--121-ts-c). (B---121-ts-c).
AVAILABLE MAY Ist. 1 apt. for
4 students, 2 blocks from campus.
Air conditioners, $l2O per student
for summer semester. 1918 NW
Ist Ave. Call 372-3572. (B-117-
lOt-c).
APT. IN COLONIAL MANOR for
Spring Trimester for 2 people.
Call 378-3748. (B-123-3t-c).
HONOR BLACKMAN 11
Plus Color Hit #2 I
"THE ART OF LOVE" I

for rent
' I
FURNISHED APT. for rent, avail available
able available April Ist. Can accomodate
3 or 4 students, $lO5 monthly, 219
NW 3rd Ave. Call 372-5746. (B (B---121-st-c).
--121-st-c). (B---121-st-c).
AIR CONDITIONED APTS. For
Summer. Suitable for 2 or 3, $l3O $l3O-for
-for $l3O-for A or B Term. Suitable
for 3 or 4, SIBO per Term. Call
376-8990, 8 a.m. 5p.m., or 7 p.m.
- 10 p.m. Also renting for fall.
(B-115-ts-c).
CLOSE TO CAMPUS. Three bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, furnished house. Available
May Ist for Summer Trimester.
SIOO per month. Call 378-4391.
(B-123-ts-c).
ATTRACTIVE ROOM in modern
home. Ideal for student who needs
a quiet, pleasant place to study.
372-7883. (B-123-ts-c).
MODERN SPLIT LEVEL APT.
A/C, kitchen, washing machine,
furnished. Reduced summer
rates. 3 blocks from campus.
1824 NW 3rd Place. 376-2349.
(B-123-3t-c).
XfeiOx Copies
1-19 Copies, 10y ea. 20&
Over, 9£
Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1020 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
PoHEOF*!
1 THE BEST" 1
jg Life Magazine b
| "Sensational!... I
M A Strong And I
Stinging I
| Picture!" |
- Bosley Crowther,
== N. Y. Times =
M "Pictorially 11
4 Powerful, M
| Cinematically s
Exciting!" 3
= Archer Wmsten
= N. V. Post =E
I "A Loud, Long, k
Powerful a
Cry Os |
Outrage!" 3
- Judith Crist, s
Herald Tribune S
A shocker! -Time^ Magazine
PcS
rVforfef
r 1-3-5-7-9 1
_ sMI
11 %



IGATOR CLASSIFIEDS I

| wanted |
emale student driving
rough California, Oregon, and
Washington, needs two other girls
drive and pay expenses. Leave
round Ist of May. Call 378-1026.
_122-3t-c).
aTURE female roommate
share 2 bedroom apt. at Coy
homas or Frederick Apts. a/C,
ool, call Linda, 378-2487. (C (C---
-- (C--- 22-3 t-c).
BwO FEMALE ROOMMATES to
hare two bedroom apt. for Spring
rimester. 4 blocks from campus,
/C. $29 per month. Call 378-3132.
c-124-st-p).
I TWdc. (IJma
|t|f RENTALS
I lluiurrjatti} §l|op
1620 W. UniVi_Ave. J

0
TO STUDENTS and UNIVERSITY
MjgljMCSro PERSONNEL
WJ CAFETERIA
I VV 1212 N. Main St (G o E
____ljLir!L r U^eS rom com P uS ) CENTER)
I ED ABBOTT, 1965 graduate of
I the University of Florida and
I presently with Abbott, Bitter
I and Associates Life Insurance
I Consultants, will be in
I Gainesville on April 2 and
13, 1966.
I The purpose of his visit is:
I 1. To discuss the recent G. I. Bi 11 with
I veterans and its possible applications
I in developing a life insurance estate;
I and
I 2. To talk with professional and medical
I graduate students concerning tneir
I estate accumulation and conservation.
I If you fit into either of those
I categories, please join Ed
I for coffee and donuts on
I Saturday, April 2, at 10:30
I A.M. in Room 215 of the
I Florida Union.
I Abbott, Bitter and Associates
FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MIAMI, FLORIDA

ft?
L/j

[ wanted 11
NEED 3 ROOMMATES for Sum Summer.
mer. Summer. Private bedrooms. Trans Transportation
portation Transportation needed to quiet modern
neighborhood. Large yard. Call
378-3337 anytime. S2O/mo. (C (C---123-3t-c).
--123-3t-c). (C---123-3t-c).
NEED MALE ROOMMATE to
share modern A/c apt. with three
others for Spring Tri. $125 for
Tri. Call 378-3240.(C-l 23-st-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATES for A& B
or just B Term to share new
modern A/C 2 bedroom apt. In
Village Park. Ph. Arlene at 378-
3003. (C-123-3t-c).
EXCEPTIONAL 2 female
roommates to share 3 bedroom
house with one graduate student.
Sun deck, carpeted, washing
machine, fireplace. Near cam campus.
pus. campus. $37 per month. 378-2152
mornings. (C-123-3t-c).

