Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Tlie Florida Alligatfr

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OR CHESIS DANCES

Modern dance, featuring primi primitive
tive primitive ballet and a love song- inter interpretation,
pretation, interpretation, will be presented by
Orchesis this evening at eight
oclock in the University Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium.
This is the annual concert pro program
gram program this group gives to the cam campus
pus campus each year. All the dancing and

Teach-In Scheduled
Today In Plaza

A teach-in, sponsored bytheUF
chapter ol Students tor a Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic Society, is scheduled today
at 2 p.m. in the Plaza of the Amer Americas.
icas. Americas.
Speakers at the teach-in will
include Dr. Thomas Hanna, chair chairman
man chairman of the Philosophy Department;
Mrs. Emily MacLachlan, assistant
professor of social science; Wayne
|Shirbroun, humanities instructor,
£nd Dr. William Goldhurst, hu humanities
manities humanities professor.
mLaw Professor Stanley Laughlin
will be present to answer legal
questions.
The teach-in will t>e emceed by
LWCien Cross, "a. UF student and

Vol. 58, No. 121

choreography is done by the stu student
dent student dancers themselves.
Tonights concert is an opjxir opjxirtunity
tunity opjxirtunity for those who appreciate
modern dance and those who want
to familiarize themselves with this
form of art, Alice Bloch, presi president
dent president of Orchesis, notes.

co-chairman of the local SDS chap chapter.
ter. chapter. t?
Purpose of the teach-in,
Cross said, will t>e to discuss
both jthe questions of student free freedom
dom freedom (the right to protest) and the
war in Viet Nam.
Other speakers on the program
include Julian Brown, who current currently
ly currently is getting a discharge from the
Marine Corps as a conscientious
objector; Marve Davidov, field
secretary for national chapter of
Committee for Non-violent Action;
Kenneth Lebman, clerk of the lo local
cal local Friends Society; and Joe Weiss.
(See TEACH-IN,Page 8)

University of Florida

Gator Gras Weekend

\
Gator Gras weekend brings a
variety show, a parade and a soap
Box derby to campus this weekend.
A queen and the outstanding gradu graduating
ating graduating student leader have already
been chosen.
The Soap Box .Derby is a hew
feature in this years agenda. The
elimination races will start at
2:30 Sunday afternoon behind the
Med Center following a half hour

yy'tVlAlN yy'tVlAlNentran<
entran< yy'tVlAlNentran<
fi (T %Jp
SUSPICIOUS ANTICS AT HAROLDS CLUB
Gwen Stapleton slips the winning combination to Larry Bishop while Jane Steiner kibitzes for Wayne
Boynton at Graham Area's Harolds Club party to t>e held tonight.

Harolds Swings Tonight

Dancing, luscious women, gamb gambling,
ling, gambling, drinks on the house, and night
club entertainment tonight at Har Harolds
olds Harolds Club.
Harold is putting on a wmg-ding
blast in Graham Area. Dress is
casual and all are welcome. Ad Admission
mission Admission is a buck for the men and
women will be free.
College Aptitude
Tests Given By
Draft Boards
UKs male population can pick
up applications for the College
Qualification Test of the Selective
Service at Local Board No. 17,
315 Federal Building, downtown
Gainesville.
Local Board No. 17 is open
Monday Friday from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m.
The tests are scheduled for May
14, May 21 and June 3. Deadline
for the exam sign-up is an April
23 postmark on the application.
Those eligible k> take the Selec Selective
tive Selective Service College Qualification
T st must:
Be a Selective Service regis registrant
trant registrant who intends to request oc occupational
cupational occupational deferment as a college
student.
Not have previously taken the
test.
The Selective Service System
established this testing program
to provide selective Service local
(See Selective, Page 9)

Friday, March 25, 1966

parade through campus.
There will be a trophy for the
mens and womens division as
well as the best theme creation
car.
Saturday night a variety show
featuring satire, folk singing, co comedy,
medy, comedy, dramatic reading and pop
singing will be presented twice.
Admission is 50C per person to

Slick dealing Harold and his lady
card sharks have taken over the
library and changed it into a gam 4
bling casino.
The rec room is now a sinful
dance hall. Two bands will provide
constant temptation and music for
all swingers and would-l>e

- < *

GATOR GRAS TALENT SHOW
Marty Lawson, Danielle Thomas, and C D Hobbs, members of
Friends and Lovers, * are performing in the Gator Gras Talent
Show tomorrow night at 7 and 9 p.m. in the University Auditorium.
SEE PAGE 8 FOR SCHEDULE
OF GATOR GRAS EVENTS

both the 7 and 9 oclock shows.
Kim Bretton, Tri-Delt, won the
beauty contest judged only on one
criteria, beauty.
The Outstanding Student Leader
of the Year goes to Jim Hauser
and Kay Lindquist.
Each year a girl and boy from
the senior class is presented with
this award.

swingers.
The downstairs lobby is a low
light nightclub witli lovely hostess hostesses,
es, hostesses, ala Playboy Club. These sweet
young tilings will be serving free
booze while you watch entertain entertainment,
ment, entertainment, including a sneak preview
of a few Gator Gras acts from
Saturdays talent show.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 25, 1966

FROM THE WIRES

International
TEXAS TOLL MOUNTS . U. S. Marines sweeping through the
coastal plains northwest of Quang Ngai Thursday discovered more Viet
Cong killed in their Operation Texas and put the Communist death toll
in the five-day-old operation at a possible 656. In other ground fight fighting,
ing, fighting, American, South Korean and Vietnamese troops scored a series
of victories that killed more than 500 additional Viet Cong in a 24-hour
period. The U. S. Coast Guard, in one of its rare combat operations,
killed three men on a Communist sampan.
GOON SQUAD HIT . Anti-government agitators, enforcing what
they call a popular rebellion with goon squads, kept central Viet Nams
vital seaport of Da Nang paralyzed Thursday with a continuing general
strike led by students. But student leaders in the ancient imperial
capitol of Hue, 50 miles to the north, were counseling against violence
proposed by some of the more hot-headed demonstrators. Hue Univer University
sity University student leaders overruled calls for an attempted takeover of the
American-operated Voice of Freedom radio station outside the city.
MYSTERY GIRL DEAD . A woman identified by police as Virginia
Hi11,"49, a central figure in the Kefauver crime hearings of the early
1950 s was found dead near Salsburg, Australia Thursday. Police said
the cause of her death was not known and that an autopsy would tie held.
She was married to Austrian ski instructor Hans Hauser who spent
many years in the United States and went by the name of Hill-Hauser.
It was alleged that she served as a transcontinental messenger girl for
mobsters, carrying large sums of money between New York. Chicago
and Los Angeles.
National
ART COLLECTION SOLD . The sale of one of the worlds great
private collections of 20th century art -- the greatest such collection
to be auctioned at one time -- sold for $3 million Thursday. On Wed Wednesday,
nesday, Wednesday, 45 paintings and sculptures owned by the late G. David Thomp Thompson,
son, Thompson, a Pittsburgh industrialist, brought $1,228,350. The total included
record prices for paintings by Leger and Mondrian and for sculpture
by Henry Moore and Auguste Rodin.
NEWS STRIKE CONTINUES . The Boston newspaper strike stret stretched
ched stretched into its 19th day Thursday with both sides pessimistic over
prospects for ending the costly dispute. The walkout, which idled the
citys five daily and three Sunday newspapers, will become the longest
newspaper strike in Bostons history Sunday. James. B. White, presi president
dent president of the striking Mailers local, said Wednesday night settlement of
the dispute before Sunday was out of the question.
DIAMOND CACHE STOLEN . Two masked gunmen held up a
jewelry store in downtown Boston Thursday and fled with an estimated
$300,000 worth of diamonds, police said. Cash and other carefully
selected jewels and watches were also taken. Police quickly arrived
at the building, possibly while the bandits were inside, but left when
they thought they were at the wrong place. If the police had come
here the first time we called them they would have caught them.
said Harry Cortell, owner of the store.
STEEL PACT DISPUTED . The United States has no plans to
protest formally to West Germany over its deal to supply Red China
with steel mills although Bonn has been made aware of American
displeasure. The proposed $87.5 million pact was reported from Bonn
a week ago and some U. S. congressmen called for a strong State
Department protests. The U. S. Embassy in Bonn has been instructed
to express general concern, but informed sources said the department
would not demand officially that the Germans back out of the trans transaction.
action. transaction.
+
Florida
FUNDS INNOVATION . Expenditure of $99,950 in federal funds
for projects aimed at sparking innovation in the public schools was
announced Thursday by St. Supt. Floyd T. Christian. Christian said
using money from a special funcL>under the National Defense Education
Act, he has approved projects ranging from publication of a new math
booklet for parents to train ministers in counseling of school-age
problem children. The special fund is part of reimbursement to county
school systems for purchase of equipment and materials.
FAILURE STUDY . State Rep. Jess Yart>orough urged a legis legislative
lative legislative Study committee Thursday to find out how many persons failed
examinations given by minor state regulatory Ixiards. I think it will
open your eyes, the Miami legislator told the interim committee on
Governmental Reorganization and Efficiency. The committee, headed
by Sen. George Hollahn of Miami, met to get its study programs
underway following the special reapportionment session of the Legis Legislature.
lature. Legislature.
MEDICARE DEADLINE . Republican Congressman William C.
Cramer of St. Petersburg joined Gov. Haydon Burns Thursday in
appealing for extension of the deadline for enrollment in the Medi Medicare
care Medicare program. Cramer wrote the secretary of Health, Education and
Welfare asking that the deadline be extended from March 31 to
June 30. Governor Burns m idea similar plea a month ago.
The Florida AJllator reserves the right to regulate the typographical ton*- of .11 .'ivertlsen t Ms au
to revise or turn .way ropy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUAHANTgtD, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement involving tvj.,-
graphlcal errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day a/ter advertisement appears .
The Florida Alllfalor will not be responsible for more lhar one Incorrect insertion of at' advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices lor correction must tie given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the ofllcl.il stud, ni newspaper of iht I mversjiy of limit, ~nd Is
((ve tImPS weekly except during May, June and July when It Is published s. ml-weekly ( ml
tutorials repreaenl the official opinions of their author ~ The Alligator Is entered as second class
theUnltod States Pod Offl-e at Gainesville.
~ J

