Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
B
^ s *" fl ; t:-: K
' pr'
SHBBBBP"* m ''
vi
wmmi. ji t H (ff
Hf| If-* ; K
* jt-^B
THE CROWNING TOUCH...
... is applied by last years Military Ball Queen, Suz Ann Hull, who
places the queens tiara on the 1966 choice, Betty Wendt. See Page 4
for other Military Ball and Peter Nero photos.
Nothing Decided Yet
By Electric Committee
By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
The committee for investigating campus electrical rates came out
of its second meeting Friday convinced of a need for at least one more
meeting before making any recommendations. Hope was expressed,
however, that valid conclusions might be reached within a reasonable
amount of time.
At the first meeing, questions to be directed to housing residents
and the Business Office, Plants and Grounds and Florida Power were
drawn up.
However, we didnt ask enough the first time, said Clyde Taylor,
president of the Interfraternity Council and a member of the committee.
We really couldnt come to any valid conclusions. Taylor was the

only member available for comment
A second meeting was called to
formulate additional questions.
The information from these ques questions
tions questions will be presented at a meet meeting
ing meeting this Friday in the office of Dr.
Williard Stone, head of the Ac Accounting
counting Accounting Department of the College
of Business Administration.
Recommendations and data com coming
ing coming out of this and other meetings
of the committee will be presented
to UF President J. Wayne Reitz,
who will approve any action taken.
Other than these simple facts,
I really cant say anything else,
Taylor said. Any statements or
recommendations now wouldbe un unfair.
fair. unfair. As yet we dont have enough
information to base any con conclusions
clusions conclusions on, but I think well even eventually
tually eventually come up with something
substantial.
The committee of five consists
of Dave Vosloh. assistant major majority
ity majority leader of Legislative Council
representing Student Government;
Tom Kennor, chairman of the
Mayors Council; Taylor; Dean
of Student Affairs Lester L. Hale
and Dr. Stone.

TWO BIG PAGES
OF LETTERS
SEE PAGES 7 & 8

5a wm vs iTa >-!* %* CV T" JM(K| %Tpi!i7Â¥>
*.£ v hl .MKsm3r^r > mik Hiu Jr ifUMH Aw- v
i&m ¥ i
Mjjl> ll'j) 1 1 ' a
BBBBSBMBBBBBBLa *4Bh*dfcj!MuL* i3L* >"*^^nNi
NEW SQUADS DEBUT

UFs new cheerleaders made their debut Saturday in the Orange-
Blue intrasquad game. They are (1-r): Back row: Jean Eagleson,
Roddy Grubbs, Bill Dixon, Marty Stone, John Myrick and Janet Martin.

The Florida
Alligator

Vol. 58. No. 117

Shepherd, Haverfield
To Lead Symposium

Charles Shepherd, a senior ma majoring
joring majoring in political science, today
was named general chairman of
ACCENT 67, the UFs first annual
Spring symposium.
The announcement was made by

ACCENT Blanks
Available Today

Applications for ACCENT 67
the UFs first annual Spring sym symposium
posium symposium -- will be available through
Thursday at 5 p.m., General Chair Chairman
man Chairman Charles Shepherd announced
today.
Shepherd says interested stu students
dents students can pick up application blanks
at the Florida Union information
desk or in Room 310. The blanks
are to be turned in at the same
desk.
Bill Haverfield. assistant chair chairman
man chairman of ACCENT 67, says appoint appointments
ments appointments for interviews should be
made when the completed appli application
cation application forms are returned to the
desk.
Haverfield says all students who
have the time and interest are
urged to apply.
Both Charlie Shepherd and I,
Haverfield says, hope to involve
students in this program who pre presently
sently presently arent participating exten extensively

University of Florida

Buddy Jacobs, president of the
student body.
Shepherd, who also is the presi presidents
dents presidents administrative assistant,
had previously been acting as un unofficial
official unofficial leader of the group of

sively extensively in other extracurricular
activities.
Areas in which applications will
be accepted are finance, program
planning, speaker selection, maga magazine
zine magazine staff, public relations and re related
lated related areas.
People with experience in these
areas are greatly needed. Haver Haverfield
field Haverfield says, but enthusiasm and
willingness to work are even great greater
er greater considerations.
Shepherd pointed out that AC ACCENT
CENT ACCENT 67 is not actually a part
of Student Government nor of the
UF Administration, although it has
been sanctioned by both groups.
ACCENT 67 will be carried
out by interested students and
faculty, Shepherd says. The
closest parallel in regard to how
this program will be carried out,
is the Dollars forScholarsdrive.
Shepherd says hes interested in
getting ideas from any students
and faculty members.

Front row: Donna Berger, Kay Melton, Barbara Latham and Jana
Feldman.

Monday, March 21, 1966

students who formulated the ideas

for ACCENT 67
Its actually
been Shepherds
project from the
first, Jacobs
said. He brought
the idea back
with him from
an ASG conven convention.
tion. convention.
Student Gov-

ernment leaders
representing schools across t h
nation hold the Association Stuo it
Government (ASG) convention to
exchange ideas. Shepherd first
learned of symposiums at an ASG
convention.
The 22-year-old Shepherd, a na-

BF~- iHl v
I Jjx
HHb mfe M (
HAVERFIELD

field, a freshman law student, was
named assistant chairman by Ja Jacobs.
cobs. Jacobs.
Haverfield, who lives in Miami,
earned his bachelors degree in
economics at the University of
Pennsylvania.
The 22-year-old law student al also
so also serves as secretary-elect of the
John Marshall Bar Association.

SHEPHERD

tive of Plant City
who looks older
than his age, has
a 3.3 overall
grade average,
and is planning
to attend UF Law
School in the
Fall.
Bill Haver-



Page 2

The Florida Alligator. Monday March 21. 196 C

- International
REPORTS G. I. TOLL . The Viet Cone claimed nearly 1.000
l'. S. troops were killed or wounded, three tanks destroyed and three
aircraft downed n nine days of fighting endinc last Wednesday in Mar
Zone D. a Peking broadcast reported early Sunday. 7he official New
China News Agency broadcast monitored here quoted the clandestine
South Viet Nani press agency concerning American losses in the battle
area 40 miles northeast of Saigon.
PULL-OUT SOON . French President Charles de Gaulle probably
will begin his pull-out from NATO within two weeks reliable French
sources said Saturday. He hopes to complete it arid to have all United
States and Canadian troops and bases out ol France by the end ol this
year the sources said. The F rench leader served formal notice on his
Allies a week ago that he plans to withdraw France from the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization military setup.
VIET BORDER CLASH ... I'. S. Marines
infantrymen and paratroopers battled Com Comm
m Comm mist forces Sunday in sharp clashes on three
sectors -- one of them only about 35 miles from
the North Viet Nam border. The Americans
killed about 50 Viet Cong in the widespread
fighting. The American action coincided with
disclosure that the Viet Cong had apparently
used 75mm pack howitzers for the first time in
a battle against American paratroopers last
week.
National
BIRTHDAY FETE ENDS . Lynda Bird Johnson wound up a 22nd
birthday celebration among the movie elite Sunday to return tc her
classes at the University ol Texas in Austin. Secret Service men who
guarded the President's daughter refused to disclose details of her
departure and referred all questioners to the Whi e House. Lynda
stayed the weekend in the 39-room mansion actor George Hamilton
shares with his mother. Hamilton has been squiring the President's
daughter ior some weeks.
CULTURAL EXCHANGE SIGNED . The United States and Russia
late Saturday signed a new agreement extending U. S.-Soviet cultural
exchanges for another two years. The agreement, was signed at the
State Department by Soviet Ambassador F. Dobrynin and Assistant
Secretary of State lor European Affairs John M. Leedy. The agreement
had been scheduled to be signed in ceremonies at 11:30 a.m. EST
Wednesday but the Soviets said the United States balked at the last
minute.
ADVOCATES CHINA TALKS . Secretary
of Dean Rusk said Sunday that the United
States would be prepared for discussions with
Red China on peace in Southeast Asia but the
other side keeps hanging up the phone." He also
noted that the United States has held 129 meet meetings
ings meetings with Chinese Communist representatives
in Warsaw trying to settle momentous issues
under dispute but we get no response.
Florida
CYCLE VIGIL. .State troopers and local police rode herd 7 Satur Saturday
day Saturday oi: severed motorcycle clutis to make sure nc trouble broke out in
connection with motorcycle races scheduled in Daytona. Lt. T. H.
Aaron ol the Florida Highway Patrol said several ol the groups that
came into towr wore swastikas and iron crosses and patterned them themselves
selves themselves after the Hells Angels gang ol California. Beginning to pour
into town at the same time were thousands of collegians who annually
migrate to this city and to Fort Lauderdale or their spring vacations.
GAMBLING EXPOSED . State Atty. Dai Warren studied the
mailing list ol a cock-fighting establishment Sunday and said he plans
to press contempt ol court charges against the'alleged operator. State
investigator- raided a barn-like amphitheatre Friday afternoon during
what was billed a- the world series of cock lighting' and arrested
*5 persons. Many other- bolted through windows and escaped in the
surrounding woods.
Tb*- etorta Alligator rewrwi tin right tv rvpulaU- thf typographical ton* of all atJv**rtifrr>cni* aia..
U, rvla*- or turr cop', whtcl it considers nbjMctionabb
N r vethnerf' IS CItiAKAKTgLLi.
" V lo'idi Alligator will not consider adjustment of payment lor any advertisement involving type typegraphical
graphical typegraphical trrruri or erroneoth insertlc: uruesr notify. Ls giver tt tie AOvertl .ini V'aiiap"! *rltlv:i
(lju d.;y after advert! .emen' ape-ara
The florid.- Alligator will no' to respue H i- lu: more lhar in* rtrnrrvt" mwrtioi of at advertl -ment
.-hedue tc -ur several timer. Notice iur eorrvtio! muv tw giver belure next 1 icertime
TUI f l/OkH>* AI.UC.AT Jh i fh' oflielaf Mud- m of it.> t nivertil'V <>! i irirhU nc 1.
publlahec live time ep' ou. inr May. Jui* an-' Jut' wte-i r t pupi'-n**o si nn-m-fc t> *n'
editorial' represent tie- official 'jp.-aunr ill tlieii alllrior re fur is entered a .e otic ci.es ci.esmatier
matier ci.esmatier at tie United St*tea Pc t (Jf at (aainesyllic.

SPACE CENTER REVEALS
Thruster Misfire Caused
Failure Os Gemini Mission

SPACE CENTER Houston CPE
__ short-circuited ;> wthru-tei
spinning Gemini '6 to tfi*- left the
rate oi almost a revolution a se second
cond second was the probable cause of the
abrupt end Wednesday of the space
vehicle's flight.
Manned Spacecraft Director Ro Robert
bert Robert Gilruth Saturday night said
the short circuit in the thruster
likely was the villain and ruled
out airy pi lot error.
The 'rev deornonMr->ted re remarkable

H-Bomb Recovery Delayed
As High Winds Buffet Spain

P ALOMAR ES. Spain UPI --
High winds And a running sea
Sunday hampered efforts to brine
to the surfac a U. S. nuclear
bomb lying in 2.500 feet ol water
m the Mediterranean off the Span Spanish
ish Spanish eoas-t.
Recovery work was further de delayed
layed delayed by the absence of one of the

submarines being used .to help
retrive the H-bomL that was lost
five miles off the coast in the
in-flight collision of a Strategic
Air Command 852 bomber with
a yet tanker nine week> aco.
A Navy timetable had called
lor the bomb to be raised from
the ocean bed Sunday probably
by the USS Hoist, a salvage ship
of the U.- S. Navy's Sixth Fleet.
The bomb, still attached to its
parachute was located last Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday lying on a steep ridge on
the sea floor. The 22-foot two
man submersible Alvin' took
photographs of an object on the
ridge which nuclear experts said
was the missing bomb.
Navy ships dragged the bomb
along the ndge to a y-aler position

1 I P||j| lliiill 11 io v^/ j | |||l|| ||g ii ppsh| £-Jk$ i
V v ; s v / B B I jj|
/1 flk g L fin it
I fm wH|f "'
/ M pi/f Jl HKf : *1 -
1 I t II
/ %. JO 1 S^^^l^-*-
(K University

markable remarkable piloting skill in bringing
the spacecraft to a safe landing.
Gilruth said.
The crew -- Neil Armstrong and
David Scott -- was due in Houston
Monday night for a reunion with
their families at Ellington Air
Force Base.
Armstrong and Scott were sche scheduled
duled scheduled to leave Cape Kennedy, after
three days debriefing there, dur during
ing during the afternoon Monday on a

to avoid .the possibility of it slip slipping
ping slipping into deeper water when the
recovery effort was made.
A Saturday night squall that left
white-capped sea and high winds
Sunday combined to harrass the
scheduled effot.

j 10%
TO ALL STUDENTS and UNIVERSITY
Rja-y'W personnel
fy CAFETERIA
V V 1212 N. Main St G^S G L£
Ri (4 minutes from centef.