Wednesday, March 30, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

wanted
RIDERS WANTED to Cocoa and
points between. Leave Friday at
5 p.m., return Sunday afternoon.
$6.00 round trip; $3.50 one way.
Call 372-6450, Mon.-Thurs., after
6 p.m. (C-104-lt-c).
NEED ONE FEMALE ROOMMATE
to share large furnished apt. for
summer tri. One block behind Nor Norman
man Norman Hall. Ph. 378-4589. $45 month.
(C-124-3t-c).
WANTED ONE FEMALE ROOM ROOMMATE
MATE ROOMMATE to share split level apt.,
1824 NW 3rd Place, $35 monthly.
April Ist -- Aug. Air conditioned.
378-1278; 378-2068. (C-124-3t-c).
LIFE GUARDS WANTED, 3 or 4
to work in Atlanta, Ga. Start April
30th, WSI preferred. 378-4423. (C (C---124-2t-c).
--124-2t-c). (C---124-2t-c).
FEMALE WANTED to share home.
Must have own transportation. S4O
a month. Call 372-7186. (C-124-
Bt-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE for A Term
to share 2 bedroom apt. at Village
Park with balcony overlooking
pool. $53 a month. Call 378-3752.
(C-124-2t-c).
RIDER WANTED to and from At Atlanta.
lanta. Atlanta. Leave Friday, return Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday. Share expenses. Ph. 378- 3213.
(C-124-2t-c).
WANTED: CYCLE HELMET
WITH FACE SHIELD. Tel: 376-
3569. (C-123-3t-p).
WANTED: Two riders to Washing Washington,
ton, Washington, D.C. Leaving April 17th, re returning
turning returning on April 24th. $17.50 each
way. 1965 Mercury.Call372-3974.
(C-121-st-nc).
WANTED an individual 21 or older
who needs a FREE RIDE to Chica Chicago.
go. Chicago. Leave April 20-22. Call 372-
9464, Rm. 1046.(C-124-3t-c).
WANTED: Roommates for Fall
Trimester. Contact Marilyn or
Sandy. Ph. 372-9273.(C-124-lt-p).
NEED SUMMER EMPLOYMENT?
Counsellors wranglers wanted
for large Eastern Boys* Ranch.
Horsemanship required. Work with
boys age 8-16. For more informa information,
tion, information, 378-4940 during week. (C (C---117-10t-c).
--117-10t-c). (C---117-10t-c).

I Getting Married?
I Look Girls Former Distributor For Famous
I Name Stainless Steel, Waterless Cookware
1 Going Out Os Business.
I Save 50% on
I Cookware Sets (Only 4), Electric
I Breakfast Grill (Onlv 2), Electric
I Automatic Coffee Pot (Only 2),
I Solid Stainless Tableware (Only 6).
I 'Small Monthly Payments'
1 Hurry For Further Information Send Name,
I Address, Phone No. To Box 477, Gainesville.

Page 9

help wanted
NEED EXTRA CASH. Local com company
pany company needs several students or
faculty members who would like
to earn from SSO to SIOO per week
part time. Call 372-7811,9- 10 a.m.
for further information. (E-124-
ts-c).
WAITER WANTED. Must be 21.
No experience necessary. Ph, 376-
9335, from 9-12a.m.(E-124-tf-c).
RECENT COLLEGE GRAD, with
background in Biology and exper experimental
imental experimental Psychology seeks perma permanent
nent permanent position. Call 372-2165. (E (E---124-4t-c).
--124-4t-c). (E---124-4t-c).
mmmmmm i i -
FULLER BRUSH CO. needs stu student
dent student representative in Diamond
Village, Flavet m and Schucht.
Can be worked in off hrs. with
average of $2.00 per hr. in earn earnings.
ings. earnings. Also need part or full time
help for other areas of Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. Write to H. Silver, 1028
Clearwater Dr., Daytona Beach,
Fla. (E-117-ts-c).
autos 1
MUST SELL 1962 RAMBLER. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Severe financial
need. Highest offer. Call 378-4296.
(G-124-3t-c).
1959 BLACK CHEVROLET CONV.
Good condition, 1 owner, factory
348 cc, high performance, 335 hp,
4-speed transmission. Positra Positration.
tion. Positration. $875. 372-7130.(G-124-3t-c).
1957 CHEVROLET, Belair, 4 door,
hardtop, V-8, automatic, radio.
New brakes, battery, tires, front
end alignment. Runs fine. Call
376-7886. (G-124-lt-p).
1959 VW. Radio and heater, runs
great. $595. Hiram, Rm. 4102.
376-9236. (G-122-3t-p).
1956 CHEVROLET, Belair, 4door,
V-8, $125. Contact Jim Holson Holsonback,
back, Holsonback, 376-8281 or 378-3786. (G (G---121-st-c).
--121-st-c). (G---121-st-c).
I 1962 VALIANT. Good condition, 4
new tires. See Bob McCollum at
| McCollum Drugs, 1124 W. Univ.
Ave. (G-122-3t-c).
1963 VW 1200 or 1965 VW 1600,
phone 376-3261, ext. 2271. (G-120-
st-c).
1964 BLUE MG-MIDGET. Radio
and heater, luggage rack. Call
376-3561. (G-123-ts-c).

