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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
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Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
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English
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v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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29.665245 x -82.336097

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Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
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01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Tlie Florida Alligat§i

70/. 58, No. 11l

|2lsf Engineers Fair Opens Today

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James Meni is getting ready to take the family cushion out
for a ride. This Hoover Craft is the car of the future. It never
has a flat because it rides on a cushion of air. And did you

M arcet DeLoach:
Coed Energy
Means Work

Coed energy means work.
And Marcet DeLoach is the first coed to serve as executive
secretary in the Engineering Fair since 1933 when it all started.
I dont know how we ever made it without one, says Bill
SIiDDV president of Benton Engineers Council.
Miss DeLoach has spent at least three hours every day since
February working with Chuck Daniher, chairman of the Fair, and
hl Shes our general coordinator of all staff functions, Slippy
pleasant voice on the telephone, a regulator of office hours
source of refreshing ideas, constant letter writer, protector of
engineers spelling reputation, and guardian of morale that s
mir Marcet, says Slippy.
Miss DeLoach was asked to assume her current role because
of her outstanding performance in last years Gator Growl staff.
Miss DeLoach is activities chairman of the AOP house and has
mobilized many of the girls houses to work for the Fair.
SUppy explained that one of the reasons the Fair has expanded
beyoncUhe College of Engineering is that many of the staff functions
previously handled by engineers are now handled by coeds like
Miss DeLoach.

Today's Alligator2o pages thickis
dedicated to those hard-working U F
engineering students who put on the
annual Engineers' Fair. The regular
paper can be found inside this wrap wraparound
around wraparound Engineering Special.

RIDING AN AIR CUSHION

University of Florida

ever wonder what happens to an air cushion that rides two
feet off the ground when it passes over a rock that is three
feet off the ground. (Exhibit 24; see map on Page 2-A)


IfJV m JrA.M V
By! aw r **
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Marcet DeLoach, after working as Executive Secretary for five
weeks, falls for Otto the mechanical robot. (Exhibit 100)

MARCET AND OTTO

Friday, March 11, 1966

Dr. Reitz
Cuts Ribbon
At 4 P.M.

By AGNES FOWLES
Alligator Staff Writer
The 21st Annual EngineersFair
opens today at 4 p.m. at a ribbon
cutting by UF President J. Wayne
Reitz.
Exhibits by the UF engineering
societies and by industrial exhibi exhibitors
tors exhibitors will be featured.
For the first time in the history
of the Fair, an award will be pre presented
sented presented for- the best industrial ex exhibit,
hibit, exhibit, according .to Fair Chairman
Chuck Daniher, SEG.
Judges for the award are: Dani Daniher;
her; Daniher; Bill Slippy, SEG, Benton En Engineering
gineering Engineering Society president; Doug
Miller, SEG, judging and awards
chairman; and Bill Harper, SEG,
industrial chairman.
Saturday afternoon student ex exhibits
hibits exhibits will be judged by Bob Alli Alligood,
good, Alligood, executive director of the
Florida Engineering Society; An Andrew
drew Andrew Pickens, Florida Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering Society president; Robert B.
Mautz, UF vice-president for aca academic
demic academic affairs; Leonard Schieber,
director of research, Martin Co.,
Orlando; and Lee Dupuy.
Awards will be presented Satur Saturday
day Saturday night.
College of Engineering Dean
T. L. Martin will speak at a lunch luncheon
eon luncheon Saturday noon.
The luncheon will be attended
by the Fair committee, the society
presidents, the Fair Queen and
her court, and engineering faculty
members.
Open house will be sponsored
by the UF computer center. Those
attending the Fair will be able to
play checkers and tic-tac-toe with
the IBM 709 computer.
Amateur radio stations will be
set up and operated by the Gator
Amateur Radio Club. Free radio radiograms
grams radiograms will be sent anywhere in the
United States.
Graduate Engineering Education
System (GENYSlS)facilities willbe
on display. This will give the pub public
lic public an opportunity to see how the
closed circuit television network
works.
A lecture and tour sponsored by
the Student Satellite Tracking Sta Station
tion Station will explain the process of
tracking the satellites.
The American Nuclear Society
(ANS) will sponsor a tour of the
UF nuclear reactor. A demonstra demonstration
tion demonstration of the mechanical hands used
to handle radioactive material will
be featured.
Tours of the graduate research
laboratories will be conducted by
members of Sigma Pi Sigma and
the American Institute of Physics
(AIP). How basic equipment used
in physics experimentation is
operated will be shown.
Two films on the vocal cords
to demonstrate the principle of
auditory delayed feedback will be
projected in the communications
science lab.
Many of the nations leading in industries
dustries industries will have exhibits at the
Fair. Southern Bell Telephone,
Reynolds Metals Co. and Florida
Power Corporation are included.



SIMPSON
HALL

Key To The Map
r AREA 1- ENGINEERING BUILDING
Exhibit
132 Ideal Florida Harbor
230 A-C Machines Lab Display
270-273 Plant model of Cigar factory
279 Tic-Tac-Toe with Computer
319 Monroe International, Inc.
320 E. I. du Pont
322 Southern Bell Telephone Co.
331 Buckeye Cellulose Corporation
334 Tektronix Inc.
343 Florida Concrete Pipe Institute, Inc.
345 U S. Army Corps of Engineers
418 Levitational Melting Metals Display
420 Florida Power Corporation
424 Pulse Circuit Laboratory
427 Microwave Laboratory
428 Reynolds Metals Company
430 U. S. Geological Survey
512 Communications Sciences
518 NASA
521 American Institute of Architects
525 Gator Amateur Radio Club
527 Society of Mechanical Engineers
307 GENE SYS
AHils l HANGAR
Pratt and Whittney Aircraft
Hovercraft
Concentrated Orange Juice Machine Process
Supersonic Wind Tunnel
Subsonic Wind Tunnel
AREA 3 NUCLEAR. SLIhNCE BUILDING
r
Nuclear Reactor l our
Van de Graaf Accelerator
Radiation Detection Equipment
AREA 4 PHYSICS BUILDING
Tour of Research Lab
Demonstration of Basic Equipment

EL Tfjm a v
REi
* Warn 'WflWmVk 11
CHECKING WIND TUNNEL BLADES
A wl. Change el ,unnpl deslpl **'<>" **" t tarter tunnels,
is built. (Exhibit 268-1) C n ** w oi'kod out before the expensive life-size moc 1

The Florida Alligator, Friday, March li, 1565

Page 2-A



The Florida, Alligatfr

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iHH HUP^HI
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EMPTY... WELL ALMOST
The polling booths at the Hub sophomore seat uii the leg council
had the aura of the Gator locker enticed only a small portion of the
room during a football game .. sophomore student body (290).
empty. The special election for the
Sparse Voting In
Soph Re-elections

By 808 MENAKER
Alligator Staff Writer
Two hundred-ninety sophomores
turned out to vote yesterday in
a special Leg Council election,
and Richard Smith couldnt be
happier.
In last months election Smiths
name was locked off the Broward
Hall machine after 114 votes had
been cast for him. Smith lost,
but because of his unusual mis misfortune
fortune misfortune a special election was held
yesterday to fill the sophomore
seat.
This time the results were dif different
ferent different and Smith was a winner,
with 178 votes, finishing third in