CITIES PARALYZED
Blizzard Stuns
Midwest States

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (UPI) --
The death toll passed 30 in the
wake of the second great blizzard
to paralyze the upper Midwest in
three weeks.
Below-zero cold chilled Mid Midwesterners
westerners Midwesterners struggling to break
out of the drifts heaped across
parts of Minnesota, Michigan,
lowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin and
Kansas.
The second March blizzard dealt
a heav\ blow to Upper Michigan
before veering northward into Can Canada.
ada. Canada. Thirteen inches ol snow' in
less than 24 hours raised the snow
level .at Marquette. Mich., to 22
inches. Schools and businesses
N.Viet Leaders
To Attend Confab
MOSCOW (UPI) A high highranking
ranking highranking North Vietnamese dele delegation
gation delegation will arrive here Saturday
for the Soviet Communist party
congress and a Viet Cong group
is expected F rida\. Vietnamese
sources said toda\.
The report took on major sig significance
nificance significance because oi Communist
Chinas rejection ol an invitation
to attend die meeting. Hanoi is
dejiendent on both Peking and Mos Moscow
cow Moscow for aid and appeared to l>e
caught m the middle.
The Vietnamese sources said tin*
Hanoi delegation would he led by
Communist part\ secretary Le
Duan. a right hand man to Presi President
dent President Ho Chi Minli. Both he and
the Viet Cone delegation will stop
over in Peking belore living to
Moscow.

fPODR BO? NEWS
for the rich
weeks ahead
This Establishment finds the gam gamin
in gamin look adopted by the ladies
quite charming, and has gathered
together poor boy" casuals to
suit it. A sampling is shown,
others await. The price is modest.
££>tag n Brag
>

yere closed in Marcjuette, Alger,
Baraga and Iron Counties.
Behind the blizzard, search par parties
ties parties made grim discoveries# The
bodies of four men were found in
a snow-drifted car near Howells,
Neb. The body of William Mann,
29, was found near St. Peter,
Minn., in a car completely covered
by snow except for the aerial.
A total of 32 deaths were blamed
on the storm -- 15 in Nebraska,
six in Minnesota, four in lowa, two
each in South Dakota, Wyoming
and Colorado, and one in Wiscon Wisconsin.
sin. Wisconsin.
As the skies cleared, 7 below
zero cold closed in on Roseau,
Minn. It wa6 just 2 above at North
Platte, Neb., and Wichita. Kan.,
recorded 15 above, a record low
for the date.

fl 0 %H
to ALL STUDENTS and UNIVERSITY;
PERSONNEL
LUNCH
ll:30am-2:00pm
CAFETERIA
X!U 1212 N, Main St
(4 minutes from campus) center)

Fidelity UnioT
Life
ti
THE COLLEGE PLA}
exclusively for
THE COLLEGE MAN
. Full Accident and
Disability Benefits at
Low Premiums.
. .Family Plan Rider
Available for Wife
and Children.
Campus Representatives:
Dan Sapp
Mel Ward George Corl
376-1208



New Officers For MENSA

New officers for 19GC-G7 have
been elected to the UF chapter of
Mensa, an international organi organization
zation organization whose members score in
the upper 2 per cent of the popu population
lation population on intelligence tests.
Officers are Michael T. Sipe,
president; Armando Lozano, vice
president; Louise Kurtz, seere seeretarv;

LOOK
FOR OUR.THREE DAY
BOOK SALE''"
SPONSORED BY
fc f)
COMING f/l
S OQti!

|||j t " v H
g*J | | p*. I HJ I I H
i---:'M3

tarv; seeretarv; and Gretchen Laird, trea treasurer.
surer. treasurer.
The local Mensa chapter lias
grown from 15 members in Octo October,
ber, October, 1965, to over 125 today. Daily
luncheons are held 11a.m.-lp.m.
in a reserved section of the main
cafeteria, and interested students
and faculty and staff members are
invited.

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PIKES LITTLE SISTERS
The officers of Pi Kappa Alpha Little Sisters are: Sharon Black, social chairman: Sally Summers,
corresponding secretary; Denette McConnel, president: Cathv Bond, vice president; Patty Beatty, tea teasurer;
surer; teasurer; and Ann King, recording secretary.
The new initiates are, second row: Mariann Crane, Pat Latham, Pam Parnell, Judy Bourdage, Linda
Feldman, Andrea Westman, Shelia Sandsbury, Gretchen Lay, Karen Carlson and Libby Miller.
Third row: Debbie Dail, Theresa Adams, Kim Bretton and Pam Bacharach.

SUNDAYS SPECIAL
CMfc FRIED CHICKEN
With French Fried Potatoes,
Creamy Cole Slaw, C1 45
Rolls & Butter. !
Ai I THE CHICKEN YOU CAN EAT!
MAGAZINES OPEN 24 HOURS SUNDRIES
1802 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. PHONE 378-3236
DAILY BREAKFAST SPECIAL 38<;

Friday, March 25, 19GG, The Florida Alligator,

Easter Egg Hunt
Planned By Dames
With Easter just around the
corner, UF Dames are planning
a holiday treat for children (ages
2 to 6) of UF students, faculty and
staff.
The annual Dames Easter Egg
Hunt will be held Saturday, April
9, at 2 p.m. at the University Wo Women's
men's Women's Club (Perry House) on New Newberry
berry Newberry Road.
Children will be divided into
groups of 2-year-olds, 3- and
4-year-olds, and 5- and 6-year 6-yearolds.
olds. 6-yearolds. Each child should bring his
own basket.
Prizes will be awarded and re refreshments
freshments refreshments served to the children.
Agriculture Dames are spon sponsoring
soring sponsoring the hunt, to be held rain or
shine.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 25, 1966

ALLIGATOR
EDITORIALS
on the student
bill of rights
arl Faircloth, Floridas attorney general, has
C ruled that the bill of rights proposed by FSUs
student body doesnt have a legal leg to stand on.
Faircloth has said the proposed bill of rights would
be a legal nullity without force and effect.
One of the things included in the bill of rights is a
provision prohibiting the school from punishing a
student for action when the students case is l>efore
the local, state or federal courts.
The Board of Regents asked for Faireloths ruling,
and they got it.
Nevertheless, we hope the FSU Student Government
goes ahead with the bill of rights. While it may or may
not have a legal leg to stand on -- because Mr. Fair Faircloth
cloth Faircloth certainly is NOT the final authority -- it does
have moral and ethical legs to stand on. And doesnt
this still mean something:?
What universities can do to students nowconsti nowconstitutes,
tutes,w nowconstitutes, r e think, nothing less than double jeopardy. At
present, when a students case is before the courts,
the university administration can suspend or expel
the student regardless of the outcome of the court
case -- merely on the grounds of embarrassment
to the university.
It doesnt seem to matter whether or not the court
finds the student innocent.
It is time, we think, for our own Student Government
to draw up a student bill of rights and request from
the UF Administration a clearly-defined code of be behavoir
havoir behavoir for students. (And dont tell us that ridiculous
Student Handbook and the even more absurd 1949
Miller Memo.)
Os course, we cant expect much action of any kind
until Student Body President Buddy Jacobs quits
being so goshawful afraid of controversy.
... and on Mr. Ba 11
l|tj| hen financier Ed Ball, the last of Floridas
++* railroad-land-bank barons, made a suggestion
to a committee of the U. S. House of Representatives
last year, he had no intention that it should be followed.
Ball, whose every command is the public wish in
large parts of North Florida, was on the spot. The
source of his power, the multimillion-dollar DuPont
Estate, was under political attack in Washington.
Falsely represented, it had won the most glaring
exemption granted in 1956 to the national law pro protecting
tecting protecting the public from bank monopolies and nowsome
congressmen wanted to correct that mistake.
Why not make a general application and put every everybody
body everybody under the Bank Holding Company Act? Ball
suggested, believing this to be the best way to pro protect
tect protect his owm favored position because there would l>e
more opposition to a general improvement of the law
than to a one-shot law aimed directly at the DuPont
Estate.
The U. S. Senate will decide this year whether
Ball was right. True, when the House passed the bill
ending all exemptions, there was some l>elief that it
was headed for a Senate graveyard.
Subsequently, there has been a tendency to take a
second look.
It has been remembered that when President Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower signed the present law, aimed at the general
principle of prohibiting banks from owning nonbanking
businesses, he said that as a result of the various
exemptions . the legislation falls short of achieving
these objectives.
It has been recalled that, in every annual report to
Congress since 1956, the Federal Reserve Board has
recommended that all exemptions be eliminated.
Closer looks at the exemptions have raised this
question: Well, what would be so bad about ending
them all?
The major exemption is the DuPont Estate,
which controls 31 Florida banks, the St. Joe Paper
Co., the Florida East Coast Railroad and millions
of acres of Florida land. Because the estate is both
a borrower and a lender, Mr. Ball has a constant
conflict between his interests and those of his de depositors.
positors. depositors.
The law also permits the ownership of one bank
along with a nonbanking business. Certainly this would
not be a serious obstacle.
Three exemptions were written merely to apply
to single companies (Financial General Corp., Con Consolidated
solidated Consolidated Naval Stores and The Trust Company of
Georgia) and cannot be justified.
A final exemption applied to labor, agricultural
and horticultural organizations. This was Mr. Balls
trump. He didnt think Congress would bring a union
bank under theanti-monopolylaw.The major examples
are the Amalgamated Clothing Workers, which con controls
trols controls banks in New York and Chicago, and the United
Mine Workers, controlling the National Bank in Wash Washington,
ington, Washington, D. C.
Except that their exemption was not obtained through
misrepresentation, theres no more reason why unions
should violate a national principle of protection against
banking monopolies than should Mr. Ball.
In short, we think the Senate Committee on Banking
and Currency, now holding hearings on this law, should
endorse and the Senate should pass this bill correcting
a 10-year-old error.
The influences that Ed Ball held for years over
Florida Legislatures and the Dowers he still exerts
over some of the states political leaders are
reason enough for affirmative action by the Senate.
St. Petersburg Times