services |
NOW OPENING. Teddy Bear
Nursery. 3 departments, com completed
pleted completed infant dept. Planned
program for children over 3.
Central heating and air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Ph. 376-0917.1214-1/2
NW 4th St. (M-116-ts-c).
WEE FOLKS NURSERY SCHOOL.
Two locations to serve you. 616
NW 9th Ave. uptown, phone
372-4525 and 2706 SW 34th St.
near Archer Rd and Medical Cen Center,
ter, Center, phone 372-5466. By hour, day,
week or month. (M-124-Bt-c).
RUBY'S ALTERATIONS. 1238 SW
3rd Ave. 376-8506. (M-89-lt-c).
lost-found |
LOST Two German 201 Texts;
Abnormal Psychology text and
notebooks; call 372-9696 or return
108 Anderson. (L- i 24-1 t-p).
LOST White Gold Bulova Lady's
Watch with mesh band. Call Mary
Walter, 372-9166, Rm. 131. (L (L---124-1
--124-1 (L---124-1 t-p).
real estate
GOING TO BE IN GAINESVILLE
a while? S6OO down, $75 per month
will make you the owner of a fur furnished
nished furnished 2 bedroom home. Located
in NW section. Call 376-8032 for
more information. (I-123-3t-c).
personal
I WANT TOMEETOBJECTIVIST
GIRL. Box 12797 Univ. Station.
(J- 123-3 t-p).
NOSE, NOSE! HOT AIR IT STILL
BLOWS, BUT NO LONGER GOES!
HOLY HAM SANDWICH! YOU
LOVED IT AGAIN! STICK. (J-124-
lt-nc).
It Doesn't Take
Nine Months
To Get Results
L S*
From Gator Ads
Close In For
The Way Out
HUMOR CANDLES
DECOR LINGERIE
FLAGS IMPORTS
Free Film With Processing
8 1511 N.W. 6th Street



Ihe Orange

Campus Calendar t
PLEASE TURN IN ALL ITEMS FOR CAMPUS CALENDAR TO THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS OFFICE, FLA. UNION

U. S. MARINE CORPS OFFICER SELECTION TEAM:
Today, 9-5 p.m., FU 116 & Hub. U. S. Marine Corps
Officer Selection Team on Campus to interview seniors
and graduates. Openings for ground or pilot training.
One quota for Radar Intercept Officer (Airborne).
NAVY RECRUITING: Today, 9 5 p.m., FU 123.
COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN: Today,
5:30 p.iru, Health Center Cafeteria, lecture and dinner.
Dr. Designing Development Behavior.
FIX)RIDA SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY: Today, 7
p.m., FU 212.
YOUNG DEMOCRATS: Today, 7:30 p.m., FU 208.
Elections for next years officers.
A.I.A. MEETING: Today, 8 p.m., 1038 Arch.&Fine
Arts Bldg. Film, Fury of the Wind.
LECTURE: Today, 8:15 p.m., Univ. Aud. Dr. Leo Leonard
nard Leonard Reiffel, Deputy Director for Sciences, Apollo
Program, NASA, The Present and Future of the
Space Race.
FILM CLASSICS SERIES: Today, 8:15 p.m., MSB
Aud., Beauty and the Beast.

Administrative Notices To Students, Faculty Sc Staff

STUDENTS
JUNIOR COLLEGE PLACEMENT DAY: Interviews
with representatives of 21 junior colleges in Florida
and out of state will be* held Friday, April 1, for
teaching positions next fall. Students with masters
degrees may schedule interviews in Room 150, Nor Norman
man Norman Hall. Interviews will be held from 8:30 a.m.
noon and 1-4 p.m. Several hundred teaching positions
are available, with the demand particularly high in
science, mathematics and administration.
GRE APPLICATION DEADLINE: Deadline date for
receipt of applications for the Graduate Record Ex Examination
amination Examination to be given April 23 is April 8. Booklets
on the GRE may be obtained from 235 Tigert.
JOBS AVAILABLE NOW: The Student Employment
Office announced that there are many part-time jobs
now available. The jobs will continue through the
spring trimester. These jobs are part of the Work-
Study Program and are limited to students whose
parents are in the low-income group. For informa information,
tion, information, contact the Student Employment Office, 124
Tigert. Students are needed to begin work immedi immediately.
ately. immediately.
APPLY FOR .SUMMER EMPLOYEES: The Central
Employment Center is receiving applications from
students seeking summer employment. All depart departments
ments departments interested in employing student workers during
the summer months should send in their requisition
as soon as possible.
General Notices
RESIDENCE FOR RENT: The University golf course
residence will be available for rental on June 1, 1966.
This is a two bedroom, one bath home; two rooms are
air conditioned. Call Perry C. Moore, 2131, for an
appointment. Rent, SIOO per month.
UNIFORMS FOR RESALE: The Military Department
will resell Air Force khaki uniforms on April 4. Items
include short sleeve shirts at $1 each; trousers,
$1.50 a pair; and low quarter black shoes at $3 per
pair, sizes 9-12.
ROTC GRADUATE REVIEW: The annual ROTC
Graduate Review will be Saturday, April 2, at 10:30
a.m. on the upper drill field. Reviewing officer will
be Maj. Gen. Robert P. Hollis. The public is invited
to review the combined units of the Air Force and
Army ROTC along with the Angel Flight, Army Sweet

