Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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SOAP BOX /N A BREEZE

Student Body Vice President Fred Breeze (he*s in
the Red Baron) races down the Health Center hill
in the Gator Gras Soap Box Derby Sunday afternoon.

The Florida
Alligator
Vol. 58, No. 122 University of Florida Monday, March 28, 1966 I

Peek Is Named Chairman
Os Dollars For Scholars

Gene Peek was named chairman
of 1966 Dollars for Scholars Fri Friday
day Friday by Student Body President
Buddy Jacobs.
Peek announced a facelifting for
the Dollars for Scholars program
which he said will feature a year yearlong
long yearlong effort through 1966 instead of

BPif '/
Wmm.W' / >
PUBLICATIONS BANQUET
Former Alligator Editor Steve Vaughn (left) receives the Student
Publications student of the year award Saturday night from Board
of Student publications Chairman John Webb. See another picture and
and story on Page 3.
Bob Hope Tickets Remain
About 1,000 tickets for the Bob Hope performance at the UF
Gymnasium April 2 at 8:15 p.m. are still available at the Florida
Union on campus and Belks and the Record Bar downtown.
The tickets are selling for $2, $3, and $4, which entitles the
holders to any of the seats in the respective sections on a first
come-first served basis. The show will be featured in the center
of the gymnasium floor so that all seats will provide close viewing.
The show is being sponsored by the Arnold Air Society, student
honorary of the Air Force ROTC unit at the University, to raise
money for the Dollars for Scholars program. Each dollar over
and above the cost of the show will be matched by $9 in federal
scholarship support funds.

the concentrated, but brief effort,
of the past.
The 1966 drive will begin this
Saturday night with the Bob Hope
Show, proceeds of which will go
to Dollars for Scholars.
Peek named Tim Johnson and
Kay Melton to serve as his chief

Breeze, a veteran Soap Box racer from Gulf Breeze,
barely edged out Donald Miller and his little red
wagon.

assistants.
The new plan for the student loan
drive will include a major money moneyraising
raising moneyraising event in each trimester.
The first of these is the Hope ben benefit,
efit, benefit, which is being staged by the
Arnold Air Society.
Future Dollars for scholars
drives will include similar shows
for the winter trimester, if the
Hope appearance goes over well,
Peek said.
The new chairman estimated that
profits from Saturday nights show
will give Dollars for Scholars a
start of upwards of $3,000.
Next trimester Dollars for Scho Scholars
lars Scholars will sponsor a Summer
Frolics to take advantage of the
UFs increasing spring trimester
enrollment. Past summer frolics
have not been well attended. Peek
said, but with increased enroll enrollment,
ment, enrollment, good entertainment and the
impetus of a Dollars for Scholars
appeal, this one should be a suc success.
cess. success. q
The usual campus pacs will
be sold by Dollars for Scholars
again, but Peek will add to this a
new presentation of the spirit hats
sold last fall by student govern government.
ment. government. Pat Kelly has been appointed
to handle straw hat sales which
will include an increased sales
program on campus and among the
alumni.
Peek said the major activity for
the fall trimester will be the fami familiar
liar familiar weeks drive in which students
solicit contributions. Peek said the
goal for the entire campaign will be
$30,000, but that he hopes to raise
more than this through the new
sources of funds he js introducing.
I hope students realize, Peek
said, that every time they support
a Dollars for Scholars activity they
are helping someone to get a
college education.
The first opportunity the stu student
dent student body has to show its support
for this program is the Bob Hope
show. Every dollar we make on
this brings nine more from the fed federal
eral federal government, so I hope it will
be a complete sellout.

HAROLDS GO-GO G/Rl
Pretty Dianne Kaufman showed up at Harold's Club Friday night
as a go-go girl. The go-go girls and Harold's Club were part of the
annual spring escapade sponsored by Graham Area.
Peace Crusader 'OHanlon
Actually A Sex Psychopath
Mike OHanlon, a* paid peace crusader from the Viet Nam Day
Committee in Berkeley, Calif., lectured in front of the UF library
on free speech and against the war in Viet Nam in February.
OHanlon isnt OHanlon, according to a March 20 article in the
San Francisco Chronicle and Examiner. OHanlon is really Fran Francis
cis Francis Michael Medaille, 23, whos wanted in New York, where he
was adjudged a sexual psychopath and killer.
The article said Medaille lured a seven-year-old girl to the roof
of a New York apartment house, where tie molested her and hurled
the girl to her death in the street 13 stories l>elow.
He was later admitted to a mental institution as a sexual psycho psychopath.
path. psychopath. In 1963, the article continued, Medaille pleaded guilty to a
lesser charge of first degree manslaughter. He was given a 5- to
10-year suspended sentence and placed on probation for five years.
After moving to Los Angeles with his family, he left for Florida
in 1965 and changed his name.
Probation authorities in New York issued a warrant for his
arrest one month later. The warrant has never been served.
To convince people his name was OHanlon, he obtained a Cali California
fornia California drivers license. His identification was established through
a comparison of thumb prints by a spokesman in the Sacramento
Motor Vehicle Department. 4
Relive Saturday's Florida Relays in
pictures see Page 11.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 28, 1966

'Wm IHmjHi
International
SPEAKS IN PARIS . The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. warned
Sunday that bloody racist violence in the United States will erupt again
unless the condition of American Negroes is improved soon. Speaking
at a news conference at the American Church of Paris, King charged
that Los Angeles authorities have done little to improve the situation
of the predominantly Negro Watts community since last Augusts
violent rioting.
POLL TAKEN . With only four days left before the British gen general
eral general election, public opinion polls Sunday showed the Conservatives
cutting into the ruling Labor Partys commanding lead. But although
Conservative leader Edward Heath announced happily, We are begin beginning
ning beginning to make an impact on the electorate, most observers predicted
Prime Minister Harold Wilson would be back in office after Thursdays
poll with a parliamentary majority of 60 to 100 seats.
TOURS PAKISTAN . Red Chinese President Liu Shao-ehi toured
the Pakistan countryside with President Mohammed Ayub Khan Sunday
to cheers of villagers waving Chinese flags. Government officials
warmly applauded when he denounced American imperialism at a
glittering state banquet in his honor. The two leaders also engaged
in diplomatic discussions concerning ways of strengthening ties of
friendship, officials said. The Viet Nam war also was believed to be
high on the agenda.
National
PEACE DENIAL . .The White House and the State Department
firmly refused Sunday to comment on a report that fresh negotiations
are under way with Viet Nam Communists for the release of a cap captured
tured captured U. S. official, Gustav C. Hertz. Hertz, an administrator of the
Agency for International Development (AID), was abducted by the
Communists while riding a bicycle outside Saigon 14 months ago.
UFO MOCKERY CITED . One of 87 college coeds who reported
seeing mysterious flying objects in Michigan last week Saturday called
an Air Force report that the objects were luminous gas a mockery.
Barbara Kohn, 21, a Hillsdale College student in Cleveland to visit an
aunt, accused Dr. J. Allen Hynek of not doing his research thoroughly
before rendering his opinion. Hynek, sent by the Air Force to Hills Hillsdale
dale Hillsdale to investigate the reports, said Friday the objects were probably
swamp gas.
HOUSING DEBATE EXPECTED . President Johnson will send
Congress today a new civil rights package containing an emotional
time bomb for the North -a proposed ban on housing discrimination
that is sure to explode in controversy. The legislation, carrying out
pledges Johnson made in his State of the Union message in January,
also will include measures designed to outlaw Jim Crow juries and
to permit the attorney general to initiate school desegregation suits.
The President also had called then for new authority for federal courts
to try those accused of murdering, attacking or intimidating civil
rights workers.
MRS. GANDHI ARRIVES . Indian Prime Minister Mrs. Indira
Gandhi arrived in Williamsburg, Va., Sunday for an overnight stop
before her meeting with President Johnson and a hoped for new under understanding
standing understanding between the two world leaders. Mrs. Gandhi, clad in a red
and gold sair, was flown in aU. S. presidnetial jet airliner from Paris
to the nearby Langley Air Force Base, arriving at 4:43 p.m. EST.
She flew to Virginia in a presidential helicopter which touched down to
a greeting of some 500 persons, many of them Indian students.
Florida
CRASH KILLS SEVEN ... A two-car collision near Alachua, Fla.,
was the nations worst traffic accident during the weekend. Highway
patrolmen said two cars collided Saturday night on interstate 75,
near Alachua, Fla., when one of the vehicles strayed into the wrong
lane of the highway. The dead included Richard H. Clotworthy, New
Iberia. Va., John Stephen Gage, Atlanta. Ga., and Alton Clyde Peebles.
Pitts, Ga., all Georgia Tech students: Walter Rozier, his wife and
teen-age daughter, all of Ocala, Fla., and Bennie Summers. Ocala.
Another student was seriously hurt.
LAW REVISION . The Constitutional Revision Commission closed
out its preliminarv session on major constitutional issues Saturday,
laying the groundwork for the first total rewrite of Floridas basic
law in 80 years. Chairman Chesterfield Smith of Bartow bowed,
however, to a nearly unanimous request for one more-work session
to feel out members reaction to important proposals for judicial
and legislative changes.
ADMITS EDUCATION GAP . Florida is not doing the job it should
in providing for the education and training of retarded children although
it has come a long way, State School Superintendent Floyd Christian
said Saturday. Christian was the main speaker at dedication of special
facilities at Paxon High School here for the intellectually handicapped.
He said in prepared remarks that the state m ist provide funds for
every handicapped child in every county.

The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisements and
to reels* or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day a/ter advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be respon.sltleTor more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices lor correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the ofllrlal student newspaper of ihc University f 1 lorldj nd Is
published five times weekly excepi during May, June, and July when II Is published m mi-weekly. On);,
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class
natter at the United States Po;l Office at Gainesville.

Buddhists Demand Civilian
Rule Os South Viet Nam

SAIGON (UPI) -- Tens of thou thousands
sands thousands of angry Buddhist demon demonstrators,
strators, demonstrators, venting strong anti-
American feelings, surged through
South Vietnamese streets Sunday
demanding a return to civilian rule.
In Saigon. Buddhist boy scouts used
long staffs in an attempt to re re*

Red Leaders Confer

MOSCOW (UPI) Scores of
ranking Communist leaders con converged
verged converged on Moscow Sunday for the
Soviet partys 23rd Congress, a
meeting that loomed as a potential
international propaganda triumph
for the Russians in their dispute
with the Chinese.
A Hungarian delegation headed
by Communist party First Secre Secretary
tary Secretary Janos Kadar was the latest
of the arrivals for the Congress,
which opens Tuesday. Some 80 de delegations
legations delegations were expected, with about
half in Moscow already and the
rest due to arrive Monday.
The Communist Chinese, their
split with the Soviets deepened by
the Viet Nam war, are boycotting
the Congress. They were joined
in their self-imposed exile only
by the Communist parties of New
Zealand, Japan and Albania.
The arrival in Moscow Saturday
Cable Cutting
Thwarts Bomb
Recovery Try
PALOMARES, Spain (UPI)
The steel cable bringing a missing
nuclear bomb from 2,500 feet be below
low below the Mediterranean surface was
accidentally cut Sunday, sending
the bomb plummeting back to the
bottom.
The freak accident shattered
hopes for a quick recovery of the
bomb, lost almost 10 weeks ago
in the crash of a 852 bomber, and
presented the U. S. Navy salvage
teams with an even more difficult
task.
An official Navy communique
issued Sunday night said an anchor
being used in the recovery oper operations
ations operations became entangled in the
cable and cut it as it was lifting
the warhead to the surface.
Informed sources said two sim similar
ilar similar cable separations occurred
before, but this was the first offi officially-admitted
cially-admitted officially-admitted mishap.
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co.