ROTC Prof Hailed From Viet Nam

Not many people are ordered
from the war in Viet Nam to the
UF campus but Major John J.
Shannon was.
Shannons new objective is not
to secure the campus but to teach
Army ROTC.
When I received my assignment
I talked to a colonel about my new
post, said Shannon.
He said I should be proud of
it since it is a priority position.
Teaching ROTC is a mighty
priority post since the bulk of
U. S. Army officers are trained
in the ROTC program, Shannon
said. Approximately 15,000 to
17,000 officers are turned out
through this program each year.
The Army assignment mill goes
into action when a post on a
campus is about to be vacated.
[Officers are nominated to fill the
[opening, either by request or gen general
eral general assignment.
I

VoL 58, No. 11l

a field of 10 candidates. June
Mann finished last with 110 votes
and was the only candidate not
elected.
The other candidates and their
party affiliations are: Pam John Johnson
son Johnson (D) 188, Don Middlebrooks (S)
183, Susan Hart (S) 176, Scott
Baymen(S) 175, Judyosenberger
(D) 174, Jim Parsons (D) 154,
Mike Pent (D) 116, and Steve
Kaufman (D) 117.
Misses Johnson, Hart and Par Parsons
sons Parsons changed party affiliation
after the election, jumping to
Student Party, but Honor Court
Chancellor Herb Schwartz ruled
that they must be listed on the
ballot under their original party.

When an officer is nominated, a
copy of his file is sent to the
head professor of military science
in charge of the ROTC program
on the campus involved. He re reviews
views reviews the file and if the prospec prospective
tive prospective professor meets with his ap approval,
proval, approval, the file is then sent to
the president of the university
who will approve or disapprove the
request that the officer be assigned
to the university.
Even though I am paid by the
Army I am also a university faculty
member, Shannon stated.
Dr. Reitz has the final say so
on his faculty members even though
they are in the military service.
When Shannon received his
orders to transfer to the UF in
November, 1963, he was serving
a tour of duty in Viet Nam, which
is classified as a hardship tour.
This was his second hardship tour
in a row since he was sent to

University of Florida

Past Miss UF Cuts SG,
2 Girls Hold 66 Title

By EUNICE I. TALL
Alligator Staff Writer
Former Miss UF Jinny Jasper
has charged last terms Student
Government with disorgani disorganization*
zation* disorganization* when it comes to picking
the top UF coed and said that
no one seemed to know what
they were doing.
They are entirely in the dark,
Miss Jasper said.
I dont mean to sound like sour
grapes, the 21-year-old educa education
tion education major continued, but I didnt
know what the office of Miss UF
held, and no one else seemed to
know.
Miss Jasper contended that:
SG was responsible for send sending
ing sending her her applications for the
Miss Florida Pageant two days
after the deadline.
SG has defeated its own pur purpose
pose purpose by moving the contest up to
the Fall Trimester instead of the
traditional second trimester com competition.
petition. competition.
She was denied a car in the
Homecoming Parade.
SG had failed to notify her
promptly of information concern concerning
ing concerning her title.
The blue-eyed blonde returned
to campus last September expect expecting
ing expecting to hold her title for seven
more months but was succeeded
by 19-year-old Donna Berger at
Fall Frolics Nov. 12.

1,000 Students Affected
By New Veterans Club

S
By AGNES FOWLES
Alligator Staff Writer
The Veterans Club, a new organ organization
ization organization on campus, will meet to tonight
night tonight in the Florida Union Auditor Auditorium.
ium. Auditorium.
Presently on temporary status,
the club is petitioning for perman permanent
ent permanent status as a campus organi organization,
zation, organization, according to Bart Kimball,
acting president of the club.
Currently work is being done
with the University and the State
Department of Veterans Affairs
to streamline all of the procedures
that will be necessary to file an

Berlin in 1961 during the Berlin
crisis
(See ROTC, Page 3)
SHANNON

Friday, March 11, 1966

jpr -^SRH
tip
.
MISS JASPER
As the official UF entry in the
state-wide contest last summer,
Miss Jasper revealed that she re received
ceived received her applications for the con contest
test contest two days after the deadline.
She explained that student offi officials
cials officials at that time told her the
contest for the Miss Florida title
was to be held in July, and it was
scheduled for June 13.
Jim Kincaid, chairman of the
1965 UF contest and then SG public
relations secretary, retorted the
applications were supposed to be
sent to Jinny directly from Sara Sarasota,
sota, Sarasota, where the contest is held.
SG gets a contract with the
contest officials for an entry. The
individual contract, between Jinny
Jasper and Sarasota is taken care

application for any of the bene-*
fits provided by the new GI bill,
Kimball said.
The meeting tonight is to out outline
line outline the goals of the club, ratify
the recently drawn constitution,
and elect a slate of officers.
A veteran is defined fn the new
GI Bill as anyone with more than
181 days of active duty and who
has been discharged after Jan.
31, 1955.
Approximately 1,000 UF stud students
ents students will fall into this category,
according to Kimball.
Concern for veterans arose due
to the question of how to go about
obtaining full benefits of the new
GI Bill, said A1 Holdervach, 7BA,
who is acting Vice-president of the
club. Holderbach helped to organ organize
ize organize a similar organization at Flor Florida
ida Florida State University in 1955.
Other services the club will aim
to provide, he said, include: assis assistance
tance assistance to returning veterans in
adjusting to college life, recrea recreation
tion recreation for veterans and their fam families,
ilies, families, aid in obtaining disability
benefits where applicable; and aid
in obtaining loans or scholarships.
A committee will be formed to
keep up with rulings in Congress
Holderbach said.
Availability of state lands to
veterans will also be investigated.
The new GI Bill provides SIOO per
month for single veterans; $125
per month for married veterans?
and $l5O for married veterans
with one or more children.
Sponsoring the Veterans Club
is Dr. Robert B. Marcus, assoc associate
iate associate professor of physical science.

from tne main omce," he saia.
Kincaid said the contest was
moved up to the Fall trimester
in order to give the new Miss UF
several months to practice her
talent for the summer Miss Florida
Pageant in which the queen is
entered each year.
Not only that, Kincaid con continued,
tinued, continued, there are already too
many contests held in the spring.
He mentioned the International
Beauty, Sigma Chi Derby Queen
and Military Ball Queen.
Jinny was all upset about her
shortened reign and I dont blame
her, he said. There wasnt a
personal reason for'SG changing
the contest to the Fall. Weve been
trying to do it for one year.
Jinnys main complaint last
year was that she didnt have
enough time to prepare for the
state contest, the 20-year-old
secretary said.
(See FORMER, Pd.qe 3)
1 1 1
I
TREED HIM!!
Jeuley Livingston and Lynda
Bales have trapped JohnGundlach,
getting a head start on the Pan Panhellenic
hellenic Panhellenic Council sponsored Sadie
Hawkins dance.
The proceeds from the dance are
for Pan hellenics orphan, Ter Teresita.
esita. Teresita.
Grab your guy and drag him to
the banquet room, top of the Hub
for 50 cents a couple tonight,
8:30 12:30 p.m.
v >. v < > > \