Gullstream jet.
They face six mt re; rj dVj o{
debriefing at the
-paCe
craft Center in' Houston, a *p. Ce
center spokesman :.d not know
whether they will be v,eit o g 0
home nights with the;r lamili^s
Gilruth said this w a s whai'h d pi
pened to Gemini t.
Ground controllers gave C-emini
8 a go-ahead to dock with the Agena
target vehicle. This was accom accomplished
plished accomplished smoothly o\er the tracking
ship Roseknow Victor.
Everything was working per perfectly
fectly perfectly on both vehicles. At a com command
mand command from Gemini 8 to the Agena
control system a 90-deeree yaw
maneuver was completed. Thenthe
trouble began.
XER6X Copies
1-19 Copies. Ilk ei, zui-
Over. 9C
Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available Prom
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 W. UNIVE RSI TY' AVE.



w
EVERY ITEM DISCOUNTED EVERY DAY
SAVE up to 40%
1023 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE
ACROSS FROM UNIVERSITY CITY BANK
SPECIALS 600 D
MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY
HOURS: 9 7:30 Monday Through Saturday
OVER 3,500 NATIONALLY
ADVERTISED BRAND ITEMS
CHANEL BRUT FOR MEN YARDLEY
FABERGE ROYAL LYME REVLON
ENGLISH LEATHER LANVIN SHULTON
MAX FACTOR MATCHABELLI GILLETTE

WOODBURY
Reg. 1 \OO for
golden rich
shampoo *Tpy
DIPPITY-DO
setting gel l IQ
Reg. 2.00 for M
MICRIN
Mouthwash CQa
Reg. 98C for W W V
AQUAVELVA
... .1 Reg. 98c; for
silicone lather pw
Shave Cream J / y
FRESH-START
|# Reg. 1 .59 for
medicated f\Q
cleansing gel I >U /

NEW BAN 7 ..
spray deodorant QQft
Reg 1 .50 for
MaCLEANS
Reg. 95
toothpaste (
family size U/ v
DERMA-FRESH
complexion lotion K7 A
Reg. 1 .00 for
BUFFERIN
no. 100s QQa
Reg. 1.39 for
VITALIS
for men QQa
Reg. 1.49 for W W 1/

fp|, >{ F y| ,'', y.__ **^
'."iiSjsM- i ; * -Jk*iiii 4
\Mks.s&Ly~ : IB^Hf
11 I *~...m- ''iMiife,
p \ mSh mm&mr 2c
H l i |i
NEW DEVELOPMENT
UF student Peter C. Wilson explains his architecture project for a
housing development in San Juan, Puerto Rico, to architecture pro professors
fessors professors (1-r) F. Blair Reeves, Daniel Branch, and Dr. Lyle N.
McAlister, director of the Center for Latin American Studies.
/Museum Applies
For Federal Grant
The Florida State Museum has applied for a federal grant for
$300,000 for three years to provide a traveling museum for the state.
The museum would include specimens as well as audio-visual
presentations to reinforce what Florida students have seen.
Many rural Florida schools are so poor, they cant even take
their students on field trips, said Mrs. Penney Denning, museum
technician, who wrote the request for federal funds.
The application was made in cooperation with St. Jones County in
late January, and the museum hopes to have an answer soon. It will
be considered under the Aid to Supplementary Education for Secondary
Schools program.
Wed like to expand this program throughout Florida if the funds
are made available to us. Then maybe our exhibit can be exchanged
for a year with a similar exhibit from another state, added Mrs.
Denning.
The traveling museum would have a staff of two full-time teachers.
Mrs. Denning feels that the second teacher might be an education senior
at the University of Florida who would travel with the museum on an
assistantship basis.
All of our exhibits are gauged to the level of a 14-year-old, which
would require a lot of work and rewriting, said Mrs. Denning.
She reads through massive doctoral dissertations on a particular
subject, condenses the material and rewrites it in a final script form.
The art department prepares the graphics for the display and utilizes
the final script as a source of label content.
Mrs. Denning, a fine arts graduate of Cornell in 1963, hopes the
federal government will grant the money to the largest museum in
the Southeast to make the traveling museum a reality.
WHERES HOME NEXT TRIMESTER?
_ : : ; r ; 1 vr~
lOOK9NQ Wfi ?
|p
GOOD STUDY CONDITIONS g
GREAT FOOD-3 MEALSXDAY S
CO-OPERATIVE LIVING
llf| SPORTS & SOCIAL EVENTS
ORGANIZED DISCUSSIONS
j LOUNGE & TV.
- . i : ' ' \ ..
M
ALL FOR f 260.0(/rRIMESTER
ROOM & bOARD
SUMMER and FALL
SPACE AVAILABLE
)
rMnlgil l0 2 W. Uv.n,.y Ave
For Information (..all
372-6736 or 372-9410
--

Monday, March 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 21, 1966

f
Wfa. t JHp jjP
l, f . p JRf fl^B
B ;M T nfi Pv. jj
y^H^K
|| J?; I I 1 r -fril |
B Hi
SB b!b b
,§f f , mBiKBFf :;
TRIBUTE TO THE QUEEN
The arch is formed and Queen Betty Wendt enters with her escort
Harry Schindehette. <.

II J BMP
11 |P %. |§|||§SkjH
I^H
s t tEg pfl
II w'l.'-iJifil
HONOR GUARD ENTERS
The Honor Guard of Gator Saber Drill Team members enters to
form an arch for the newly crowned Military Ball Queen.

w| , TmiWA mist 4g^-
I JPjIJkP
UA wmM) 4 MM
w Ify ;fls^B,
fi. f. lllBg'
§^ >4,eTr Jr s 4f?fe
1
COUNT BASIE PERFORMS
Count Basie and his orchestra were on hand to provide music for
the Military Ball.

P
Last weekend wasn't
the time for those who
prefer the quiet life.
Saturday night, Betty
Wendt was crowned
queen at the 1966 Mili-t
tary Ball. Count Basie
provided entertain entertainment
ment entertainment for the annual
program sponsored
jointly by Air Force
, and Army ROTC.
P o pular pianist
Peter Nero played for
a full house at a Ly Lyceum
ceum Lyceum Council spon sponsored
sored sponsored show in the
Florida Gym Friday
night.

Photos by
NICK
ARROYO

KEYBOARD MAGIC
Peter Nero takes to the keyboard to entertain thousands of UI
students. Those who attended the Friday night performance said 1
was one of the best presented by Lyceum Council.

jggHi
xHT A BB I I \£,
I wBM j&iaJKj
| i J "V 5- PSsHhy amwl smHH^^HraglS* '&** [kH| j£ &'
' ' 1 y - ' % '- *' v .''!t.* (( 1 7>i V ~'c
K M
'' .v- 7 V.' ;> %' ;/ *r. '% S j;'
AND FOR FRIDAY NIGHT...
Popular pianist Peter Nero played for a full
house at Florida Gym.



Highs Poke Is Humorous
Miami Mayor Robert King High flew into Gainesville yesterday to
attend the alumni barbecue and the spring football game.
The Miami redhead did not make any political speeches, but he
managed to get a humorous political poke at Gov. Haydon Burns.
High suggested to ihe alumni that now that President Lyndon John Johnson
son Johnson has refused to support Burns gubernatorial candidacy he should
try to get Lynda Birds.
Burns earlier this week said that President Johnson and Vice Presi President
dent President Hubert Humphrey are supporting him in his bid for reelection.
Both the president and the vice president have subsequently denied
this.
High also attended the district convention of the Rotary Club.
ATTENTION COLLEGE MEN
FLORIDA COMPANY WILL BE ON CAMPUS MARCH
23rd, WEDNESDAY, IN THE SOCIAL ROOM OF
FLORIDA UNION BLDG., FROM 11:00 AM TO
4:00 PM FOR A 10 MINUTE INTERVIEW CONCERN CONCERNING
ING CONCERNING FULL TIME SUMMER EMPLOYMENT.

i Js
lipilip i
Th greatest socks &s>!

Whenever you
wear a tie your socks
should come over the calf.
And stay there. Without tugging.
Whenever you sit down, sock (not leg)
should be showing.
Ban-Lon' O.T.C. (over-the-calf) hose.

, v Br -** >Jk .Jifllfciu, '' 4l
SERVICE PROJECT
Three boys from the Rodeheaver Boys Ranch look on as three mem members
bers members of UFs Phi Delta Theta chapter work on fixing up a fence. Phis
pictured are (1-r) Bud Hale, John Shea and Walter Bowden with Jim
Ward, a teacher at Palatka High School, overseeing. In all. 73 Phi
Delts participated.
patronize
GATOR ADVERTISERS

Fresh and different in design and color
Never fall down on the job.
Socks with theSilkenTouchr in
80% nylon, 20% silk.
Regular fits men up to 6 ft. (- A
Tall, men over 6 ft. $2.00.
Another fine product of Kayser-Roth

Monday, March 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Negro,
31 Runs
For Senate
John Due, 31-year-old lawyer
from Quincy, became the first
Negro since Reconstruction days
to run for the state senate from
North Florida when he announced
his candidacy for the District 6
seat in Gainesville Friday.
Due says he will base his can candidacy
didacy candidacy on an appeal to three groups:
the Negroes, poor Whites and lib liberals.
erals. liberals.
The poor, the Negroes and the
liberals of North Florida, Due
said, need representation,^and
they need a spokesman who will
not call them out when it suits
his interest to do so.
Due predicted the aforemention aforementioned
ed aforementioned constituency will discover it itself
self itself and become a great creative
political majority. Negroes, liber liberals
als liberals and the poor are already a
numerical majority, and it is my
hope that this candidacy will bring
them one step closer to being an
electoral majority.
As Due sees it, there are four
main issues in the District 6 race:
racism, poverty and public edu education,
cation, education, university reform and the
war in Viet Nam.
His major opponents are B. C.
Pearce, long-time member of the
Pork Chop gang from Palatka, and
Pete Gibson of Perry.
McMillan
\
Speaks Out
On Protests
Major General Henry McMillan,
head of the Florida National Guard,
was the main speaker at the Phi
Kappa Tau Founders Day Banquet
held Saturday night.
In .the 4&Stivities held at Holiday
Inn, the General spoke out against
the protests against the Viet Nam
war. Among other dignitaries in
the audience was Verle Pope of
St. Augustine, president-elect of
the Florida Senate.
Dont be misled by a small
misguided, misdirected, highly vo vocal
cal vocal group here and there, on or
off our campuses, McMillan said.
Young Americans today can think,
and are thinking for themselves,
even as they have always done in
the past.
Education Gets
$68,000 Grant
The Department of Personnel
Services of the UFs College of
Education has received a $68,000
grant from the U, S. Office of
Education to be used for*training
teachers of mentally retarded and
emotionally disturbed persons.
Dr. Myron Cunningham, director
dtf the special services program,
states that seven one-year fellow fellowships
ships fellowships will begin Sept. 1 for students
working toward masters degrees
in the area of emotional disturb disturbances.
ances. disturbances. Dr. Arthur E. Alper will
coordinate this program.
Four fellowships at the masters
degree level and two senior train traineeships
eeships traineeships for students preparing to
become teachers of mentally re retarded
tarded retarded persons also have been
provided by the grant. Dr. Windel
Dickerson will coordinate this
program.
Applications f or the 13 fellow fellowships
ships fellowships and traineeships, should be
made with the Personnel Services
Department in Norman Hall.