NOTICE I
I The Board Os Student Publications Is Accepting Applications For The I
Following Positions. Forms Should Be Picked Up In Room 9Of The I
Florida Union And Returned No Later Than Tuesday, March 29, 12:00 Noon 1
I POSITIONS j
||£ . i |B
I MANAGING EDITOR, THE SEMINOLE (1966-67 BOOK) 1
nnSl jSBj
EDITOR IN CHIEF, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR (TRIMESTER 1 &2. 1966-67).1
MANAGING EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR (TRIMESTER 1 &2, 1966-67) |

* re* V
strain furious student demonstra demonstrators.
tors. demonstrators.
While Buddhist protests swirled
in Hue and Saigon. U. S, para paratroopers.
troopers. paratroopers. cavalrymen and Marines
pressed three new American oper operations.
ations. operations. They reported killing at
least 20 Viet Cong in scattered
clashes.

of delegations from North Korea
and North Viet Nam set the stage
for the Russian triumph over their
Chinese rivals.
Both countries have been con considered
sidered considered allies of the Chinese in the
bitter internecine battle that was
climaxed Wednesday with a scorn scornful
ful scornful refusal by Peking to send a
delegation.
Support for the Soviets came
from Yugoslavia, which had a lone
observer at the last Soviet Con Congress
gress Congress in 1961. This year Alexander
Rankovic, considered President
Titos right-hand man, heads a
six-man Yugoslav delegation. For Foreign
eign Foreign delegations are guests, not
participants, iat the deliberations
of the Congress.

U of F Staff & Faculty Since 1935
*'
GAINESVILLE FLA. CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
| Bldg. J Ext. 2973]
I f /A a/
I / ItyDISCOUNI
W' /O
ft2llW TO ALL STUDENTS and UNIVERSITY
rawIj?^ PERSONNEL
iTfi f LUNCH
imp ll:30am-2:00pm
4T\) CAFETERIA DINNER
AM 4-30pm-8:00pm
V 1212 N. Main St (G^ 0 E P S P V I I N L G LE
(4 minutes from camous) center)

A force of U. S. Marines that
landed 30 miles southeast of Sai Saigon
gon Saigon Saturday in the wars sou southernmost
thernmost southernmost American landing, suf suffered
fered suffered light casualties during a night
attack early Sunday by an estimated
squad of Viet Ceng. Eighteen air
sorties were flown in support of
the bold Leatherneck operation
launched to protect Saigons vital
river channel link with the sea.
On the political front Buddhist
unrest erupted into massive street
demonstrations and unruly anti antigovernment
government antigovernment rallies as demonstra demonstrators
tors demonstrators demanded replacement of
South Viet Nams ruling military
junta with a civilian regime.
In Hue, 400 miles north of Sai Saigon,
gon, Saigon, a crowd of some 20,000 Budd Buddhists
hists Buddhists marched five miles through
the city calling for formation of a
civilian national assembly and
carrying banners protesting al alleged
leged alleged American interference in
Viet Nams domestic political af affairs.
fairs. affairs.
Some Buddhist leaders said the
anti-American sentiment was the
result of popular belief that Amer Americans
icans Americans controlled the money that
was backing the Saigon military
junta.



Publications Fete: Serious And Funny

Awards, songs, a hard-hitting
speech on the status of The Alli Alligator,
gator, Alligator, some wicked lampooning of
members of the Board of Student
Publications, and a visit from the
UF president highlighted the an annual
nual annual student publications banquet
Saturday.
Gathering in the main dining
room of the Hotel Thomas Saturday
evening were members of The
Alligator and Seminole staffs, the
board, the publications business
and professional staffs, and a
number of invited guests -- all
treated to an occasion that ranged
from quiet seriousness to un unrestrained
restrained unrestrained comedy.
Guest speaker H. G. (Buddy)
Davis, UF professor of journa journalism
lism journalism and a past winner of the
Sigma Delta Chi national award

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for editorial writing, admonished
the student journalists in the au audience
dience audience to exert every effort to
prevent The Alligator from be becoming
coming becoming a laboratory publication
under the School of Journalism
and Communications.
He said he was puzzled by the
desires of some students -- in including
cluding including several Alligator staffers
--to put the paper under faculty
control when college journalists
generally have strong ideas in the
opposite direction.
He noted a report by the liberal
American Civil Liberties Union
in which a hypothetical system of
publications was set up, and said
it was almost identical to the one
we have at the University of Flor Florida.
ida. Florida.
Davis said he suspected UF

college journalists ultimately har harbored
bored harbored similar liberal sympathies.
Quit sending out invitations to a
wrecking party, he said, alluding
to earlier Alligator editorials ask asking
ing asking that consideration be given a
move to the J-School. (The paper,
more recently, has editorialized
against such a move.)
If the problem is one of extra extracurricular
curricular extracurricular overload^ Davis said,
take a close look It your five fiveissues-a-week
issues-a-week fiveissues-a-week schedule. If its too
much for you to handle, you might
possibly reduce to two or three a
week. Dont damage your integrity
as students.
Besides, Davis said, if the paper
came under the journalism facul facultys
tys facultys control, the school would be
bound in an intellectual strait straitjacket.
jacket. straitjacket. Then, a journalism brain
drain would begin. He said aca academic
demic academic pursuits by the faculty might
be overthrown in order to concen concentrate
trate concentrate purely on the production of
the paper.
Davis said great changes in
the world are underway -- things
that couldnt have happened 15 or
20 years ago. The Alligator ought
to be a part of this world.
Davis reminded his listeners
that the J-School is not a mono monolithic
lithic monolithic organization, and that feel feelings
ings feelings were mixed among the faculty
concerning moving The Alligator
there. He said he was by no means
alone in opposing the move.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz,
in his brief remarks as special
guest, revealed he also had been
a college journalist, and that he

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BANQUET SPEAKER: H.G. (Buddy) Davis

had learned the hard way, more
than once, about the inadvisability
of accepting information from a a
- a sources or replying on
secondhand sources for direct
quotes.
Any newspaper, Dr. Reitz stated,
should attempt to be the con conscience
science conscience of the community," but it
does not do this fairly without
showing responsibility, good judg judgment
ment judgment and a willingness to print all
sides of an issue.
Steve Vaughn, Alligator editor
last fall trimester, was presented
the Student of the Year award
by Journalism Professor John
Webb, chairman of the Board of
Student Publications and master
of ceremonies.
The selection committee felt
Vaughn, graduated and now sports
editor for The Cocoa Tribune, best
measured up to the standards of
skill, accomplishment and dedica dedication
tion dedication for the preceding year.
Service certificates were pre presented
sented presented by Board Executive Secre Secretary
tary Secretary Gary Burke to other publica publications
tions publications staffers holding editorial
status, and to the student business
manage.. The recipients: Gator
Editor Benny Cason, Managing Ed Editor
itor Editor Drex Dobson, former Sports
Editor Andy Moor, former Exe Executive
cutive Executive Editor Ed Barber, Assistant
Editors Fran Snider and Yvette
Cardozo, Vaughn, Seminole Editor
Beth Kpaselsky, Seminple Manag Managing

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Monday, March 28, 1966, The Florida

ing Managing Editor Nel Laughhon and Busi Business
ness Business Manager Ben Bond.
Mock awards and telegrams
were delivered from the podium
by emcee Webb to the approxi approximately
mately approximately 60 persons in attendance.
He then turned the program over
to Publications Production Man Manager
ager Manager Jim Moorhead who emceed
the student side of the show a
series of monologues, songs,
blackouts and impersonations
which President Reitz said later
represented the best entertain entertainment
ment entertainment Ive ever seen on this cam campus.
pus. campus.
Gator staffer Kay Huff master,
piano accompanist, also displayed
her vocal and guitar-playing ta talents
lents talents with a pair of songs. Gator
Columnist Gerald Jones poked fun
at a number of UF staff and stu student
dent student personalities, including Dean
of Students Lester Hale, who de delivered
livered delivered the invocation before the
meal.
Moorhead was joined by Assis Assistant
tant Assistant Production Manager Barber
in the blackouts -- satires on se several
veral several campus figures lately in the
news and in the impersonations,
parodying Faculty Board Mem Members
bers Members Webb, Dr. H. B. Clark, Dr.
D. D. Ray and Mrs. Betty Taylor,
plus Burke. Grand finale was a
send off in song for Burke, who
leaves in August for a new job
with a publishing firm.

Page 3



Page 4

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 28, 1966

ALLIGATOR
EDITORIALS
>
ACCENTS
moving rapidly
CCENT *67 -- the UFs first annual Spring
symposium on vital issues scheduled for next
year is progressing at a rapid, if not breakneck,
pace.
Assistant Chairman Bill Haverfield has been in interviewing
terviewing interviewing the past week all students who applied
to work on ACCENTS executive committee. He and
General Chairman Charlie Shepherd will get together
this week and pick the executive committee.
Shepherd has assured The Alligator the selections
will be based on qualifications, not politics. And
there is no reason to disbelive Shepherd, for he has
never led us astray before.
During the Fall trimester, additional applications
will t>e taken in order to fill vacancies that some sometimes
times sometimes unexpectedly pop up.
While nothing spectacular has taken place so far,
we are impressed by the intelligible and impartial
manner in which Haverfield and Shepherd are run running
ning running the show. With good leadership, good results
are sure to follow.
hard workers
woof the hardest-working members of Student
Body President Buddy Jacobs* cabinet are Bill
Chiara, secretary of international affairs, and Ira
Liebesfeld, secretary of athletics.
Chiaras main project has been the moving of a
house to serve as temporary center for the Board
of International Activities. Since Legislative Council
passed an allocation for the project last week, it
shouldnt take much longer for Chiara to complete it.
He also has set up a Spanish Conversation Club
and helped start a weekly column in The Alligator
for international student activities. Under Chiaras
direction, the BIA donated $159 -- its profits from
the international students ball to WUS and Dollars
for Scholars.
Liebesfeld began a free bus shuttle between cam campus
pus campus and Lake Wauburg recently. It will be continued
each Saturday and Sunday throughout the trimester.
He also is near an agreement which will produce
reduced bowling rates for students and is taking a
survey to improve the facilities at Wauburg.
Hard work deserves recognition, so we salute
Eill and Ira today for their efforts on behalf of the
students.
racial progress
71 ts remarkable what a few years time do.
j) When Bobby Reid, 18-year-old Negro from
Madison, Ga., was elected president of the student
body at Miami-Dade Junior College Friday, little
commotion was made and few eyebrows \Vere raised.
Imagine what would have happened a few short
years ago.
Although racial progress in the South has been
too slow for some, to us it is moving along rather
swiftly. For this, the younger generation can take
a bow.
Now that Miami-Dade has eliminated race as a
criterion for student body elections, we hope other
universities and colleges around the South will
follow.
We think they will, because the day of judging
a man by the color of his skin is fading as rapidly
as the setting sun.
ALLIGATOR STAFF
t
Editor Benny Cason
Managing Editor Drex Dobson
Editorial Director Andy Moor
Executive Editor YvetteCardozo
Assistant Managing Editor Fran Snider
Wire Editor Steve Hull
Sports Editor Bob Menaker
Assistant Editors Mike Malaghan
Eileen Dworkin
Copy Editors Agnes Fowles
Ami Saperstein. Julie McClure
Associate Editors Bill Martinez
Kay Huffmaster, Gene Nail
Staff Writers Justine Hartman
Norma Bell, Jane Solomon, Marjory Schwartz
Gene Picchi, Belton Jennings. Brad Sawtell