Page 2

:, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 11, 1966

M UPI
______

International
SHROUD LIFTS . The U. S. military Thursday lifted the curtain
of secrecy shrouding the massive sea and ground search operations
for a missing hydrogen bomb near Palmores, Spain. Rear Adm. W. W.
Guest, commander of Task Force 65, told newsmen that 120 U. S.
Navy frogmen and divers, three undersea research craft and 15 war warships
ships warships were scouring a 120-square mile-area for the bomb that was
lost in the crash of a 852 bomber more than seven weeks ago. Amer American
ican American and foreign newsmen, photographers and television crews were
invited to see the 51-foot undersea craft Aluminaut.
VIOLENT PROTEST . Thousands of students again seized the
Indonesian Education Ministry in Jakarta Thursday in the 15th conse consecutive
cutive consecutive day of violent anti-Communist demonstrations. Others stormed
the Communist Chinese news agency building and set it afire. Reports
from the scene said police made no effort to disperse the shouting
students and stood by as they surged through the ministry ripping out
fixtures and overturning files.
SPACE DOGS A- OK . Russian spacedogs
Blackie and Breeze were reported feeling
quite satis factory f Thursday as they soared
along a high-flying orbit to pave the way for a
possible Soviet cosmonaut flight to a new al altitude
titude altitude record later this month. Tass confirmed
reports here that the dogs are doing fine des despite
pite despite prolonged weightlessness and an orbit
that takes them in and out of the fearful Van
Allen Radiation Belt more than 500 miles
above the surface.
National
WAR AMMO MYSTERY . Three mysterious accidents involving
ammunition to be used by U. S. forces, some of it bound for Viet Nam,
remained unsolved Thursday. At Corning, Ark., early in the day, a
Missouri Pacific freight trains two carloads of 175 mm artillery
shells blew up, gouging a huge crater in the ground. At Logan in New
Mexico, a Rock Island freight with ammunition for Viet Nam and
blasting powder was derailed. At the Picatinny Arsenal in Dover, N. J.,
two men died in the explosion of several newly developed bombs being
assembled for use in Viet Nam.
WALK REHEARSAL . The Gemini 8 spaceship underwent a
series of imaginary flights Thursday in the last major test before
launch Tuesday from Cape Kennedy on a historic three-day rendez rendezvous
vous rendezvous and spacewalk mission. Engineers Were putting the 7,500-pound
capsule and its Titan 2 rocket through simulated launches and flight
maneuvers to make sure that the 109-foot vehicle is ready to haul
astronauts Neil Armstrong and David Scott into orbit. The test got
underway at 10:30 a.m. EST.
FIGHT' FUNDS . Congress pressed ac action
tion action Thursday on President Johnson's bills to
step up military and economic aid to Viet Nam
and raise extra money to help finance the
fighting. With most of the argument over
Johnson's policy out of the way, the House
waived a normal 24-hour wait and unanimously
gave its final okay to a $4.8 billion supplemen supplemental
tal supplemental military authorization previously passed in
slightly differing form by House and Senate.
Florida
CASTRO PROTEST . Havana students, for the first time since
the Communist takeover of their school, have demonstrated against
Cuban Premier Fidel Castro, according to unconfirmed exile reports
in Miami. The students protested the arrest and trial of a former
student leader and Army Major Rolando Cubelas, according to the
exile reports. The rumors of the demonstrations coincided Wednesday
with cancellation for one day of the daily Cuban refugee airlift flight
from Varadero, Cuba, to Miami.
GRUDGE FILE . Sens. B. C. Pearce, East Palatka, and L. P.
Gibson, Perry, pre-filed qualifying papers Thursday to set up the
first grudge campaign growing out of the new reapportionment law.
The papers were left with the secretary of state for automatic filing
at noon Thursday, when qualifying officially opened for the new seats
created by the 48-senator, 117-representative bill passed late Wed Wednesday.
nesday. Wednesday. Dozens of House members announced plan to run for new
Senate seats. And in a switch. Republican Sen. Warren Henderson,
Venice, pre-filed papers making him a candidate for the House.
The F lorida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisements anj
to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
NO PCftnON E GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(l)one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices ior correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALIJGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Flotilla ..nrt is
published five times weekly except during May, June, amt July when It is published s* ml-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class
alter at the United States Pu t Of,'be at Gainesville.

U.S. LOSSES HEAVY

'Beret Unit
After Viet Cong Onslaught

SAIGON (UPI) North Viet Nam
Communist regulars attacking
through Laos today captured a
U. S. Special Forces camp which
had held out for two days against
a siege by overwhelming numbers.
In their loss the Americans reach reached
ed reached new heights of valor.
A radio operator among the 12
to 13 green-bereted Americans
holding the outpost with 300 Mont Montagnard
agnard Montagnard tribesmen called down air

Burns Signs State
Reapportion Bill

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Dying
echoes of Ill see you at the
polls rang through empty legis legislative
lative legislative chambers Thursday and big
city voters all over Florida wait waited
ed waited with assurance for their day
in court next Tuesday.
Gov. Hay don Burns signed into
law a 48-senator. 117-representa 117-representative
tive 117-representative reapportionment plan Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday night and the Legislature went
home from its special session.
The governor, who called the
special session after the U. S,
Supreme Court ordered Florida to
give urban voters a bigger voice
in the Legislature or else, called
it a near perfect plan.
BURNS
This is a great day in Florida,
said the governor. This Legis Legislature
lature Legislature has done what every one
said was impossible and turned
chaos and crisis into glowing suc success.
cess. success.
There is no doubt that the plan
provides the Legislature with its
fairest apportionment in 50 years.
But as to whether it follows the
Supreme Courts one-man. one onevote
vote onevote mandate closely enough will
have to wait on a hearing by a

I NOTICE I
I Tl 2 e , oa ? l f S^dent Publications Is Accepting Applications For The I
Follovving Positions. Foims Should Be Picked Up In Room 9Of The I
Florida Union And Returned No Later Than Wednesday, March 16, 1966. I
I POSITIONS I
I D A '^ R ''s- HIEF TH£ FLORIDA ALLIGATOR (SUMMER TERM) I
NAGiNG EDiTOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR (SUMMER TERM) I
I F THE SEMINOLE (1966-6 7 BOOK) I
I NG EDiTOR, THE SEMINOLE (1966-67 BOOK) I
I MANAGING Emrop' Jup FLORIDA ALLIGATOR (TRIMESTER 1 &2, 1966 6 /J
OR< THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR (TRIMESTER 1 & 2, 1966-67)1

strikes against his own position.
At the height of the battle Maj.
Bernard Fisher of Kuna, Idaho,
landed his AIE Skyraider fighter fighterbomber
bomber fighterbomber in a curtain of bullets
and plucked from death or cap capture
ture capture Maj. Stafford W. Myers of
Newport, Wash., his wingman who
had crash landed.
The Americans and the mountain
tribesmen were reported to have

three-judge federal panel in Miami
Tuesday.
Atty. Gen. Earl Faircloth, who
told the federal court in December
the states old 58-senator, 109-
representative plan was unconsti unconstitutional,
tutional, unconstitutional, said he can support this
one to the hilt when he goes be before
fore before the federal panel.
The reapportionment plan puts
the power in the Legislature over overwhelmingly
whelmingly overwhelmingly in the big city popu population
lation population centers. Dade and Monroe
counties share nine senators and
Dade has 22 representatives alone
under the measure.