Page 5



, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 21, 1966

Page 6

ALLIGATOR
EDITORIALS
lets ACCENT
the symposium
ne b es ideas to come forth from UF
W students in the last decade is the first annual
symposium on vital issues -- called ACCENT
'67 -- scheduled for next Spring.
Prime mover behind the symposium which will
attract nationally-known figures in government and
the arts is Charlie Shepherd. a greying-but-ener greying-but-energetic
getic greying-but-energetic young man of 22 who doesnt know what it
is to be idle.
Shepherd attended a meeting of the Association
of Student Governments of the United States earlier
this month in Atlanta and he came back with
enthusiam for the symposium. Schools such as
Emory. Vanderbilt, North Carolina, Duke and even
Alabama already have similar symposiums.
Theyve all proven to be highly successful.
Shepherd figures, and we agree, that if the Uni University
versity University of Florida cant match the efforts of the
aforementioned schools then we ought to be ashamed
of ourselves.
ACCENT 67 will be beneficial to the UF in
many ways:
It will put us in the national news spotlight.
When a school can attract such figures as Dr.
Milton Eisenhower. Dr. Martin Luther King, historian
C. Vann Woodward, the Kennedy brothers and various
U. S. Senators -- as other colleges have done
national press coverage is sure to follow.
It will enhance the UFs educational and in intellectual
tellectual intellectual prestige. And our prestige surely could
use some enhancing. In many parts of the country,
the UF is regarded as little more than tfiother
Southern cow college.
It will make it easier in the future for the
Florida Union Forums Committee to attract better
speakers. Gainesville at present seems such a
remote and out-of-the-way place for most national
figures that they are reluctant to come here now
unless the money is enough to compensate for the
location.
It will offer a perfect time to rally the
alumni around the UF during the January-to-
April trimester. In fact, it could match the Fall
trimesters Homecoming in scope and effect. And
it would be tied around an intellectual and educational
endeaver, not just a football game.
It will be a stimulating and highly educational
experience for both students and faculty members.
The symposium probably will last three days,
Shepherd says, but he doesnt know yet whether it
will be on a weekend or during the week.
The idea has the full blessing and support of
both Student Government and the gentlemen in
Tigert Hall. Both groups should be complimented
for offering their cooperation in this program, for
without their cooperation there would be little
hope for its success.
What should be pointed out, however, is that
ACCENT 67 is definitely not tied to campus politics
and the bureaucratic red tape that naturally follows.
Steps are being taken, too, to insure that the
symposium remains apolitical in nature. This
will include the formation of a permanent executive
committee made up of faculty members and students.
A theme for the symposium will be chosen by
a program-planning committee. It could include
any of the following topics: ACCENT on Inter International
national International Affairs, or ACCENT on the South in
Transition, or ACCENT on the American Social
Revolution. Or it might be on a subject other
than these three mentioned above.
D
We point out these themes just to illustrate the
possibilities of the symposium. Some of the afore aforementioned
mentioned aforementioned themes have already proven successful
at other universities.
Shepherd and his assistant chairman, Bill Haver Haverfield.
field. Haverfield. are both highly capable individuals, but they
CANNOT begin to make ACCENT 67 a success
by themselves. Theyll need much help from
students, faculty, administrators and alumni.
We hope and believe the necessary help will
come, for the symposium idea certainly is too
important and too good to be left dying on the
vine of apathy.

The Florida Alligator
% JK Mojvuty hOu Raam. Tlr

The 1965 Voting Rights Act Has Been Upheld Io Insure
"Clear Enough?"
Dr. Robert
Hutchins
i/ ;
il|J| y career as a con man began early, and unexpectedly.
When I was very small, my mother asked me whether 1 had
done something she had just seen me do. It suddenly occurred to
me to deny it. I looked my mother in the eye; both of mine filled
with tears, and I said, How can you accuse me of such a thing?
Overwhelmed with remorse, although she knew better, my mother
embraced me and forgot all about the matter.
This was the turning point of my life. I had discovered, in infancy,
the meaning of salesmanship, the aim of oratory, the delights of
fakery and the value of that great labor-saving and pain-killing device,
the half-lie.
From that moment I began to practice those arts of deception and
chicanery which led first to success in the presidency of a large
university and then to fame and riches as a newspaper columnist.
Every con man recognizes in himself the essential qualifications
for the Presidency of the United States. Since only oneVof us at a
time can hold the job, the rest sit around watching with a critical
yet sympathetic eye the one who had the luck to get elected.
There are in general two styles of Presidential con men. The
first is that of Franklin D. Roosevelt. He was, as we say in the
American language, a great kidder. You knew you were being
conned. He knew you were. The Conner and the connees had a good
time admiring the skill of the performance. It was the kind put on
by a jovial sleight-of-hand artist at a county fair.
The other sort of Presidential con man is typified by Lyndon B.
Johnson. His style is solemn and avuncular, like that of the patent
medicine salesman convincing you that his product will cure all the
ills of man or beast. His weapon is the boring monotone, the over overpersuasive
persuasive overpersuasive manner, the repetition of the empty word.
As history shows, both styles are effective. But any con man can
see that the Rooseveltian offers greater freedom and wider range
The Roosevertian con man can always say. I was only kidding/
Not so the Johnsonian. The patent medicine vendor whose nostrum
makes his victims sick has no recourse but to get out of town
The Johnsonian con man. therefore, suffers from a serious limit i
tion. He must avoid misstatements of fact. Unlike the Rooseveltian
he cannot laugh them off when they are pointed out to him.
The con man of the world, if I may venture to speak for them
are ala. med by certain departures from the true principles of
Johnsonian conning in the Presidents recent statements.
For example, he celebrated the 13-year low in the unemployment
rate by saying that it was a triumph for the nations economy and
tribute to the public and private policies that led to this achievement
As everybody knows, the policy that led to this achievement is the
noUcy (,f escaping the war in Vietnam, a policy that everybody
including the President, deplores.
The unforgivable sin among con men is to con yourself.
(Copyright 1966. Los Angeles Times)

Speaking* I
Out I
(EDITORS NOTE: Ray Cohn. 3JM. Js aCt H
in the campus Young Democrat Clut in 'j fl|
supporter of Miami mayor Robert Km,-
bid for the governorship. In a serie>
today, he explains exactly why he feels Go.
Burns should not be reelected. In i a t er
he will show why he feels High is the best m^B
By RAY COHN H
It has, been only two years since the then m
Haydon Burns promised to do for Florid.!
claimed he did for Jacksonville.
Now that the governors race has started
worthwhile to go back to the last campaign
review Burns promises and compare them
actions.
In his bid to become governor. Mau.r
sold to the people of Florida what lie
Jacksonville Story. He painted before the V
a picture of a dull, run-down city which
his leadership turned into a prosperous- ;..ufl
metropolis. In speech after speech lie
about Jacksonvilles new expressway, its re h \
downtown and its continued success in
new' business.
The other side of the Jacksonville -ter.
lack of communication between the rare- .. i, B|B
to street riots; a school system that w.i- : ufll
be disaccredited while roads and beautiittl
scrapers were going up all over the city, a
rate which was one of the highest m the
and a constant rise in the expense of pun
the right-of-way for Burns mighty expn
somehow went unmentioned.
Despite all this, Burns managed to rule
version of the story into the governors
His sucess isnt hard to explain when you
all that he had behind him.
Money to burn (which he spent as if it w^B
going out of style.)
The backing of some of the states most pow^H
ful forces; those special interests which
dominated the state for years at the
the average Floridian.
The endorsement of many of the stat^Bj
leading politicians including most of the
Porkchoppers.
The handy race issue which all but deafei^B
the ears of the North and Central Florida
to any other issues.
A mighty organization, called the Burns Bl^B
zers. which on more than one occasion used
sonville policemen to stomp for its hero around H|
state.
So Burns started his term as the states
executive, having promised to apply the
claimed magic of the Jacksonville Formula to
governors mansion. H
Throughout the campaign he had promised
provide the state with all the little
which he claimed to have given to
If we only voted for him, his speeches and
said, then Florida would be turned into a
progressive state with modern highways. boomiM
industries, excellent colleges, beautiful parks
comfortable recreational facilities. H
In short, Burns promised with the
of education -- to convert Florida into a
scale Jacksonville. For the latters school meM
he naturally disclaimed any responsibility since
mayor. Burns contended, he had nothing to do
Duval Countys school system. H
Let us now. however, leave the promises Bur*
made and proceed to compare them with the
he took to carry them out. Since his campai^B
centered around his desire to make Florida
Jacksonville, a comparison of the two is in ordeM
Indeed in many ways Florida today looks
Burns Jacksonville, but these ways he canhardlyM
proud of. B
The states colleges and universities d*H
largely to his political meddling, are in the sarrM
mess today that the schools of Jacksonville weI M
before the disaccreditation. fl
The same atmosphere of power politics thM
existed in Burns Jacksonville today exists on V
state level. The Miami Herald, for instance, rfl
vealed a few weeks ago that nearly nil tirt j
purchased by the State Road Department and tlj
Florida Highway Patrol are bought from firms whos
owners or officers contributed to Burns canipmgt
chest in the last election.
The complete machinery of the state gey
ment is used today to promote Governoi arl )
just as the complete machinery of
government was used to sell Mayor Bui ns.
methods, too, are almost identical. as
running for governor he used Jacksonville police
to forward his candidacy; as governor trying to s
his road bond program he used Highway P-brol
fa ci 1 ities to advance his cause.



MIKK MAL.UiII.VYs

too much credit for Hall

Editor:
Having read the articles by Mike Malaghan in the
March 14-15 issues of The Alligator. I feel com compelled
pelled compelled to offer a rebuttal concerning Dr. Hall and
infirmary policy.
Sure, there has been a lot of fire toward the
infirmary and Dr. Hall lately, and I say it is about
time. The infirmary has been in dire need of
changes for some time and this seems to be the
only way they will take place.
The first and foremost change is the Florida
licensure of staff physicians. You ask why is this
necessary, why not have reciprocity of licensure?
Let me attempt to explain the situation involved.
Florida is a tourist state; each year thousands
)f physicians, no doubt, come here for their va vacations.
cations. vacations. What would keep them from freely prac pracicing
icing pracicing medicine here if it were not for the recip reciprocity
rocity reciprocity laws? What would become of their patients
ind records of same when they decided that vaca vaca:ion
:ion vaca:ion time was over? What about the bona fide
iracticing physician in the state who would be
njured by the influx of such physicians?
The law was set up to protect the resident
ihysicians in this state from such a fiasco. The
;ame holds true for pharmacy, as a protection.
These laws were not set up by Florida pork porkchoppers,
choppers, porkchoppers, either, but by organized physicians
ind pharmacists in all parts of the state. It a
Dhysician wants to practice permanently in the
state, he should not mind taking the test, unless
le feels himself incompetent of passing it, and a
great majority do pass it.
Why shouldnt a Florida student have the privi privilege
lege privilege of being treated by a physician who is deemed
competent by the state examining board?
1 would also like to comment on a couple of
items in Dr. Halls accomplishments. I will admit
that there are many on the list of which I do not
know anything, but others I do.

Cditor:
According to todays Alligator
15 March), the City Commission
andidates have been asked what
hey plan to do to i mprove housing
onditions tor UF students. Their
nswers varied in tenor one from
nother, but it is the question,
ather than the answers, which
nerits scrutiny.
The implication that the Com Comnission
nission Comnission has an obligation to do
nything about student housing
nakes me squirm, all the more so
ipeause the circumstances of the
asking show that student sympathy

By MIKE MALAGHAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Close to AGO students turned out to see
a panel discussion on student rights and
the mythical term, academic freedom.
What happened?
Was it a success?
The answers to both questions are the
same: for what happens determines suc success.
cess. success.
The fact so many people turned out was
a success in itself.
Included in the audience was Jim Har Harmeling.
meling. Harmeling. Freedom Party presidential can candidate
didate candidate in 1965; Bruce Culpepper, past SG
president; Benny Cason, Alligator editor,
and Dr. William Hall, director of the UF
Infirmary.
The fact Dean of Student Affairs Lester
Hale participated must be counted a suc success.
cess. success. He must have known full well he
would be put on the spot (he was) as the
only member of the panel from the ad administration.
ministration. administration.
Lesser men of Tigert might have bowed
out.
The faculty-disciplinary committee was
discussed in depth. As a result of this
exchange, we can expect the administration

since when?

with the question is presupposed
(and probably right). Why should
anybody do anything about mar married
ried married students housing?
I am an off-campus student.
When I grew up and started shav shaving
ing shaving and got married and things
like that, I undertook responsi responsibilities
bilities responsibilities which I surely don t want
the state or anybody else to under underwrite
write underwrite for me. I will guarantee to
myself the quality of my housing.
I will guarantee the equitability
of my rent.
My landlord happens to be a

Campus I Vrspact iVo

The first ol these is the 24-hour physician
coverage. Such a coverage was started in about
April, 1964. not by Dr. Hall, but by Dean Stanley,
after recommendation by Dr. Braswell, who was
assistant director at the time.
There also seemed to he a sense of vagueness
in the statement. . "standardization of phar pharmacy
macy pharmacy to eliminate proliferation of drugs. Reducing
inventory and precluding introduction of new and
relatively untried drugs . Is he referring to
a hospital formulary or the banning of the research
use of drugs as tests in the infirmary?
In either case. I can see no reason for any
credit. In the first place, the infirmary pharmacy
has had a very efficient formulary for four years,
and is in its third revision. In the second place. I
do not believe that Dr. Hall or the public remem remembers
bers remembers how much a new drug has to go through to
get on the market, or even be allowed for hospital
tests. Every drug on a shelf of a pharmacy must
have a license issued by the Food and Drug Ad Administration,
ministration, Administration, and a similar license is required
to run hospital tests. In order to obtain such a
license, a company must submit a DETAILED
report on all research experiments and clinical
trials of the drug, a process which takes from
three to five years.
If the FDA then deems it safe, a license is
issued -- but ONLY if it is deemed safe for use.
So, if Dr. Hall has taken measures to exclude
untried drugs from the infirmary, he has worked
in vain, for they have already been excluded.
As a last point. I would like to comment that in
the five years that I have been enrolled in this
University, I have seen no change in the excuse
system of the infirmary (except a new pad form),
no change in medical exemptions, no way shown to
keep a student in school who has missed a vital
part of his courses due to sickness, and I have
always had to wait a long time to see a physician.
Ken Norfleet, SPH

to "further evolve procedural methods to
protect a students rights. when he is
facing charges from the administration.
The need for more detailed published
guidelines concerning "conduct un unbecoming
becoming unbecoming a Florida student was demon demonstrated.
strated. demonstrated.
We can label THAT as a success if the
administration follows through and pub publishes
lishes publishes such guidelines.
The relationship between the University
and the student was debated inconclusively.
This wasnt success or failure, because
nothing was decided. Continued dialogue
is needed to work on this basic question.
The panel was a failure in that Dean
Hale, at times, was more concerned on
defending the administrations current
position rather than discussing the merits
of some of those positions.
It was a failure in that some of the panel
deliberately put Hale of the spot, leaving
him little opening for a frank discussion
of the problem without embarrassing the
administration.
Alan Levin, in his tone of address, did
just that.
Some of tin 1 student audience felt that it
was a good thing to applaud and heckle at

good guy. but if lie werent I
wouldnt wail about the injustice
of it all. Id get another landlord.
1 freely entered into a rental agree agreement
ment agreement with him. and if I become
dissatisfied with its terms Ill go
make another one with someone
else. No agreement freely made
works an inequity on either party.
If there is an inequity in the area
of student housing it is the exis existence
tence existence of the states socialized
married housing, which invades
an economic sector properly the
province of private enterprise.
Ronald G. Cotton Jr.. 4AS