Tlie Florida Alligator
i
'A Ia CW Pmm H NoWIADjeS A,M^
ZS Committee. t keep I
I i burns Governor
uZI i brings you,"A DAy /
I *ol, u tfe* l |N THe U,FE OF /
IM> A
MIKE MALAfiI IAN'S
Campus Perspective
Today this reporter is getting rid of all the items he has wanted
to write on, but didnt localise they didnt demand a full column or
were left out of previous columns.
I have really enjoyed reaction to Campus Perspective. All sorts
of |>eople come up to tell me that these columns are good because they
tell students things that have gone untold in news media for a long time.
These same people react quite differently when it is THEIR
organization that goes under analysis. Then the article should be
a glowing report oi all that is good. Mistakes should not be into
print because, that doesnt belong in a newspaper.
This reporter feels that when a student takes, on a leadership
position, he or she must be ready to assume all the notoriety that
responsibility brings.
You cant serve the public and remain private.
Speaking ot mistakes. Wednesdavs column had an error in it.
I listed Carol Marcus and Marilvn Pankratz as presidents of Ra .vlings.
That was wrong. They were elected, but dont assume office for two
more weeks.
Current officers, who failed to send a representative to SGs
educational forums meeting, were .Judv Moore and Irene Minkof.
Dorm presidents in the girls living areas are quite interesting.
The four all-girl living areas have 10 presidents.
Except for Jennings, each section of the dorms feels it m st have
its own president.
And some-of these'.areas dont even have an executive committee
to coordinate the efforts of decentralization.
Jim Parsons, one of the Beta jumpers, is .chairm noi the powerful
budget and finance committee in the Legislative Council. At times
it is the only committee that functions. However, Parsons is well
qualified for the job. He had attended three previous Leg Council
meetings l>efore t>eing given the award!
When Buddy Jacobs walked nto the Florid i Union to deliver his
State of the Campus address everybody stood up. Everybody, that is,
except Ernie Litz and John Darlson.
The Apathy presidential canTdate, and Decision Party memer
and SG treasurer do* t feel the presided of the student body is
deserving of such acclaim.
Bill Hardy has joined the group of people who detract without
confirmation. This reporter hopes he will sit down and talk to
Jack Rutledge, acting director of food service.
Hardy is getting much of his information from sour grapes
Gay Welborn who was fired from the job as director. Welborn,
by the way, is still getting paid since his contract hasnt expired.
Remember the Perspective column on the infirmary? I asked
Litz and The Alligator to come across with facts to substantiate
accusations. Have YOU seen any such substantiations yet?
One cabinet member was skipped over in yesterdays column:
Bruce Rogow.
Rogow is secretary of finance and is scrutinizing budget requests
with unparalleled vigor.
Previous Secretary Tommy Backmeyer set a tough pace to follow
and Rogow appears to be pursuing it with greater intensity.
SG is talking a lot about telephones. They talked last year and the 1
year before, too.
If somebody else wants to tackle the job here is what you do:
1) Draw up a list of all places that need phones.
2) Get an appointment with Dr. Riker and go over the list with
him.
3) Once you have his approval, which wont t>e too hard, youre
home free.
Lastly, why cant Spring Alumni Reunion, Harolds Club, Gator
Gras and the Military Ball join forces for one weekend and provide
this campus with a real spring homecoming?

JIM MOOR HEAD'S I
thinking I
out louc
Hav Cjraves. Im ->ure, is a very nice
extends a waran, firm handsiiake -- which is
extent of my acquaintance witli him and
confident he also is kind to animals, loves
family and gives his players appreciated
their well-conditioned rumps from time to
I regret, however, the way he accepts
Cadillacs from admiring Fightin Gator boost
This practice ot giving coaches expensive
biles and other baubles simply because they BBt
performed their jobs well generally
hackles, but I really get burned when I see it i
pening right under my nose,
I get burned when I see the coach accepting Bqpl Bqpla
a Bqpla ridiculous and gaudy sentiment; I get burned
I see a bunch of misguided individuals think thl|§
an appropriate way to show appreciation; and HB
burned when 1 see such misplacement of valu--
particularly here, where putting values in H|R§
proper perspective is one of the bigger and
important lessons supposed to be learned. .:JB|
It is dismaying to see a man of Ray
caliber (that is, if you accept the many fine
said of him, and I do believe most of these
because l I see very little evidence to the contfjjjHp
accepting such a gift when he holds the
and commands the respect to tactfully
well wishes of his fans onto a much more
dahle course. sfp
Ray Graves has no real need for a $7,000 CadfUMp
Although a number of Southeastern Conference coacs|f
is are considerably better paid than he, he IS one of
he higher salaried and more highly rewardedJt|B
employes in all of Florida. His monthly paycheck is
only slightly less than that of the president of this
university. He comes in for several thousand more
i dollars yearly, for television appearances in the fall
on Sundays after the big games, through other guest
appearances and through his expense account. And, of
course, well-heeled alumni jovially dish out countless
tributes to him and to his players.
Perhaps all this gratitude is even embarrassing at
times. Nevertheless, it is obvious that Ray Graves
does not lack for much of anything in the way Os
terial abundance for a man of his station in life.
But successful coaches, for some reason! h£Y
always been objects of adoration and handouts! They
are hired to build teams and win games, but, in inevitably,
evitably, inevitably, when they accomplish this in betteraHul
average fashion, the fans come forth like
pilgrims before Buddha and display grateful gH§j}g£§
ositv that would reduce the cheeriest charity w to tears. Nothing is too good for the man \vtflK|B|
guided our boys to victor;.. G
In the present case, it really galls. Here w fl f
a near-great and growing university, with too
facilitie-. underpaid professors and many
impoverished students unable to meet the
demands ol higher education -- and our
coach is accepting a luxurious automobile in
of a cause which, lets lace it, has only a
nection with the ultimate aims (and they are scholas scholastic)
tic) scholastic) or the University ot Florida. The shiny, chnojraH
wagon seems to mock UFs real needs and endet^^^^B
Not that I dont appreciate the good job
Graves is doing. I do, and I have written
more than one occasion to tell him so. I have,
other hand, never considered GIVING him
Mbs contract, substantially increased over the
takes care of that for me. villi
But I have given to Dollars for Scholars an UF Alumni Association and other groups which
ture this universitys aims, without the
which there would be no Department of IntercollegMp
Athletics, no Florida Field, no Orange & b|*
It seems to me that $7,000 Cadillacs and tljr
equivalent could better serve this university andi|
people of this state -- and Coach Graves
esteem -- were they to take the form of seholajf
assistance. $7,000 could go far in underwriting
years ot college for a couple of deserving yog
would-be teachers or scientists or engineers --BB
coaches. ($7,000 contributed to Dollars for Scholal;
by the way, would convert to SEVENTY thousaii
Im sorry if the foregoing has embarrassed oB
coach and athletic director; he is really only a time;
and unfortunate example of a very widespread prafl
tice. But I do call on himand coaches everywhere Bi
to serve notice that their services are not up foB
extraneous material rewards, that they are hard-B
working men who are aware of crying needs in
elsewhere on their campuses, and that they hereby*
admonish their contribution-minded rooters to give,*
in the coaches names if they like, where the giving B
will count for more than additional occupancy in B
already well-filled carports. |
We could start with the Coach Ray Graves $7,000 I
Cadillac Memorial Scholarship of 1966.



aboard the
l \jC \i \i INfjooner withErnieL.Uz_

This week from my stool in the
dark corner* near the keg I will
relate intellectual discussion we
engaged in perchance the other eve.
Our discussion ranged over the
wide field of politics but settled
(no -- not on the gubernatorial
race, thats Mike Garcia column,
Florida Politics, a la go-team
Kelly) on the so-called New Left
in American politics, the new lib liberals,
erals, liberals, ultra-liberals or whatever
YOU want to call them. (This is a
clean column.)
I have definitely come around to
believing that the basic theory --
that the political spectrum is a
line from left (extreme liberal)
to right (extreme conservative) --
is thoroughly invalid.
To my way of thinking, the po political
litical political spectrum is a circle, so
that in effect extreme left and
extreme right are actually right
next to each other and the posi position
tion position of each is relatively only from
the individual vantage point.
As one approaches the extremes
it is quite obvious that the view viewpoint
point viewpoint becomes more and more nar narrow.
row. narrow. Let me take Freedom Party
here on campus (or better yet,
YOU take Freedom Party). They
are, I think, by their own admis admission,
sion, admission, a radical group espousing
radical change. Usually their grips
center around the University, Ti Tigert,
gert, Tigert, the City of Gainesville, the
State of Florida, et al. In essence
they are disagreeing with the bu buraucracy
raucracy buraucracy (?) or more specifically,
with AUTHORITY.
Stop and think a second. Isn*t the
extreme right the Birchers,the
KKK, the Minutenen -- doing the
same thing? They too are speci specifically
fically specifically disagreeing with the
AUTHORITY figures. Most of the
time the two are screaming at
each other, LEFTIST COMMIE

IA word to our readers |
:Â¥ &:
J: Alligator accepts all letters to the editor, jij:
J: Due to space limitations, however, we are unable |
to print letters exceeding 500 words.
*#v ....**

IT
8 J o 8
a 1 O a
n n
d 4 d
I w w
Hfl M '
:i v
I h / University # h
I O Shop 0
I Dial Either Number And Then .Just Relax
I Theres Some Mighty Fine Eating On Its Way .

or RIGHTIST FASCIST. I think
most of us are aware that neither
side is within the realm of the
great majority consensus of Amer American
ican American citizenry.
One end is always preaching that
they seek an end to INTERFER INTERFERENCE
ENCE INTERFERENCE with individual rights and
freedom. Neither ever defines
their terminology, by the way.
The area in which I concern
myself here is that we too often
dont see the historical and poli political-social
tical-social political-social significance in these
groups. The conservative feels that
life is good now and we shouldnt
rock the boat. The extreme con conservative
servative conservative feels that things have
gone way too far and we should
return to the better days of yes yesteryear.
teryear. yesteryear. The liberal thinks things
are fine now, but we should still
move ahead and the extreme lib liberal
eral liberal feels what weve got now is
terrible and weve got to immedi immediately
ately immediately change everything.
Where they ALL miss the boat
is that they DEMAND immediate
change (left or right); they are so
dogmatic and inflexible that de despite
spite despite whether they are right or
wrong they invariably wind up
antagonizing the very people with
whom they need to reach an accord
to effect any change.
Historically they have failed to
see the American past for what it
really is. If I had to describe the
American experience of change
and/or progress in one word, that
word most certainly would be
COMPROMISE. The individual or
group so inflexible that it cannot
comprise somewhere on some
things is doomed from the start.
I am in full agreement with both
groups that there indeed is too
much bureacracy, red tape and
bigness. But fortunately or un unfortunately,
fortunately, unfortunately, thats the way the sys system

tem system is. By maintaining the system
this way, it secures its own sta stability.
bility. stability. We dont have military re revolutions
volutions revolutions and chaos; we do pro proceed
ceed proceed with orderly change when
change is called for.
Too often, of course, change is
actually effected late or past its
time of greatest need, but then no
system is perfect. Both extremes
want immediate change and this
just cannot be accomplished. All
too often we need committees and
petitions and reviews and analyses
and research. To effect these need needed
ed needed changes usually requires long
lengths of time. But theres where
the success of the American sys system
tem system lies.
The law is the best example.
The Supreme Court decision on
school segregation (Brown v.
Board of Educ. of Topeka, 1954)
took almost three years and over
$200,000 to bring to the Supreme
Court.
Efficiency needed? Yes. Radical
reform immediately? NO.
As Winston Churchill once re remarked:
marked: remarked: The United States has
a most inefficient government. But
its the best system anyones gotten
so far.
to clarify
Editor:
I wish to clarify a statement re reported
ported reported in Thursdays Alligator ar article
ticle article concerning Richard Condons
candidacy for the Florida House of
Representatives.
The statement: Condon said his
third section is a slap in the
face to people who llieve in
less federal control.
I fear that interested parties
may misinterpret Mr. Condons
stand on the Federal Government.
What he favors is a conservative
national government and strong
state governments which are re responsive
sponsive responsive to the needs of the peo people.
ple. people. This is illustrated by a quo quotation
tation quotation from a recent speech by
Condon, Increased centralization
of government is latently stifling
to freedom and opposed to per personal
sonal personal dignity.
Barry Blount Kempson
Campaign Manager