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V, / I
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c/ ms ni ','#l
JH Finest Italian Restaurant V.B
A SPECIALIZING IN S vl
J SPAGHETTI LASAGNA RAVIOLI VEAL PARMIGI AN A PIZZA a
MANICOTTI-EGG PLANT PARMIGIANA f A I
1 CHARBROILED NY, STRIP FILET MIGNON LOBSTER VUy V I
4 *. OPEN 5P M l2 P M W Y \
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suffered heavy losses as a refl .H
ment of North Vietnamese-aw
2,500 men- -attacked their
camp near the Laotian border
375 miles northeast of Saigon, I
Some were rescued by helic o pt ers I
which flew into almost point blank I
Communist fire. H
During the siege when clouds I
prevented air strikes which might I
have beaten off the enemy assault I
daring fliers flew through theover- H
cast and enemy fire to parachute I
ammunition and supplies to the I
defenders. At least three Ameri- I
can planes were shot down.
While the battle for A Shau I
reached its climax South Viet Nam I
was torn by new political strife
that sent rumors of a coup detat I
seething through Saigon. I
Reliable sources said Premier
Nguyen Cao Ky, in a demonstra* I
tion of his own strength, had ousted I
the most powerful general in the I
South Vietnamese army from his I
command. The ousted general I
was Maj. Gen. Nguyen Chanh Thi, I
commander of the First Corps and I
long considered the most powerful I
man outside the government-the I
man in best position to lead any I
possible new coup. 1



NEA Blames Pork Choppers

TALLAHASSEE (UPl)The Na National
tional National Education Association(NE A)
released a highly critical report on
Floridas education system Thurs Thursday
day Thursday and laid much of the blame on
the states rural country-domi country-dominated
nated country-dominated legislature.
The NEAs special investigating
committee, in delivering the report
to the Florida Education Associa Association
tion Association (FEA) and Florida State
Teachers Association, maae nu

SUNDAYS SPECIAL
FRIED CHICKEN
With French Fried Potatoes,
Creamy Cole Slaw, 45
Rolls & Butter. J
A' I THE CHICKEN YOU CAN EAT!
MAGAZINES OPEN 24 HOURS SUNDRIES
1802 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. PHONE 378-3236
DAILY BREAKFAST SPECIAL 38
Engineering, Business and Social Science Majors:
MARITIME
ADMINISTRATION
CAREERS
Advance Swiftly at MAR AD... Participate in the Nations Most
Exciting Career Development Program:

You can embark on one of the most challenging
and satisfying careers ever offered to a college
graduate, a career with the Maritime Administra Administration
tion Administration of the U. S. Department of Commerce.
The Maritime Administration we call It
"MARAD"aids development of the American
merchant marine to carry the nation's water waterborne
borne waterborne commerce during peacetime and serve as
a naval and. military auxiliary in time of war or
national emergency.
MARAD Engineering Opportunities
Engineers of the Maritime Administration partici participate
pate participate in design and construction of new ships,
improvement of existing ships, and maritime
research (basic and applied) and development.
Among the better-known recent products of
these activities are the Nuclear Ship Savannah
and the advanced Hydrofoil Ship Denison. Soon
to come (perhaps with your help): new concepts
in port operations, shipbuilding, ship operations,
and advanced operations, such as "surface
effect" ships.
Engineering Work-Study Scholarships
To meet current and future engineering needs,
MARAD has developed a specialized program
for individuals who have earned their BS degrees
in Naval Architecture, Marine, Electrical, or
Mechanical Engineering, or a closely-relateH field.
Our work-study program combines cla-sroom
and on-the-job training. It is designed so that you
may earn a masters degree in your field, plus the
diversified experience and proficiency that will i
lead to positions of maximum responsibility in
minimum time. Requiring 30 to 36 months tc com complete,
plete, complete, the work-study program is in four phases:
(1) a six-months sea assignment.
(2) a six-months tour of duty and study at a
shipyard.
(3) assignment to the Washington Office of
Ship Construction or Research and Development |
for on-the-job training in Naval Architecture,
Marine or Electrical Engineering.
(4) nine to 12 months advanced study in one of j
these or related disciplines at/a university ac acceptable
ceptable acceptable to MARADstudy which normally com completes
pletes completes the requirements for a master's degree.

mention of sanctions or other pen penalties
alties penalties against Florida.
This would come only upon re recommendation
commendation recommendation of the FEA which
asked for the study after the 1965
legislature refused to vote addi additional
tional additional state funds for teacher pay
increases.
The report said that Floridas
rural-dominated legislature has
under-valued education.
Dr. Dana Swick, school super superintendent

You may earn promotions twice during the
work-study program, from GS-7 to GS-9 after a
year's service, then to GS-11 upon award of a
masters degree or its equivalent. And through through:
: through: out the program, in addition to full salary and
Federal Civil Service career benefits, you will be
reimbursed 100% for all educational, transpor transportation
tation transportation and associated expenses.
Starting salaries for Engineers in each grade:
GS-7, $7,304; GS-9, $7,987; GS-11, $9,267. Sub Subsequent
sequent Subsequent promotions are earned in keeping with
the employee's demonstrated fitness to take
greater responsibilities.
Management Trainee Program
Business and social science graduates are urged
to investigate MARAD's Management Trainee
Program. Participants undertake 12 months of
concentrated training in one of these major pro program
gram program areas: Budget and Management, Comp Comptroller,
troller, Comptroller, Contract and Procurement, Government
Aid, Personnel Management, Program Planning,
Public Information, Ship Operations, and Mari Maritime
time Maritime Promotion.
Trainees work on actual projects under guid guidance
ance guidance and supervision of qualified management
personnel, attending staff conferences and meet-1
ings to learn about management considerations
governing the day-to-day operation of the Mari Maritime
time Maritime Administration. Beginning as GS-7 or GS-9 |
(depending on educational level and experience),
the Trainee is promoted to GS-9 or GS-11 and
assigned to a regular position at successful con conclusion
clusion conclusion of the program.
Starting salaries for Management Trainees in
each grade: GS-7, $6,269; GS-9, $7,479; GS-11,
$8,961. Subsequent promotions are earned in
keeping with the employees demonstrated fit fitness
ness fitness to take greater responsibilities.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
MARCH 15 ... SEE
YOUR PLACEMENT OFFICE NOW
Visit your placement office as soon as possible
to arrange a campus interview with MARAD
representatives. You may write for further infor information.
mation. information.

intendent superintendent in Kinsgsport, Tenn., and
chairman of the NEA study com committee,
mittee, committee, said few of the recom recommendations
mendations recommendations are new. They parallel
those of 20 years ago when the
Florida citizens committee on ed education
ucation education made similar proposals.
ROTC Prof
(From Page I )
This has been my best assign assignment,
ment, assignment, Shannon said. I am in involved
volved involved in something I have wanted
to do help train officers.
This assignment normally lasts
three years. When Shannon was
notified that he would be trans transfered
fered transfered this summer, he asked for an
extension of his tour of duty here.
The extension was granted and he
will stay at his present post until
the summer of 1967.
My next assignment will pro probably
bably probably be Viet Nam again, Shannon
said.
Shannon teaches junior and sen senior
ior senior cadets subjects such as tactics,
communications, counter insur insurgency
gency insurgency and military justice.
He is working on a masters
degree in education on the side
as a university professor can only
take four credits per term.