4 queries for Boaz

Col. Boaz;
If you really love the freedom you say we are defending in Viet Nam,
tiave the courage to answer the following questions.
1) What did that story you wrote about the smutty picture have to do
with issues on this campus? (Incidentally, I notice you thought enough of
the picture to remember its caption. Too bad your friend didnt destroy
that vile picture instead of showing it to you. But after all, what are
friends for?)
2) When the Faculty Disciplinary Committee (of which you were a
member) asked Lucien Cross, How many children do you have that
you know of?, did it occur to you that this was a vile, leading question
which had no bearing on the case, and would have been thrown out of a
real court?
3) Why werent you there at the opendebate to defend your position?...
or do you prefer to ask your questions behind closed doors when you
can do all the talking?
4) You doubt whether The Charlatan is really a college humor
magazine, and yet it was voted the number one college humor magazine
in the country! Obviously, Colonel, your thinking here differs from the
MAJORITY of the people. Does this make you a way-out professor?
Answer these questions if you've got the guts. Or back out. Better
still, why dont you find a previous comitment? Please keep your stories
about lewdness to yourself and your friends.
Gary Sutton, 3ED
P.S.: How many human lives have been lost in Viet Nam that you know
of?

Patrick Henry
for me, too

An Open Letter to Col. Boaz:
I would like to comment on your
column in the Speaking Out sec section
tion section of Thursdays Alligator.
At the onset let me say that I am
not a pacifist. War is sometimes
unavoidable, justifiable, and ne necessary,
cessary, necessary, and Viet Nam is a case
in point. Let me clarify my state statement.
ment. statement.
You speak of OUR freedom and
the Constitution. What about the
documents guaranteeing the free freedom
dom freedom of the Vietnamese people?
Have you not heard of the Geneva
Accords of 1954 or the United'
Nations Charter? The U. S. has
picked up where the French neo neocolonialists
colonialists neocolonialists left off. We have sup suppressed
pressed suppressed the will of 80 per cent of
the Vietnamese people (Mandate
for Change by Dwight D. Eisen Eisenhower)
hower) Eisenhower) and have given military
support to a series of 10 unpop unpopular
ular unpopular dictators.
Shall we continue to aid other
nations to be free by beneficiently
bestowing the peace of the grave
upon the self-determined citizens
of a foreign country? Shall we
eliminate hunger and suffering

Monday. March 21, 19G6, The Florida Alligator,

times, and this detracted from what could
have been a more frank discussion of
issues and not defense of policy.
It was a failure in that questions from
the floor were not questions. They were,
rather, three-minute speeches about the
beliefs of the questioner. This
tered type of questioning was unfair to
both the audience and to the person being
questioned.
It was failure in that the chairman, at
the suggestion of Lucien Cross, stated at
the end of the end of the scheduled dis discussion
cussion discussion that those who wish to remain
can do so.
This clearly was intended to spot the
administration.
Overall, the panel discussion must be
rated a qualified success. It did confront
both the administration and students with
questions when both were present.
This type of communication has been
long in coming.
If action follows discussion and further
exchanges between students and faculty and
administration follow this, then the panel
discussion will have been a real success.
This type of exchange is certainly a
mature answer to Berkeley.

among all peoples through such
modern contrivances as crop de defoliation
foliation defoliation bombs? Really, Colonel;
is it any wonder that the U. S.
controls only 12 per cent of the
land area of SOUTH Viet Nam?
You ask where the line- should
be drawn on Communism. Well,
we are quickly erasing any line
that ever existed. The sympathies
of the people of the world are be becoming
coming becoming increasingly manifest, as
is evidenced by the supply line
networks in Laos and Cambodia,
by the Japanese press, and by the
riots against U. S. aggression in
Latin America. The only Red
Hand I see in this country is
extended -LOOO miles, and it drips
with bloyjeL
Yes, I, too, stand with Patrick
Henry, and since the United States
will not completely oase its ag aggressive
gressive aggressive policies in Viet Nam I
am forced to abandon any idea idealistic
listic idealistic notions of peace. My only
alternative is to lend moral sup support
port support at the very least -- to
the people who I consider justified.
James Koppel, lUC

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator. Monday. Marcn zi, tuou

Editor:
In answer to Col. Boazs
letter to The Alligator, I might
suggest that Col. Boaz cer certainly
tainly certainly needs an agonizing re reappraisal
appraisal reappraisal of the current inter international
national international situation.
His statement, The inter international
national international communist con conspiracy
spiracy conspiracy is the most ruthless,
determined, clever and dan dangerous
gerous dangerous enemy that our nation

Buck on Boaz
Editor:
Bill Killeen, editor of a magazine which has never been indicted
for obscenity says Col. Boaz is haunted by visions of leftist hor horrors.
rors. horrors.
Col. Boaz has little to fear on the UF campus. The leader of the
leftist group here managed to muster about 100 votes in his bid for
president of the student body -- somewhat less than one percent of the
student body. Surely, ALL of his followers voted for him.
Killeen also says the bearded ones (thanks to the trademark; please
dont shave and go underground or we couldnt recognize you) will
work with communists because they get nohelpfrom The Stagnant
Masses. To quote him, You work with who and what youve got.
He does NOT say the ends justify the means. He just comes close
to that all too familiar phrase.
Free speech is, indeed, worth striving for. But isnt it possible a
vocal few have cast a blight on free speech through their actions,
thereby accomplishing the opposite of their announced purpose?
Elsewhere in Fridays Alligator, a pair of students (foreign policy
majors in their undergraduate days, quite obviously) question Col.
Boaz logic on drawing the line in Viet Nam.
This reminds me of A1 Capps observations some time ago during
an appearance on The Tonight Show. It went something like this:
Why, certainly, I believe we should turn our foreign policy over to
these protesting students. After all, what does the President of the
U. S. know about foreign policy . after 40 years in public service,
having been an assistant to a Congressman, having served in the
House of Representatives, having served as a Senator, Senate Major Majority
ity Majority Leader, Vice President and President? What does he know?
Certainly, we should turn our foreign affairs over to these young
protestors. Its quite obvious they are capable of making the most
critical of judgments in world affairs. As evidence, just look at the
judgment they use in their personal appearance . .
Capp received a modicum of applause from The Stagnant Masses.
Now, would someone on this campus please do the President, Secre Secretary
tary Secretary Rusk and Secretary McNamara a favor and answer some of the
questions raised by Col. Boaz . answer them without namecalling
and emotionally toned phrases?
First, lets start with whether there is a communist threat. Is there
a communist conspiracy (attempt, if you prefer) to dominate the world?
Is there a communist attempt to upset the balance of power in favor of
communism?
If your answer is yes, please say whether the U. S. should resist
this attempt. How? If your answer is no, please support your argument.
Now, here is the main question Col. Boaz raised one which was
raised at the Fulbright hearings. Should the U.S. draw the line in Viet
Nam? If not, then where? Name countries, boundary lines, continents
if you like.
What will be the net result of your strategy?
Please dont get emotional. Just answer the questions.
D. L. Buck
? ... Rolfs Hall

Shirbroun clarifies some points

Editor:
In the Wednesday, March 16, editionof The Florida
Alligator, in the article entitled Panel Discusses
Rights, the following paragraphs appear:
Wayne Shirbroun . explained that many
students are not certain just what their
rights are.
The administration has issued clear
statements from time to time, Shirbroun
said. I hope this panel will help tie up all
these statements.
I made the comment attributed to me in the first
paragraph above, but did not make it in the context
in which the article places it. The second paragraph
contains a rather misleading formulation of my re remarks
marks remarks to The Alligator reporter.
The reporter asked me why the Agenda Committee
of the Faculty Study Group was sponsoring the panel
discussion. I replied by saying that attention had
recently been given to the subject of student rights.
Letters and articles concerning the subject (written
not only by administrators but also by teachers and
students) had appeared in The Alligator. I said that
these statements tended to have a kind of random
effect on the reader. That is, a letter or article
concerned with one aspect of student rights would
appear one day and a letter or article concerned
with a different aspect of student rights would appear
another day.
Further, differing views about the same aspect of
student rights would appear at widely separated
intervals. (I then told the reporter that these remarks

V.D.C. strikes back!

lias ever faced, is just un unbelievable.
believable. unbelievable. I suggest that com communism
munism communism is NOT the real issue,
rut rather its revolt against
domination.
I am not as paranoid as some
people in believing that com communism
munism communism is at the root of all our
problems, as is suggested in
Col. Boazs letter to V.D.C.
For example, we might take
the Viet Nam war. Dr. Arnold

were in no way intended to belittle the aforesaid
articles or letters.)
Because of this random effect, the Agenda
Committee saw a need for giving members of the
University community an opportunity to focus their
attention on the subject of the scope ahd limits of
student rights and for bringing differing views about
student rights into direct confrontation.
In the same edition of The Alligator, in a column
entitled Campus Perspective (by Mike Malaghan).
the following paragraphs appear:
The makeup of the panel includes four
members of the American Civil Liberties
Union, Cross, Levin, Goldin, and Jones.
According to Shirbroun, it (the Faculty
Study Group) is an informal group of faculty
members who were orginally formed last
summer: Shirbroun, Dr. Herman Levy and
Professor Robert Barry.
Here are the facts: Goldin and Levin are not
members of the American Civil Liberties Union;
Levy, McCleary, and Shirbroun were people in instrumental
strumental instrumental in forming the Faculty Study Group, but
did not constitute its sole membership as seems
to be implied in the column; although Barry, Levy,
Jones, Professor Stanley Laughlin and Shirbroun
constitute the membership of the Agenda Committee,
Barry and Jones were out of town when plans were
being formulated for the panel discussion.
Wayne Shirbroun
Instructor of Humanities
- ft

Toynbee wrote an article to
The London Observer con concerning
cerning concerning Viet Nam. He states:
Now the imposition of the
fiats of western governments
by force is the humiliation that
has been inflicted on the non nonwestern
western nonwestern peoples during the
last 200 years. When they
had got rid of the European
and Japanese imperialists,
they thought, for a moment
that they had genuinely re recovered
covered recovered their freedom. But
now the Americans have jump jumped
ed jumped in and are dictating, in
their turn, to the Asians what
may or may not do. In other
words, the Americans, in their
turn, are threatening the Asi Asians
ans Asians are natives and this is
infuriating them.
The only practical basis
for coexistence between the
non-western majority and the
western minority of mankind
is a relation of absolute equa equality.
lity. equality. All western powers, in including
cluding including the puisSant United
States, as well as feeble, yet
impenitent, Portugal, will
have to accept equality in the
long run.
So one cannot just state that
the international conspir conspiracy.
acy. conspiracy. whether it be communist
or facist, is at the root of all
the problems that face this
nation. This is what the John
Birch Society and Let
Freedom King would have us
all believe. I am sorry, but it
just is not that simple.
Now in answer to your im implication
plication implication that Viet Nam Day
Committee is dominated by
communists: It is hard Tor
me to see how the V.D.C.
could be controlled unless
it has handles of power that
can seized, some central
apparatus that can enforce
orders. The V.D.C. has no
such apparatus and it is a main
hard point with us that it never
shall. The V.D.C. wants to
involve everyone equally and
openly in the making of deci decisions,
sions, decisions, to break down social
machines that bestow power
undemocratically and with withhold
hold withhold in the same sorry way.
Lucien Cross of Gainesville
S.D.S. (Students for A Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic Society) has stated.