This is your chance,
Student #7026941.
Drink Sprite and be
somebody. MR.BIG
Take heart. Take a dime.
Then take a bottle of Sprite
from the nearest pop
Suddenly
your hand. Cold.
tingling. You
cackle fiendishly B
and rub your
together. (You g M
should; they're
probably chilled to w
the bone by now.) M
You tear off to a i
corner, alone, but M
within earshot of \ m
your fellows. M
And then 7 And then 7 And then you unleash it.
SPRITE! It fizzes! It roars! It bubbles with
good cheer!
Heads turn. Whisperings. "Who's that strangely
fascinating student with the arch smile. And what's
in that curious green bottle that's making such
a racket?"
And you've arrived! The distinctive taste and
ebullient character of Sprite has set you apart.
You're somebody, uh...uh, whoever r you-are.
fcW'i I VMI SPRITE. SO TART AND
VJ 1 if II ITINGLING. WE JUST COULDN'T
KEEP IT QUIET.
*- A M'.
wWrnm
fulfil li vy/AJ i\ [AjiM/m Hr I
) APARTMENTS j
SPECIAL SUMMER RATES (
AVAILABLE APRIL Ist. j
i Landscaped Roof Garden r
( Gas Fired Grills j
j Two Balconies Per Apartment r
/ Rent Includes Partial Utilities (
( Occupancy Up To Four /
i Sun Deck Stylish Furniture \
j Appliances By )
| GENERAL @ ELECTRIC j
HIGH RISE LUXURY
| AT DORMITORY RATES
I Office Hours 3:30-6 PM Weekends 10 AM-6 PM ]
( 207 N.W. 17th STREET ]
I next to University Post Office i
I 378-7534 )

Friday, March 25, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
4 TIRES. 8.55 x 14. Only 8,000
miles. Like new. sl6 each. Call
W. S. Harrison, ext. 2673. (A (A---121-2t-c).
--121-2t-c). (A---121-2t-c).
1962 TRIUMPH 650 cc. Excellent
condition, fast, reliable, good en engine,
gine, engine, tires, upholstery. $525. Call
378-2125. (A-121-st-c).
SPRING WARDROBE Sizes 8,
9, 10. Sportswear and cocktail
dresses. Specials on a 3-piece
Kiml>erley suit; Jeune Liegue
dress and White Stag l)errnudas.
376-5616. (A-121-ts-c).
1963 YAMAHA YDS-3, 250ce, 27
H.D. Like new, $550 cash or fi financed
nanced financed if preferred. Call 372-
9745. (A-121-2t-p).
34' x 8 TRAILER with 20 x 9'
cabana. Good condition. Perfect
lor married or single students.
$l,lOO. 12-B Archer Rd. Village.
Ph. 378-2126. (A-121-3t-c).
RCA 4 TRACK cartridge tape re recorder,
corder, recorder, includes 10 tapes, $125.
Call Mason, 378-3007. (A-121-
lt-c).
Must Sell FENDER GUITAR and
amplifier with 2-12s reverb and
tremolo Vega Banzo, 5-string long longneck.
neck. longneck. Jim Manderscheid. 376-
9140. (A-l 19-st-p).
1965 HONDA 150. Black, like new.
$395. Call 378-4260.(A- 11 9-3 t-e).
500 cc BMW Motorcycle (1959),
privately imported, excellent con condition,
dition, condition, S7OO. TV aerial with 30
pole and cable (assembled), S3O.
Motorola Stereo portable record
player, 3 yrs. old, black and beige,
$75. Motorola TV, 21, 1964 han handsome
dsome handsome cabinet, remote control,
SIOO. 372-9708. (A-l 19-st-c).
1965 HONDA Sport 50. Good con condition,
dition, condition, blue and white color screen.
$lB5. Call Wayne at 376-3379 after
8 p.m. (A-l 19-3 t-c).
1965 HONDA Sport 50. Excellent
condition. Only 2.000 miles. S2OO.
Also have helmet. Call Earl. Rm.
430. 376-9124. (A-l 17-st-c).
KOMOFLEX S.* 127 single lens
reflex camera. Wide angle and
telephoto lens, tripod, cable re release,
lease, release, and light meter. S7O. Ruger
.22 automatic pistol w/holster.
S3O. Rm. 149 Grove Hall. Ph.
376-9171. Residence 378-4481.(A 378-4481.(A---117
--117 378-4481.(A---117 stc).
HARLEY-DAVIDSON 74 . $325;
1965 YAMAHA 125 .. $375; 1965
YAMAHA 55cc . .$195; 1966 Y YAMAHA
AMAHA YAMAHA Sports 250 cc . $595.
Cyclerama, opposite the Old Post
Office, 378-2811. (A-l 17-st-c).
STUDENTS ONLY. Brand new
Admiral Air Conditiioners, un unredeemed
redeemed unredeemed on lay-away (all sizes).
Pick up payment with nothing down.
Sudden Service Fuel Oil Co., au authorized
thorized authorized AdmirgJLQealer. Ph. 376-
4404. (A-l 18-10 t-c).
1964 BSA Lightning Rocket, 650 cc.
Excellent condition. Cash or trade.
$895. Call Dave Heney. 372-6938.
( A-l 08-ts-c).
LADY'S BICYCLE with basket,
sl3; 23 TV, table model does
not work, sls; guitar, new $18;
hand lawnmower, $5; 4 x 5* piece
of plywood suitable for bed, $4.
Call 378-2257 after 5. (A-120-
2t-c).
1965 YAMAHA 250ec. Super Sports
in excellent condition. Must sell.
$450. Call 376-2755 anytime. If
rio answer try after 5. (A-120-
2t-c).

for rent
MODERN ONE BEDROOM APT.,
2 or 3 people. 3 blocks from cam campus,
pus, campus, furnished, including washing
machine. A/C. Call 378-1530. (B (B---121-ts-c).
--121-ts-c). (B---121-ts-c).
SUMMER STUDENT. Apt. for Sum Summer
mer Summer term in Colonial Manor. slls
per month, pool. Call 378-4848
weekdays after 4 p.m. (B-121-
3t-c).
THREE BEDROOM Stone House,
1319 NW 3rd Ave. sllO a month.
Call in evenings, 376-8421. (B (B---121-3t-c).
--121-3t-c). (B---121-3t-c).
FURNISHED APT. for rent, avail available
able available April Ist. Can accomodate
3 or 4 students, $lO5 monthly, 219
NW 3rd Ave. Call 372-5746. (B (B---121-st-c).
--121-st-c). (B---121-st-c).
AIR CONDITIONED APTS. For
,Summer. Suitable for 2 or 3,5130-
$l5O for A or B Term; suitable
for 3 or 4, SIBO per Term. Call
376-8990, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., or 7 p.m.
-10 p.m. Also renting for Fall.
(B-115-ts-c).
AIR CONDITIONED one bedroom
apt. One block from campus.*
Available for Spring Trimester.
Rent sllO. Call 3 76-2969. (B (B---121
--121 (B---121 -2t-p),
CHOICE ONE BEDROOM furnished
apt. A/C, available April 25th.
Horne's Apts. Ph. 372-2436. (B (B---121-ts-c).
--121-ts-c). (B---121-ts-c).
ATTRACTIVE MODERN air con conditioned
ditioned conditioned two bedroom furnished
apt. Carport and storage room.
Available April 26th. See and re reserve
serve reserve now. SIOO for 2; slls for 3.
3314 NW 21st St. 376-0894. (B (B---121-lt-c).
--121-lt-c). (B---121-lt-c).
FOE RENT. One bedroom apt. Air
conditioned. Available April 20th.
Suitable for 2. 4 blocks from cam campus.
pus. campus. Ph. 378-4143. (B- 1 17-st-p).
AIR CONDITIONED HOUSES AND
APTS. Now leasing for Summer
and/or Fall. 3 or 4 students, male
or female. Call Charlie Mayo.
Town and Country Realty. 370-
4664 anytime. (B-l 14-ts-c).
AVAILABLE NOW. One bedroom
modern air conditioned apt. Near
Univ. and Medical Center. Adults
only, no pets, lease required. S9O.
Ph. 372-3488 or 376-4360. (B-98-
ts-c).
VILLAGE 34. SECOND EDITION.
Located near Univ. Golf Course.
328 SW 34th St. 24 new 1 bedroom
apt. units, furnished and air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Availabe April Ist. Rent
SIOO per month. See Resident Man Managers
agers Managers apt. on premises after 5
p.m. Lou Schilling, apt. 10.
Managed Ernest Tew Realty Inc.
376-6461. (B-108 f-c).
AN APT. to be proud of, 427 SE
Bth St. New 1 bedroom, central
a/c, private patio, smart furnish furnishings.
ings. furnishings. 372-7294 or 372-3576. (B (B-
- (B- 119-3 t-e).
CONVENIENT AND COOL, 2 bed bedroom
room bedroom furnished large apt. Less
than block from campus.sllo. Also
cute 1 bedroom SBS. Both air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, includes part utilities.
1210 SW 3rd Ave. 372-7294 or
372-4692. (B-l 19-3 t-c).
CLOSE TO CAMPUS. Large2bed Large2bedroom
room Large2bedroom furnished apt. Available for
summer trimester at reduced rate.
912 SW 6th Ave. 372-7989. (B (B---1
--1 (B---1 19-31-c).
2 HR DUPLEX, 2 block from
campus, $95. Available now. Ph.
376-6671. (B-11 9-3 t-e).
AVAILABLE MAY Ist. 1 bedroom
modern a/c apt. f urnished, pool
privileges. 4 mins, to campus.
Call 378-1 579. (B-l 20-st-c).