CASH
CONSOLIDATE BILLS
TRAVEL EXPENCE
$25 S6OC
Marion Finance Company Inc.

NAVY RECRUITING: Thurs., Mar. 31, 9 5 p.m.,
FU 123.
PROPELLER CLUB: Thurs., Mar. 31, 7 p.m., FU
324. Program will be presented by Jacksonville Pro Propeller
peller Propeller Club.
ALPHA KAPPA PSI: Thurs., Mar. 31, 7 p.m., MSB.
Installation of Officers. Guest speaker: Dr. Goodwin.
CIRCLE K: Thurs., Mar. 31, 7:15 p.m., FU 212.
Important meeting; everyone please attend.
GAMMA BETA PHI: Thurs., Mar. 31, 7:30 p.m.,
FU 116.
FLORIDA PLAYERS: Take Her, Shes Mine,
Thurs., Mar. 31, 7:30 p.m.; Fri., Apr. 1, 8 p.m.;
Sat., Apr. 2, 8 p.m.; Norman Hall Aud. Ticket sales:
Today, noon to 4:30 p.m., FU Box Office; Thurs.,
Mar. 31, noon to 4:30 p.m., FU Box Office and 5:30
p.m. to curtain, Norman Hall.
FORUMS COMMITTEE DEBATE SERIES #3: Thurs.,
Mar. 31, 8:15 p.m., FU Aud. The Governors Debate:
Education, Taxation and Civil Rights. Students for
High vs. Students for Kelly vs. Students for Burns.

ID PHOTO APPOINTMENTS END: Thursday, March
31, is the last day identification card photographs will
be made for students who have received notification
during the winter trimester. Only those students who
have received notification of appointments should re report
port report for photographs at this time. These students will
have to pay a $5 penalty fee if they miss having the
identification photo made. Other students will receive
appointment notices during May or September.
SPANISH EXAMINATION: The Foreign Language
Reading Knowledge Examination in Spanish and func functional
tional functional knowledge for graduate students will be held
Saturday, April 2, 10 a.m. to 12 noon in 18 Anderson
Hall.
FACULTY AND STAFF
IMPORTANT REMINDER: The Personnel Division
reminds all faculty and staff members AND THEIR
DEPENDENTS who reached age 65 before Jan. 1,1966,
to sign up for Medicare before March 31 in order to
receive this coverage. You will not be able to keep
your present Blue Cross-Blue Shield and/or Gulf
Medical coverage after July, 1966, if you are eligible
for Medicare, even if you dont sign up for Medicare.
This includes all people over 65 whether they are
employees, retired, or are dependents of employes.
Contact the Social Security Office immediately if you
have not done so.
MENSA MEETING: MENSA meets ever/day, includ including
ing including Saturday, in the West Wing of the Main Cafeteria
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. For information call Mike
Sipe, 8-4950.
808 HOPE SHOW: Tickets are still available for
the April 2 Bob Hope Show and are on sale at Florida
Union, Belk-Lindsey and the Record Bar.
COBOL COURSE PLANNED: A COBOL (Common
Business Oriented Language) course in programming
will be given April 25-29. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., by the
University Computing Center. Registration forms are
available in the March issue of Bits and Pieces. Fur Furthere
there Furthere information may be obtained from R. E. Jacobs.
Administrative Assistant. Computing Center.

TAXES DUE

and

BLUE BULLETIN

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 30, 1966
'S

Page 10

ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE,
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE.