Bureaucracies concentrate
and conceal power. We avoid
them. Anyone who tries to in invade.
vade. invade. therefore, invades only
himself, for the only power to
any of us is in the power of
good sense and humanity.'
This statement is not only
applicable to S.D.S., but to
V.D.C. as well.
Therefore. Col. Boaz, I re reject
ject reject your efforts to red bait

hit Hales actions
Editor:
Dean Hale is to be congratulated on showing up for the panel dis discussion
cussion discussion on Wednesday night when he must have known that he would
meet with strong opposition; it was most unfortunate that Colonel
Boaz could not have been present as well.
Nevertheless, we can hardly be satisfied with Dean Hales per performance
formance performance at the meeting. To every penetrating question he replied
with several minutes of talk in which no thread of argument was dis discernible;
cernible; discernible; the final question, which asked whether or not he defended
the outrageous questions which the Faculty Disciplinary Committee
asked (Alan) Levin and (Lucien) Cross during their recent interroga interrogation.
tion. interrogation. he avoided by first questioning the honesty of another panel
member and then hastily retreating with the excuse of another appoint appointment.
ment. appointment.
His actions suggest that either he has no rational basis for the
views he holds, but that he holds them nevertheless; or that he does
not really hold these views, but expresses them in order to keep his
job.
Names Withheld
suggests try "pot

Mrs. MacLachlan:
I find it hard to believe you are
an honest woman, for you have
undertaken to express yourself as
a sociologist on a topic you have
obviously no,t bothered to research
and about which you have no pro professional
fessional professional or personal knowledge.
I am sorry that so many will as assume
sume assume that your title, Professor
of Social Sciences, guaranties
that you are doing more than
talking off the top of your head:
You are only spinning pre-pro pre-prohibition
hibition pre-prohibition sophomorisms. (Inciden (Incidentally,
tally, (Incidentally, William J. Lederer wrote
Nation of Sheep, not David Ries Riesman
man Riesman as you indicated. A real so sociologist,
ciologist, sociologist, or even any reasonably
well-educated person, would have
known better.)
Now there are many reasons why
one perhaps ought not to smoke
marijuana (no one says reefers,
except maybe narcs and aging
journalists, and the word is ar argot
got argot or patios, not lingo ..
an expression which I fear dates
you more than your confession that
you worried about drinking and
smoking in your college days), but
tear of being driven to criminal
assault is not one of them.
Marijuana is NOT a stimulant

asks Delts to pipe down

Editor:
We are residents of Murphree
Hall. Some of us have been for
twoyears. As residents of Uni University
versity University Housing, we are expected
to obey several simple rules which
require reasonable quiet. Quote
from the Murphree Area Regula Regulations:
tions: Regulations: Reasonable quiet is ex expected
pected expected at all times. Observance of
this rule is especially important
alter 7:00 p.m. DAILY when resi residents
dents residents are studying or sleeping,
and, Playing or practicing of
musical instruments in rooms is
prohibited.
Is it too much to expect the Delta
Tau Delta Fraternity, which is
ac ross University Avenue from
Murphree Hall, to obey some sort
of rules of peace and quiet when
having a party? if dormitory resi residents
dents residents were to make anywhere near
as much noise as the Delts do at
their parties, they would be
severely reprimanded. We admit
that the Delts dont have too many

us! I even further suggest that
you are unconsciously using
this argument to obscure the
real issues with which we are
concerned. The real issues
are those concerning the Viet
Nam war and not domination
of our organization by so socalled
called socalled traitors, etc!
Joel Starkey
Viet Nam Day
Committee member

as you misinform us, and The
Mayors Committee on Marijuana
in The Marijuana Problems in
New York has adequately demon demonstrated
strated demonstrated that it is not a factor in
crime or crime rates. I suspect
the reason there are laws against
marijuana is that people who find
their happiness in a weed are not
as easily suckered into the ratrace
that keeps the capitalist mill turn turning.
ing. turning. (Lest I be misunderstood:
Communism is merely state capi capitalism.)
talism.) capitalism.)
I should offer you the opportunity
to experience marijuana intoxica intoxication
tion intoxication yourself and to meet a group
of heads, but since I gave up seek seeking
ing seeking the Apocalypse through chem chemistry
istry chemistry I have lost touch. Until some someone
one someone else offers, then, I suggest
you go quickly to the nearest li library
brary library and research the question
thoroughly (avoid, please. Read Readers
ers Readers Digest, Life, Look, Ladies
Home Journal, and J. Edgar Hoov Hoover).
er). Hoover). Then write an apology or re retraction
traction retraction of your recent Alligator
articles, for you have done a great
disservice to the discipline of
Sociology which- had had enough
trouble establishing itself as a
real science.
Name Withheld

parties, but we should not be forced
to participate in even these few
while in our own rooms. Even it
University Regulations dont applv
to off-campus fraternities, the
civil laws against disturbing the
peace, which the Delts seem to he
violating, should be obeyed.
We have no complaint against Pi
Kappa Alphas or Delta Upsilon
parties, or parties in general.
These, fraternities and others in
the vicinity are able to sponsoi
parties which dont shake t<
neighborhood.
We called the Delta Tau Delia
house twice on the night of Man h
12 and asked, politely no less, for
them to tone their band down. Hoi
attempts were failures.
After putting up with the noise
for a long time, we would like to
request that in the future the Delts
use a lower volume setting on their
bands amplifiers.
George Mcae. -fEU
David Miller, 3AS



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

1~~I ~~ for rent |
I vAILABLE MAY Ist. 1 apt. for
I students. 2 blocks from campus.
I ir conditioned. $l2O per student
I e r summer trimester. 1918 NW 15
H ve. Call 372-3572. (B-l 1 7-1 Ot-c).
I Qft rent. One bedroom apt. Air
1 mentioned. Available Aprils2oth.
1 jitablefor 2.4 blocks from cam-
I is. Ph. 378-4143. (B-l 17-st-p).
I VAILABLE FOR SPRING TRI.
§ illage Park, 2 bedroom, air cond.,
I iol: wall-to-wall carpeting. Call
I 6-3486. (B-l 17-st-p).
1 [ft CONDITIONED HOUSES AND
1 PTS. Now leasing for Summer
§| nd/or Fall. 3 or 4 students, male
H r female. Call Charlie Mayo,
B own and Country Realty, 376-
B 664 anytime. (B-l 14-ts-c).
I SEVERAL 1 and 2 bedroom, kit-
I hen equipped, apts. Furnished and
B unfurnished. Available now and
April Ist. East Side Garden Apts.
Apply at 309 NE 9th St., managers
office. (B-l 11-1 Otc).
HOUSE, 3 bedroom, 1-1/2 baths,
I I block from campus. For Spring
I Trimester. Contact Mrs. Moeler,
376-4471. (B-l 15-3 t-p).
REALLY EXTRA LARGE 2 Bed-
I room well furnished duplex.
Separate kitchen, air conditioners.
1 3 mature persons. Quiet, close to
I Univ. requirements. $125 a month.
I 376-6494. (B-113-st-c).
I FOR MEN. Ground floor, 2 room
I furnished, air conditions and re-
I frigerators. Near Univ. P.O. and
Library. 376-6494. (B-113-st-c).
I AVAILABLE NOW. One bedroom
I modern air conditioned apt. Near
I Univ. and Medical Center. Adults
I only, no pets, lease required. S9O.
I Ph. 372-3488 or 376-4360. (B-98-
I
I VILLAGE 34, SECOND EDITION.
Located near Univ. Golf Course.
1 328 SW 34th St. 24 new 1 bedroom
|upt. units, furnished and air con conjditioned.
jditioned. conjditioned. Availabe April Ist. Rent
sloo per month. See Resident Man Manjugcr
jugcr Manjugcr s apt. on premises after 5
| p m Lou Schilling, apt. 10.
Managed Ernest Tew Realty Inc.
376-6461 (B-108f-c).
'FT. EOR RENT. 2 large rooms,
Ael heated and lighted, ground
lor. Available immediately.lll
aW 3rd Ave. 376-9864. (B-115-
;3t -c).
CONDITIONED APTS, for
Rummer. Suitable for 2 or 3,
- 30-si : ,o p er term; suitable for
3 w 4. SIBO per term. Call 376-
990 8 a.m.-5 p.m., or 7 p.m.-
10 P-m.(B-ll 5 -ts-c).
LCOKLNG for a swinging
* D this summer? Modern 2 bed bedjrn
jrn bedjrn -*Pt. Air cond., wall to wall
11 P ( Ung. balcony overlooks pool.
0 11
[,,( (or rent April Ist.
$u V te anc entrance. 1241
Tth Ave. Ph. 376-5043. (B (B---118-2t-c).
--118-2t-c). (B---118-2t-c).
BEDROOM FURNISHED APT.
month. Married couples
> Available immediately. Call

for sale
1965 305 cc HONDA Super Hawk.
Never driven in rain, never driven
over 40. S3OO (P7OO, onooi' Now
$475 cash. Rex Rittgers, 376-9150.
(A-117-3t-p)
1965 HONDA Sport 50. Excellent
condition. Only 2,000 miles. S2OO.
Also have helmet. Call Earl. Rm.
430. 376-9124. (A-l 17-st-c).
KOMOFLEX S.* 127 single lens
reflex camera. Wide angle and
telephoto lens, tripod, cable re release,
lease, release, and light meter. S7O. Ruger
.22 automatic pistol w/holster.
S3O. Rm. 149 Grove Hall. Ph.
376-9171. Residence 378-4481.(A 378-4481.(A--
- 378-4481.(A--
80cc YAMAHA Trailmaster. Like
new; 170 miles. Yellow stepthrough
design, two sprockets. $250. New
all steel utility trailer. SBO. 378-
2032. (A-l 17-1 t-c).
HARLEY-DAVIDSON 74 . $325;
1965 YAMAHA 125 .. $375; 1965
YAMAHA 55cc . .$195; 1966 Y YAMAHA
AMAHA YAMAHA Sports 250 cc . $595.
Cyclerama, opposite the Old Post
Office, 378-2811. (A-l 17-st-c).
1964 VESPA 125 cc. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Recent SSO engine tupe up.
Call Norm, 378-3288 anytime. (A (A-114
114 (A-114 stp).
1964 BSA Lightning Rocket, 650 cc.
Excellent condition. Cash or trade.
$895. Call Dave Heney. 372-6938.
(A-108-ts-c).
1960 GREAT LAKES TRAILER,
10x40, 2 BR, air-cond., excellent
condition. $2,195. Call 372-5485.
Hickory Hill Trailer Park, Lot #B.
(A-113-st-p).
57xlO NATIONAL Mobile Home
with 25 Silver Top awning. Also
wall-to-wall carpeting throughout
and many other extras. Reasonable
amount for our equity and takeover
payments. 475-5627 or 4575097.
(A-113-st-c).
HARLEY-DAVIDSON, 55 cu. in.
$250 or trade for small car. New
tires and paint. Call Jim, rm 130,
372-9262,1 eave message. (A-l 16-
3t-c).
6 MONTHS OLD, 14 cubic foot
upright ADMIRAL freezer. SIOO.
Call 376-1702 after 5:30 p.m. (A (A---114-3t-p).
--114-3t-p). (A---114-3t-p).
Ilost^foundj
LOST Pair of Mens Prescription
Glasses. Black Rim, dark blue
carrying case with light blue tape
on front. Call 378-4445. (L-117-
lt-p).
gy
5:21-7:18-9:15
lOk DEAN
MARTIN
' T'' \ as MATT HELM
\.l w The
Silencers
V

Monduy, March 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator, 1

wanted
I
NEED TWO ROOMMATES to share
High-Rise Apt. for summer tri trimester.
mester. trimester. 1/2 block from campus.
Special rates. Call William Kugel,
378-4524. (C-117-si-p).
NEED SUMMER EMPLOYMENT.
Counsellors wranglers wanted
for large Eastern Boys Ranch.
Horsemanship required. Work with
hoys age 8-16. for more informa information,
tion, information, 378-4840 during week. (C (C---117-1
--117-1 (C---117-1 Ot-c).
***
help wanted
ACCOUNTING MAJOR -- at least
6 hours of accounting for assistant
business manager, Student Publi Publications.
cations. Publications. Apply Rm. 9. Fla. Union.
(E-l 17-tf-nc).
FULLER BRUSH COL. needs stu student
dent student representative in Diamond
Village, Flavet 111 and Schucht.
Can be worked in off hrs. with
average of $2.00 per hr. in earn earnings.
ings. earnings. Also need part or full time
help) for other areas of Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. Write to H. Silver, 1028
Clearwater Dr., Daytona Beach,
Fla. (E-l 17-ts-c).
TYPIST for dissertation wanted.
Will be at Univ. for 2 wks. in
March. Must have much exper experience
ience experience and references. Write de details
tails details to: Mr. Martin Rosmarin,
Box 351. Middletown, Conn. (E (E---1
--1- (E---1
MALES NEEDED to work over noon
hours: 11-1. Arranged to class
schedule. Good pay, food half price.
Kings Food Host, 1430 SW 13th St.
378-1656. (E-l 15-3 t-c).
services
NOW OPENING. Teddy Bear Nur Nursery.
sery. Nursery. 3 departments, complete
infant dept. Planned program for
children over 3. Central heating
and air conditioned. Ph. 376-0917.
1214-1/2 NW 4th St. (M-l 16-ts-c).
PETER PAN MOTEL, Williston,
Fla. 20 mins, from Gainesville.
Rooms available for all Univ.
events. Special rates for students.
2 in 2 double beds. S2O a week or
S6O a month. Ph. 528-3941. (M (M---1
--1- (M---1
WILLIAM
WYLERS l ffj|
the collector nj
PLUS AWARD WINNER