Page 6

;, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 25, 1966

for rent
WANT FOUR OCCUPANTS to take
over 2-bedroom apt., University
Gardens. Air conditioned. Full
summer. Call 372-0279. (B-l 19-
3t-c).
AVAILABLE for Spring Trimes Trimester.
ter. Trimester. Nice apt. for 2. Paneled wall,
*air conditioned, close to campus.
Call 376-3379 after 8 p.m. (B (B---119-3t-c).
--119-3t-c). (B---119-3t-c).
1 BEDROOM Furnished Apt. $65
per month. Married couples only.
Available immediately. Call 378-
4798. (B-l 16-ts-c).
COOL ROOM FOR SUMMER TRI.
One bedroom double, private bath,
kitchen, TV antenna. Three blocks
from campus. Call Paul, 378-4059.
(B-l 19-3 t-p).
CONVENIENT air conditioned 2
bedroom apt. Swimming pool, TV,
stereo, wall-to-wall carpeting.
Need 2 male roommates for A & B
terms. Call 376-1345. (B-l 19-st 19-stc).
c). 19-stc).
AVAILABLE SPRING Trimester.
1 bedroom studio apt. Suitable for
2 or 3. 3 blocks from Campus,
a/c, washer. Low summer rates.
1824 NW 3rd Place, Apt. 23. Call
378-3104. (B- 1 20-st-c).
NEW 4 BEDROOM APT. Air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, kitchen, DR, LR, private
terrace. Made for 4. Block away.
S2OO. Corner SW 3rd Ave., SW
12th St. 372-3576. (B-120-st-c).
FURNISHED APTS: Two bedroom
furnished apts available end of
April. Special low summer rates.
Right near campus. Suitable for
up to 4 students. Call Mrs. Jones,
376-5636. (B-120-ts-c).
AVAILABLE MAY Ist. 1 apt. for
4 students, 2 blocks from campus.
Air conditioners, $l2O per student
for summer semester. 1918 NW'
Ist Ave. Call 372-3572. (B-117-
lOt-c).
for sale
11 | r- i
JUDSON SUPER-CHARGER for 40
hp. VW engine. Unbelievable in increase
crease increase in power. S9O or best of offer.
fer. offer. 378-4423. (A- 120-2 t-p).
! wanted
i l
NEED TWO ROOMMATES to share
High-Rise Apt. for summer tri trimester.
mester. trimester. 1/2 block from campus.
Special rates. Call William Kugel.
378-4524. (C-l 17-st-p).
NEED SUMMER EMPLOYMENT.
Counsellors -- wranglers wanted
for large Eastern Boys' Ranch.
Horsemanship required. Work with
boys age 8-16. For more informa information.
tion. information. 378-4840 during week. (C (C--
- (C--
iitict ii § %
|| |i |J .4 )] I* V
/ y i uy
TONIGHT THRU SAT.
HILARIOUS HITS
l)isnoys |
IlliXlW WINNIE 1
I WlflnLi the 1
pooh
PLUS
iSey Tnar 1
QoNaLD FeeliMG
.OCQWNQR, tech N ,co L q t j

wanted |
NEED RIDE OR RIDER from Ft.
Lauderdale to Gainesville weekend
of Bob Hope Show, April Ist. Call
Ed, 378-4671. (C-121-lt-p).
W ANTED: One ticket lor Lower
East Stand for the Bob Hope Show.
Will buy or exchange for a $4 Lower
East Stands. Ph. 376-3261, ext.
2832. Ask sor 1 Donna. (C-121-tf (C-121-tfnc).
nc). (C-121-tfnc).
WANTED: Two riders to Washing Washington,
ton, Washington, D.C. Leaving April 17th, re returning
turning returning on April 24th. $17.50 each
way. 1965 Mercury Call 372-3974.
(C-121-st-nc).
COMPATIBLE FEMALE ROOM-
M ATES needed for Fall Trimester.
Village Park Apts. Please contact
Mary, 372-9417. (C-120-3t-p).
TWO ROOMMATES ior Summer
Trimester. 3 liedroom, A/C,com A/C,completely
pletely A/C,completely furnished. $37.50 a month*
share utilities. 378-2157. (C-121-
lt-p).
ROOM FOR RENT IN PRIVATE
HOME for mature male student
for Spring Trimester. Separate
entrance, linen and maid service.
376-5360. (C- 121-ts-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
modern a/c apt. (219-A NW 3rd
Ave.) with 2 others. $45 a month
plus utilities. Call 378-3731 after
5 p.m. (C-l 193 t-c).
WANT TO BUY LUGGAGE RACK
for Triumph Spitfire. 378-4527.
Ask for Nancy. (C-119-3t-c).

I AJUJIIJIUMHI'
I y^^UVe^U^HeATRB/^
I 2400 Hawthorn* Rood Rf. 20 Phone ffl 6-5011 1
I STARTS' r> COLOR
iJ Action Hits!
W fii ( (.i/a 2 Nites Only
I OPEN 6:00 SHOW STARTS AT DUSK
Or.GOLOFOOT... / V'
I PRICE t instant l InjJ Ip W 4
I hesMAO? pil/iyi iKil
I reawKiF CRAIG ** DllvINI
ft iuiiau T Agent 00% hes MARHINF T
AVALON just a fraction **.,. j L
r | stupid! pat. n0.36*24*35 *s.. (
I nu/ivur V T00D... worlds ; a Just push the button
luini/UHU wealthiest playboy gand itll GO-GO-GO! *1
tied up in girls! Wfj- \ /*., I
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House 1 <*- V 3 I
a
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color3l Girt raPIAfowAYNE HICKMAN I
~^2!^2SiS2ilL!!ii^

wanted
2 SENIORS want one male room roommate
mate roommate Summer or B term only.
A/C, 1/2 block off campus, car carpeting.
peting. carpeting. $37 plus utilities. 376-
8159. (C-119-3t-c).
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share 1 bedroom furnished apt.
S4O a month, phone 37G-85G9. (C (C--
- (C--
! help wantedi
, i
WAITRESS WANTED. Must be 21.
Work 3 hr. lunch shift. Call Mrs.
Druash, 37G-9913. (E-l 19-st-c).
MAID WANTED One Day Per Week
to do ironing and house cleaning,
8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fridays. "Good
pay, free lunch, no child care.
Ph. 376-9069 after 7 p.m. (E (E---119-tf-nc).
--119-tf-nc). (E---119-tf-nc).
- U UACCOUNTING
ACCOUNTING UACCOUNTING MAJOR --at least
G hours of accounting for assistant
business manager. Student Publi Publications.
cations. Publications. Apply Rrn. 9. Fla. Union.
(E-l 17-tf-nc).
FULLER BRUSH CO needs stu student
dent student representative in Diamond
Village, Flavet 111 and Schucht.
Can be worked in off hrs. with
average of $2.00 per hr. in earn earnings.
ings. earnings. Also need part or full tirm
help for other areas of Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. Write to H. Silver. 102'
Clearwater Dr.. Daytona Beach
Fla. (E-Jl7-tf-c).



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I autos |
1962 TR-3 RCADSTER. Wire
wneels, reasonably priced. 1609
17th Place. 372-5160, and also
372-1145. (G-121-lt-c).
MUST SELL. 1961 RENAULT with within
in within week. Needs repairs, priced
accordingly, recent paint, good in interior.
terior. interior. Call Gary afternoons and
weekends. 378-1400. (G-121-lt-p).
1965 CHEVROLET BELAIRE, 4
door, V-8, contact Jim Holson Holsonback.
back. Holsonback. 376-8281 or 378-3786. (G (G---121-st-c).
--121-st-c). (G---121-st-c).
1959 T-BIRD. Factory A/C, R & H,
all power, recent paint, new rear rearend
end rearend and exhaust system. sso.Call
376-5849 after 7 p.m. (G-121-
lt-c).
MERCEDES-BENZ 190 SL. 1960
1960 Conv. Coupe tops, mint
condition, new tires and battery.
$2,050. Call 378-2307. (G-121-
3t-c).
1965 YW. Bahama blue, radio,
white sidewalls, 10,000 miles. 376-
1728. (G-118-4t-c).
1963 YW 1200 or 1965 VW 1600,
phone 376-3261, ext. 2271.(G-120-
st-c).
W Uin
.RENTALS

ROMAN POLANSKI'S ~ whatsis ? jt
REPUISiON 4
w Award- Winning

# STARTS TODAY!
* , LAKEY-Moro! Li*of the smokinf room for women only! IKtTTIE-Thin women are more sensual The nerveendsarecloser I
to the surface PRISS-She fell in love an, l lived to be an "experiment" POUY-N money no clamour no defenses I
1 poor Cinderella KAY The "outsider" at an Ivy League Ball I'OKEY-Slun plumped full of oystem money, money, money J I
1 , yum! IJBBY-A big reel sear in £f*egW a rnomh sea. and thnve on ,t I I
[HE GIRLS: ** I
I TiNnirP RFRGFN as Lakey JOANNA PETTET as Kay JAMES BRODERICK as Or Ridqeley HAL HOLBROOK as Gus Leroy I
IV' iS ( ; MARY ROBIN REODasPokey JAMES CONGDON is Stan RICHARO MUttIGAN as D,ch B-o.n | I
\ tv, *M AKA ? SHIRLEY KNIGHT as Wr JESSICAWALTERasitti LARRY HAGMAN as tod ft I
| M(( .\Kim KATHLEEN WIDDOESa;HeIena 12/ p I
; \ ELIZABETH HARTMAN | I

I autos
i 960 CORVAIR. Good condition
with radio. s3a7. Call between 4-7
378-3092,(G-119-st-c).
1958- TR3. Wire wheels, luggage
rack, heater, top. Needs some
engine repairs. Will accept any
reasonable offer. Call 378-3254.
(G-l 19-st-p).
1966 MG-B. British Racing Green,
wire wheels, 3,500 miles, factory
warranty, delux equipment, excel excellent
lent excellent condition. $l5O and take pay payments.
ments. payments. Call I.arry Strickland, 372-
9213. (G-l 19-3 t-p).
1958 CHEVROLET. Automatic
transmission, power steering, ra radio,
dio, radio, heater, 283. $225. Call ext.
2741 before 5. Or 378-4173 alter
9. (G-l 19- ; st-p).
19a9 AUS3 IN-HEALEY Roadster.
Wire wheels, electric overdrive,
new metalic blue paint. $995. Ph.
378-2059. (G-l 20-3 t-c).
ENGLISH FORD. 1958 in good con condition.
dition. condition. Recently overhauled. $l5O.
Contact TK, 376-3261, ext. 2805
from 1-5 p.m. (G-120-3t-p).
FTAT 600, 1959 model. Reasonably
good condition. New tires, heater,
needs minro adjm ment. $1 25. Call
372-2288 between 6-8 p.m. (G-120-
2t-c).