L
Jp: ||| :§
BWW | § |
ii
flj Bp > b
Maritime Administrator Nicholas Johnson (right)
counseling a MARAD college trainee
THE MARITIME ADMINISTRATION
General Accounting Office Building
441 G Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20235
An equal opportunity employer MAF
i

Former Miss UF Speaks

(From Page 1)
The new queen will now have
six months to practice her talent
and get an idea of what the contest
will be like.
But as Miss Jasper explained,
I suggested the contest be moved
up to early January instead of
sponsoring it in March. I think that
the contest this year conflicted with
the Homecoming competition.
Girls who would have ordinarily
entered the Miss UF contest didnt
this year because of the proximity
of the two. (Homecoming contest
was held in early October.)
However, Miss Jasper contended
that SG had been in the dark
concerning all functions related to
her position. I had to contact them
at the last minute to find out what
I was supposed to be doing, said
the 1963 Orange Bowl Queen.
In the Homecoming Parade Mrs.
UF and her court were represent represented
ed represented with two cars.

Friday, March 11, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

I guess everyone just assumed
Id be riding with the cheer cheerleaders,
leaders, cheerleaders, Miss Jasper continued.
She was one of the six girls on
the squad.
An additional problem arose with
the Seminoles picturing of Miss
UF. Sharon Testy was shown in the
1965 annual, while Donna Burger
holds the title for 1966.
Editor Beth Kraselsky inserted
Miss Jaspers picture in addition
to Miss Bergers very close tq,
deadline. She claimed that noone
from SG ever mentioned a thing
about it to me, Miss Kraselsky
said.
Miss Jasper said that Kincaid
told her to see if she could make
the picture arrangements herself.
Tickets Sold
For 'Count
Tickets for. Count Basie are
$1.50 per person for spectators,
ROTC and invited guest tickets
are $3.00 per couple, and facul faculty
ty faculty and retired and reserve officer
dance tickets are $5.00 per couple.
Dancing will be from 9 p.m. to
1 a.m.
The dance will be highlighted by
the crowning of the 1966 Military
Ball Queen who will be elected by
the cadets at the dance.
Basies orchestra is currently
appearing with Frank Sinatra at
the Fontainebleau Hotel in Miami
Beach.
Tickets are available at UF
Information Booth, Top Tunes Rec Record
ord Record Ship, Record Bar, Rutherfords
Jewelry, Robertsons Jewelry,
Baird Hardware, and on the second
and third floors of the Military
Building.
i*K tr- m
Jim
La Brec*
says...
ou get so much more fori
your life insurance dollars from
College Lifes famous policy,
THE BENEFACTOR, because
College Life insures only college
men and college men are preferred
risks. Let me tell you more.??
*JIM LABREC
1105; W, University Ave
Shuts 4
GainesviM v
Tel. 378-2476
representing
THE COLLEGE Uf-*
INSURANCE
GF AME r! iv. A
. . ihs only Con-psry selling
exclusively to Coli&yi Men |

Page 3



Page 4

[, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 11, 1966

state of affairs

in U.S. politics
YJJ ith Congressional elections but a matter of
away, interest in national politics
is mounting.
Os prime concern at present is the impact the
Vietnamese Crisis will have upon the Democratic
Partys once firm control of Congress.
In 1964, behind the impetus of the Johnson elec electoral
toral electoral triumph, the Democrats picked up 38 House
seats and one Senate seat to improve their margins
to 295-140 and 68-32, respectively, relative to the
out-party Republicans.
If present signs are indicative, however, the
Great LBJ Consensus will dip after November.
The Democrats stand the chance of losing from
30 to 50 House seats. Joseph Clark, liberal Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic Senator from Pennsylvania, flatly predicts
a loss of 75 seats to the GOP. If the shift were this
drastic, Johnson would be left with a razor-thin
220-215 House majority, while no doubt maintaining
a healthy lead in the Senate. Shades of Harold Wilson
and the British Laborite government.
Most of this is due to disenchantment with John Johnsons
sons Johnsons handling of the critical Viet Nam crisis, which
continues unabated. As the war that remains un undeclared
declared undeclared escalates, its popularity in the United States
has waned somewhat. With it goes the popularity of
the Democratic Party.
Gallup Polls showing Johnson in favor with 61 per
cent of the American people are not exactly correct,
in that they fail to give a true picture of the state of
things.
Americans, being generally a patriotic lot, are not
likely to degrade their own government by showing
disfavor with their commander in chief in times of
stress. However, this does not carry over in the
Congressional elections, where emphasis is placed
on party, not president.
A president may actually pick up support during
war years, his party may lose support simultaneously.
The odd thing about this loss in power by the
Democrats is that it is coming without Republican
participation. The G.O.P. merely sits, elephantine
as always, refusing to take much of any stand on
much of anything, and meanwhile disenchantment
with LBJ continues at home and recalcitrants turn
to the only alternative at hand presently, namely the
G.O.P.
The real opposition to Johnsons Viet stance is
occurring within his own party, where the so called
doves are flapping their wings and forming a
schism in the Great Consensus Party.
First, there are the ideological recalcitrants,
those men who are against Johnsons Viet policy for
purely ideological, non-political reasons. Included
here are the like of Senators Wayne Morse, the aging
Oregonian maverick, J. William Fulbright, the
Arkansan who heads the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee which has been a constant barb in the
side of the Johnson Administration, Idahos youthful
Frank Church, and Alaskas wizened Ernest Gruen Gruening.
ing. Gruening. Gruening and Morse were the two men who
refused to vote for the 1964 Senate resolution giving
LBJ a wide range of authority in Viet Nam.
Then come the political deviates that is, those
who are moving away from the main party due to
political reasons. Sen. Joseph Clark of Pennsylvania
and Sen. Robert Kennedy of New York are two prime
examples. Clark as mentioned earlier, firmly be believes
lieves believes the present foreign policy, if continued, will
result in a loss of some 75 congressional seats.
Kennedy has said he felt it was not improper for
U. S. students so desiring to send blood to the North
and more recently has requested a
more-or-less coalition government in South Viet
Nam, which would include Viet Cong representatives,
a la Laos in the early 19605.
Kennedy, hardly a true liberal on most issues in
the past, seems hell-bent on establishing his own
star several notches to the left -- foreign-policy
wise of the teetering Johnson-Humphrey star.
Wooing the liberals is Bobbys present occupation.
Now there are others disenchanted with Johnson
also. Some, like Indianas Vance Hartke, are becom becoming
ing becoming more noisy. Others, such as ex-Air Force sec secretary
retary secretary and present Missouri Senator Stuart Syming Symington,
ton, Symington, a one-time presidential darkhorse, think John Johnson
son Johnson is bending too much to the doves on the Viet
Nam problem.
On the Republican side of Congress, few are ter tertibly
tibly tertibly displeased with the Johnson Administrations
stand on Viet Nam. Senate minority leader Everett
Dirksen has backed Johnson to the hilt, while House
minority leader Gerry Ford of Michigan has been
calling for bombings of Hanoi and Haiphong for
months. Aging George Aiken (R-Vermont) has been
one of the few of the Republicans to question LBJ.
Non-congressional GOP leaders like George Rom Romney
ney Romney (Michigan), Chuck Percy (Illinois), Bob Taft, Jr.
(Ohio), Nelson Rockefeller (New York) and others
remain strangely silent. Henry Cabot Lodge remains
in Saigon, Richard Nixon praises Johnson every time
another soldier hits the beach, and is noticeably
wooing the old Goldwater conservative support.
Meanwhile, Goldwater, back home in Arizona pre preparing
paring preparing a comeback campaign for the Senate in 1968,
speculates on the need of homing Red China.