"Take Me To Your Leader"
nom 11ic basement
(EDITORS NOTE: Reporter Yvette Cardozo had the opportunity
to attend her first Florida Blue Key tapping session late Friday
night. With minor name changes to protect both innocent and
guilty, this column is her front line report.)
*\
Darkness hung heavy as the sounds of little scratchings stole over
the land to the waiting ears of the invaders.
Hidden behind a veil of University Golf Club shrubbery, figures
could be seen moving -- sometimes slinking, sometimes boldly
crossing the faint light shining from within.
This was IT the holiest of most holy -- the Florida Intrepid
Night Keepers (FINK) yearly pajama party.
A fuzzy-lipped, red-haired image recorder stepped briskly to the
front door. He stepped briskly through the hall. He stepped briskly
into the back room and leaned briskly against the wall.
Somehow, his moustache, jeans and boots had escaped detection.
Business within continued as FINK members tenderized the bottoms
of their fists on nearby table tops.
But luck was not with the gallant image recorder. His unbuttoned
collar gave him away and soon the closely knit FINK membership
took it upon themselves to explain why OUTSIDERS could not be
present at sacred pajama parties.
The fuzzy-lipped, red-haired image recorder was amenable to the
gently put suggestions. He left the sacredhutand returned to the other
waiting invaders his mission of initial reconnaissance was suc successfully
cessfully successfully completed.
The time had come for the major infiltrator to embark upon the
dangers of battle. She, too, stepped briskly through the door, down the
quiet hall and into the smokey backroom interior. But lacking the
disguise of moustache, boots and jeans, her presence was sensed
almost at once by the hard-at-work FINK membership.
FINK members took this invasion calmly.
You cant. This cant be done.
NO, NO, NO, NO, NO, came the well-put, carefully thought replies
of the closely knit brothers.
Faces glistened as various members softly pointed out again that it
is just UN-CAMP for outsiders to sit in on FINK pajama party pro proceedings.
ceedings. proceedings.
They pointed it out in the smokey backroom interior.
They pointed it out down the quiet hallway.
They pointed it out by the dimly lit doorway.
The fearless infiltrator felt vaguely out of place standing at the
exact center of a circle of 40 closely knit brothers (give or take a
knit).
One member reflected thoughtfully and hit on a momentous decision.
We must find the leader of this all, he opined softly.
The leader Yes, the leader of the invaders (who doubles during
the day as mild mannered bespectacled head of the community mind mindspeak
speak mindspeak joyfully known to all as The Crocodile).
Fearless invader tried a diversionary tactic. She agreed to take
leave of the holy proceedings in exchange for her safe passage off
the porch steps.
The always gallant brotherhood decided to insure-her passage
not only off the porch steps, but down the pebbled lane of the parking
lot and up to the very door of her waiting vehicle.
This was unfortunate, for adorning the interior of her waiting vehicle
were the fuzzy-lipped, red-haired image recorder and the mild manner mannered
ed mannered Crocodile leader of double identity.
But these two took it well when the closely knit FINK brother came
knocking at the vehicle door.
Feeling the FINK brother might be wearied from the nights pro proceedings,
ceedings, proceedings, the vehicle passengers offered him a seat.
He declined the generous offer, deposited the fearless invader and
returned to his waiting membership.
But all was not lost for the invading party.
As luck would have it, a major campus leader (veteran head of
Unbirthday Party) decided this night was the time to put in his mem membership
bership membership application for the illustrious FINK brotherhood.
The major campus leader strode briskly (always briskly) through
the door, down the hallway, and into the still smokey back room
The FINK membership arose as one and acknowledged his presence
with a call to the local keepers of the peace (KOP).
Demonstrating their close-knit qualities, the FINK brothers sur surrounded
rounded surrounded the major campus leader and requested that he delay his
departure for a while. It was then cheerfully suggested that he visit
with the local KOP. This he did with equal cheeriness.
Latest news brings the word that despite brief interruptions the
FINK members did complete their party proceedings successfully
The major campus leader kept his visit with KOP to the barest mini
mum. And the invading group, feeling misunderstood by the world"
has promised to repent until next year.

When my students asked me to say a few words
at the campus teach-in on Viet Nam I had no pre previous
vious previous intention of mentioning the subject of beards.
I boned up on the history of China and Viet Nam
and on how we got involved in this war back in the
fifties.
But after hearing the first speaker give a long
account of his extraordinary activities in the Negro
freedom movement, and tell of his hunger strike
in the Albany jail, I began to realize that this was
a sort of personal-testimonial affair like an old oldfashioned
fashioned oldfashioned religious revival, or a meeting of Al Alcoholics
coholics Alcoholics Anonymous, where sinners are called to
testify to the power of the Holy Spirit. It was a
beautiful afternoon and nobody was in a mood for
complicated history.
So I threw away the notes I had worked on so hard
and I dredged up that bit about my grandmother and
my mother working hard with the other churchwomen
of Mississippi to put a stop tb the Negro lynchings
that used to occur by the hundreds in the twenties
and thirties. This was a true story, but not some something
thing something I could personally claim, having never stopped
a lynch mob or gone hungry in a jail because of my
religious beliefs.
I did use the church women of Mississippi (who
finally brought enough social stigma to bear on
sheriffs and jailers to make them give better pro protection
tection protection from lynch mobs to their prisoners as an
example that not all the people of the South had
condoned all the terrible things happening to Ne Negroes
groes Negroes in the past. Yet very few had come out pub publicly
licly publicly against these evils.
The condoning of cruelty and violence is undoubt undoubtedly
edly undoubtedly a social disease of our times and one that
seems to be growing in its evil effects as our lives
become more anonymous and hurried in industrial
society. The killing of millions of Jews by the Nazis
was only a spectacular example of the fact that most
middle-class respectable people do not bother to
become aware of large-scale social evils, or, if
aware, feel they are powerless to do anything to
stop them.
Somewhere along the way I got sidetracked for a
moment on the subject of beards and I hereby apo apologize
logize apologize to all the beards in the crowd. Beards are
pretty irrelevant in comparison with war and re revolution,
volution, revolution, hunger, disease and death.
All I said was that if I became convinced that I
could better influence the middle class people (who
run our country) for the cause of peace without a
beard than with one, I would not hesitate to sacrifice
my beard. Yet, being a woman, perhaps I just can't
quite understand how some men feel about their
beards.
I can account for my impulsive remark only by
the remembrance of a large beard since gone from
the face of my sophomore son, now safely past the
age of 26, safely educated, safely married, and on
the verge of getting his Ph.D. at Stanford University.
Soon after his father died quite suddenly, he in insisted
sisted insisted on sprouting a beard. I was struggling to
hold down my first teaching job, finish bringing up
the family, and nurse an invalid grandmother with
terminal cancer. The beard was the last straw.
It made my middle son look like a handsome bri brigand.
gand. brigand. His grandmother, his little brother and I all
felt suddenly stigmatized.
Sometimes I wonder whether the ascetics dont
have an innter security that the elegant young snobs
do not have. Certainly they cost their parents far
less money. They identify themselves with the poor
and oppressed, live with them in the slums, and go
around looking like Jesus Christ in tight jeans.
Fortunately, both types of extravagances tend to wane
as young males reach their middle twenties, become
involved in their families and hard work.
Toward the end of his senior year in college my
eldest son began to recover his sense of proportion.
He gave up all his old sports cars and returned
happily to a stripped-down bike -- but not before
he almost wrecked the family finances on his last
sports car, a snakey old black Jaguar with Vic Victorian
torian Victorian rosepoint upholstery especially installed for
him at some expense. It drank up enormous quan quantities
tities quantities of expensive Amoco gas and we finally dis discovered
covered discovered that its gas tank was riddled with tiny, in invisible
visible invisible pin holes. This son is now a member of a
firm of economic consultants in Manhattan and lec lectures
tures lectures me about proper budgeting.
In the late 1950 s there were only a few perceptive
students who were sensitive to the hollowness oi
American materialism and who rejected it in their
daily lives. Today there are thousands of them and
their numbers seem to swell.
I can now look back with fond indulgence on m>
middle son who wore his beard with a swagger, acted
in campus plays, and sang folk songs so movingly
with his guitar. He never cost a fraction of what his
two brothers have cost. Last summer he received
a grant from the National Science Foundation to live
with his wife in a tiny Indian village in order to study
Indian food culture. Feeling free as they do of an
dependence upon American luxuries and con conveniences,
veniences, conveniences, they are able to live happily at the village
level, without a refrigerator or plumbing, without
meat, working long hours outdoors in a climate
now in its hot season in southern India.
His beard, you see, never hurt him one bit, though
I worried about it at the time. Maybe it served a
very good purpose in untying him from his
apron strings at a time when he very much neede ;
to become a man on his own.
Emily Maclachlan



In the bar with me sat Homer who had
had the vision and was telling of it itl
l itl was just walking along, says Homer
serenely, when all of a sudden it hits me,
right in the Plaza of the Americas, or at
least, where it used to be, that all it is is
heads I mean that everyone else is just
a head walking around. You know what I
mean? That everything else is there for
the head.
So what happened then? say I, in inquisitive.
quisitive. inquisitive.
Well, says Homer, blowing the foam
out of the glass into my eye, it suddenly
occurs to me how useless it all is. You
Jsnow -- how futile. I mean, it might be
different if it was more than heads, but
if its just that, whats the sense in it?
You know what I mean?
Home, say I, good-naturedly, I think
youve got a sex hang-up.
Homer laughs. Criminy, Corseri! How
can you make love when its just heads?
Im unruffled by all this. Homer, say
I smiling, since I dont even exist, Im
going to leave you now to the contemplation
of your own sweet head. When the bill
comes, you can say that it doesnt exist.
And when they throw you in the nut house,
you can say that, too, doesnt exist. I

I LOVE killing
Editor:
Re: Col. Boaz and the Viet Nam debate
First of all, the sky is falling. This is apparent
to anyone except Communists and their dupes,
like that Rhode Island Red, Henny-Penny. The
Maroon Elbow is behind many a bush in this great
and good land, this bastion of democracy. I love
peace, do you hear? I LOVE it -- but I love killing
more. Only a Red would see anything inconsistent
in that.
I also think all these freedom groups must
be a bunch of nuts or Commie-lovers or something
like that, as they say in Starke. Who ever heard
of such a thing? -- free speech! What would Patrick
Henry (after whom I have modeled myself, inci incidentally)
dentally) incidentally) think?
The whole question of free speech and the other
matter of war in Viet Nam boil down, in essence,
as I see it -- and I am eminently qualified to com comment,
ment, comment, having been a civilian before going into the
service (come to think of it, who hasnt been?) and
having travelled widely in occupied Tuscaloosa
boil down, I say, to a question of beards, Al Capps
opinion and Mrs. OLearys cow.
The matter is one of patriotism and light, and
no rest for the wicked. A strong America is a free
America, I say, and my country, right or wrong!
What this country needs is a good five-cent witch witchhunting
hunting witchhunting kit. Speak softly and carry a big load of
napalm for those shifty oriental women and children!
We will defend to the death our right to determine
your right to say what you will!
. And Ill soon give you ten thousand
more ... Death to the infidel LBJ wills
it! And finally, for all you treacherous pinks and
leftists out there, Remember The Maine! is our
cry, we will fight on; in our hearts we know were
right. Hang all those who object! Theyre double doubleplus
plus doubleplus ungood in our red-white-and-blue book. So there!
Lt. Col. America
speaking for all true Americans
LOOK
fOl OUR THREE MY
BOOK SALE?'!!
s?o{jsokh> Vi
fe f)
coming mi
sooti! - J *-
i'

GARY CORSERIS

tip my non-existent hat. Adieu, Homer!
It was fun ...
In front of the library I espy an alien
form approaching me in darkness. When
the form is closer I nod to it and it asks
me for a light.
Dont smoke, say I.
No matter, says the form, and snap snapping
ping snapping its fingers it makes a little flame
grow out of its fingers and lights a cigar cigarette.
ette. cigarette.
I figure something is up. and I wait for
the form to begin.
My name is God, says the form.
You been looking for me?
No, I explain, I just wanted to see
if there was any bananas left.
Come, come now, says God. You
mean you havent sought me out just a
little?
No. Honest, Sir, I was just a little
hungry, you see, and even if Homer says
its all heads, my stomach started to growl,
and I just thought . .
You thought youd steal some ba bananas?
nanas? bananas?
Well, not exactly steal. You see . .
Do you know its against the law to
steal?
Well, yes, I know, youd do me a great

I need
help
x Editor:
x (In answer to D. L. Buck
j: : Letter, March 24.) >j:
X Buck: In reference to your :£
questions . .being a student
£ I u'ould like to know . X;
x single-spaced or double- v
* spaced? . one side of x
:x paper? ... 25 words or less X;
x -- or what? Can you be more :|:j
x pacific (sic)? £
: Fladimer X X:
: X: lUC §