1 rlday, March 25, 1966, The Florida Alligator

\ real estate 1
MARRIED STUDENT, Why Pay
Rent? 3 bedroom, 1 bath, large
shady fenced backyard. Close to
Univ., swimming, golf. $12,900
with low down, 121 NW 25th St.
372-7715 for appointment with
owner. (I-119-ltf-c).
lost-found
-
LOST -1 black wallet in front of
Jennings or Lambda Chi Alpha
house Sunday night. ID and papers
URGENTLY NEEDED. Keep mon money,
ey, money, return wallet. Contact C. H.
Edwards, Jr. 376-9102, 376-9374,
376-92 35. (I -11 9-3 t-p).
LOST Pair of dark rimmed pre prescription
scription prescription glasses. Reward. Contact
Mike Ruddleston, 372-9326. (L (L---121-2t-c).
--121-2t-c). (L---121-2t-c).
services
NOW OPENING. Teddy Bear Nur Nursery.
sery. Nursery. 3 departments, complete
mlant dept. Planned program for
children over 3. Central heating
and air conditioned. Ph. 376-0917.
1214-1/2 NW 4th St. (M-l 16-ts-c).
P< )RTRAITS, applications, pass passport,
port, passport, etc. photos. Special rates to
students. Ph. 378-1170, Sneeringer
Photo Service, 1013-1/2 W. Univ.
Ave. (M-l 19-3 t-c).
QUICK EFFICIENT TYPING at
reasonable rates. Contact 378-
4066. (M-121-3t-c)
personal
NOSE, NOSE, ANYTHING GOES!
YOU LOVED IT! STICK. (J-121-
lt-nc)

Page 7

| SCORE! |
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I BE
OUT IN FRONT
OF THINGS...
I Get with the winner The Florida
1 Alligator. It comes in first every time
with all the action each morning in
I pictures, stories, and advertisements
I all served to a winning audience that
I knows how to read and react ... and
1 how to patronize the many advertisers
fl who make it all possible. I
*&?/ slates*
..DEAN
Martin
Silencers
1:27 3:24 5:21




Page 8

. The Florida Alligator, Friday. March 29. 19GG

'Greek Evaluation
Begins Sunday
By MIKE MAL AG HAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Starting this Sunday the UF Greek system begins a weeks evaluation
of itself.
A stronger fraternity system through informed leadership. is the
theme of the week according to Bob Mims, director of the activities.
Mims, a Sigma Nu fraternity brother of IFC president Clyde Taylor,
finalized the idea for this type of retreat during Taylors election
campaign.
Mims, the Sigma Nu representative to the national workshop noted
that one weakness of the workshop is solutions to problems are more
theoretical than practical because each campus lias problems unique
to its own structure.
Taylor pointed out that former IFC retreats on campus exposed onl>
two leaders of each fraternity to a one day hurried retreat.
This year there will be eight separate study sessions.
Dean Lester Hale will be the faculty chairman of the study session
on Chapter Leadership at the Sigma Chi house Monday night at 7:30.
Also Monday night at 7:30 there will be a meeting at the Sigma Nu
house on Pledge Education. The faculty advisor for this meeting is
J. G. Hawkins, advisor to fraternities at North Carolina State.
Tuesday night, Dr. Irving Goffman. faculty advisor to the TKPs
who led the Orange League in academics, will aid in a seminar on
scholarship.
Simultaneously at the ATO house. J. S. Almeida, a C.P.A. who
handles accounts for a number of fraternities, will lead a study session
on house finances.
Wednesday evening at the Sig Ep house Ray King, director of Food
Service at the University of South Florida, will aid fraternity house
managers and kitchen stewards develop better meal and cost programs
for their fraternities.
At the same time at the SAE house Manual James, vice president oi
the IFC, will conduct a seminar session on intramurals. A memlier
of the faculty staff on intramurai c will also attend.
Thursday night, Monty Trainer, manager ol the University Inn. will
host a meeting on public relations. Trainer is a past officer of the IFC
of three years ago.
Don Slesnick. rush chairman for the IFC, will discuss the new' pro proposed
posed proposed rush rules at the Pi Kappa Phi house.
There will be a special meeting of housemothers at the KA house
Thursday morning at 9:30. Dean Frank Adams will lead the discussion
on the role of the housemother in the fraternity system.
Taylor emphasized the importance of each president appointing two
or three young potential leaders to attend each session.
The kick-off banquet for Greek evaluation will be at the University
Inn at 6:00 p.rn., Sunday. March 27.
GATOR GRAS WEEKEND
ENTERTAINMENT FOR THIS WEEKEND
FRIDAY:
Orchesis 8:00 9:00 P.M. Florida Auditorium
Harolds Club 7:30 12:30 P.M. Graham Area
SATURDAY:
Gator Gras Variety Show 7:00 & 9:00 P.M. Florida Auditorium
SUNDAY:
Gator Gras Parade 2:00 P.M, Through Campus
Soap Box Derby 2;30 4:30 P.M. Behind Med Center
TEACH-IN ON STUDENT FREEDOM
X
(From Page 1)

a UF graduate student from South
America.
Dz. Sidney Jourard, psychology
professor.has tentatively accepted
to speak.
If it rains, Cross said, the teach teachin
in teachin will move inside to University
Auditorium.
Later today, at 10 p.m., a dis discussion
cussion discussion on Theology and the War #>
will be held at the Bent Card Cof Coffee
fee Coffee House facross from the UF
handball courts).
Panel members will include
Rev. William Neville, chaplain of
the Presbyterian Student Center;
Rev. Roy Mercer, chaplain of the
Episcopal Student Center; Geoffrey
Steere, assistant professor of so social
cial social science; and Dr. Morris stor storer,
er, storer, humanities professor.
Julian Brown will emcee the
panel discussion.
As part of International Days of

|j?\Col. Sanders SPECIAL
.W SHRIMP DINNER n
! F INCLUDES KHENCH II I I
FRIES, COLE SI.AW ffi or II (E
HOT SAUCE & HUSH Z:> X
jjjjE | I
/I -AVAILABLE AT-
Tried AMi*
So Tasty 214 NW 13th St. 37G-G472
' 207 NE 10th Avr. 378-2959
OFFER GOOD FRIDAY ONLY

Protest, sponsored by the National
Coordinating Committee to End the
War in Viet Nam, six peace
breakfasts will be held Saturday
at 9 a.m.
A parade will begin at*ll;3oa.m.
in front of University Station post
office, then will follow University
Avenue to the Alachua County
Courthouse in downtown Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville.
At 12:30 p.m., a rally will be
held at the courthouse. State Senate
candidate John Due and MarveDa MarveDavidov
vidov MarveDavidov will speak at the rally.
One of the overall goals of this
Peace and Freedom Festival,
Cross said, is to get more new
people involved with the questions
of student freedom and the war in
Viet Nam. Today will be the first
time many of those on the teach-in
program have spoken out on these
questions.

I HEY. GATOBS!
BARNEYS
I HERE! ONLY 3gcV /
I TODAY AT THE
RED BARM 0/&
I GRAND
JgL jp OPEMIHG-
I BIG BARNEY, famous with college students from coast to coast, is the
RED RARNs popular double-deck hamburger sandwich. Big Barney is big
ever. Its made with two grilled patties of beet, a slice of creamy,
melted cheese, zestv pickle, crisp lettuce, special savory sauce ... all
I on a double-decker bun . and ONLY 390.
There art' other great treats at the Red Barn too Dignifried Chicken v g*
Dinner for only 090. fish sandwiches, french fries, onion rings, hot and cold | my
beverages. Theyre all served quickly ... to take out or eat in and enjoy M
the attractive surroundings.
Meet the Gator Gras Beaut\ Queen at the Red Barn tonight between 7:00
I ""' 9 oo COME ON OVER TO THE 0
RED BARM
I 2029 NW 13th STREET
- w w|
| w| Summer Business
Opportunity For
|, Sophomores, Juniors,
Seniors I
[ JEWEL TEA CO., INC. |
I 5502 Shawland Rd. a
1 P.O. Box 6458 I
I Jacksonville, Fla.
I i
This Is For That Student Who Needs Summer Employment And Can Travel The I
| Os Florida. Expense Allowance With Guarantee Income Os SBO.OO Per 1
= Week, Plus Bonus At Termination,
Also Competition For Scholarship Awards. 1
| Jewel's Summer Program Is Designed For The Ambitious, Capable College I
| Student For Opportunities In Jewel's Food Stores Routes Department Drug |
j Stores And Manufacturing.
Mail The Coupon Below Or Write To Address Above.
| Name:
| Address:
| Telephone: Age:
1 Major Subject:
| Past Employment If Any:
"
1 Best Time For Interview- |
lillliliillllllllllllllliiillllliliillillllililiiUlllilllllillliiiilillilflllilliillllilllllllllllHlllillillillllllllilllllliiiililiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii,,,j,,jjjjjnnjjjiumuijiiiiiiiyiip



l nilariaii-l nivorsalist Fellowship
OF GAI NESVILLE 1
Speaker Dr. James L. Guest
Instructor in Surgery
"Ethical Problems in Modern Medicine"
ll a.m ~ Sunday, March 27, Room 324, Florida Union
EVERYONE INVITED

ill V,- tM* JmT§ l
I
i un.wnAS+U 'M : L '|ft4~~~-
;; j 9 ifciiniSh 1 iWP |j niriPl Mttki 1
B i -**#*
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|B y
I Transportation Is No Problem At
I University Gardens. There Will
I Be Six Runs Daily, Coordinated
I With Classes, Beginning Sept. 6.
I From The University.

Outspoken Writer
Speaks On Campus
Harry Golden, national syndicated columnist and editor of the
Carolina Israelite, will speak on the UF campus at 8:30 p.m.
April 1 in Universitv Auditorium.
The outspoken journalist will present his views on What is
the American Way ol Lib' in the free public lecture brought
to the University by the Ptii Beta Kappa chapter on campus.
Goldens ideas and attitade alxjut personal journalism have
established him as one of the foremost newspapermen in the
United States.
In his career as a journalist spanning 20 years, Golden has
appeared frequently on television, written profusely in news newspapers
papers newspapers as well as liest selling books and become widely read
and recognized for his syndicated comments on the political,
economic and international scene.