"You Think Being A Cosmonaut Is Dan Dangerou
gerous Dangerou His Old Man Writes Books!"
GERALD JONES
side swipe
I should like to be the first to put a stop to a
vicious rumor. Neither now nor in the future does
The Florida Alligator contemplate the takeover of
the College of Journalism and Communications.
The staff of the paper has neither the time nor
facilities to run the college properly. Quite frankly,
they also lack the interest in doing so. I am ashamed
to admit that, but it is true.
There is a counter-rumor that says that the
School of Journalism wishes to have The Alligator
placed under its aegis. It is difficult to understand
why anyone would believe such a silly idea. Most
every other colleges professors are complaining
of the lack of time for teaching, research, and
playing the publish and flourish game. Are we to
believe that those dedicated men have so much free
time on their hands that they have nothing better
to do than run The Alligator? How could anyone
begin to ask for such an imposition on their valu valuable
able valuable time? Come now!
And there is a counter-counter-rumor that says
that Benny Cason is another Citizen Kane and The
Alligator staff is a bunch of sex-starved, sensation sensationseeking
seeking sensationseeking papparizzi. But that rumor was started
by the political party-hoppers whose motto was Id
rather switch than bitch!
Critics of The Alligator charge that it fails to
present a proper image of the University. (Oh. what
a shame!) If this were true, the Administration
would publish its own paper, Tigert Tidbits,
under the motto of How It Is Supposed To Be.
Then The Alligator would continue under the banner
of How It Really Is. Obviously this condition
doesnt exist or wed be reading the daily Tidbit
right now.
The only argument in favor of the Journalism
Schools takeover would be that The Alligator is too
important to be left in the hands of the students.
In fact, the second rumor, so seemingly absurd,
is indeed true. The move is on to put professionals
in charge everywhere. Students cant meet pro professional
fessional professional standards or function as effective mouth mouthpieces,
pieces, mouthpieces, so outside help is being brought in.
This, sadly, is the coming trend throughout the
University. Buddy Jacobs (friend of the uptrodden),
who came out in favor of the transfer, is in for a
real surprise. Wait until he finds out that the
Colleges of Business Administration and Political
Science plan to take over Student Government.
And further moves can be expected as follows:
Since the 'ROTC is the backbone of the campus
defense perimeter, to say nothing of the nation at
large, it will be placed under the authority of the
Mississippi National Guard.
Football, being such a major enterprise here, is
also too important to be left in the hands of students.
The search is now on to acquire more professionals
than are currently available. And I think I can help
out there. If either Dr. Graves or Mr. Reitz will
call me at home tonight, I will be glad to let them
in on a chance to buy the Washington Redskins at
a rock-bottom price.
There is also a good chance that I may be able
to get Cassius Clay to take charge of Dorm Intra Intramurals.
murals. Intramurals. There are advantages here for both parties.
We would have a pro in charge and Cassius could get
a teaching deferment.
In conclusion, it becomes apparent that even the
Administration itself is of such importance that we can
no longer leave the running of it to amateurs. So I
have arranged for the Tigert Hall facilities to be
taken over by General Electric. Any firm whose
motto is Progress Is pur Only Product belongs
in charge of this place.

tj

The Florida. Alligator I
Editor of this Issue Kay Huffmaster I
JIM MOORHEADS I
thinking out loudl
Anyone with an IQ is painfully aware that this is an environment!
replete with problems. With a man like Benny Cason who can smel!
rats when others all around are registering only rosebuds -- in th editors chair of The Alligator, the problems are naturally made even!
more obvious to the campus populace. I
Solutions, however, are not so numerous; panaceas are unknown . ,1
until now. Dean Credible J. Finsterwald, a little known but totally!
powerful despot who sits at the head of UFs remote Department ofl
Unlisted Records and Unsaid Statements, says he has come up withl
an answer. He offered his views in a recent interview. No notes or I
tapes were permitted, but this is Wat was said as best I can re-1
member: I
Q. Dean Finsterwald, I understand you have pinned down the reason!
for most of the problems existing in the University community?!
A. Reasons. Theres more than one. I
Q. How many?
A. About 17,000.
Q. You mean . .?
A. Exactly. Those 17,000 twerps out there who are wearing out
our dormitories, overloading our classrooms, using up our parking
places, clogging our traffic lanes, dirtying our food service estab establishments,
lishments, establishments, littering our campus, browbeating our administrators,
lowering our moral standards, polluting our air supply, magnifying
our paperwork, driving up our operating costs, and forever inflating
the atmosphere with their endless questions! Bunch of draft dodgers
and husband hunters, thats all they are!
Q. If I understand you correctly, you attribute all or most of the
Universitys problems to the presence of the student body, is that
right?
A. Os course. Get rid of the students and 90 per cent of our problems
would disappear in 15 minutes.
Q. But isnt the purpose of the University to provide a place for the
pursuit of higher learning?
A. Youre not looking at the total picture, boy. Thats one of its
purposes, granted, but there are others equally important. Theres
the career angle. Why, look at all the jobs we provide ... all the
thousands of opportunities we ofXer for administrators to administrate,
for research people to research, for maintenance people to maintain,
for clerical workers to clerk and for faculty members to . well,
to do whatever it is they do.
Q. Theyre here to teach, if Im not mistaken.
A. Ahhhh, yes, to teach. Youve hit it on it. And how much teaching
do they get done? Hardly any at all, any at all. Theyre so inundated
with students, they barely have time to perform their other essential
tasks of class preparation, academic advancement, sweeping out their
offices, publishing-or-perishing, attending staff meetings, and exerting
efforts in behalf of academic freedom. That last item, by the way, is one
I think we could stand a little less of around here. Takes up entirely too
much time.
Q. Perhaps the answer is to hire more instructors, or at least to
remove the necessity for some of these other essential tasks you
mentioned. +
A. And how do you propose to accomplish that? It costs money, boy,
and it simply isnt available because were having to reroute funds
to build dormitories, libraries, classroom buildings, university gal galleries
leries galleries and a $5 million Florida Union.
Q. But those things are for the students!
A. EXACTLY! Thats just my point. Boxed yourself in, didnt you?
Q. Well, I .
A. But let me finish what I was saying, about the Universitys pur purposes.
poses. purposes. Aside from all the people we employ, look at the political
purpose we serve. There isnt a hotter political property anywhere
in the state than right here. We keep plenty of wheels spinning up there
in Tallahassee, believe you me. And at Homecoming, all that wheeling
and dealing actually shifts to right here. Oh, its something to behold!
And all this, of course, embraces the Universitys social importance.
We at the top are crucially aware if nobody else is of the
importance of providing an appropriate setting for the visitation of the
important personalities who flatter us with their presence during the
years, people like the governor and the Board of Regents and others.
I might add here, that these peoples visits would be a lot more plea pleasant
sant pleasant if we didnt always have students coming around and asking a lot
of embarrassing questions.
Q. But isnt that why theyre here, to ask questions?
A. Children should be seen and not heard. Then theres the athletic
significance of our setup here. People are always crying in the fall
because were never No. One. Perhaps if we didnt have to throw away
money on things like stadium additions and reduced student tickets,
wed have the funds to acquire whatever it is we need to put us up there
on top of the rankings.
Q. But whod cheer for the team?
A. Those $5 ticketholders, boy. No, I tell you, we wouldnt be having
all this disquiet over infirmary conditions if there werent so many
dissatisfied students; Food Service could run a smooth catering oper operation
ation operation if it werent for those confounded endless hordes of students in
the cafeteria lines; the library would be a blamed sight more accessible
without all those fruit vendors out in front; The Alligator could expand
its Orange & Blue Bulletin page if so much space werent taken up
with damfool causes; and academic freedom? Why, I daresay it wouldn t
even be an issue if we had less of an upstart adolescent audience around
this place.
Q. Now sir, wont you concede that without the student body the
University wouldnt even exist? And wont you admit that the first and
foremost consideration of everyone within the University staff structure
should be the students welfare?
A. If I didnt know better, Id swear you were a member of the Gre.d
Student Conspiracy. You may be one of us . but dont rock my bout
boy .^