Page 9

f II
autos
1953 PACKARD. Automatic trans transmission,
mission, transmission, power steering, power
brakes, heater. Recently overhaul overhauled.
ed. overhauled. $75. Call 372-6220. (G-l 17-
3t-c).
1959 BLACK VW with white side sidewalls,
walls, sidewalls, sunroof, and new radio. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Will accept any
reasonable offer. Call 372-4129
after 6 p.m. (G-l 17-3 t-c).
1960 CHEVROLET. Automatic
transmission, radio, heater, new
| front tires. $450. 2109 SW 13th
St. 376-9218. (G-117-3t-p).
1961 ANGLIA. Less than 1.000
miles since complete overhaul.
Clean. $395. Will consider offers.
Ph. 376-0656 evenings. (G-117-
3t-c).
1964 SUNBEAM ALPINE. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition, low mileage,
bright red with black interior.
See at lot 36, Glynwood Park, di directly
rectly directly behind Fla. Power Corp.
(G-l 14-ts-c).
RISE ABOVE THE MIDDLE
CLASS. Buy Mercedes
Benz, local owner, exceptionally
clean. Call 372-6031.(G-112-tf-c).
6
1965 MGB. Still in factory war warranty.
ranty. warranty. less than 10.000 miles.
$2,000 cash or S2OO and take up
the payments. Service record if
necessary. 376-9723 or 378-2244.
(G-102-ts-c).
1965 CHEVROLET IMPALA Con Convertible,
vertible, Convertible, excellent condition, 300
hp engine, power steering, radio,
heater, white sidewalls. Call 376-
3211, ext. 5741 or 372-1881. (G (G--
- (G--
1957 MG-A CONVERTIBLE. Wire
wheels, tonneau cover, Navgahide
pleated upholstery, newbrakesand
tires. Engine transmission per perfect.
fect. perfect. $695. 376-9142, #322. (G (G--
- (G--
, r : - 1 v : ' ; I ~
real estate
I J
HOUSE FOR SALE. No Qualifying.
3 bedrooms, 2 baths. S3OO down.
s9l per month. Highland Court.
Ph. 372-6985. (I-109-ts-c).
3 Bedroom CCB House. 1-1/2 bath,
complete built-in kitchen, pool
privileges. Low down payment
$98.48 per month includes tax and
insurance. 2909 NE 13th St., 376-
3717. (1-113-1 Ot-c).

' 1 <" I I
SPECIAL! MONDAY & TUESDAY ONLY!
Req. sl.lO Box Dinner
COMPLETE DINNER (£
CLUDES: 3 pieces of Fried
Chicken, French Fries, tf r^fCTr l d
Slow or Grovy ond RCj
NO SUBSTITUTIONS. Wjpjpy
COL SANDERS
AVAILABLE AT Wo".??
Kentiifkij Tried
214 N.W. 13th St. 207 N.E. 16th Ave.
Phone 376-6472 Phone 378-2959

||f|ry LAST TWO DAYS
Rita Tushingham t*
7-9
r^Sn
I HW W f. Wimtl
I TONITE m TOP
thurs hits
1 FIRST AREA SHOWING
I From the author
1 of 'Room At The Top"?
I LAURENCE JEAN #\
I HARVEY-SIMMONS \
HONOR MICHAEL A' .4
I BLACKMAN CRAIG Q t >
That'Pusay Galora'Girl! / ' i
I \<
r Life At r
ITheTop f|
I 2nd Action Comedy of theJSB I
| Year! PETER SELLERS w I
PETER OTOOLE I
TECHNICOLOR I
rfSh
I N.W. 13th SI at 23rd Road I
I Tatophona 378-2434 j
KA <£j|
I James \ Maureen
I StewartX Ohara
I"THE RARE
I BREED"
>| r j iifgHl



. The Florida Alligator. Monday. March 21. 1966

Page 10

|i(iiiiiinirniiiiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiiiiHiiiiiiii;i;!iiii(iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiM!i
| SUPPORT GATOR ADVERTISERS |
!i^ "I ?
* At least half the students working 13 weeks earned
SISOO or more. And heres what others earned .
even those working fewet weeks:
lost of 2 sl2l
earned Qr more
a week.
' ; .. :> : ; v
. '. :
1 "iSrt *133
earneD or mere a week.
1 out Os 4 SIQQ
earned or more a we ek.
as much or more this
/ and you need no sales experience. Youre care carefully
fully carefully trained and work on proven routes where
1 people have been buying Good Humor for years.
\ Everything supplied, free .. theres nothing /
\ to invest. J
HOW TO QUALIFY FOR INTERVIEW
1. Minimum age 18.
2. Need a valid drivers license . and must be
able to drive a clutch transmission.
3. Be in good physical condition.
REGISTER NOW
Ask your Summer Placement Director or Student
Aid Officer to schedule you for our campus visit.
An Equal Opportunity Employer. (M F)

Profs Support Honor System

By RICK DUPUIS
Alligator Staff Writer
Faculty members at the Univer-
Florida have given over overwhelming
whelming overwhelming support to the honor
system used on campus.
Herb Schwartz, recently-elected
chancellor of the honor court, said
99 per cent of the faculty returned
a questionnaire mailed to them in
August with a favorable yes to
the system.
The questionnaire did indicate
an orientation program should be
given to acquaint new faculty mem members
bers members who arrive each year and re re
re Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co.

~ STEAK NIGHT
Monday, 5 to 9 p.m.
12 oz. CHOICE
Bms T-BONE
Steak Served With French
2310 S.W. 13th St. Fries, Cole Slaw, Hot Rolls
and Butter.
1505 N.W. )3th St. Amy $a (9

| Summer Business |
I Opportunity For |
Sophomores, Juniors, (
I Seniors |
| JEWEL TEA CO., INC. 1
| 5502 Shawland Rd. 1
| P.O. Box 6458 |
I Jacksonville, Fla. 1
l This Is For That Student Who Needs Summer Employment And Can Travel The I
| State Os Florida Expense Allowance With Guarantee Income Os SBO.OO Per 1
= Week, Plus Bonus At Termination.
Also Competition For Scholarship Awards. M
1 Jewel's Summer Program Is Designed For The Ambitious, Capable College
| Student For Opportunities In Jewel's Food Stores Routes Department Drug
= Stores And Manufacturing s
Mail The Coupon Below Or Write To Address Above. s
== S
1 Name:
| Address:
| Telephone: Age:
1 Major Subject:
I Past Employment If Any:
| Best Time For Interview I

acquaint those faculty members
who have been here for some
time. said Schwartz.
He said he is sending letters to
the dean of each college advising
them he would be available to
meet with its faculty to explain the
nature and operation of the honor
system.
Most of the faculty attached a
sheet of paper explaining their
point of view.
They shared the belief that the
honor system was -the best
approach for a community lilce a
university with an adult popula population.
tion. population. he said.
Schwartz said some colleges on
campus were more receptive to the
honor system than others.
He said he did not want to point
them out because support was by
far the majority opinion in all col colleges.
leges. colleges.
As might be expected, the
faculty members from the Law

School gave their full support,
stating the best Way to administer
justive is by ones own peers and
~not by one professors arbitrary
decision. said Schwartz.
Some of the faculty members
pointed out in their replies that
although they supported the honor
system they did not wish to be
cross-examined by a law student
and perhaps made to look foolish.
- Again these professors were in inthe
the inthe minority. said the Chancellor.
Some of the faculty members
said in their reply they would find
the experience interesting having
never been in a courtroom before.
The questionnaire was sent out
during the last week of August by
Sid Stubbs, past chancellor of the
honor court.
Glee Clubs Sing
Tomorrow Night
UFs combined mens and
womens glee clubs will preview
their 1966 concert tour with a cam campus
pus campus performance at Tuesday 8:15
p.m. in the University Auditorium.
Highlighting the tour presenta presentations
tions presentations will be special guest appear appearances
ances appearances by Evelyn McGarrity and
Samuel Teeters, both members of
the Universitys Department of
Music.
Directed by Guy B. Webb the 70-
member group will visit the
Florida Gold Coast with stops
in Ft. Pierce. Daytona Beach,
Miami, Orlando and Palm Beach,
winding up the tour with a four fourday
day fourday visit to Kingston, Jamaica.
The campus concert is the first
of 14 performances slated for the
Two glee clubs.



m Orange *

address notices to orange and blue,
informational services office.
Campus Calendar

PLEASE TURN IN ALL ITEMS FOR CAMPUS CALENDAR TO THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS OFFICE, FLA. UNION

GOLF: Today, 12:30 p.m., UF Golf Course, UF vs.
Georgia Tech.
BASEBALL: Today, 3 p.m., Perry Field. UF vs.
Yale.
INTER- VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: To Today,
day, Today, 5 p.m., 4th Floor Lib., Prayer meeting.
BOWLING LEAGUE: Today, 7 p.m., Palm Lanes.
Bus leaves front of FU at 6:30 p.m. Bowlers pay for
own games.
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL ENGI ENGINEERS:
NEERS: ENGINEERS: Today, 7:30 p.m.. 270 Eng. Bldg. Prof.
Martinson guest speaker.
BASEBALL: Tues., Mar. 22, 3 p.m., Perry Field,
UF vs. Y'ale.
ALPHA ZETA BANQUET: Tues., Mar. 22. 7 p.m..
Student Service Center. Speaker Dr. George K.
Davis, Director Biological Sciences. Tickets, $1.75
for students and $2.25 for faculty. Available from Dr.
V. F. Nettles, 114 MCC.
PHI ETA SIGMA: Today, 7 p.m., FU 324. Elections.

Udministrative Notices To Students. Faculty Sc Staff

students

I.D. PHOTOS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY: Only those
students who receive notification of appointment should
report for photographs for identification cards at this
time. Other students will receive notification of an
appointment at a later date, either in May or possibly
not until September. The $5 penalty fee for missing
appointments is effective after a student misses TWO
appointments. This is to allow for possible class con conflicts.
flicts. conflicts. Students who have received notification of
photo appointments are urged to be on time. Students
are requested to bring their Social Security card
with them.
NATIONAL DEFENSE LOAN INTERVIEWS: Inter Interviews
views Interviews to determine eligibility and amount to be granted
for National Defense loans in the academic year be beginning
ginning beginning September, 1966, will be held March 14- April
7, according to the following alphabetical schedule.
Applicants will report to 124 Tigert Hall for inter-

General Notices

WORKERS NEEDED: There will be a meeting Tues-
March 22, at 3 p.m. in 311 Florida Union for all
students interested in working with the student govern-
T en t olfice of off-campus housing. Anyone interested
)u t unable to attend the meeting should contact Ernie
itz, 310 Florida Union, extension 2545 before the day
3f meeting.
COBOL COURSE PLANNED: A COBOL (Common
business. Oriented Language) course in programming
Ml be given April 25-29, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.. by the
n iversity Computing Center. Registration forms are
v ailable in the March issue of Bits and Pieces. Fur Furlere
lere Furlere formation may be obtained from R. E. Jacobs,
Assistant, Computing Center.

CASH
CONSOLIDATE BILLS
TRAVEL EX PENCE
525 S6OC
Marion Finance Company Inc.

UF YOUNG REPUBLICANS: Tues.. Mar. 22, 7:30
p.m.. FU 121. Y'oung Republican Platform to be
debated.
SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB: Tues., Mar. 22,
8 p.m., FU Johnson Lounge. Program.
GATOR GRAS QUEEN CONTEST: Tues., Mar. 22,
8 p.m.. FU 324.
CONCERT: Tues.. Mar. 22, 8:15 p.m., Univ. Aud..
Annual Formal Concert Combined Mens and Womens
Glee Clubs, directed by Guy B. Webb.
FACULTY LECTURE FOR 1966: Tues.. Mar. 22.
8:l,i p.m.. Bless Aud. Dr. P. A. Black, Water and
Your Health. Public invited.
EDUCATION DAMES: Wed., Mar. 23, 8 a.m.
7 p.m.. Norman Hall Aud. Booksale.
TWILIGHT CONCERT: Wed., Mar. 23. G:45 p.m.:
Plaza of the Americas. University Symphonic Band,
conducted by Richard Bowles.
GATOR GRAS STUDENT LEADERS BANQUET:
Thurs. Mar. 24. 6 p.m.. Hub Banquet Room. Campus

views. Persons whose last names begin with:
( F G ) on March 21; ( H ) on March 22; ( I
J K ) on March 23; ( L ) on March 24; ( M )
on March 28; ( N O ) on March 29; ( P ) on
March 30; ( Q R ) on March 31; ( S )on April
4; ( T U V ) on April 5; ( W ) on April 6;
(X-Y-Z)on April 7.
STATE TEACHER SCHOLARSHIP LOAN HOLDERS:
Funds for scholarship loans for state teachers are now
available, Scholarship Section, Student Service Center,
for winter trimester 1965-66.
STAT E_ NURSING SCHOLARSHIP LOAN HOLDERS:
Funds for scholarship loans for state nurses are now
available, Scholarship Section, Student Service Center,
for the winter trimester 1965-66.
GRE APPLICATION DEADLINE: Deadline date for
receipt of applications for the Graduate Record Ex Examination
amination Examination to be given April 23 is April 8. Booklets
on the GRE may be obtained from 235 Tigert.