Quarter System Will
Relax Pace Says Hale

lie ttie academic future for the
UK lies the quarter system.
The State Board of Regents,
which recommended the quarter,
had the proposal sent to the Flor Florida
ida Florida Legislature. The vote will come
any day and ttie trimester system
will hear its death knell.
How will the change affect ttie
more than IG.OOO students pre presently
sently presently enrolled at the UF? Will the
students lose credits in the change changeover?
over? changeover? What exactly will the quarter
system do?
Assistant Dean of Academic Af Affairs
fairs Affairs Franklin Doty said recently
that the quarter system will re relax
lax relax the pace a little tor both the
students and the professors. In Instead
stead Instead of the 27-week academic year
under the'trimester system, the
academic year under the quarter
system will last 30 weeks.
Ttie year will be divided into
four quarters. Throe quarters will
extend from September until the
end of May. There will lie one sum summer
mer summer quarter, Doty said, with no
divided summer sessions as there
are under the trimester system.
Students who have already ac accumulated
cumulated accumulated trimester credits will
not lose any hours when the change changeover
over changeover is made, he said. Ttie old
hours will l>e re-evaluated tor
EUROPE
21DAyS>gEg
toted ill tciwse
CAjWWN ECONOMY TOURS
Engl., Holt., Belg., Germany, Switz.,
Liecht Aust, Italy, Monaco, France.
DCPAHTUWCS WEEKLY APT to MOV
for Fr<** ||lntrAft flrnfhufM
W WORLD
W TRAVEL
- SERVICE,
808 W. UNIVERSITY AVENUE
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA

I NOTICE I
I The Board Os Student Publications Is Accepting Applications For The I
I Following Positions. Forms Should Be Picked Up In Room 9Of The I
I Florida Union And Returned No Later Than Tuesday, March 30, 12:00 Noon I
I POSITIONS I
I MAMAGING EDITOR, THE SEMINOLE (1966-67 BOOK) I
I EDITOR IN CHIEF, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR (TRIMESTER 1 & 2, 1966-67)
I MAMAGING EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR (TRIMESTER I & 2, 1966-67) I

quarter hours, by inorel\ adding
one-third of a semester hour.
Each quarter hour will l>o worth
two-thirds of a trimester hour.
The course loads lor each quar quarter
ter quarter will In' about the same as for
one trimester. Doty said that at
some colleges students take three
courses a quarter all worth five
hours each. Florida, however, will
probably maintain the old system
of taking five courses worth three
credits, he stated.
The costs for the changeover
will l>e financed through new ap appropriations.
propriations. appropriations. The additional money
is needed because of the time and
paperwork involved.
Individually, each student will
find that each quarter is naturally
cheaper than one trimester. The
overall cost for a college educa education
tion education will not increase drastically,
if at all, said Doty.
The quarter system was pro proposed
posed proposed as an alternate means to
keep the university facilities oc occupied
cupied occupied all year long. The legis legislative
lative legislative intent was to have equal
terms, which leaves onlv the quar quarter
ter quarter system,* said Doty.

Mortar Board Officers Elected

Lee Ann Draud, 20-year-old
Arts & Sciences junior from Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville Beach, is new president
of Mortar Board, UFs senior hon honorary
orary honorary tor women.
Miss Draud, a member of Kappa
HILLEL
FOUNDATION
PASSOVER SEDERS
April 4 and 5
Call Hillel Foundation
For Information
And Reservations
2-2900

Friday, March 25, 19C6, The Florida Alligator,

-ME
-t BB
m : v jp|K
HARRY GOLDEN ?

Selective
Service
(From Page 1)
boards with evidence of the rela relative
tive relative qualifications of registrants
for college study. The test scores
will provide local boards with evi evidence
dence evidence of their aptitude for conti continued
nued continued college work.
Administered and prepared by
Science Research Associates, Chi Chicago,
cago, Chicago, 111., the test presupposes no
schooling beyond the ordinary high
school preparations for college.
Scores on the test will not them themselves
selves themselves determine eligibility for
deferment from the draft.
Scores on the test will be used
by the Selective Service local
l>oards in considering the eligi eligibility
bility eligibility of registrants for occupation
deferment as students.
Florida test centers for all three
tests include Boca Raton, Braden Bradenton,
ton, Bradenton, Coral Gables, Daytona Beach,
DeLand, Gainesville, Jacksonville,
Lake Worth, Lakeland, Marianna,
Miami, Ocala, Crlando, Palatka,
Panama City, Pensacola, St. Au Augustine,
gustine, Augustine, St. Petersburg, Tallahas Tallahassee,
see, Tallahassee, Tampa, West Palm Beach and
Winter Park.

Delta sorority and chairman of
Womens Judiciary, was named
Thursday and will be installed at
Mortar Boards next meeting on
April 7. Fellow incoming officers
are Candy Hampton, vice presi president;
dent; president; Sally Boland, secretary;
Alison Conner, treasurer; Nancy
Calhoun, editor, and Jane Kim Kimbrell,
brell, Kimbrell, historian.
|X£ft6x eopiEsl
1-19 Copies, iOv ea. 20&
Over, 9 Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Page 9



Orange

Campus Calendar

PLEASE TURN IN ALL ITEMS FOR CAMPUS CALENDAR TO THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS OFFICE, FLA. UNION

PHI SIGMA ALPHA: Today, 11 a.m., FU Aud.
Lesley Rubin, Howard Univ.: South Africa Today:
Challenge to the west.**
PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM: Today, 4 p.m., Bless Aud.
Prof. E. Scott, Univ. of Alabama: Topics in the
History of Physics & Os Physicists.
AMERICAN NUCLEAR SOCIETY BANQUET: Today,
6:45 p.m., Blue Room, Student Service Center. George
Kinsman: The Future of Nuclear Power Generation.
Members & Guests Invited. Tickets $3.00 per person,
available at 202 NSB.
MOVIE: Today, 7 & 9;30 p.m., MSB Aud. Away
All Boats.
UF WRESTLING AND JUDO CHAMPIONSHIPS:
Today, Mar. 25, 7:30 p.m., Fla. Gym. No admission,
public invited.
HAROLDS CLUB: Today, 7:30 12:30 p.m., Gra Graham
ham Graham Area. Gambling Casino, 3 Dance Bands, Floor
Show. Dress is Casual.

ORCHESIS MODERN DANCE CONCERT: Today,
8 p.m., Univ. Aud. Admission free.

Administrative Notices To Students, Faculty & Staff

STUDENTS
APRIL DEGREE GRADUATES: There will be a
meeting of all students currently enrolled as candi candidates
dates candidates for degrees at the April 24 commencement on
Tuesday, March 29, at 4 p.m. in University Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium. Instructions for the commencement ceremony
will be given at this meeting.
JOBS AVAILABLE NOW: The Student Employment
Office announced that there are many part-time jobs
now available. The jobs will continue through the
spring trimester. These jobs are part of the Work-
Study Program and are limited to students whose
parents are in the low-income group. For informa information,
tion, information, contact the Student Employment Office, 124
Tigert. Students are needed to begin work immedi immediately.
ately. immediately.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS: Reading
Knowledge Examination in Spanish and functional
knowledge for graduate students will be given Satur-

General Notices
808 HOPE SHOW: Tickets are still available for
the April 2 Bob Hope Show and are on sale at Florida
Union, Belk-Lindsey and the Record Bar.
FACULTY CLUB MEMBERS: Luncheons are served
at the Faculty Club overlooking the golf course from
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. daily. For reservations in
private dining rooms, call 2561. Thursday night buffet
suppers are served from 6:30 7:30 p.m., with a
A

CASH
CONSOLIDATE BILLS
TRAVEL EXPENCE
$25 S6OO
llaxion Finance Company Inc.
222 W. University Ave.

TRACK: Sat., Mar. 26, 9:30 a.m., Varsity Track.
Florida Relays.
CHILDRENS MOVIE: Sat., Mar. 26, 2 p.m., MSB
Aud. The Three World of Gulliver.
GATOR GRAS VARIETY SHOW: Sat., Mar. 26, 7
& 9 p.m., Univ. Aud.
MOVIE: Sat., Mar. 26, 7 & 9:05 p.m., MSB Aud.
Sands of Iwo Jima.
GATOR GRAS STREET DANCE: Sat., Mir. 26,
8-1 a.m., South of Fla. Union.
DUPLICATE BRIDGE TOURNAMENT: Sun., Mar.
27, 1:30 p.m., 215 FU. Students, faculty and staff.
LATIN AMERICAN CLUB: Sun., Mar. 27, 10:45
a.m. 12:30 p.m., FU Social Rm., Social.
SIGMA ALPHA IOTA INITIATION: Sun., Mar. 27,
2 p.m., Univ. Aud.
GATOR GRAS PARADE: Sun., Mar. 27, 2 p.m.,
Starts at ROTC Drill Field.
GATOR GRAS SOAP BOX DERBY: Sun., Mar. 27,
2:30 p.m., Med Center Hill.
FACULTY CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES: Sun., Mar.
27, 4 p.m., MSB Aud. Florida String Quartet.

day, April 2, 10 a.m. to noon in 18 Anderson Hall.
Application deadline is March 25.
NATIONAL DEFENSE LOAN INTERVIEWS: Inter Interviews
views Interviews to determine eligibility and amount to be granted
for National Defense loans in the academic year be beginning
ginning beginning September, 1966, will beheld March 14- April
7, according to the following alphabetical schedule:
Applicants will report to 124 Tigert Hall for inter interviews.
views. interviews. Persons whose last names begin with:
(I-J-K)on March 23; ( L ) on March 24;
( M ) on March 28; ( N O ) on March 29; ( P )
on March 30; ( Q R ) on March 31; ( S ) on
April 4; ( T U V ) on April 5; ( W ) on April
6; (X-Y-Z)on April 7.

bridge party scheduled the first Thursday of each
i
month following supper.
OPERATION SAV-A-LIFE: The American Cancer
Society is sponsoring movies and discussions about
cancer, 9-11 a.m., Saturday, March 26, at the local
theaters. Program for men over 16 years will be held
at the Plaza and the program for womenover 16 years
will be at the State. Details on the program are avail available
able available in the local newspaper, on radio or you may call
the American Cancer Society,, 376-6866.

TAXES DUE

and

BLUE BULLETIN

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 25, 1966

Page 10

ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE,
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE.
3

L.S.A.: Sun., Mar. 27, 6:30 p.m., L.SLA. Center.
Come with clean hands.
CERAMICS CLASS: Children 8-12 yrs. $6.00 all
materials; starts Sat., Mar. 26, 9 11a.m., FU Craft
Shop. Instructor Olive Briggs.
JOHN JACOB NILES: Tues., Mar. 29, 8:1 > p.m.,
Univ. Aud. Ticket Sales: Today, noon to 4:30 p.m.,
FU Box Office. Students on ID cards. Faculty & Staff,
SI.OO per person. General Public, $2.00 per person.
MENSA: Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m. -1 p.m., Main Cafeteria.
West Wing.
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF AERONAUTICS AND
ASTRONAUTICS: Mon., Mar. 28, 7:30 p.m., 328 Eng.
Bldg. Film: Gemini 6 and 7 Rendezvous.
808 HOPE SHOW: Sat., Apr. 2, 8:15 p.m., Fla.
Gym. Ticket Sales: Today, noon to 4:30 p.m., FU Box
Office. Only $2 ticket left.
JAMAICA TOUR: Apr. 23 29, 2nd Annual FU Trip.
$30.00 deposit by Mar. 31, FU 315. 7 days 5165.00.
EUROPEAN TOUR: June 21 Aug. 15. 8 weeks
$310.00. $125.00 deposit, FU 315.

FACULTY AND STAFF
IMPORTANT REMINDER: The Personnel Division
reminds all faculty and staff members AND THEIR
DEPENDENTS who reached age 65before Jan. 1,1966,
to sign up for Medicare before March 31 in order to
receive this coverage. You will not be able to keep
your present Blue Cross-Blue Shield and/or Gulf
Medical coverage after July, 1966, if you are eligible
for Medicare, even if you dont sign up for Medicare.
This includes all people over 65 whether they are
employees, retired, or are dependents of employes.
Contact the Social Security Office immediately if you
have not done so.
APPLY FOR SUMMER EMPLOYEES: The Central
Employment Center is receiving applications from
students seeking summer employment. All depart departments
ments departments interested in employing student workers during
the summer months should send in their requisition
as soon as possible.