is "pot addicting?

(EDITOR'S her(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is
the second of four articles on
alcoholism, smoking and drug
addiction, written by Mrs.
Emily MacLachlan, UF pro professor
fessor professor of social science.)
One reason why the U. S. has the
highest rate of alcoholism in the
world today is because so many
people have money to spend on it
and because we Americans tend to
use everything in a utilitarian way.
We use alcohol as medicine to re release
lease release our tensions and anxieties,
to promote our social skills and to
win friends and influence people
in the world of business. We let
down the barriers to alcohol in
great floods once we found it so
personally useful.
Societies like those of the Jews
and the Italians who have used al alcohol
cohol alcohol in limited controlled ways in
connection with family and relig religious
ious religious ceremony, and with meals,
have never suffered from high
rates of alcoholism. However, as
all Western people become more
affluent, more worried about social
conflicts and the bomb, more de determined
termined determined to rise in the business
and social world, the rates of al alcoholism
coholism alcoholism will go up.
An as yet undetermined percen- i
tage of people live in bodies that <
are constitutionally, physiologi- 1
cally vulnerable to alcohol. We
have somewhat better tests to find
out those who have dependent per personalities
sonalities personalities vulnerable to alcohol and i
drugs.
Another reason why we Ameri Americans
cans Americans suffer from the highest rafe"
of alcoholism is because we are
herd-minded. Our individualism
and belief in personal freedom is (
not altogether limited to the old
mythology of justifying the right ;
to use personal and corporate pro- i
perty and privilege as we please :
and to resist the social controls i
on property advocated in the name ]
of society, to be sure. We also <
cherish individual liberties and

LETTER:
many happy returns

Since 1961, the Foreign Student
Office has seen various leader leaderships
ships leaderships come and go. Gone are the
jovial Dr. Putnam and the busy
Mr. Young. The serious, hard hardworking
working hardworking Colonel Glenn A. Farris
is at the helm now. Amid all these
developments, foreign students
still get the same friendly atmos atmosphere,
phere, atmosphere, whether the International
Center is in the cool Tigert Hall or
the dusty Building AE, because
the one and familiar face is al always
ways always there.
Her helping hands and her
friendly smile make you realize
that in this big campus somebody
is concerned about you and your
well-being. To some shes the
Immigration Service, to others
shes the banker, and to others
still shes the Thanksgiving host.
Most troubles seem to end with
her because, for one thing, she
has the answers through her years
of working with the problems.
Some professors are troubled
by foreign names. It is difficult
enough to pronounce them right
and more difficult still to remem remember
ber remember them. But to our great friend,
whether its Juan or Singh,
she always manages to know you
by your name. Realizing how deli delicate
cate delicate the international relations can
be when you have Jews and Arabs,
Malaysians and Indonesians, the
University of Florida community
should be proud of this able and
competent diplomat of Building AE.
My friends, I think it is about
time that we salute this truly dedi dedicated
cated dedicated American Mrs, Rosanna

Speaking Out

civic rights and we allow and en encourage
courage encourage people to succeed or fail
on their own without much social
help.
Yet, as David Riesman first
pointed out, we are a nation of
sheep and once a thing has become
the thing to do, everybody rushes
to do it. This other-directed type
of behavior is much more charac characteristic
teristic characteristic of young people than of
older people, say the sociologists.
When the use of drugs spread from
slums to suburbs and were taken
up by the best young people, parents
and teachers really began to worry,
and for good reason. Once Ameri Americans
cans Americans pass the 50 per cent point
on the public opinion polls we call
it proudly our consensus and it
becomes almost un-American not
to do or believe whatever is being
measured.
Are drugs even more addicting
and habituating than alcohol and
tobacco? Scientists believe they
are, depending upon what kind of
drugs you are talking about and
depending upon your definition of
addiction. Today there are many
new drugs available to the public
either legally or illegally, includ including
ing including tranquilizers, barbiturates,
amphetamines, opiates, marijuana
(a stimulant), cocaine, L.S.D. mes mescaline,
caline, mescaline, peyote and Heaven only
knows how many more to come.
There is confusion over the term
addicting. Urban youngsters who
demand the right to smoke reefers
(cigarettes made of marijuana,
spoken of in the lingo as pot)
claim that marijuana smoking is
hot addicting. They are right only
in saying it is not physiologically
addicting in the sense that heroin
(a morphine derivative) is addict addicting.
ing. addicting. Heroin users build up a phy physiological
siological physiological tolerance that causes
them to need and demand (and
steal to get) more and more of
the drug to avoid the terrors of
painful body reactions when they
can no longer get enough. They
will kill to get money to buy her her(EDITOR'S

Laurie, for the wonderful job that
she has done for this great uni university
versity university of ours with respect to
foreign students.
A CAMBODIAN
P.S. Happy Birthday, Yankee.
hi :
our "simon legree 1
boss is cracking his
whip again, and says
we've got to give you
gals more service SO
WE ARE.... Henceforth,
we will be...
OPEN
FRIDAY
NIGHTS
TIL 9
twig
1131 w. university ave.

oin, but except for this kind of
crime they are at most times in inert
ert inert people half asleep, incapable
of either crime or any sexual
activitv.
On the other hand, the users of
marijuana (which is habituating
like tobacco and alcohol in a psy psychological
chological psychological sense but not addicting
like heroin and alcohol in a phy physiological
siological physiological sense) are stimulated
to excess activity that often ends
up in crimes of rape, assault and
murder. Most of the murders of
the past have been crimes of quick
passion taking place between
friends and relatives. The change
that come over crimes of passion
such as rape, assault and murder
today, in which total strangers are
the victims, have been very much
affected by the use of drugs and
the even more widespread use of
alcohol or some combination of
the two. Many of these are sense senseless
less senseless crimes in which there is no
motive between the
perpetrator and the victim.
Lawyers and legislators are
taking about trying to recompense
the victims or their families for
these failures of the state to con control
trol control people temporarily mad on
drugs. Women living in cities are
afraid to walk out at night and are
arming themselves with a variety
of weapons and devices to protect
themselves. (See the current issue
of Look.)
In the next part of this article I
will continue the discussion of
drugs as a social problem and will
take up the need for a new attitude
on the part of campus leaders and
innovators.
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co.