CAMPUS CALENDAR AND NOTICES DEADLINE:
The Campus Calendar and Orange and Blue Bulletin
appear Monday, Wednesday and Friday in The Alli Alligator.
gator. Alligator. Announcements for the Calendar must be in the
Public Functions Office, 104 Florida Union, by :au
a.m. the day BEFORE you wish the announcement to
appear. Notices for Saturday and Sunday will appear
in Fridays Calendar and must be submitted by 8:30
a.m. Thursday. Notices for the ORANGE & BLUE
BULLETIN must be submitted to the Division of In Informational
formational Informational Services. Bldg. H, by 9 a.m. the day
BEFORE the notice is to appear. Due to limited
space, notices will run no more than two times, ex except
cept except for official University notices.

TAXES DUE

BLUE BULLETIN

Monday. March 21 1966, The Florida Alligator,

organizations must make reservations and pick up
tickets in FU 312 by 5 p.m., Tues., Mar. 22. Price
$2.25 per plate.
CERAMICS CLASS: Starts Tues., Mar. 29, 7:30-
9:30 p.m., FU 120 Craft Shop. $5.00 for 8 lessons.
Mrs. Olive Briggs Instructor. Call for reservations,
ext. 2951.
CHILDRENS CERAMICS CLASS: Starts Sat., Mar.
20. 9-11 a.in., FU 120CraftShop. Children 8-12 yrs..
$6.00 all materials. Mrs. Olive Briggs, instructor.
Call for reservations, ext. 2951.
THE 808 HOPE SHOW: Sat., April 2.. 8:15 p.m.,
Fla. Gym. Ticket sales: Today, noon 4:30 p.m..
and Tues. Mar. 22, noon to 4:30 p.m.. FU Box Office.
Till AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL EN ENGINEERS:
GINEERS: ENGINEERS: Today, 7:30 p.m. 270 Eng. Bldg. E. P.
Martinson Award to be presented.
THE SOCIETY OF AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERS:
Today, 7:30 p.m., 512 Eng. Bldg. Joint meeting with
ASME, Faculty vs. Students.

DEADLINE DATE: March 25 is the deadline date
for applications to be received by the Department of
Foreign Languages for reading knowledge examination
in Spanish and functional knowledge examinations to be
given April 2.
JOBS AVAILABLE: The Student Employment Office,
124 Tigert, has jobs available in Food Service. Hours
can be arranged. Also, job available for research
assistant, junior or senior with science background,
to work for chemical engineering. Students interested
in these jobs should contact the Student Employment
Office.
FACULTY AND STAFF
REFRIGERATORS AVAILABLE: Property Records
has 26 G. E. refrigerators that may be obtained for
us by operational departments at a cost of $lO each.
Contact Property Records Department, Ext. 2994.

PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
(Sign-up sheets are posted in Placement Office, Bldg.
H. All are degree-level positions. Asterisk indicates
summer employment available for juniors. Interviews
will be held in Florida Union unless Otherwise indi indicated.)
cated.) indicated.)
MARCH 25: CALIFORNIA PACKING SALES
CORPn Gen. Bus.. Mktg., Ed.. Lib. Arts, Agric.
IRC, INC.IE, ChE, EE.

LOANS
SHORT TILL PAYDAY
BUYING SECOND CAR
525-S6OO
V* H i 111 1 111 iIHV t sillip.lliv Inc.
_ j;. -r>

Page 11



Page 12

1,-The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 21, 1966

yQiamAUMjCaaMl
the commencement of construction of (J
*the TreNeh Quarter
European in design, the feel of these 114 apartment units is strictly mid-century
American. The architecture is from a French inspired Town House design. Each
apartment is entirely enclosed (from the foundation to the roof) within its own walls insuring
the maximum of privacy. Located downstairs are the kitchen, dining area and living room; the
bedrooms are upstairs. Such amenities as compartmented baths, walk-in closets, private fenced patios
and lavishly terraced and landscaped courtyards, including a heated swimming pool,
are available to our tenants. It's hardly necessary to mention such things as all General
Electric kitchens, wall-to-wall carpeting and central air conditioning. In short
the bare minimum approach to apartment living, the uninspired architecture, the cramped living
areas, the dormitory-like corridors is out; the imaginative approach, old world
charm adapted to modern living is in.
Enough of the sales pitch, and let us prove it.

For information concerning
floor plans, rates, terms, etc.
please inquire at the
rental office of The Village Park
1001 S.W. 16th Ave. Gainesville, Fla.
'

the lre\rh Quarter
999 S.W. 16th Ave. Gainesville. Fla.
Phone 378- 3771



Orange Tops Blue In Spring Thriller

Hf JH V
'- syffi iinmnuMMfr*****^****^-^-*^----
fM .. WHWy^
f .... :c^|BSj^a^^fc-.v
Y*tf%sslli-' v -'' -a- ' **'*'
Wm %mw.
torl
** ji
PW My." Jk ** A wsjjjf/t
f g|f ':# mf^ :
ftp- fli^Kp*
HJI
Â¥msM 4 ,. |p JBp. C li- /"/
UPSY DAISY
Richard Trapp (44 dark) gets a ride frpm sophomore linebacker
Mike Upensky as he hauls in a Kay Stephenson aerial. Looking on
are Bobby Adams (44 white) and Jim Yarborough (88 dark). The fine
play of Trapp and Yarborough elicited a great deal of praise from the
Bull Gator. Ray Graves.
>**<****. Vv- ... -*ii DEFENDERS DEFLECT BALL
B g Jim Yarborough (88 dark) tries to catch a pass amidst two
; defenders. Halfback Larry McQuinn gets there too late, bu
amrT Gte Bill Gaisford gets a hand in the way and deflects the pass.
Photos by RON SHERMAN

-a
Orange Squeezes By Rentz And Co.;
Stephenson Stars As Stellar Sub

By 808 MLNAKEK
Sports Editor
Question: Whats orange and blue and green all
over) Answer: the Gator football team in Saturdays
annual Orange and Blue spring game.
Senior Kay Stephenson led the Orange toa victory,
33-28, completing 18 of 25 passes for 251 yards.
Sophomore sensation Larry Rentz, quarterbacking
the Blue team, almost pulled off an upset in the
waning minutes of the game. Rentz passed for 118
yards and picked up another 114 running.
Those were some of the highlights of Saturdays
game, but as Head Coach Ray Graves said, They
were just too green. Graves heaped praise on
Stephenson and Rentz and was generally pleased with
the offense. The defense was another story.
Weve just go to outs core our opponents next fall,
said Graves. I dont think we will win any games
with our defensive ability.
Graves said that Rentz, who has missed most of
spring practice with assorted ailments, will go both
ways for the Gators this season, seeing action on
offense and defense.
Graves also hinted that All-America Steve Spur Spurrier,
rier, Spurrier, who enjoyed the game as a spectator because
of a knee injury, may play some defense if he is
needed there.
The Orange team, behind Stephensons accurate
arm. bombed the Blues during the first period. The
Pensacola senior hit end Jack Coons with a 39-yard
aerial for the first score.
Tommy Glenn fumbled the ensuing kickoff and the
Orange recovered it on the 28. The Orange drove
down to the two where Wayne Barfield bulled his
way across for the score.
The periods third TD resulted from a bad snap
to Rentz as he was attempting to punt. After evading
several would-be tacklers. Rentz tried to get the kick
away. Sophomore Harrell Reid blocked the punt and

Wr 'w l !** l jjr <*
' ''^"*"**"""*""^*^ j
BBAsfL ~a .. "" wttj vN 41
'Hr AH jp|)||MjJg(r S | > ,_, 4\ : ~B H
HUNGERBUHLER HAULS ONE IN

Tom Hungerbuhler (36 white) intercepts a Larry
Rentz pass and takes off downfield as teammate

RUSHING
No. Net
Smith 16 43
Stephenson 5 7
Barfield 3 7
Wages 3 5
Healey 1 4
Robles 1 3
No. Net
Rentz 19 114
Glenn 20 79
Christian 11 39
Mcride 2 9

GAME STATISTICS

PASSING
Stephenson No. Yards
18-25 251
Rentz No. Yards
10-20 118
SCORING
Orange 19 0 0 14 33
Blue 0 77 14 28

Monday, March 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

corraled it in the end zone for the score. At the end
of the first period the Orange led 19-0.
Rentz, not to he outdone, moved the Blues G 8 yards
for their first score. Looking like Fred Astaire on
the gridiron, he danced around right end for the
six-pointer.
With the Orange leading 19-7 early in the third
period, Rentz moved his team 80 yards for the TD,
with Glenn ripping in for the score.
Stephenson and Co. came right back with a 90-yard
drive, as sophomore Larry Smith took the ball in
from 11 yards out. That made the score 26-14, with
the Orange holding what appeared to be a comfortable
lead.
With 13:09 remaining, Rentz put the Blues right
back in contention. He took his team 66 yards, with
Tom Christian fighting his way in for the score from
the one-yard line. The conversion was good and the
score stood at 26-21.
The Blues got possession again at their own 46 with
5:42 left in the game. Rentz moved the team 48 yards
and then threw a J short pass to Richard Trapp to put
the Blues in the lead.
Stephenson and the Orange came right back, as the
big quarterback wrote another chapter in Floridas
best-seller, The Two Minute Offense. With 2:30
left in the game, Stephenson directed the Orange
attack to the game winning score, flipping a seven sevenyarder
yarder sevenyarder to Larry Smith.
Paul Ewaldsen was the games leading receiver,
hauling in eight passes for 73 yards. Jack Coons
caught three for 58.
One thing that did look very good was the pass
receiving, said Graves. Trapp. Coons and Ewald Ewaldsen
sen Ewaldsen played very well. I think you could sum up the
game very well by saying individuals looked good.

Bill Gaislord (23 white) sets a collision course for
intended receiver Richard Trapp.

RECEIVING
No. Yards
Ewaldsen 8 73
Coons 3 68
Smith 3 59
Wages 2 2 3
McCann 2 23
No. Yards
Glenn 3 34
Trapp 3 18
Christi.iii 2 35
Mcride 1 20
Yarborough 111

Page 13



The Florida Alligator

March 21, 1966

Cindermen Top Hurricanes;
Hager Anderson Pace Victory

The Gator track team, led by
Scott Hager and John Anderson,
paced Florida to a narrow 74 1/2-
70 1/2 victory over Miami in a
dual meet Saturday.
Hager took first place in the
intermediate hurdles, second in the
pole vault and third in the high
jump and high hurdles to pick up
11 1/4 points.
Team Captain Anderson took
firsts in the 100 and 200-yard dash dashes
es dashes and filled a spot on a mile
relay team which finished in a
dead heat with Miami. Anderson
garnered 10 3/4 points for his days
work.
The Baby Gator track team also
came out on top in the Magic City,
taking first place in the Miami-

Netters Had Bad Weekend

The Universities ofGeorgiaand
Tennessee handed Gator netmen
two losses last weekend to even evenout
out evenout the Florida Tennis record at
7-7 for the year. Georgia won 6-3
on Friday and the Vols won 7-2 in
Saturdays action at the UF varsity
courts.
The strong Volunteers won five
of six doubles and two of the three
single matches Saturday as Steve
Gardner was the only Gator victor victorious
ious victorious in singles. He alsoteamed-up
with Ron Fick in Floridas only
doubles win.