16TH ANNUAL JAZZ CONCERT: Thurs., Mar. 31,
8:15 p.m., Univ. Aud. Gator Variety Band, Robert
Foseter conducting.
OUTDOOR MOVIE: Fri., Apr. 1, East side of Bro Broward
ward Broward Hall. That Touch of Mink, 7:35 p.m. & 10:45
p.m. The Mouse That Roared, 6 p.m. & 9:15 p.m.
50£ per couple and 50£ per person. Bring your own
blanket. Also being shown at MSB Aud. same times.
MURPHREE-JENNINGS SOCIAL: Fri., Apr. 1, 8
p.m., Jennings Rec Room. The Playboys, everyone
invited no charge.
AG ECONOMICS CLUB: Sat., Apr. 2, 10 a.m.,
Beta Field. Softball game between students and faculty
followed by picnic.
VETERANS CLUB: April 5 meeting will be can cancalled.
called. cancalled. No meetings until after finals.
SPANISH INTL DINNER: Thurs., Apr. 7, 6 p.m.,
FU Social Room. Tickets are being sold at FU 215
& Intl. Center. $1.50 per person, sign up by April 5.
JAMAICA TOUR: April 23-29, 2nd Annual FU Trip.
$30.00 deposit by April 7, FU 315. 7 days -- $165.00.
EUROPEAN TOUR: June 21 August 15. 8 weeks
for $310.00. $125.00 deposit at FU 315.

FULBRIGHT-HAYS AWARDS: Announcement of Ful Fulbright-Hays
bright-Hays Fulbright-Hays awards for faculty members for research
and lecturing in Europe, Africa, the Near East, South
and East Asia, the Pacific, the Far East and Latin
America during the 1967-68 academic year are now
available for reference at the office of Faculty Ful Fulbright
bright Fulbright Adviser Col. G. A. Farris, International Cen Center,
ter, Center, Bldg. AE. Col. Farris does not distribute the
application forms, which are supplied to individuals
by the Committee on International Exchange of Per Persons,
sons, Persons, 2101 Constitution Ave. N.W., Washington, D. C.
On request the committee also will provide separate
lists of awards in American studies, anthropology,
area studies, biochemistry, biology and agriculture,
business administration, chemistry, earth sciences,
economics, education, engineering, home economics,
law, mass communications, mathematics, medical
sciences, physics, political science, psychology, social
work and sociology. Deadline for research awards is
June 1, while persons interested in lectureships should
apply before May 1 if possible.
FACULTY CLUB MEMBERS: For reservations for
one of the five private dining rooms at the Faculty
Club overlooking the golf course, call 2561. Luncheons
are served every day from 12 noon until 1:30 p.m.
Thursday night buffet suppers are served 6-7:30 p.m.
Faculty Club members and their guests are invited.
CAMPUS CALENDAR AND NOTICES DEADLINE:
The Campus Calendar and Orange and Blue Bulletin
appear Monday, Wednesday and Friday in The Alli Alligator.
gator. Alligator. Announcements for the Calendar must be in the
Public Functions Office. 104 Florida Union, by b;au
a.m. the day BEFORE you wish the announcement to
appear. Notices for Saturday and Sunday will appear
in Friday's Calendar and must be submitted by 8:30
a.m. Thursday. Notices for the ORANGE & BLUE
BULLETIN must be submitted to the Division of In Informational
formational Informational Services. Bldg. H, by 9 a.m. the day
BEFORE the notice is to appear. Due to limited
space, notices will run no mare than two times, ex except
cept except for official University notices.

LOANS
short till payday
BUYING SECOND CAR
525-S6OO
V II'UMI i Hi 1 1 JIN' ( ninp.illY Inc.



4 Moses In The Desert 9
Oratorio Set Sunday

n, e choral Union, reinforced by
he University Choir and the Uni University
versity University Orchestra, will present
Moses in the Desert*' Sunday,
&pril 3. The oratorio by Dr. A.
)idier Graeffe will be given at
4:00 p.m. at the University Aud Auditorium.
itorium. Auditorium.
Dr. Elwood J. Keister, director
of the Choral Union, and Edward
Troupin, conductor of the Uni University
versity University Orchestra, have prepared
the presentation.
Guy Webb, featured as Moses,
is the main soloist. The other
soloists are Dr. Gerald Lang Langford,
ford, Langford, Miss Julianne Belger, Miss
Lenore Bierbaum and Charles W.
McDonnell.
Dr. Graeffe said I am very verypleased
pleased verypleased with the selection of the
soloists. I wrote the part of
Moses with Guy Webb in mind.
Although I had nothing to do with
the actual selection of the per performer,
former, performer, I am pleased that the music
department recognized that the
part was written for his voice
quality and chose him for the part.
Dr. Graeffe explained why he
chose the oratorio as a means
of presentation. I am very pre preoccupied
occupied preoccupied with the oratorio as a
musical form in our
flourished in the 18th century and
most of our oratorios today were
written 200 years ago.
The oratorio went out when the
classical style came in. Although
Mozart and Beethoven wrote ora oratorios,
torios, oratorios, they wrote very few. The
oratorio seemed to have lost the
life and vitality it once possessed.
The old oratorios were a suc succession
cession succession of set musical numbers.
As in other modem ones, I have
written mine so that it could almost
be performed on stage with cos costumes.
tumes. costumes. It is a cross between the
old oratorio and o^era.
This work is dedicated to Carl
Orff. Since he was my teacher,
I followed in his footsteps. How However,