1 Spacious,
FI
Lu x ui-i us
I V
* -* \ >
jlm
Reserve Your Apartment Now For September.
IlllllllJWWlill
FOR INFORMATION, CALL 376-6720

favor if you just kept it quiet, between
ourselves. I mean I dont want to make up
hours and all.
God frowns. Dont you have any idea
at all who I am?
Why sure, say I. brightly. Youre
a head. Or rather, Im ahead.lm not sure
how it goes. Youll have to ask Homer. .
You know if I wanted to I could make you
disappear. Youre just a figment!
Suddenly, the sky exploded in a multi multitude
tude multitude of stars .
+ *
The first thing 1 did upon w-aking was
look for a newspaper to find out what Id
missed. The newspaper was The Hades
Gazette. The headline was: Corseri
Arrives!
Hello, old boy, a voice says behind
me.
Hows tricks? say I, turning around,
facing some red guy with a tail.
Weve been expecting you, says the
Red Guy.
Would you mind telling me how I got
here?
You were sent Special Delivery, he
says, winking.
Im flattered, say I. But all I want

Cutouts

~ STEAK NIGHT
VY Monday, 5 to 9 p.m.
JgWf 12 oz. CHOICE
BMa T-BONE
Steak Served With French
2310 S.W. 13th St. Fries, Cole Slaw, Hot Rolls
and Butter.
1505 N.W. 13th St. Q^iy

Monday, March 28, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

is a banana to quell my hungry maw.
The Red Guy leads me to a pool filled
with cold beer. I lean down to drink it up
and- it recedes. The Red Guy laughs. Again
I bend down, and again the beer recedes,
si What the hell! say I, perturbed.
This is only the beginning, The Red
Guy says. Imagine, killing your hungry
Maw. Why, I remember my Maw gentle,
sweet . . and he starts telling me all
about her, bawling like a baby.
While the Red Guy is thus preoccupied,
I hop altoard a boat setting out upon a
river. The Captain says Ive got to get off,
that nobody can leave Hades, only go to it.
I tell him Im Corseri and I want out.
He says hes read my stuff in the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator and that I dont deserve to be in
Hell. He says Chaos is too good for me.
Thats kind of you, say I, always
amiable.
* *
In the bar, Im eating a banana and
Homers talking about visions again.
It suddenly occurred to me, says
Homer, right in the Plaza of the Amer Amercas,
cas, Amercas, or where it used to lie, about God.
I mean, what He must tie like.
I order Homer a beer and he explains
it all to me.

Page 5



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

wanted |
WANTED: College student or
working girl to share private home.
Ph. 372-3770 after 5 p.m. (C-122-
st-c).
FEMALE STUDENT DRIVING
through California, Oregon, and
Washington, needs two other girls
to drive and pay expenses. Leave
around Ist of May. Call 378-1026.
(C-122-3t-c).
MATURE FEMALE ROOMMATE
to share 2 bedroom apt. at Coy
Thomas or Frederick Apts. A/C,
pool, call Linda, 378-2487. (C (C---122-3t-c).
--122-3t-c). (C---122-3t-c).
NEED 3 FEMALE ROOMMATES
to share high-rise apt. for sum summer
mer summer trimester. Special rate for
summer. Call 378-1406. (C-122-
3t-c).
NEED SUMMER EMPLOYMENT?
Counsellors wranglers wanted
for large Eastern Boys* Ranch.
Horsemanship required. Work with
boys age 8-16. For more informa information,
tion, information, 378-4940 during week. (C (C---117-10t-c).
--117-10t-c). (C---117-10t-c).
WANTED: Two riders to Washing Washington,
ton, Washington, D.C. Leaving April 17th, re returning
turning returning on April 24th. $17.50 each
way. 1965 Mercury. Call 372-3974.
(C-121-st-nc).
COMPATIBLE FEMALE ROOM ROOMMATES
MATES ROOMMATES needed for Fall Trimester.
Village Park Apts. Please contact
Mary, 372-9417. (C-120-3t-p).
ROOM FOR RENT IN PRIVATE
HOME for mature male student
for Spring Trimester. Separate
entrance, linen and maid service.
376-5360. (C-121-ts-c).
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share 1 bedroom furnished apt.
S4O a month, phone 376-8569. (C (C---119-st-c).
--119-st-c). (C---119-st-c).
WANTED. One $3 ticket for Lower
East Stands for the Bod Hope Show.
Will buy or exchange for a $4
Lower East Stands. Ph. 376-3261,
ext. 2832. Ask for Donna. (C-121-
tf-nc).
lost found
LOST REWARD. ES-404 Text
(Public Policies Toward Business).
Return to J. F. Rice, 147 Fletcher
J. I AM DESPERATE. (L-122-
lt-p).
LOST Pair of dark rimmed pre prescription
scription prescription glasses. Reward. Contact
Mike Ruddleston, 372-9326. (L (L---121-2tr-c).
--121-2tr-c). (L---121-2tr-c).
services
NOW OPENING. Teddy Bear
Nursery. 3 departments, com completed
pleted completed infant dept. Planned
program for children over 3.
Central heating and air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Ph. 376-0917. 1214-1/2
NW 4th St. (M-116-ts-c),
QUICK EFFICIENT TYPING at
reasonable rates. Contact 378-
4066. (M-121-3t-c).
| for rent
1 BEDROOM Furnished Apt. $65
per month. Married couples only.
Available immediately. Call 378-
4798. (B-116-ts-c).
CHOICE ONE BEDROOM furnish furnished
ed furnished apt. A/C, availably April 25th.
Horne's Apts. Ph. 372-2436. (B (B---121-ts-c).
--121-ts-c). (B---121-ts-c).
AVAILABLE SPRING Trimester.
1 bedroom studio apt. Suitable for
2 or 3. 3 blocks from campus,
a/c washer. Low summer rates.
1824 NW 3rd Place, Apt. 23. Call
378-3104. (B-120-st-c).

| for rent
Available SPRING TRIMESTER.
Large 2 bedroom, furnished apt.
Pool, air conditioned, usually
$l4O/mo., will lease for $l3O/mo.
376-2916. (B-122-3t-p).
AVAILABLE NOW, one bedroom
furnished apt. Perfect for summer
student, a/c, 3 blocks from
campus, S9O monthly. Call 376-
9842. (B-122-ts-c).
VILLAGE 34, SECOND EDITION.
Located near Univ. Golf Course.
328 SW 34th St. 24 new 1 bedroom
apt. units, furnished and air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Available April Ist* Rent
SIOO per month. See Resident Man Managers
agers Managers Apt. on premises after 5
p.m. Lou Schilling, apt. 10. Man Managed
aged Managed Ernest Tew Realty Inc. 376-
6461. (B-108-ts-c).
APT. TO SUBLET for summer
A-B term. Suitable for 2 people.
Close to campus, $95 per month.
A/C. Call 378-1558. (B-122-lt-c).
UNUSUALLY NICE furnished room
in private home. Central heat and
A/C. Call 372-7943. (B-122-ts-c).
APT. FOR RENT, 2 bedroom; all
electric; air conditioned; pool;
near campus. Spring Term. 372-
7157. (B-122-3t-p).
MODERN ONE BEDROOM APT.,
2 or 3 people. 3 blocks from cam campus,
pus, campus, furnished, including washing
machine. A/C. Call 378-1530. (B (B---121-ts-c).
--121-ts-c). (B---121-ts-c).
SUMMER STUDENT. Apt. for Sum Summer
mer Summer term in Colonial Manor. slls
per month, pool. Call 378-4848
weekdays after 4 p.m. (B-121-
3t-c).
THREE BEDROOM Stone House,
1319 NW 3rd Ave. sllO a month.
Call in evenings, 376-8421. (B (B---121-3t-c).
--121-3t-c). (B---121-3t-c).
FURNISHED APT. for rent, avail available
able available April Ist. Can accomodate
3 or 4 students, $lO5 monthly, 219
NW 3rd Ave. Call 372-5746. (B (B---121-st-c).
--121-st-c). (B---121-st-c).
AIR CONDITIONED APTS. For
Summer. Suitable for 2 or 3, $l3O $l3O-for
-for $l3O-for A or B Term. Suitable
for 3 or 4, SIBO per Term. Call
376-8990, 8 a.m. 5 p.m., or 7 p.m.
- 10 p.m. Also renting for fall.
(B-115-ts-c).
AIR CONDITIONED one bedroom
apt. One block from campus.
Available for Spring Trimester.
Rent sllO. Call 376-2969. (B (B---121-2t-p).
--121-2t-p). (B---121-2t-p).
AVAILABLE MAY Ist. 1 apt. for
4 students, 2 blocks from campus.
Air conditioners, $l2O per student
for summer semester. 1918 NW
Ist Ave. Call 372-3572. (B-117-
lOt-c).
AIR CONDITIONED HOUSES AND
APTS. Now leasing for Summer
and/or Fall. 3 or 4 students, male
or female. Call Charlie Mayo,
Town and Country Realty, 376-
4664 anytime. (B-114-ts-c).
AVAILABLE MAY Ist. 1 bedroom
modern a/c apt. Furnished, pool
privileges. 4 mins, to campus.
Call 378-1579. (B-120-st-c).
FURNISHED APTS. Two bedroom
furnished apts. Available end of
April. Special low summer rates.
Right near campus. Suitable for
up to 4 students. Call Mrs. Jones,
376-5636. (B-120-tf-c^.
CONVENIENT air conditioned 2
bedroom apt. Swimming pool, TV,
stereo, wall-to-wall carpeting.
Need 2 male roommates for A & B
terms. Call 376-1345. (B-119-
st-c).
Ttrtwul UW
(Up rentals
lutnrrjaiig

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Marcn 28, 1966

Page 6

for sale
1963 A-H MARK 11. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. No reasonable offer refused.
See at 306 NE 6th St. Call 376-
9991 after 7; before 7, 372-2528.
(A-122-st-c).
TRAILER, 50 x 10\ 2 BR, fur furnished
nished furnished kitchen, washing machine,
A/C, 1 bedroom now with built-in
desk and shelves. Sell to best offer.
378-2776 after 6. (A-122-st-p).
"
1956 GENERAL TRAILER. 27x8
with 25x8 cabana and awnfhgs.
Very good condition. A real bar bargain
gain bargain for $950. Archer Road Village,
lot: Beta 10. (A-122-st-p).
NEW PUBLISHED 2 Vol. Set. Web Websters
sters Websters 20th Century Dictionary.
Brand new, still in box. Coat
$42.50. S3O firm. 378-3197. (A (A---122-st-c).
--122-st-c). (A---122-st-c).
RCA PORTABLE STEREO. Plays
well, good for college student. $25.
Call Kay, 372-5784 before 12 a.m.
or after 5 p.m. (A-122-3t-p).
i ! I
4 TIRES. 8.55 x 14. Only 8,000
miles. Like new. sl6 each. Call
W. S. Harrison, ext. 2673. (A (A---121-3t-c).
--121-3t-c). (A---121-3t-c).
1962 TRIUMPH 650 cc. Excellent
condition, fast, reliable, good en engine,
gine, engine, tires, upholstery. $525. Call
378-2125. (A-121-st-c),
SPRING WARDROBE -- Sizes 8,
9, 10. Sportswear and cocktail
dresses. Specials on a 3-piece
Kimberley suit; Jeune Liegue
dress and White Stage bermudas.
376-5616. (A-121-ts-c).
1965 YAMAHA YDS-3, 250 cc, 27
H.D. Like new, $550 cash or fi financed
nanced financed if preferred. Call 372-
9745. (A-121-2t-p).
Ml II -I -I---34
--34 -I---34 x 8 TRAILER with 20 x 9
cabana. Good condition. Perfect
for married or single students.
$l,lOO. 12-B Archer Rd. Village.
Ph. 378-2126. (A-121-3t-c).
Must Sell FENDER GUITAR and
amplifier with 2-12s reverb and
tremolo Vega Banzo, 5-string
longneck. Jim Manderscheid. 376-
9140. (A-119-st-p).
500 cc BMW Motorcycle (1959),
privately imported, excellent con condition,
dition, condition, S7OO. TV aerial with 30
pole and cable (assembled), S3O.
Motorola Stereo portable record
player, 3 yrs. old, black and beige,
$75. Motorola TV, 21, 1964 han handsome
dsome handsome cabinet, remote control,
SIOO. 372-9708. (A-119-st-c).
STUDENTS ONLY. Brand new
Admiral Air Conditioners, un unredeemed
redeemed unredeemed on lay-away (all sizes).
Pick up payment with nothing down.
Sudden Service Fuel Oil Co., au authorized
thorized authorized Admiral Dealer. Ph. 376-
4404. (A-118-10t-c).
1964 BSA Lightning Rocket, 650 cc.
Excellent condition. Cash or trade.
$895. Call Dave Heney, 372-6938.
(A-108-ts-c).
f ill J iIJIHI
roiriT COLOR
TKRU THITR £ HITS
M SW EDWARDG ANN
McQUEEN ROBINSON margrel
KARL MALOEN TUESDAY WELD ,*< &§
. aUDTIW RM^OHOff PBOOUCTIOM
MET ROCOLOR O'
p
ELIZABETH TAYLOR Mplni
RICHARD BURTON TjFW
EVA MARIE SAINT