ROTC GRADUATE REVIEW: The annual ROTC
Graduate Review will be Saturday, April 2, at 10:30
a.m. on the upper drill field. Reviewing officer will
be Maj. Gen. Robert P. Hollis. The public is invited
to review the combined units of the Air Force and
Army ROTC along with the Angel Flight, Army Sweet Sweethearts,
hearts, Sweethearts, Gator Raiders, Gator Guard, Gator Sabres
and the Billy Mitchell Drill Team.
<*
MENSA MEETING: MENSA meets every day, includ including
ing including Saturday, in the West Wing of the Main Cafeteria
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. For information call Mike
Sipe, 8-4950.
v

LOANS!
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THEOLOGY w P n N NI^Me SSl< a a^i l J H: r^a y
Geoffrey Steere, Professor March 25
L BTTT] TXTBTS R y Mercer Chaplain
AI!iU A Morris Sforer, Professor 10 p.m.
MVl.benb card Kou.se,

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SUPPORT GATOR ADVERTISERS

Tlie Florida Alligator

March 25, 1966

Page 11

UF Signs Prospects

With basketball recruiting at its
height, UF announced today the
signing of two college prospects
considered to be among the finest
in the state of Florida.
Basketball coach Norm Sloan
said he plans to ink Ft. Lauder Lauderdales
dales Lauderdales Tony Duva to a four year
scholarship tonight prior to Duvas
being honored at the Gainesville
Tip-Off Club as one of the top ten
cagers in the state.

SPORTS

Sloan will also sign Chipola Jr.
College guard Harry Dunn to a
two year offer. Dunn, a former
Cocoa High School standout, led
Chipola to the national junior col college
lege college tournament this year where
his team finished fourth in the na nation
tion nation among the two-year colleges.
Duva, an All-State competitor
for stranahan in Ft. Lauderdale,
stands 5-11 and averaged 23.8
points a game on a club that went
20-3 for the year. He was also
selected player-of-the-Year in
Broward County by the Ft. Lauder Lauderdale
dale Lauderdale News and is considered by
coaches in South Florida to be one
of the finest college guard pros prospects
pects prospects in that area.
Both of these boys will greatly
help us,** declared Sloan. Dunn
is a tremendous shooter and is
big and strong for a guard. Duva
can handle the ball extremely well
and is a fierce competitor.*'
Bob Marcum Duva's high school
coach, rated his scrappy guard as,
the best basketball player to come
out of Stranahan in the past 1C
years."
Dunn, a 6-3, 195-pounder, gain gained
ed gained honorable mention All-Ameri All-American
can All-American honors among the junior
college teams in the nation in lue
of his performance for the season.
*
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COSMETICS
ME FT 3ILL HEINAUER:
The charming president of
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1 GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA
J



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 25, 1966

Gators Face Stiff Test

UF*s baseball team faces the
stiffest team of its early season
this weekend when the Gators jour journey
ney journey to Auburn for a two game stand
that could go a long way in deciding
the eventual Eastern Division SEC
champ.
Coach Dave Fullers hard hardhitting
hitting hardhitting Gators are 3-1 in confer conference
ence conference play, having swept past Van Vanderbilt
derbilt Vanderbilt twice and split with Georgia
on the Gator diamond. Auburn is
currently leading the Eastern Di Division
vision Division but has played fewer league

UF Holds Wrestling, Judo
Championships Here Tonight

The UF judo and wrestling
championships will be held to tonight
night tonight in the south end of Florida
Gymnasium at 7:30 p.m.
Judo competition will take place
in the following weight divisions:
139 lbs., 154 lbs., 176 lbs., and un unlimited.
limited. unlimited.
Trophies will be awarded to first
place finishers in each division
and for the overall champion. Me Medals
dals Medals will lie given to second and
third place winners.
UF Coach Richard Reisinger
emphasized that in both the judo
and wrestling competition fans will
have an opportunity to see some
excellent young athletes perform.
Stands will be provided for the
spectators.
Some of those participating in
the judo competition will be Martin
Carroll, Doug McDilda, David
Frisby, John Flynn, Jack Haney,
Jerry Neigm and Kiyo Saji.
At the Florida State champion championships
ships championships held at South Broward High
School in Hollywood on March
19-20, members of the UF Judo
Club participated and were pro promoted
moted promoted to higher ranks. The UFers
promoted were David Frisby, John
Flynn and Kiyo Saji.
Wrestling competition weight di divisions
visions divisions will be 123 lbs., 130 lbs.,
137 lbs., 145 lbs., 152 lbs., 160
lbs., 167 lbs., 177 lbs., 191 lbs.,
and unlimited.
Jim**
Larec*
says...
You get so much more fori
your life insurance dollars from
CoMege Lifes famous policy,
THE BENEFACTOR,, because
College Life insures only college
men and college men are preferred
risks. Let me tell you more.?/
*JIM LABREC
1105 W. University Ave.
Suite 4
Gainesville, Fla
Tel. 378-2476
representing
THE COLLEGE LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
OF AMERICA
... the only Company sailing
exclusively to College Men

games than Florida.
Ray Rollyson, the Gators* lead leading
ing leading hurler with a 3-1 record, will
get the nod for the Friday contest
and Kelly Prior will face the Ti Tigers
gers Tigers the following day. Prior is
1-1 thus far in the season but has
a respectable earned run average
of 0.82 for some 22 innings pitched.
Fuller has had to make little or
no changes in his lineup since the
beginning of the year and this Ga Gator
tor Gator squad is considered to be
among the best in hitting that he

Working with Coach Reisinger
to put on the competition and
working closely with the UF
Wrestling Club is manager Mar Martin
tin Martin Shield.
Some of the outstanding wrest wrestlers
lers wrestlers who will be competing include
Lars Balck, Jim Brackin, Mark
Cremin, John Edmunds, Billy Joe
McCabe, Brad Munroe and Ron
Scott.
Reisinger said he hoped that as
many people as possible would
attend because this would l>e one
of the exceptionally rare times
to see a really wide field of ex excellent
cellent excellent wrestling and judo com competition.
petition. competition.
Salukis Are Rare
CARBONDALE. 111. UPI'
The Saluki, nickname of South Southern
ern Southern Illinois University's Athlet Athletic
ic Athletic teams. is an ancient
Egyptian hunting dog similar
in appearance to a greyhound.
There are fewer than 1.000 of
them in the United States.


11
how many great oldies do you have?

COLLECTORS SERIES of LPS a the original hits by the original artist
M Immmmmmmmmm*
1 MONEY HONEY GOODNIGHT SWEETHEART M A
SH-BOOM SHAKE RATTLE AND ROLL / \
MR. SANDMAN KOKO MO TWEEDLE DEE JT j
SINCERELY CRAZY OTTO DANCE WITH
ME HENRY SEVENTEEN ONLY YOU r jMllt7?aiiTl[3T7]7'll 111 l ]
BLACK DEN IUM TROUSERS IN THE STILL **
OF THE NIGHT
2 5 COME GO WITH ME FOUR WALLS SCHOOL
DAYS FREIGHT TRAIN LITTLE DARLIN*
GOLD THE GREAT PRETENDER TUTTI TEENAGERS ROMANCE C.C. RIDER
FRUTTI ILL BE HOME MOSTLY MARTHA LOVE LETTERS IN THE SAND SEARCHIN
NO NOT MUCH ITS ALMOST TOMORROW SO RARE SIT RIGHT DOWN REBEL
WHY DO FOOLS FALL IN LOVE EDDIE MY WHISPERING BELLS TIL AFTER SCHOOL
LOVE BLUE SUEDE SHOES HOT DIG
GITY HEARTBREAK HOTEL LISBON
ANTIGUA A TEAR FELL MAGIC TOUCH BUTTERFLY GONNA GET ALONG WITH WITHOUT
OUT WITHOUT YOU MOONLIGHT GAMBLER
LOVE IS STRANGE DONT FORBID ME
o STANDING ON THE CORNER IVORY TOWER YOUNG LOVE AUCTIONEER TEENAGE
O CHURCH BELLS MAY RING DEVIL OR CRUSH PARTY DOLL IM STICKEN
ANGEL ROCK ISLAND LINE LONG TALL WITH YOU 99 WAYS GONE ROUND AND
SALLY WAYWARD WIND STREET WHERE ROUND DAY-O MAMA LOOK A 800
YOU LIVE BORN TO BE WITH YOU 800 SITTIN IN THE BALCONY
STRANDED IN THE JUNGLE BLUE VELVET
FLYING SAUCER MORE PICNIC M
DELILAH JONES Mm
4 HONKEY TONK TREASURE OF LOVE M m A EMM
YOU BELONG TO ME MIRACLE OF LOVE S* g A M J)|f
BLUEBERRY HILL GREEN DOOR hmflM // # hU*
SINGING THE BLUES ROCK A BYE Mmllj ** U
GARDEN OF EDEN SINCE I MET YOU (JAP
BABY ROSE AND BABY RUTH CINDY Li ft r \
lou Canadian sunset happiness buy direct from the maunfactU)'C /* ( r\i
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H ADDRESS H j.

has ever had.
Three Florida boys are batting
better than .300. Left fielder Skip
Lujack leads the pack with .378
followed by second baseman Bruce
Moore, .333, and catcher and team
captain Jack Kenworthy who has a
.318 average.
Auburn is extremely tough no
matter where you play them, says
Fuller, and we can expect them
to be playing their best against us,
like always.
f THE QUESTION IsTN
I AM I A HAS-BEEN OR )
V. A NEVER-WAS? J
\f
HELP 54 if
-rue poctor
IS REAL IN ~
YOU NEED
HELP,
CHARLIE
BROWN
THE NEW
PEANUTS 3
CARTOON BOOK!
by Charles M. Schulz
ONLY A Mat your college
M bookstore
Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc.

ED ABBOTT, 1965 graduate of
the University of Florida and
presently with Abbott, Bitte r
and Associates Life Insurance
Consultants, will be in
Gainesville on April 2 and
3, 1966.
The purpose of his visit is:
1. To discuss the recent G. I. Bill with
veterans and its possible applications
in developing a life insurance estate;
and
2. To talk with professional and medical
graduate students concerning their
estate accumulation and conservation.
If you fit into either of those
categories, please join Ed
>_ A
for coffee and donuts on
Saturday, April 2, at 10:30
A.M. in Room 215 of the
Florida Union.
Abbott, Bitter and Associates
FIRST NATIONAL BANK, MIAMI, FLORIDA