S r
I
f ffl\*&<£x v W- m' x -i$
*+Jfl V NBOClftlx £\ zwrSF^NllmlbZx
I &J&& *£&£&*<* F'\f JV fMr r^
I <&£&- y
liwli niMdnUf umyQiiui #>§ j^WwiMMIBP^
I ~
v /^m x^^ < >v;
H < **%Z.'\f #v,
" J jnUji_' Jr l'i
iCIC' /S£'t ^f>v^^j|ifi' w \^iqbJtf!^P.^W < '<^^^WB^B|HHB|PHBBWB|^^^^^fe
1 JB|bllbhs£ : ~

What do the imaginative go for? Trousers by Corbin, Ltd. Plaid. Prophetic. In Dacron polyester and
cotton from Galey and Lord. 1407 Broadway, New York 18. A Division of Burlington Industries.
Galey Low

Page 14

SPORTS

Ab. tB 1
% ff %
HAGER
Dade Junior College meet. The
frosh cindermen scored 67 1/3
points, followed by Manatee Junior
with 66, Miami Dade with 52 and

Number one Gator netman Rick
Chace lost to Tennessee ace Lenny
Schloss 6-1, 6-4 in the Florida
loss.
However, in Fridays action,
only Chace was able to salvage
glory for the Gators in singles as
he defeated Georgias Henry Field
6-2, 3-6, 6-1 inathreeset match.
The Bulldogs took the rest of the
singles and all but one of the
doubles matches. Floridas doubles
win came when Chace and Perrin
downed Field and Jay Davis 6-4,
1-6, 8-6.
UFs undefeated freshmen net netters,

Gators Green As St. Pats

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Staff Writer
We should have played this
game onSt. Patricks Day, as green
as we are, joked Gator head foot football
ball football coach Ray Graves after Satur-

v..
1
Daytona Beach with eight.
Mike Burton took first in the
javelin with a heave of 193 feet
and first "in the broad jump, leap leaping
ing leaping 22-11 Clint Fowlkes was first
in the intermediate hurdles with a
time of 39.6. Harry Drake set a
new frosh record for the mile,
running it in 4:20.9 to take another
first place for the Gators.
Tuesday, the Gators warm up for
the Florida Relays with a dual meet
against Southern Illinois. Oscar
Moore, Southern Illinois great
distance runner will be a feature of
the meet and of the Florida Relays.
Moore, an Olympic performer, has
run the two-mile distance in 8:38,
bettering the Relays record with
time to spare.

ters, netters, now 12-0 for the season, faced
the Bulldog freshmen Friday and
took two singles and a doubles
victory to continue their winning
ways.
Today the Gators face Ohio Wes Wesleyan
leyan Wesleyan on the varsity courts. Game
time is 3 p.m.
Tuesday the netters play Emory.
Wednesday is a breather in the
teams heavy March schedule.
Georgia Tech comes here Thurs Thursday
day Thursday and Davis Lipscombplays here
on Friday.

days Orange and Blue gridiron
clash.
Graves took another draw on his
cigar and continued, I thought both
squads played an exciting brand of
football, but there were just too
many mistakes.
The Gator mentor cited a lack
of consistency and typical sopho sophomore
more sophomore errors as his reasons for
concern.
This is the greenest team Ive
coached at UF. said Graves.
Right now, were probably the
least experienced group in the con conference.
ference. conference. However, I know that well
improve with experience.
In noting players who showed
promise for the autumn football
campaign, Graves singled out
quarterbacks Kay Stephenson and
Larry Rentz, running backs Tom Tommy
my Tommy Glenn, Larry Smith, and Tom
Christian and pass catchers Paul
Ewaldsen and Richard Trapp.
Kay hasnt played much for us
during his college career, stated
Graves, but he displayed a lot of
determination and poise. We may
be using him a lot more this fall
than in previous years.
Rentz looked a little ragged
at times, but he came up with
some fine plays, stated the UF
mentor. Hes been out with a
broken nose and strep throat and
practiced only five times all
spring.

La Fontana
( APARTMENTS I
j AVAILABLE APRIL Ist. }
) Landscaped Roof Garden )
( Sun Deck j
) Gas Fired Grills (
i Two Balconies Per Apartment i
j Rent Includes Partial Utilities )
( Occupancy Up To Four )
i Stylish Furniture (
General Electric Appliances )
HIGH RISE LUXURY j
AT DORMITORY RATES j
207 N.W. 17th STREET j
next to University Post Office (
' M.

Graves expressed displeasure
with a pass defense that looked
extremely pourous.
I know we lost a lot of good
defensive players last year, but
a combined total of over 350 pass passing
ing passing yards is too much to give up.
Were going to have to do a lot
more work there, stated Graves.
I was more impressed with our
offense today than our defense, as
Im sure most people were. Our
running game, as well as our pass passing
ing passing game, looked strong.
Graves pointed out that ten play players
ers players had missed the game and most
of spring practice due to injuries.
Included in the group were quarter quarterback
back quarterback Steve Spurrier, running backs
Don Knapp and John Feiber and
defensive ends Don Barrett and
Chip Hoye.
Were counting heavily on many
of these boys for the fall, and Im
hoping theyll be ready, said
Graves.
The Bull Gator also stated plans
now indicate that Rentz and Spur Spurrier
rier Spurrier will both work at quarterback
ars defensive safety in the fall
practice sessions.
I guess you would have to say
this is definitely a question-mark
team, said Graves. We lack
experience, but we have as good a
group of sophomores as weve ever
had.



Kjay, March 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

~ J
j<**^^j^gjjPy^ppppi s :: mSSIr
GROSS LEGS IT OUT
Gator catcher Ed Gross legs it out for a hit in Saturdays game
th Georgia. Gross got the hit, one of only two the Gators managed
a 4-1 loss to the Bulldogs. The Gators split the series, winning
ridays game 5-2.
U of F Staff & Faculty Since 1935
**
AINESVILLE FLA. CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Bldg J Ext. 29731

THE LOCALLY OWNED I
ALACHUA FIRESTONE SERVICE CENTER I
615 N. MAIN ST. I
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA I
1 SHORT BLOCK NORTH OF CITIZEN'S BANK |
NOW GIVING fO
ON RETAIL PURCHASES gBBBgI I
A ..7:-..irv.y .,>>>< I
CHECK THESE INTRODUCTORY OFFERS I
GOOD THROUGH SATURDAY I
300 A/GreenStamps I 500 AiGreenStamps I
muffTer $6 95 ll DELCO BATTERIES I
andup BEGINNING AT $12.44 & UP. I
INSTALLATION FREE I
500 AtfGreenStamps I
A Uinrn DAI ANfF ON PURHASE OF SET OF I
on our SHOCK absorbers I
HIGH SPEED ELECTRONIC BUY 3 GET ONE FREE |
VISUBA LANCER I 1
IN ADDITION, OUR REGULAR LOW PRICES WILL I
MEET OR BEST COMPETITION ON COMPARABLE I
QUALITY SERVICE AND PRODUCTS. I
WE HAVE A QUALITY TIRE TO MEET EVERY I
_ BUDGET AND DRIVING REQUlEMEN^^^^__^^^^J

Page 15

808
f
-Mencsker-
SPOR TS EDITOR
A PLACE FOR STEPHENSON
After watching Saturdays Orange and Blue
game, I can only wonder where Kay Stephenson
has been all these years. Much of the past five
years (he was a red-shirt) has been a study in
frustration for Stephenson. Gator coaches tried
him at several positions, but he couldnt seem
to make it. He ballooned up to 230 pounds and
you cant blame him. If youre going to warm
the bench you might as well be comfortable.
With Steve Spurrier missing all of spring
practice and Larry Rent/, missing all but five
days, Stephenson was given the opportunity he
needed to show his ability.
Stephenson is an example of what work will
do for a player. said Coach Ray Graves. Kay
is a boy who never gave up."
If you were at the game Saturday, you had a
chance to witness possibly the best right arm

Gators Split With Bulldogs

By ALAN BUKTON
Alligator Staff Writer
Tile Gator baseball team had its
eight game winning streak ended
and at the same time suffered its
first conference loss of the season,
dropping a 4-1 decision to the
Georgia Bulldogs Saturday at
Perry Field.
In the opening game of the series
on Friday, the Gators collared the
Georgia nine 5-2.
Poor fielding and hitting support
behind pitcher Kelly Prior led to

the Gators downfall Saturday. The
Georgians pushed across three un unearned
earned unearned runs in the third inning
while the Gators committeed two
errors.
Meanwhile the Florida hitting
attack was held to two harmless
singles, by shortstop Dave Hodges
and catcher Ed Gross.
Prior walked six and struck out
six while giving up eight hits.
Winning Bulldog hurler Charles
McDaniel fanned five Gators while
walking six.

(CLEARANCE SALE]
j MARCH 31ST END OF FISCAL YEAR! g
J For tax reasons our used car inventory
= must be reduced. §§
| SEE US THIS MONTH FOR THE BEST DEALS §
165 CADILLAC. Sedan de Vi lie. Hardtop sedan. gj
|| One owner, sold and serviced by B&G Still f
E under factory warranty. Fully equipped-comfort =
1 control aircond., cruise control, power windows I
jj & seat, power door locks. 5% GMAC financing
§j (compare rates). Outstanding value .... $5295
i 64 OLDSMOBILE. Cutlass coupe. White & f§
1 yellow. Bucket seats. Aircond., Power steering E
| $1995 |
E 64 OLDS. 3 seat station wagon. Brilliant white
s & red Factory air cond., cruise control ~ full
E power, roof rack. Get ready now for summer trips E
| ....$2295 |
§j 64 CHEVROLET. Impala convertible. Excellent 5
H condition. Sharp looks. White top over solid
= black. V 8 & p0wer....51995
M 62 FORD. Galaxie 4 door sedan. VB, standard
j shift, radio & heater. A nice car.... 5895
H 64 PONTIAC. Catalina 4 door sedan. White
s with red interior. Factory air & power. Very
H good appearance & condition.... $2395
11
E 64 PONTIAC. Custom Tempest coupe. Midnight §f
§f blue. 24,000 true miles. One owner. Factory
f§ air c0nd....51995 E
BSC MOTOR CO. INC. 1
| CADILLAC OLDSMOBILE DEALER |
| 2001 NW 13 ST. 376-7515 |
MillllllllllllllllllUllllllllS

on the Gator football team. Stephenson may
not scramble like Larry Rentz and he may not
get the passes away as quickly as Spurrier
can, but theres a definite place for him in the
Gators plans for 19GG.
#
NOTES . One thing I noticed at Saturdays
game was the fine condition the Gators were in,
much better than they were last spring. The
team has been working on a strict schedule:
four days scrimmage, two days weight lifting
and running a mile, and one day studying game
films and having chalk talks . The Gators
may or may not better last years record, but
theyll certainly be a better conditioned team
. . Larry Rentz put on a dazzling performance,
even if it was a bit ragged. He made many
typical sophomore mistakes which is nothing out
of the ordinary for a Gator team which will be
one of the most inexperienced in the SEC. I just
wish he would stop carrying the ball like a loaf
of bread when he decides to run with the ball.
I was afraid he would fumble, but amazingly
enough he never did . Larry Smith showed
signs of greatness, perhaps another Donnie
Anderson. Ex-Gator tackle Mike Waxman pre predicts
dicts predicts Smith will win the Heisman Trophy before
he leaves UF.

In Fridays game,, two double doubleplays
plays doubleplays behind Gator pitcher Ray
Rollyson gave Florida the win.
Rollyson walked only one man
while striking out seven Bulldogs.
Losing pitcher Mike Wyscki walked
four men and struck out three.
The Gators will try to get back
on the winning side again Monday
when they begin a two game series
with the Yale Bulldogs. Friday and
Saturday they take to the road for
a crucial two game set with an
always strong Auburn nine.



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator Monday. March 21, 1966

JOIN THE THOUSANDS
\Who Are Saving Money i
WH MpMP SAVE Money, Time
imi and Parking Space .jgLgpg
SAVE On Every Item
Everv Dav HEALTH BEAUTY AIDS COSMETICS GREETING CARDS |
y Y PHOTO FINISHING XEROX COPYING PAPERBACKS MAGAZINES
If q
Q || FREE TENDER TOUCH I
SPECIAL JsE ~£§|
.... | |H Moisturizing Bath Oil by Helene Curtis LUSTRE-
H§ with any purchase. |||
CONCENTRATE JP (Good thru Saturday, March 26th.) |j| CREAM
SHAMPOO 1 1 rpetwnwtew roiipnm i 1 HAIR SPRAY
y 1 j|!
ADY E IICT 7n nll Bni/ E
wr I l i 70z., L/ST 79< OUR PRICE
Ixpires Mar. 26 1966 i- 5
ty Rights Reserved ij
umi't T-?_. 11 9Q/
Good Only @ QUIK-SAVE V
BIG BIG BIG
Q Q Q
SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL
PENCILS ALCOHOL MEDICATED
NO2 RUBBING FACE
5c value, 3 for COMPOUND CONDITIONER
49c VALUE, FULL PINT By MENNEN, 51 SIZE
5< | 9< | 67<
SAVINGS OF OVER 50%!! q
SPECIAL a SPECIAL
PERSONNA QUIK-SAVE 1 Plazo [I OLD SPICE
runrn ctaimiccc Xarox Copios as Low os 8C Each!
SUPER STAINLESS HIGHEST QUALITY WORK
KJEEL BLADE AccaptabU lor Tom Papon, Th*s*s, Etc. L-__J
$1 VALUE
10S $1.45 VALUE
GAINESVILLE'S LOWEST PRICES
q A ON FILM DEVELOPING- 59£
OOV ONE DAY SERVICE
S'
1620 W. UNIV. (Carolyn Plaza) Now 2 Locations To Serve You: 9W. UNIV. (Downtown)