autos
FIAT 600, 1959 model. Reasonably
good condition. New tires, heater,
needs minor adjustment.sl2s.Call
372-2288 between 6-8 p.m. (G-120-
2t-c).
1959 VW. Radio and heater, runs
great. $595. Hiram, Rm. 4102.
376-9236. (G-122-3t-p).
1956 CHEVROLET, Belair, 4door,
V-8, $125. Contact Jim Holson Holsonback,
back, Holsonback, 376-8281 or 378-3786. (G (G---121-st-c).
--121-st-c). (G---121-st-c).
1962 VALIANT. Good condition, 4
new tires. See Bob McCollum at
McCollum Drugs, 1124 W. Univ.
Ave. (G-122-3t-c).
1963 VW 1200 or 1965 VW 1600,
phone 376-3261, ext. 2271. (G-120-
st-c).
1960 CORVAIR. Good condition
with radio. $357. Call between 4-7,
378-3092. (G-119-st-c).
1958 TR3. Wire wheels, luggage
rack, heater, top. Needs some
engine repairs. Will accept any
reasonable offer. Call 378-3254.
(G-119-st-p).
1959 AUSTIN-HEALEY Roadster.
Wire wheels, electric overdrive,
new metalic blue paint. $995. Ph.
378-2059. (G-120-3t-c).
ENGLISH FORD. 1958 in good con condition.
dition. condition. Recently overhauled. $l5O.
Contact TK, 376-3261, ext. 2805
from 1-5 p.m. (G-120-3t-p).
THE CENTER
1100 LUXURIOUSLY
ROCKING CHAIRS
WITH A FULL 42
OF LEG ROOM AT
YOUR NEW
CENTER
THEATRE.
i iicmi I j o j
I Natalie wood I
cHmstoPHer
piummer
IN A PAKULA MULLIGAN PRODUCTION
lessee
passu CLOver i

'
I a i
I! T, '.P*". 378-2434 | QJ
K^V^HfipVt
REPUI&ON

help wanted
PART-TIME HELP. Apply Tonys
Pizza. 1308 W. Univ. Ave.(E-122-
2t-c).
GRADUATE STUDENT COUPLE
to stay in faculty members home
Wed., March 30th Sun., April
3rd. Cook 2 meals daily for elder elderly
ly elderly father in return for board, room
use of private swimming pool and
$35 salary. Call 372-3086. (E (E---122-2t-c).
--122-2t-c). (E---122-2t-c).
WAITRESS WANTED: Must be 21.
Work 3 hr. lunch shift. Call Mrs.
Druash, 376-9913. (E-119-st-c).'
MAID WANTED One Day Per Week
to do ironing and house cleaning,
8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fridays. Good
pay, free lunch, no child care.
Ph. 376-9969 after 7 p.m. (E (E---119-tf-nc).
--119-tf-nc). (E---119-tf-nc).
FULLER BRUSH CO. needs stu student
dent student representative in Diamond
Village, Fla vet m and Schucht.
Can be worked in off hrs. with
average of $2.00 per hr. in earn earnings.
ings. earnings. Also need part or full time
help for other areas of Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. Write to H. Silver, 1028
Clearwater Dr., Daytona Beach,
Fla. (E-117-ts-c).
VKM,k^r
2 PRINTS FOR 1
COLOR & B&W
46 Hour P roc cuing For
KODACHROME & ECTACHROME
376-1258
dean Martin
'""Mi: a ?MATT HELM
Silencers
1:27-3:24
mmmdmmmm s:&i-7:i
2EQQI 9;15



Orchesis Show Goes Over Well

primitive stampers, led by
r inda Ford, who spent a year yearaxid-a-half
axid-a-half yearaxid-a-half in Rhodesia, climaxed
45-minute Orchesis performance
Saturday night in the University
Auditorium.
Stengali! A primitive South Af African
rican African demonstration of percussion
rhythm was the highlight of the
evening's performance.
The rumbling, frenzied beat of
the drums drove both audience and
performers to spellbound inten intensity.
sity. intensity.
A lyrical rendition of Try to

I TOMORROW THE PUBLIC I
MUST CHOOSE BUT...
MY OPPONENT REFUSES
TO DEBATE
ISSUES PUBLICLY
I How will my opponent I
I SOLVE THE CRISIS IN LOW-COST HOUSING? I
I EASE RACIAL TENSIONS? I
I DEAL WITH THE INCREASING PROBLEMS INVOLV- I
I ING JUVENILE EMPLOYMENT AND CRIME? I
I The WRIGHT PROGRAM includes I
I BUILD ATTRACTIVE LOW-COST HOUSING WITH I
I FEDERAL FUNDS I
I BUILD NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS AND PLAY- I
I GROUNDS AND PLAN FOR A COMMUNITY I
I ZOO I
I DEVELOP AN EFFICIENT, ECONOMICAL PUBLIC I
I TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM USING LOW-COST I
I MICRO-BUSES I
I ESTABLISH A DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RELATIONS I
I WITH AUTHORITY TO DEAL WITH RACIAL PROB- I
I ~ LEMS ; ~ _ I
I 0 ESTABLISH A JUVENILE SHELTER JOINTLY WITH I
I THE COUNTY I
I SET UP A NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH CORPS TO I
GIVE EMPLOYMENT AND JOB TRAINING
I OPPORTUNITIES FOR LOCAL YOUTH I
Elect The Man Who Has The Courage To Bring The Problems And
The Public. Take Part In The Live ONE-MAN FORUM Between 7:30-8:00 Tomghtl
Call Thomas A. Wright at WGGG (376-1230) I
VOTE TOMORROW FOR I
* * SB
THOMAS A. WRIGHT
t in

Alligator
Review

Remember gave the song new
feeling and expression. Sherril
Rutty sang the number while Joyce
Dorf danced the piece that she al-

so choreographed.
The most graceful performance
was Beth Lassards rendition of
Jeux sur la Plage by Mompou.
A five minute interpretation of
Eliots The Love Song of J. Al Alfred
fred Alfred Prufroek was choreographed
by Alice Bloch.
Jerry Rhode read the passage of
man in competition to his trivial
society while Miss Bloch and Sher Shern
n Shern Less led a group of six dancers
demonstrating the frustration of
Eliots words.

News On Campus

SuzAnn Hull, 20, became Miss Gainesville Saturday night, when
she outpointed 11 other area beauties in the Jaycees and Cham Chamber
ber Chamber of Commerce-sponsored event.
Miss Hull will represent Gainesville in the upcoming Miss
Florida contest this summer.
She is a member of Delta Delta Delta sorority.
* *
State Senator Charley E. Johns has formally announced as a
candidate for re-election to the Florida Senate in the May Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic primaries.
Johns is the former chairman of the Johns Committee of the
Florida Legislature that investigated homosexuality and other
areas in Floridas state universities.
* *
T. E. (Ted) Williams and Rev. Thomas A. Wright are runoff
candidates for Gainesville City Commission in the city election
Tuesday.
Some 8,000 voters are expected to cast their ballots, Mrs.
Alma Bethea, county registration supervisor, said.
* *
Dr. Marvin Koger, professor of animal science at the UF
College of Agriculture, lias been named Professor of the Year by
Alpha Zeta, honorary fraternity for students in agriculture.
Koger was honored at a banquet last week sponsored by the
fraternity.
*
Voter registration liooks for the May 3 Alachua County primary
election close at 5 p.m., April 2, Supervisor of Registration
Mrs. Alma Bethea said.
Mrs. Betheas downtown courthouse office will be open every
day until then from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, March 29, the
office will be open through 9 p.m.
* *
The recent Broadway hit, Take Her, Shes Mine will be pre presented
sented presented by Florida Players beginning April 1 for seven perfor performances.
mances. performances.
The opening night and April 8 shows will begin at 8 p.m., while
the other performances April 2,3, 6,7 and 9 are scheduled for
7:30 p.m. in Norman Hall Auditorium.
Tickets are now available at the Florida Union ticket office
and will be sold in Norman Hall prior to performances.
* *
The Department of Architecture will hold its annual awards
luncheon at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday in the student Service Center
on campus.
Achievement awards, including the American Institute of Ar Architects
chitects Architects Medal and the Florida Association of Architects Medal,
will be presented to students. Recipients of departmental honors
and scholarships will be announced at the luncheon.
Alfred B. Parker, Miami architect, will be the featured speaker.
Parker is a fellow of the American Institute of Architects and a
graduate of the University of Florida.
Winners of student competitions sponsored by the Solite Cor Corporation
poration Corporation and the DuPont Company also will be cited at the Lun Luncheon.
cheon. Luncheon.
* *
The fifth edition of Dr. George D. Spaches Good Reading
for Poor Readers has recently been published by Garrard Pub Publishing
lishing Publishing Company, Champaign, 111.
This resource book offers an extensive list of all types of
learning materials for slow readers of all ages. It is expected to
have wide use in federal* projects for poor readers and educa educationally
tionally educationally disadvantaged children throughout the nation.
Dr. Spache is director of the UF Reading Laboratory and Clinic,
a unit of the College of Education.

Twelve new members of Florida
Blue Key were tapped in Friday

HILLEL
FOUNDATION
PASSOVER SEDERS
April 4 and 5
Call Hillel Foundation
For Information
And Reservations
2-2900

r -., 1 . ") ' .
SPECIAL! MONDAY & TUESDAY ONLY!
Rep. sl.lO Box Dinner
COMPLETE DINNER IN-^^
CLUDES 3 pieces of
Chicken, French Fries, |pr *, *.
Slaw or Grnvy ond Polls'sL-jg
NO SUBSTITUTIONS.
CO, sa^S available at
Kntwki| fHed C\k ken
214 N.W. 13th St. 207 N.E. 16th Ave.
Phone 376 6472 Phone 378-2959

Monday, March 28, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

BLUE KEY TAPS 12

night ceremonies.
The new members are Skip Ha Haviser,
viser, Haviser, Bill McCormick, Bill
Mcride, Eric Smith, Bill Slippy,
Steve Gardner, Dan Carlton, Harry
Meshaw, Dennis McGillicuddy,
Jake Dyal, John Hume and Gene
Brown.
Eight honorary tappees named
were Dr. Herbert Kaufman, pro professor
fessor professor of surgery; Assistant Dean
of Men Bill Cross; Dr. Frederick
H. Hartmann, professor of poli political
tical political science; James Wilson, past
president of the UF Alumni Asso Association;
ciation; Association; State Sen. Ed Price; Har Harvey
vey Harvey Pierce; Dr. Tony J. Cunha of
the College of Agriculture; and
Head Football Coach Ray Graves.