FOREIGN STUDENT GOINGS-ON
'lnternational Affairs'
By AZIZ SIURALIPOUK
A few weeks ago I asked the foreign students at the UK to write me
their opinions about Dean Bryans bulletin concerning financial aid to
tiie foreign students. I was planning to write an article concerning this
matter and include the different views of foreign students. Unfortun Unfortunately,
ately, Unfortunately, I received only one letter from Mr. Anthony Walsh which was
published in the Alligator on March 23 in the Speaking Out column.
Since I will present the article next Wednesday in fids column, I again
extend my invitation to all foreign students to write me their views
before next Tuesday.
% 4
The India Club on campus lias received a letter from Prime. Minister
Indira Gandhi, who recently visited the United States. In one paragraph
she stated: May I also remind you that the country expects a great
deal from the young men and women who have had the opportunity of
studying at institutions of international repute and of acquainting thern thernselves
selves thernselves with the latest trefidsjn human thought and modern technology.
Eighty foreign students including a woman and two men tiotn Viet
N 'am will receive degrees at the end of the spring trimester. Twelve
will receive doctoral degrees and thirty-two will receive masters
degrees.
On Saturday aftermon President and Mrs. J. Wayne Kelt/, received
tbe universitys foreign students in their home. Many of the faculty
*ho are closely associated with foreign student activities and mem members
bers members of tlie Gainesville Council for International Activities were pre present.
sent. present.
Refreshments were served, arid music was piovided by GuiilUa
Emthen of Sweden and Naser Nathan of Iran, accompanied on the
to by Mrs. Emmanuel Gitlin.
Guillermo Yglesias Pacheco, a former student In the Departmen
Statistics, has recentlv been appointed Minister of Agriculture In
toa Rica. Pacheco received a master's degree from the College of
Agriculture in 1961.
The Socony Mobile Oil Company has written to the Placement Dlr Dlr*ctor
*ctor Dlr*ctor indicating an interest in foreign students qualified for operu operuions
ions operuions Research upon graduation. Students must be from Germany,
ranee, United Kingdom, or Italy, and be planning to return,home
tventually.
A special thanks is extended to Mr. Leo Bessette, assistant cashier
the university. He spent six hours cutting ham for 300 gues s o
he Newman Club at a recent church dinner which hosted foreign
tud-ants.
, Tlle Badminton Club will meet, from H-10 p.rn. on Friday, In the
ottnan Hall Gymnasium. It is co-ed and more people are encourage'
5 Participate.

ever, However, his oratorio style and mine
do have two major differences.
Orffs music was pagan in qual quality
ity quality because this lias public appeal.
My intention is to present some something
thing something with the qualities (it religion
and existentialism. Orff also wrote
for unusual orchestral arrange arrangements.
ments. arrangements. I wrote for the traditional
arrangement that can be found on
any college campus.
From way back, most people look
upon Moses as a competent leader
who is always sure of himself
and in complete control of any
situation. Not so, says Graeffe,
'Moses was a man beset and tor tormented
mented tormented by doubts. He took enor enormous
mous enormous risks when he was not even
sure of the consequences.
I believe that each generation
should reread and reinterpret the
Biblical stories for themselves.
They will find something new and
shocking each time. This is what
keeps the Bible alive. A few
set stories meant to pacify do not
make the Bible a living and mean meaningful
ingful meaningful work.
So it is with my oratorio. It
is meant to worry people, not to
pacify and reassure them. The
text is my own, but it is not
original. Everything is backed up
by the Bible.
The play is in three acts. The
first deals with the miracles of
mana and water. 1 tried to pre present
sent present them as miracles instead of
symbols, a very daring thing to do
in modern oratorios. The second
act concerns the Golden Calf and
Moses breaking the tablets of the
law which he received from God.
It ends with the killing of 3,000
people. The third act deals with
tiie serpent of brass. Moses uses
this as a medicine to save the
people. At the end, God takes
Moses up the mountain, forbids
him entrance to the holy land
and lets him die.

- MM
I lip C T f ; v PPlfl|§f J. ifs ~SU § Is £ 1 f%f- |
M
. TRUMPETS TO BLARE THURSDAY NIGHT

Gator Variety Bands first trumpeter Da n Bowles
swings out with the rest of the band trumpet section
on one of Bowles own arrangements of Kisses

I gSt hair* g* |H
v BKL jMttttttUKtBBBBBKBBBBBtBI^^^^^£m
|*_ CiL w
THIS IS WHAT ITS ABOUT ...
.Joel Montgomery explains what the fc reign s tudert advise rs will be doing to Gunella Empther for foreign
eign foreign exchange student.
UFers Wanted For Assignment
As Foreign Student Advisors

By ED HORNYAK
In September some ICO new
International students will be taken
under the wings of the International
Host committee of the Florida
Union.
At the end of International Ori Orientation
entation Orientation week, each new foreign
student will tie assigned a Florida
student, who will acquaint his in international
ternational international counterpart with I F
and American way of life.
Tlie international host program,
initiated by F lori'ia Blue Key, was

History Profs Honored

Phi Alpha Theta, campus branch
of the national history honor so society,
ciety, society, is sponsoring an apprecia appreciation
tion appreciation dinner for the departing his history
tory history professors Wednesday at 7
p.rn. in the Hub's Banquet Room
Professors Rembert Patrick,

Wednesday, March 3C, 1 OGb, The Florida Alligator,

as summed b> the Union Board two
years ago.
Joel Montgomery, director of the
program, asserts, this oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity is one of the most reward rewarding
ing rewarding aspects of college life.
Students who sign up to be hosts
are paired off with IntematioraJ
students of similar interest and
hobbles.
At the conclusion of fall regis registration,
tration, registration, an international Ball will
be held in the New Florida Union

La-.id 'Low d, ? rar.cis a: n
Clifbn Yearly will be honored by
faculty and students.
The banquet is open to anyone
who wishes to attend. The tickets
are 32.50 and can be purchased in
the history office.

Sweater Thar, wine which will be featured in the
16th annual Jazz Concert by the Variety Band at
d:ls p.m. Thursday in the I'niversit) Auditorium.

building. The coupling of sfxSents
will take place at this bail.
This program ir. the past has
resulted in a strong bond of friend friendship
ship friendship between the host and his in international
ternational international partner. The host
learns a great deal about interna international
tional international customs and culture, while
the transfer student gains a true
.nriersta rating of the American way
of life.
Anyone may be a host who -has
a knowledge of the campus and a
2.0 average or better. Knowledge
of a foreign language is not neces necessary
sary necessary
Applications may be picked up
from the activities chairman in any
organization or 315 Florida Union.
A minimum of 200 applications
must be turned in by April 15
in order to allow for ample time
for interviews before the end of
the trimester.

Page 11



BOB
Menaker

The Florida Gator baseball team --a study in futility.
Everyone expected the team to start off slow. Thats been their
style every year -- lose the first few, test your best players and
get set for the SEC race.
This year it just hasn't worked out that way. The Gators have
been good in spots, but generally their caliber of play has been
very shoddy something you dont expect from a Dave Fuller
baseball team. <
There have been some bright notes. Rufus Frazier, Bruce
Moore, Skip Lujack and Jack Kenworthy have been flitting con consistently
sistently consistently well and Danny Cushman, though a little inconsistent,
has been a real fence buster at times.
The fielding has been pretty good. Youd have to go some to
find a better college keystone combination than Don Pendley and
Bruce Moore. Tom Shannon has one of the best gloves in colle collegiate
giate collegiate baseball, and its this great skill around first base that will
probably send him to the major leagues.
The Gators just havent been consistent, and its hard to place
the blame. In the majors, when a manager doesnt produce, hes
fired. In college ball, you dont do that, and anyway, its hard to
put the blame on Co'ach Fuller. When your players make mis mistakes,
takes, mistakes, you dont blame the coach do you?
THE CRYSTAL BALL
Speaking of baseball, it looks like its time for another Alli Alligator
gator Alligator sports editor to disagree with a Street and Smith publication.
You may recall, last trimester Andy Moor criticized Street and
Smith for picking Northwestern over the Gators in the seasons
football opener. We all know what happened to that fine prediction.
Now they come out and predict the Los Angeles Dodgers to win
the National League pennant. That was before Messrs. Koufax and
Drysdale decided to hold out in favor of higher wages and possible
Hollywood stardom.
Without the dynamic duo of the baseball world, the Dodgers will
be lucky to finish in the National League.
My pick for the National League goes with the Pittsburgh
Pirates. After a horrible start in which they lost 24 of their first
33 games, the Pirates bounced back for an 81-48 record the rest
of the way. Pitching is the story and the Pirates do well in that
department. Last years staff finished with a 3.01 earned run
average, pitched 17 shutouts and yielded only 89 homers, low in
the league. On the basis of sound pitching and such hitters as
Roberto Clemente and Willie Stargell, the pirates are the pick in
1966.
In the American League Street and Smith picks the Minnesota
Twins to take the Hag, and I go along with that. The Twins won
last year on power, something that wont be missing in this years
lineup. With Camilio Pascual, Jim Grant and Jim Kaat on the
mound, the Twins also have one of the leagues better pitching
stars.
Baltimore, Cleveland and New York should battle it out for the
pennant with the Twins, but Street and Smith must have looked the
other way when they picked the Chicago White Sox to finish in sixth
place. Chicago finished second last year, and its doubtful they
will take such a nose dive this year.
Juan Pizarro and Gary Peters had a bad season last year, and
the Sox still managed to finish near the top. I doubt that it will be
any different this year. Mahager A1 Lopez retired, but the Sox
hired Eddie Stanky, one of the best men in the business. Street
and Smith is way off base in picking Chicago sixth. They may not
take the pennant, but they wont finish sixth either.
Both leagues should provide interesting pennant races this year,
more so in the junior circuit since the temporary demise of the
Yankees. Any way you look at it, however, the senior league is
superior and should best the American Leaguers in any ccfhfron ccfhfrontation,
tation, ccfhfrontation, whether its the All-Star game or the World Series.
NOTES . Congratulations are in order to the Lionmen of SAE
for winning the Orange League Presidents Cup. The SAEs really
came on strong this trimester, winning golf and basketball and
going all the way to the finals in softball (the championship hasnt
been decided yet). Kudos also to the Lambda Chis for winning the
Presidents Cup in the Blue League. This marks the second straight
year the Lambda Chis have won the league softball crown and the
third straight year they have won the Cup . Next year Lambda
Chi and Fiji will move up to the tougher Orange League, while
KA and AEPi will be dropped to the Blue League.