Page 7



Ihe Orange

Campus Calendar
PLEASE TURN IN ALL ITEMS FOR CAMPUS CALENDAR TO THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS OFFICE, FLA. UNION

REAL ESTATE SOCIETY: Today, 7;30 p.m., FU
212. This will be an important meeting. Elections for
fall officers will be held.
NAVY RECRUITING: Today, 9 a.m. 5 p.m., FU 123.
S.A.H.P.E.R.: Today, 7:30 p.m., 216, Fla.Gym.Mr.
Floyd Lay: Trends in Florida Athletics. Refresh Refreshments.
ments. Refreshments.
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF AERONAUTICS AND
ASTRONAUTICS: Today, 7:30 p.m., 328 Eng. Bldg.
Film: Gemini 6 & 7 Rendezvous.
NAVY RECRUITING: ~Tues., Mar. 29, 9 a.m.
5 p.m., FU 123.
SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB: Tues., Mar. 29,
8 p.m., FU Johnson Lounge. Program.

Administrative Notices To Students, Faculty Sc Staff

STUDENTS
JUNIOR COLLEGE PLACEMENT DAY: Interviews
with representatives of 21 junior colleges in Florida
and out of state will be held Friday, April 1, for
teaching positions next fall. Students with master's
degrees may schedule interviews in Room 100, Nor Norman
man Norman Hall. Interviews will be held from 8:30 a.m.
noon and 1-4 p.m. Several hundred teaching positions
are available, with the demand particularly high in
science, mathematics and administration.
APRIL DEGREE GRADUATES: There will be a
meeting of all students currently enrolled as candi candidates
dates candidates for degrees at the April 24 commencement on
Tuesday, March 29, at 4 p.m. in University Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium. Instructions for the commencement ceremony
will be given at this meeting.
JOBS AVAILABLE NOW: The Student Employment
Office announced that there are many part-time jobs
pow available. The jobs will continue through the
spring trimester. These jobs are part of the Work-
Study program and are limited to students whose
parents are in the low-income group. For informa information,
tion, information, contact the Student Employment Office, 124
Tigert. Students are needed to begin work immedi immediately.
ately. immediately.
ID PHOTO APPOINTMENTS END: Thursday, March
31, is the last day identification card photographs will
be made for students who have received notification
during the winter trimester. Only those students who
have received notification of appointments should re report

General Notices

RESIDENCE FOR RENT: The University golf course
residence will be available for rental on June 1, 1960.
This is a two bedroom, one bath home; two rooms are
air conditioned. Call Perry C. Moore, 2131, for an
appointment. Rent, SIOO per month.
808 HOPE SHOW: Tickets are still available for
the April 2 Bob Hope Show and are on sale at Florida

CASH
CONSOLIDATE BILLS
TRAVEL EXPENCE
525 S6OC
Marion Finance Company Inc.
222 W. University Ave.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL: Tues., Mar. 29, 8 p.m.,
FU Aud.
GATOR WATER SKI CLUB: Tues., Mar. 29, 7 : 30
p.m., Basement of Gym. Movie: Florida Number One
at the Fair.
JOHN JACOB NILES: Tues., Mar. 29, 8:15 p.m.,
Univ. Aud. Sponsored by Lyceum Council. Ticket
sales: Today and Tues., Noon to 4:30 p.m., FU Box
Office.
FILM CLASSICS: Tues., Mar. 29, 8;15 p.m., MSB
Aud. Beauty and the Beast.
MENSA: Wed., Mar. 30, 7 p.m., Reserved Section,
Main Cafeteria. Dr. Fink: Intelligence and Problem
Definition.
YOUNG DEMOCRATS: Wed., Mar. 30, 7:30 p.m.,
FU 208. Election of Officers.

port report for photographs at this time. These students will
have to pay a $5 penalty fee if they miss having the
identification photo made. Other students will receive
appointment notices during May or September.
NATIONAL DEFENSE LOAN INTERVIEWS: Inter Interviews
views Interviews to determine eligibility and amount to be granted
for National Defense loans in the academic year be beginning
ginning beginning September, 1966, will be held through April
7 according to the following alphabetical schedule.
Applicants will report to 124 Tigert Hall for inter interviews.
views. interviews. Persons whose last names begin with: ( M )
on March 28; ( N O ) on March 29; ( P ) on
March 30; ( Q R ) on March 31; ( S ) on April
4; (T-U-V)on April 5; ( W ) on April 6;
(X-YrZ)on April 7.
FULBRIGHT-HAYS AWARDS: Announcement of Ful Fulbright-Hays
bright-Hays Fulbright-Hays awards for faculty members for research
and lecturing in Europe, Africa, the Near East, South
and East Asia, the Pacific, the Far East and Latin
America during the 1967-68 academic year are now
available for reference at the office of Faculty Ful Fuljjright
jjright Fuljjright Adviser Col. G. A. Farris,-International Cen Center,
ter, Center, Bldg. AE. Col. Farris does not distribute the
application forms, which are supplied to individuals
by the Committee on International Exchange of Per Persons,
sons, Persons, 2101 Constitution Ave. N.W., Washington, D. C.
On request the committee also will provide separate
lists of awards in American studies, anthropology,
area studies, biochemistry, biology and agriculture,
business administration, chemistry, earth sciences,
economics, education, engineering, home economics,
law, mass communications, mathematics, medical
sciences, physics, political science, psychology', social

Union, Belk-Lindsey and the Record Bar.
ROTC GRADUATE REVIEW: The annual ROTC
Graduate Review will be Saturday, April 2, at 10:30
a.m. on the upper drill field. Reviewing officer will
be Maj. Gen. Robert P. Hollis. The public is invited
to review the combined units of the Air Force and
Army ROTC along with the Angel Flight, Army Sweet Sweethearts,

TAXES DUE

and

BLUE BULLETIN

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 28, 1966

Page 8

ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE,
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE.

FLORIDA PLAYERS: Thurs., Mar. 31, 7:30 p.m.;
Fri., Apr. 1, 8:00 p.m.; Sat., Apr. 2, 8:00 p.m.; Nor Norman
man Norman Hall Aud. Ticket Sales: Today & Tues., noon to
4:30 p.m., FU Box Office. Production -- Take Her,
Shes Mine.
PROPELLER CLUB: Thurs., Mar. 31, 7:30 p.m.,
FU 324. Program by Jacksonville Propeller Club.
JAMAICA TOUR: Apr. 23-29. 2nd Annual Fla. Union
Trip. 7 days -- $165.00. $30.00 deposit by Mar. 31,
FU 315. Sign up as soon as possible.
EUROPEAN TOUR: June 21 August 15.8 weeks
$310.00. $125.00 deposit, FU 315. Sign up as soon as
possible.
SOCIETY OF AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERS: Today,
7:30 p.m., 512 Eng. Bldg. Movie: A Man With A
Thousand Hands. Refreshments.

work and sociology. Deadline for research awards is
June 1, while persons interested in lectureships should
apply before May 1 if possible.
FACULTY AND STAFF
IMPORTANT REMINDER: The Personnel Division
reminds all faculty and staff members AND THEIR
DEPENDENTS who reached age 65before Jan. 1, 1966,
to sign up for Medicare before March 31 in order to
receive this coverage. You will not be able to keep
your present Blue Cross-Blue Shield and/or Gulf
Medical coverage after July, 1966, if you are eligible
for Medicare, even if you dont sign up for Medicare.
This includes all people over 65 whether they are
employees, retired, or are dependents of employes.
Contact the Social Security Office immediately if you
have not done so.
APPLY FOR SUMMER EMPLOYEES: The Central
Employment Center is receiving applications from
students seeking summer employment. All depart departments
ments departments interested in employing student workers during
the summer months should send in their requisition
as soon as possible.
'
REFRIGERATORS AVAILABLE: Property Records
has 26 G. E. refrigerators that may be obtained for
us by operational departments at a cost of $lO each.
Contact Property Records Department, Ext. 2994.

hearts, Sweethearts, Gator Raiders, Gator Guard, Gator Sabres
and the Billy Mitchell Drill Team.
UNIFORMS FOR RESALE: The Military Department
will resell Air Force khaki uniforms on April 4. Items
include short sleeve shirts at $1 each; trousers,
$1.50 a pair; and low quarter black shoes at $3 per
pair, sizes 9-12.

LOANS
Short till payday
BUYING SECOND CAR
525-S6OO
M moii J in iium j Company Inc.
iris r,



UF Education Students To Speak In Ocala

Six students from the UFs Col Col,ge
,ge Col,ge 0 f Education will conduct a
Family Communication panel
iscussion at the Ocala High School
TA meeting Monday night.
Bob Gallup, Bill Watson, Susan
artley, Vince Rice, Diana Black Blackr
r Blackr and Sam Deitz, seniors in se senary
nary senary education, will explain to
arents and teachers what bothers
>en-age students most in their
ihool, social and family lives.
Five topics have been chosen for