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Fi. M

Rifles Finish Fine Season

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Staff Writp:
With -a pair of victories last
Saturday, the Florida Rifles closed
out their most successful season in
history with a 22-2 mark. .-
The Gator sharpshooters top topped
ped topped rifle squads from Miami Mil Military
itary Military Academy and the University
of Miami to capture top honors in
the Miami Invitational Tourna Tournament.
ment. Tournament.
Lve been more than happy with
our record this season, said
Major Harvey Dick, advisor to the
Florida Rifles. The men have

Dodger Hitters On Strike?

By JOE GERGEN
UPI Sports Writer
Now that Sandy Koufax and Don
Drysdale finally have reported for

The Florida Alligator

Wednesday, March 30, 1966

Page 12

Netters Edge Washington
Floridas varsity netters edged by Washington University of St.
Louis, 5-4, yesterday. The Gators now have a season record of
14 wins and eight losses. Washington evened their record at two
wins and two losses.
The Gators won four matches behind the playing of Co-captain
Rick Chace who defeated A1 Croft, 6-0, 6-0. Co-captain Steve
Gardner, Bill Perrin and Bill Belote added wins for Florida.
Chace and Perrin were the only Gators to score in doubles de defeating
feating defeating Dave Herman and A1 Croft.
Today, Florida takes on Amherst College on the varsity courts.
Thursday, they will play Jacksonville University. The Baby Gators
have tw.p matches this weekend, playing the tennis clubs from St.
Petersburg and Davis Island (Tampa).

ALL-CAMPUS
BASKETBALL TEAM
Dave Westerman (G) . KS
Tommy Glenn (G) KS
Bobby Threat (G) SAE
Norman Brooks (G).... TEP
Jeff Wright (G) PKT
Larue Boyd (C) SAE
Ronnie Erickson (C)... DTD
Scott Hager (F) ....... SX
Mike Hartman (F) SX :
Jim Brown (F) SPE :
(Chosen by Secretary of Ath- ;
letics)

shot well throughout the entire
campaign.'
Leading the team to victory in
the Miami Invitational were co cocaptains
captains cocaptains Jon Gordon and Toby
Muir, Lee Young and Jim Waugh.
The UF marksmen were closely
challenged by the UM team, edg edging
ing edging the Magic City c rew by 18
points.
Muir, a scheduled returnee next
season, fired for the highest match
average this year for the Rifles.
The blond sophomore shot a 264.5
average mark out of a possible
300.

work, the Los Angeles Dodgers
hitters have gone out on strike.
The result is a double disaster
for the reeling world champions
because Koufax and Drysdale,

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Also returning inSeptember will
be Young, Waugh, Bob Moeller,
Jay Weber, Bob Martin, Gerald
Wiggins and Kerry Chatham.
lm sure these men will form
a solid nucleus for a good team
next season, stated Dick. I think
its very possible for us to have
an even better record next year.
The only losses this year came
at the hands of number one ranked
Citadel, and a powerful FSU squad.
The Rifles had previously defeated
the Seminoles twice in match com competition
petition competition this year.

those paragons of pitching per perfection,
fection, perfection, began their working day in
Hollywood, 3,000 odd miles from
the Dodgers* Vero Beach, Fla.
headquarters.
And no sooner had the two
hurlers, who are seeking a com combined
bined combined three-year pact of $1 million,
began rehearsals at Paramount
Studios for their forthcoming
movie, -Warning Shot, then the
rest of the Dodgers struck in sym sympathy.
pathy. sympathy.
They didnt exactly walk out and
picket but they did the next best
thing. They laid down their bats
against the Pittsburgh Pirates and
succumbed 5-0 without a hit.
The ignominious loss was their
11th of the exhibition season and
plunged them into a deadlock for
last place among National Leauge
teams with the Philadelphia Phil Phillies,
lies, Phillies, who whipped the Baltimore
Orioles.
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