m f L SKA .. , NORTH CAROLINA I
I t n^n^ e a i C^ ey o Je r ry , Fayetteville: Hatcher s Jewelers fl
fl Fairbanks. Ralph IV. Perdue, Jeweler Gastonia Morns Jewelers I
S aiabama Goldsboro: Garris Jewelers fl
S A _ Greensboro: Schiffman Jewelry Co B
fl Anniston. Couch s Jewelry Co. Hendersonville: Gordon's Jewelers
B Auburn: Ware Jewelers H.ckory: The Bisanar Company fl
S Birmingham: Bromberg s High Point: Perkinson's Jewelry Co.
B Birmingham: Bromberg's (Mt. Brook) Jacksonville: Walton's Jewelers
fl Decatu r. Diamond Jewelry Co. Kings Mountain: Dellinger's Jewel Shop.lnc
fl Johnston St. A Gateway Shopping Center Lmcolnton: Rankin's Jewelers fl^
fl Florence: Rogers Fine Jlry Dept. Lumberton : A. J. Holmes, Jeweler fl
fl Fort Payne: Martin's Jewelers Morganto n : Gregory Jewelers fl
X Gadsden: C. F. Hoffman A Sons, Inc. Raleigh: Johnson's Jewelers
fl Huntsville: Bromberg's *' Raleigh : Jolly's Jewelers-2 Stores fl
fl Mobile: Claude Moore, Jeweler ) Reidsville: Mace's JewelryGifts fl
Montgomery: Bromberg's s' J Rocky Mount: Gehman's Jewelry Store fli
fl Opelika: La Mont Jewelers M Salisbury Bishop C. Leonard, Jewelers flj
fl Talladega: Griffin's Jewelry S'S f Sanford: Wagoner's Jewelers fl
fl Talladega: Raffs Jewelers Southern Pines: Perkinson's Inc. fl
fl / f f Wilson -.Churchwell's Inc. fl
fl ARKANSAS / M y? ' Winston-Salem: McPhails Inc. fl
fl Camden: Stinson's Jewelers ( / Sr S/S'/ fy fl
fl Crossett: Elliott's Jewelers f Sy OHIO fl
fl El Dorado: Elliott's Jewelers sSf Cincinnati: Herschede Jewelers-4 Stores fl
B Fayetteville: 1 Underwood's College Jlrs. s') _... urt u |
fl Jonesboro: Purvis Jewelers J ... . OKLAHOMA H
M I Bartlesville: Joseph Derryberry Jewelers H
FLORIDA / Durant: Gem Credit Jewelers
Clearwater: Trickels Jewelers / //< ln\d-Morgan's Diamond Shop fl
fl Cocoa-Rockledge: Lawton A Co. Jewelers >7 m' I'B
fl Daytona Beach: Wm. A. Ritzi A Sons f J /zi nktahnm* r 'rr'it i / I'* I
fl Fort Lauderdale: Carroll's Jewelers / Jf f Oklahoma I
fl Fort Myers: Fishel A Dowdy Jewelers / / f J Oklahoma City .R C. C fl
fl Fort Pierce: Charles G. Rhoads A Son, Inc. / Shawn ee-Sperry's Jewelers I
fl Fort Walton Beach: Ratcliff Jewelers Shawn ee. Sperry s Jewelers S
fl Gainesville: Robertson Jewelers SOUTH CAROLINA B
B Haines City: Frank Angle, Jlrs. Charleston: Hamilton Jewelers fl
fl Hialeah: Mayor's Jlrs. A Silversmiths Charleston: Charles Kerrison, Jewelers
fl Hialeah: Snow's Jewelers Columbia: Gudmundson and Buyck fl
Hollywood: Mayor's Jlrs. A Silversmiths Columbia: Reyner Hamilton Jewelers fl
fl Jacksonville: Underwood Jewelers Inc- DIAMOND RINGS Lancaster: D. L. Robinson Co. fl
fl 3 Stores Orangeburg: Cleo's Jewelry and Gifts fl
fl Kendall: Mayor's Jlrs. A Silversmiths Summerville: Dorchester Jewelers
fl Miami: Mayor's Jlrs. A Silversmiths H
fl Mulberry: Mulberry Jewelers TENNESSEE fl
fl North Miamieach: Mayor's Jlrs. A Chattanooga: Fischer-Evans Jewelers fl
fl Silversmiths Clarkesville: Joys Jewelers fl
fl Orlando: Lawton A Co. Jewelers Cleveland: Pinion Jewelry Co. fl
H Orlando: Ray-Mears Jewelers Dyersburg: Lewis Jewelers fl
fl Orlando: San Juan Jewelry Co. Gallatin: Blue's Jewelry fl
fl Panama City: Cogburn's Jewelers Greenville: Lancaster's fl
fl Perry: Wells Jewelers Henderson: Galbraith's Jewelry
fl Plant City: Crescent Jewelers Johnson City: Beckner's Inc. fl
fl Tallahassee: Putnam Jewelers Knoxville: Bowen's Jewelry- fl
fl Tampa: Adams-Magnon Jewelers Bearden Center fl
B Tampa: Yates Jewelers, Inc. Knoxville: Kimball's fl
fl Titusville: Chambers Jewelers Lawrenceburg: Downey A Jones
fl St. Petersburg: Bruce Watters Jewelers / x .. Lewisburg: Downey A Jones fl
fl 2 Stores /gs ">. Memphis: Graves-Steuwer Jewelers fl
fl West Palm Beach: Gillespie Jewelers Murfreesboro: Aultman Jewelers fl
fl Winter Park: Ivey'sSwalstead Jewelers hi a 'W \ F Brodnat fl
If] I*/' il\\ Green Hills village A Madison Square m
GEORGIA lit % I Ba Nashville: Phil Brodnar6th Avenue B
I Albany: The Mayfair Jewelers j/jfo 1 <=Shelby ville: Henning Jewelers |
Atlanta: Maier A Berkele Inc. //fQs. I JfWk South Pittsburg. Ha//Jewe/ers fl
College Park: Travis M. Harbin, Jeweler I B
Columbus: Kirven's Fine Jewelry /// I Tullahd Jewelers
H Decatur: Maier A Berkele Inc. | TEXAS
Douglas: Wilson Jewelry Store // Austin: Joe Koen A Son B
Gainesville: Mmtz Jewelers //Mf Bryan: Caldwell, Jewelers fl
Gordon : Dennis Jewelry Co. Dallas: Everts Jewelers
Macon: Kemaghan Inc. Jewelers //Mr Dallas: Owens Bros. Jeweler
Rossvill e: Brody's Rossville Jly. Co. I/W / El Paso : Holdsworth Jeweler
Savannah: Desbouillons2 Stores I/M/ S p aSO : Sheldon Jewelry Co. Inc.
fl Savannah: Levy Jewelers 2 Stores I/M// Fort Worth: Haltom's Jewelers fl
Valdosta: Girardin Jewelers Vm/ Nflgk Garland: Oglesby Jewelry A Gifts-
MMI Ridge Wood Shopping Center
H INDIANA Garland Shopping Center H
II Madison: Oscar C. Bear A Son / Henderson: Mitchell's Jewelers j||
New Albany: Ray's Jewelry #fl fIA Houston: Billings Jewelry-2 Stores
fl Isl Houston: Walzel Jewelry2 Stores fl
fl KENTUCKY Isl 1 jBl Killeen: Keen's Jewelers fl
fl Bowling Green: Howard Jewelers Isl fl New Braunfels Willis Jewelers fl
fl Covington: Motch Jewelers Isl | H Pasadena: Michaels Jewelry fl
fl Hopkinsville: Joy's Jewelers isl isl Port Arthur: Turnbull's Jewelry fl
fl Lexington: Victor Bogaert Co. lifl, B| San Antonio: Leopold Jewelers fl
Louisville: Lemon A Son, Jewelers \fl 'mj San Antonio: Shaw's JewelersGunter
\ fl m! Hotel-Wonderland Shoppers City
LOUISIANA \\ §/ Shopping City
Alexandria: Schnack's //£// Temple: L. S James Jeweler
fl Bogalusa : Gayles Jewelers
fl Breaux Bridge: Robert's Jewelry A Gifts
fl De Quincy: £. W. Rodgers Co. \ \ /// J fl
fl Morgan City: Besse Jewelers \ V / / Alexandria : Wmthrop Jewelers m
fl Opelousas : Mornhiveg A Castille Jlrs. / / Clifton Forg e Hodges Jewelry Store fl
fl Ruston: Grigsby's Jewelers ,\V Covmgto n. Hodges Jewelry Store fl
fl Shreveport: McCary's Shreve City Jlrs. r A Sp er Co fl
fl Shreveport: McCary Jewelers-Downtown Falls Church: Jewelers fl
fl K Harrisonburg: John W. Taliaferro, Jlrs. fl
fl MARYLAND (Wilson's) fl
H a i r / Lynchburg Phillips Bros. Jewelers
fl f h nnap rh 5: l'. 9 o and Company Norfolk: D P Paul Co.-2 Stores fl
fl r/iVnn/rwe/ers Richmond: Schwarzschild Bros.2 Stores fl
fl Wheaton: Wmthrop Jewelers prom Roanoke: George T Hitch Jeweler fl
I m.xxkx.p.l CONTESSA FROM 9 1 50 Staunton: H. L. Lang A Co.. Jewelers fl
H r, rr rr. Suffolk . Brewer Jewelry Co. Inc. fl
I u ctnre Waynesboro: Hodges Jewelry Store fl
fl Corinth: Waits Jewelry Store 7 fl
fl Hattiesburg: Parris Jewelers WASHINGTON. D.C. fl
fl Hattiesburg: Rollings Jewelry Company Washmgto n: Farr's Jewelers fl
fl Jackson : Strauss-Stallings Jewelers Washington : R. Harris and Company fl
fl McComb : Hainer Jewelers Downtown, Georgetown A Chevy Chase fl
fl Natchez: Butts A Yoste Jewelers Washington: Chas Schwartz A Son fl
Oxford: Crouch's Jewelry fl
Pascagoula: Felts Jewelers WEST VIRGINIA
fl Vicksburg: Strauss-Stalling Co. Charleston: Galperin Jewelry Co fl
West Point: Rowell Jewelers Clarksburg: Williams Jewelers fl
Fairmont: Ray's Jewelry Co. fl
fl NORTH CAROLINA Morgantown: Robert A Yagle, Jewelers fl
fl Albemarle: Starnes Jewelry Wheeling : Posins Jewelers fl
fl Asheville: Lee's Jewelers fl
fl Asheville: Gordon's Jewelers PUERTO RICO fl
Canton : Gordon's Jewelers San Jaun : Pascual. Inc -250 Cruz Street m
fl Charlotte: Fields Jewelers, Inc. fl
fl Durham: Jones A Frasier2 Stores fl
fl SOLD BY FINE JEWELERS TH RQUGHOUT AMERICA |
'S

presentation, based on results of
a give-and-take session last
week when 24 UF students visited
classrooms of 1.200 Ocala high
school students.
Teen-agers revealed the live
major areas as sex, recreation,
respect and understanding from
adults, school grades and the role
of parents.
They found that feeling runs high
that sex education is needed in
high school. The students also feel

they often are treated more-- as
children than as maturing young
people. They seek help from par parents
ents parents in establishing social pro programs
grams programs -- since dances are no
longer held in Ocala.
In regard to grades, some teen
agers feel parents take an unrea unrealistic
listic unrealistic approach to their abilities
and often compare their grades
with those of brothers and sisters,
thus producing rivalry.
Too often there is a lack of

famil; ommunication, teen-agers
said. Th< v are afraid of their par parents
ents parents reactions and are unable to
talk with them concerning prob problems.
lems. problems.
The education students from the
UF, after visiting with the Ocala
High School, worked with O. E.
Daugherty, director of instruction
for Marion County Schools, who is
in charge of the PTA programs.
The panel discussion was de developed
veloped developed from their meetings.

Monday. March 28. 1966, The Florida Alligator,

flU'

I CHARLIE GOES f
lon t.v. again f
Char}j|s Casey, All-Ameri- £
ca end for the 1965 UF foot- X
x ball teanV, will be interviewed
x Tuesday during The Second x
X; 100 television program over X
X; WUFT (Channel 5) at 10 p,m.
x The 15-minute show is spon- x
X; sored by the Universitys x
x Alumni Association and Flor- x
x ida Blue Key, leadership fra-x
X ternity at the University.
x Caseys last television ap- x
'xpearance, during the Sugar
x Bowl in New Orleans, was a £
x big hit with Gator fans. ?:
Blood Bank
Needs More
'Pro Donors
By VAN MCKENZIE
Alligator Staff Writer
The chief technologist of the
blood bank at J. Hillis Miller
Health Center has made a plea to
students for more professional
blood donors.
Although there is not a shortage
of blood or plasma at the hospital,
Dr. T. W. Younglove said that he
would like to have more registered
donors the summer tri trimester.
mester. trimester.
We often have a problem keep keeping
ing keeping an adequate supply during the
summer, ae said, because most
of our donors are students and
staff from the university and most
leave during the summer.
The hospital pays sls a pint
for blood.
Actually the money isnt for
blood itself, Younglove said.
We dont think of blood as some something
thing something you can buy. We pay donors
for their time and traveling ex expenses
penses expenses to give the blood.
Younglove said the hospital pre prefers
fers prefers professional blood donors --
those wno are registered with the
hospital to give blood at frequent
intervals.
Donors can give one pint every
eight weeks but not more than five
times a year.
The main problem is keeping
a continual supply, he claimed.
The blood itself is not usable
more than 21 days after being
extracted, although we keep plasma
for two years.
The hospital keeps the blood
supply in refrigerators. A supply
of 100 pints is considered ade adequate.
quate. adequate.
About 250 pints are given by
donors every month. However, 901
pipits were given in February --
the UF Inter-Fraternity Council
donating 647 pints.
Younglove said that profess professional
ional professional blood donors and their fami families
lies families are insured of a blood supply
without charge from the hospital
in case of emergency.
, For those who do not wish to
give blood on a professional ba basis,
sis, basis, the hospital has a Blood In Insurance
surance Insurance Plan that insures every
donor of one pint of blood for three
years. All of their blood or plasma
needs are free during this period.
Younglove stressed that profes professional
sional professional donors are morally ob obligated
ligated obligated to appear for a transfusion
when called.

By VAN MCKENZIE
Alligator Staff Writer

Page 9



Page 10

), The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 28, 1966

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'PEACE AND FREEDOM FESTIVAL

Dr. Thomas Hanna, chairman of UFs Philosophy
Department, talks outdoors Friday afternoon as part
of a teach-in at the Peace and Freedom Festival

Sharpe: Power Behind The Scenes

By GENE PICCHI
Alligator Staff Writer
Melvin L. Sharpe probably is
one of the UFs most powerful
behind the scenes men.
Sharpe, a young man only four
years out of college, has been UF
President J. Wayne Reitz admin administrative
istrative administrative assistant for two years
now.
A native of Oklahoma, Sharpe
received a M.S. degree in journa journalism
lism journalism at the University of Oklahoma
in the summer of 1962.
He then came directly to the UF
and served in an editorial position
with the Institute of Food and Ag Agricultures
ricultures Agricultures publication division.
After only two years in this posi position,
tion, position, he was appointed by Dr. Reitz
to be his administrative assistant.
Sharpes job as the presidents
A.A. covers a wide field of ac activities.
tivities. activities. As he says, My job is
to assist the president in any way
he should direct.
Sharpe handles the tremendous
amount of mail that comes into
Dr. Reitz office daily. He must
spend Jime researching the ques questions
tions questions asked by the mail before
sending appropriate replies.
When Reitz leaves the UF cam campus,
pus, campus, Sharpe must be his official
representative in public relations
functions.
For example, he said, the
other night I was host to General
(James) Van Fleet while the Presi President
dent President was in Tallahassee, and last
year I was host to Pearl Buck.
Sharpe also represents the pres president
ident president on a number of adminis administrative
trative administrative committees. He serves on
the Public Functions and Lectures
Committee whi c h determines
which functions and speakers will
be allowed on campus. He also
attends all meetings of the Cam Campus
pus Campus Planning and Development
Committee headed by former UF
Business Manager Ellis Jones.
Sharpe is the No. 1 decision
maker on campus when Reitz is
not here. Since I represent the
president, decisions as a whole are
based on the presidents policies
or on what he has directed, he
said.
When the president is on cam campus,
pus, campus, Sharpe still exerts consider considerable
able considerable power as an administration
leader.
I have a voice 5 in a lot of de decisions
cisions decisions because I work closely with
many of the deans, he said.
Some of the major changes which
are going to occur on campus in
the future, according to Sharpe,
will change the UFs whole com complexion.
plexion. complexion.
Copies
1-19 Copies, lOy ea. 20&
Over, 9C
Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.ni.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUI K-SAVE
IH2Q W. UNIVERSITY AVE.

mm
SHARPE
In a year from next fall we are
going to change our procedure for
accepting incoming freshmen, he
explained. Presently we fill our
freshman quota on a first come,
first serve .basis with the cutoff
date for accepting applications at
January 1.
Under the new system, we
will accept fall freshman appli applications
cations applications well into the year, but we
will admit only the top 2,100 scho scholastically,
lastically, scholastically, as determined by the
12th Grade Placement Tests. In
effect, we are going to let every everyone
one everyone apply on a competitive basis.

ALAS POOR YORICK. ..
S' S, I KNEW HIM WELL.
I \ \ HE DIDN'T USE
|* Vv^y^/ A) GATOR ADS
( and he went
OUT OF BUSINESS!! I
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DAILY BREAKFAST SPECIAL 38c

sponsored by the Students for a Democratic Society.
At times the crowd was as big as 300 to 400.

He estimated that under this new
system the Registrar will receive
10,000 applications a year from
graduating high school seniors.
In the fall of 1967, UF will switch
to the quarter system. Sharpe was
asked whether a trimesters work
should be crammed into a quarter
as was similary done in numerous
cases in the changeover from se semester
mester semester to trimester.
I understand that it would be
impossible the way it is set up,
he replied. All professors will
have to completely re-work their
lesson plans.
What will really make the quar quarter
ter quarter system work, he said, will
be to have sufficent planning be behind
hind behind it.--
Sharpe explained why top pro professors
fessors professors leave UF because of in insufficent
sufficent insufficent salares; We dont have
the fiscal autonomy at this univer university
sity university that others do, he said. So,
a top professor may leave the UF
to accept a position with a higher
salary elsewhere, and we are un unable
able unable to match it. Funds are just
not available
At the next session of the Leg Legislature
islature Legislature we expect to get the fiscal
autonomy that we so badly need,
he stated. It is expected that the
Board of Regents will have a great greater
er greater amount of money to work with
and a much greater say in where it
will be spent.

Graeffes Oratorio
To Premiere Here

The premiere of Dr. Didier
Graeffes oratorio Moses in the
Desert will be presented at the
UF Auditorium April 3 at 4 p.m.
The oratorio will feature Guy
Webb, singing the part of Moses,
the University Symphony Orches Orchestra,
tra, Orchestra, under the direction of Edward
Troupin, and the Choral Union. It
will be free to the public.
Graeffe, professor of humanities
at the University, in discussing the
recently composed oratorio said,
It represents a third work con concerned
cerned concerned with Old Testament stories
involving man and his conflicting
relationship with the world and
God. It is the tragedy of serving
two masters. One has to serve
both God and the world. No form
of compromise really works out.
For me, that is the central
theme of mans religious exis existence.
tence. existence. The conflict is that you
must compromise, but you cant
really compromise, Graeffe said.
The central statement of the
oratorio, sung repeatedly by Mo Moses*
ses* Moses* and the choir, is that silence
is the great void into which God

I Getting Married?
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ED ABBOTT, 1965 graduate of
the Univ ersity of Florida and
presently with Abbott Bitter
and Associates Life Insurance
Consultants, will be in
Gainesville on April 2 and
3, 1966.
The purpose of his visit is:
1. To discuss the recent G. I. Bil I with
veterans and its possible applications
in developing a life insurance estate;
and
\
2. To talk with professional and medical
graduate students concerning their
estate accumulation and conservation.
If you fit into either of those
categories, please join Ed
for coffee and donuts on
Saturday, April 2, at 10:30
A.M. in Room 215 of the
Florida Union.
Abbott, Bitter and Associates
FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MIAMI, FLORIDA

is drawn.
Graeffe said the music is neither
modern nor traditional, but goes
back to single melodic lines with
emphasis upon percussion.
Graeffe spent over four years
on the oratorio, presenting the text
initially with percussion several
years ago.
He spent a year in Europe in
1964 on a University research
grant and visited the celebrated
composer Carl Orff, under whom
he had previously stufied.
Orff encouraged Graeffe to chan channel
nel channel his talents into the production
of a major work and Graeffe then
prepared the music for the text of
the oratorio. He has dedicated the
work to Orff and is preparing a
German version to be presented
in Europe this summer.
In two previous works, Graeffe
wrote Daniel, a play with mu music,
sic, music, and Lots Wife, a dance
play.
Graeffe was born in Belgium,
studied music in Munich and Ber Berlin
lin Berlin and emigrated to the U. S. in
1937. He came to the UF in 1948.



Southern Illinois Dominates Relays

AND AWAY WE G 0...

High school milers bunch together before round rounding
ing rounding the first turn in the mile run. Approximately
70 athletes participated in the event in Saturdays

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A MIGHTY HEAVE
Florida's Harry Winkler exerts himself with a mighty effort
in the shot put. Winkler failed to place in the event as Southern
Illinois George Woods broke the meet record with a prodigious
heave of 60 ft., 7-1/2 in.

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SET TO GO

No, theyre not praying. These contestants
are getting set to run in the first heat of the
university division 100-yard dash. UFs hopes

Florida Relays. Werner Biersboefer of Birming Birmingham
ham Birmingham Bank High won the event with a time o: 4:23.1.

to take the event were dashed when team co cocaptain
captain cocaptain John Anderson came up with a leg injury.

vH v
j: Photos §
** **.
I By I
| RON |
| SHERMAN |
_!%?L_ : : ffi

~0 m &T r
Hi
^' f .";' 2f?j. lssy".ffi#-- '*t^,v*^ s '?,^-, s &XI
RACES TO NEW RECORD
Tennessees Pat Pomphrey races to a new meet record in the
120-yard high hurdles. Pomphrey ran the distance in 13.7 seconds.

Monday. March 28. 1968. The Florida Alligator.

Gators Disappointing;
Anderson injured
By GERALD BERENDT
Alligator Staff Writer
The Florida Relays were run in cold, dreary
weather Saturday and thats how the Gators looked
-- drear. Workhorse Scott Hager and freshman
Mike Burton sparkled in an otherwise disappointing
performance for Florida cindermen.
Hager, who competed in five events, placed se second
cond second in both the 120-> ard high hurdles and the 440-
yard intermediate hurdles with times of 14.1 and
52.4 respectively. Burton set a new meet record
in the freshman and junior college division by wan wanning
ning wanning the broad jump with a mark of 24 feet even.
Burtons record jump out-distanced the university universitydivision
division universitydivision jumpers by at least three inches.
The Gators showing was tarnished when ace
sprinter John Anderson pulled up lamein the semi semifinals
finals semifinals of the 100-yard dash. Anderson, who has
previously run the dash in 9.5, managed to limp
across the finish line fifth. The injury also kept
.Anderson out of the relay events and dimmed Flor Florida's
ida's Florida's hopes for a high finish.
In the fresh man-junior college division, Florida
took the mile relay in 3:18.6. The Baby Gator relay relayteam
team relayteam was made up of Glenn Schaibly, Bruce Raffer Rafferty,
ty, Rafferty, Gordie Wynn and Bob Gallaher.
Southern Illinois, defeated by the Gators last week
in a dual track meet, dominated the university class
of the Relays. The Salukis, led by Olympic distnce
runner Oscar Moore, took sbc first places. Moore
won the two-mile run in an amazing 8:41.9 and then
led Southern Illinois in the distance medley relay
by running a mile leg in 4:00.8.
Other teams competing in the university division
of the Relays were Florida State, Auburn, Wake
Forest. Georgia, Alabama. Tennessee, South Car Carolina,
olina, Carolina, Georgia Tech, North Carolina State, Duke,
Miami, Furman. Providence, Princeton, North Car Carolina,
olina, Carolina, Middle Tennessee. Army, East Texas State,
East Tennessee State, Florida A& M. Baldwin Wal Wallace,
lace, Wallace, the Citadel, Maryland, Kentucky and Clemson.
Gator cindermen face the Duke Blue Devils this
Wednesday in a dual meet on the UF oval.

Page 11



Page 12

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 28. 1966

Gator Sports Briefs

The Gator nine lost two tough road games to Auburn over the
weekend in a crucial SEC series. The Gators lost a tough one
Friday 4-1, despite a great effort by mounds man Ray Rollyson.
Rollyson protected a f-0 Gator advantage until the seventh
inning when Tiger Scotty Long homered. Auburn won the game on
three unearned runs in the eighth inning, on a fielders choice,
a passed ball and an outfield error.
* Ned Woolfolk was tagged for Saturdays 10-5 loss, throwing
only five pitches in a disastrous fifth inning. Woolfolk came in
for hurler Adrian Zabala and gave up 2 runs, handing Auburn a
lead they never relinquished.
The Gators are now 3-3 in SEC play and 9-C overall.
* *
The Baby Gator baseball team didnt fare much better than its
big brothers, dropping three games to Manatee Junior College in
Bradenton over the weekend. Thursday, the Baby Gators lost a
12-1 decision, as pitcher John Combs gave up 1G hits. Friday,
the team lost a 6-2 decision, with Dave Kahn absorbing.the loss.
Saturdays game was a closer affair. The Gators lost 1-0 to the
Lancers, who now sport a IG-1 record. Their onl\ loss came at
the hands of the Florida State freshmen.
jt 4 ¥
National Amateur champion Bob Murphy won the University of
Miami College Golf Tournament for the second year, leading
Gator linksmen to a 35-stroke victory over runnerup Ohio State.
The Gators took the tourney with a combined score of 1145,
bettering the tournament record they set last year of 1157.
Murphy shot a 275 for individual honors and teammante Wallv
Armstrong finished second, six shots liehind.
+
UF netters scored two wins this weekend over the United
States Naval Academy. The Gator varsity defeated the Middies.
5-4, and the Florida frosh downed the Navy B-squad, 6-0. Coach
Bill Potters netters have a 12-8 record, while the undefeated
frosh of Coach M. B. Chafin marked their 14th win.
The varsity teams split the singles at three each with Florida
taking two of three doubles for the margin ol victory. Co-captain
Rick Chace, Ron Fick and Russ Burr were victors in singles
events. The teams ol Chace and Bill Perrin and Co-captain
Steve Gardner and Ron Fick rallied for the Gators in doubles
Led by Armi Neely, the Gator frosh took all the singles and
doubles in their match Saturday. Captain Jamie Pressly. Steve
Beeland, and Less Steele won in singles. Neelv-Beeland and
Pressly-Steele teamed up for wins in doubles.
Today, the netters face Duke on the varsiTx courts lv Beta
Field. Match time is 3 p.m.

MARCH 31 .. ends our fiscal year. Inventory
being drastically reduced. Your chance to SAVE
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60 Rambler Custom 4 door. Standard shift. I
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62 Rambler American. Custom 4 door sedan. I
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Owned by prof. . $595
62 Rambler Custom station wagon Auto
t trans. Less than 37,000 miles. Motor replaced
at about 26,000. Record of servicing
Outstanding condition. . $895
59 Ford Galaxie FSOO. Sedan, VB, power
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