On March 15th ELECT
A QUALIFIED EXPERIENCED
|9 COMMUNITY LEADER
|H THOMAS A. WRIGHT
Hm FOR YOUR CITY COMMISSION
QUALIFIED
Bachelor of Science, Florida Memorial College
Bachelor of Divinity, Howard University
Four years as Instructor in Social Studies, Florida Memorial
College
Veteran of World War, II in Europe and Asia
EXPERIENCED
Fifteen years as an administrator and church leader
Fifteen years as a community leader
FAMILY MAN
f
Married twenty-six years
WifeAffie M. Wright, teacher, Special Reoding Class, Duval
Elementary
DaughterPatricia A. Murray, Graduate of Fisk University,
Supervisor of Nursery School under the poverty program,
Belle Glade, Florida
SonThbmas A. Wright, Jr., Pre-med student at Howard University
SonPhilerone Wright, Graduate of Lincoln High, Freshman at
Tennessee State
DaughterLaVon Wright, Graduate of Gainesville High, Freshman
at Fisk University
ELECT THE WRIGHT MAN
For City Commissioner Group 1
Pull Level 3A on March 15th

lIS (o*^2?)
traditional
at '
g>tag n Brag
;|gSl§lllP
:; Wsr MKV
Wm IIBb q | s
HBB
-^Bpg v
v, > .BB *& ; vi" iH
Creighton turns to thoughts of Brawny Oxford ... a manly oxford.
Highlighted by the seemingly careless yet carefully rolled button
down collar...the natural expression of Creightons traditional
styling. $5.95
g>tagn Brag
13 M. ntbers(ttp Hhe.

Friday, March 11, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

7 j
for sale
1964 BSA Lightning Rocket, 650 cc.
Excellent condition. Cash or trade.
$895. Call Dave Heney, 372-6938.
(A-l 08-ts-c).
1963 LAMBRETTA 125. Perfect
condition. $175. Call 376-0075 af after
ter after 5 p.m. (A-111-3t-c).
1965 HONDA CB 160. Excellent
condition, candy apple red; 7,000
miles, $475. Call John Bane, 378-
4025. (A-111-3t-c).
1965 YAMAHA 125. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Must Sell. Call Larry at
372-3091 after 5. (A-111-lt-p)..
FOR SALE or WILL TRADE for a
.357 Ruger magnum, a 1966 Win Winchester
chester Winchester model 1400 automatic 12
gauge shotgun. 376-7298. (A-111-2t-c).
2t-c).
HAIR DRYER, hand-held, $2.50.
1 pair white wedge-heed shoes,
size 9, never worn, $5.00. GE
steam travel iron, $5.00. Army
Dress Blues, 38 long, $25. Army
Greens, 36 R., $4.00. Call after 5.
372-6986. (A-108-4t-c).
1962 DUCATI, lOOcc. MUSTSELL.
Engine good, anyone handy can put
it in superb condition. SIOO. Call
Bill, 378-4524. (A-108-st-p).
HONDA 150. In very fine condition,
less than 7,000 miles. $360. Call
Larry Kip at 372-6241 after 5:30
p.m. (A-107-st-c).
HONDA 50cc. Low mileage, ex excellent
cellent excellent condition. Call John Steel,
376-9235. (A-107-st-p).
1965 HONDA S-90. Only 1,200
miles. In good condition. S3OO.
Call 372-9464, Rm. 1046. (A-109-
st-c).
LAMBRETTA SCOOTER. In good
condition, SIOO. 372-5091 after 5-
p.m., (A-110-3t-c).
ELECTRIC SMITH-CORONA 250
Typewriter. $175. 11 months old.
Originally $275. Excellent condi condition.
tion. condition. Call 376-8423. (A-110-3t-c).
GOING ARMY. Must sacrifice
these vehicles to highest bidder
before Sat. night. 1964 Honda 305
cc in excellent condition, S3OO.
1958 English Ford, runs good, $135.
Allstate Crusaire Motorscooter,
cheap dependable transportation,
SSO. 1326 NE 6th Terr. 372-0845.
(A-110-lt-p).

~

for sale
ACUARIA, EQUIPMENT AND
FISHES. Also brand new Dunelt
bicycle. Call 376-1702 after
5:30 p.m. (A-l 0-3 t-c).
for rent
SEVERAL 1 and 2 bedroom, kit kitchen
chen kitchen equipped, apts. Furnished and
unfurnished. Available now and
April Ist. East Side Garden Apts.
Apply at 309 NE 9th St., managers
office. (B-111-10t-c).
ROOMMATE (S) wanted to share
modern, close, central air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, 2 bedroom apt. with med medical
ical medical student for Summer term.
372-2164 anytime. (B-111-2t-c).
APT. AVAILABLE NOW. New one
bedroom, ct ntral air condition and
heat, private patio, paved parking.
427 SE Bth St. 372-3576 or 372-
7294. (B-111-st-c).
HIGH-RISE LUXURY at dorm
rates. See LA FONTANA Apts.,
adjacent to Univ. P. 0., 207 NW
17th St. Live in cool comfort
April trimester. 372-3576 or 372-
7294. (B-111-st-c).
AVAILABLE SUMMER TRIMES TRIMESTER,
TER, TRIMESTER, 1 bedroom apt., very nice,
married couples only, $65. Call
378-4798 after 5 p.m. (B-109-
3t-p). *,
AVAILABLE NOW. 1 bedroom
modern air conditioned apt. Near
Univ. and Medical Center. Adults
only, no pets, lease required. S9O.
Ph. 372-3488 or 376-4360. (B-98-
ts-c).
VILLAGE 34, SECOND EDITION.
Located near Univ. Golf Course.
328 SW 34th St. 24 new 1 bedroom
apt. units, furnished and air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Available April Ist. Rent
SIOO per month. See Resident Man Managers
agers Managers apt. on premises after 5
p.m. Lou Schilling, apt. 10.
Managed Ernest Tew Realty Inc.
376-6461. (B-108-ts-c).
SPLIT-LEVEL MODERN APT. for
Summer Trimester. 2 blocks from
campus. Skylighting, upstairs bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, large kitchen, washing ma machine,
chine, machine, air conditioning. Reduced
summer rent. 378-2763, 7-12 p.m.
(B-110-ts-c).

Page 6

, The Florida AlligatonlO^i^O^^^*^^^^

for rent
2 BEDROOM BRICK DUPLEX. Un Unfurnished.
furnished. Unfurnished. Kitchen equipped. Very
clean. Available immediately.
Quiet neighborhood. S7B monthly.
4140 NW 9th St. 376-0342. (B (B---110-3t-c).
--110-3t-c). (B---110-3t-c).
_
PRIVATE ROOM FOR FEMALE,
color TV, private bath, entrance.
Walk to class. 1204 NW 3rd Ave.,
378-1078. Ask for Jim. (B-110-
3t-c).

am-o ~~a x/ M Ml I Features At 1:15 3:20 H
STARTS 5:25 7:30 9:40
T 5
1 1 EXCLUSIVE FIRST AREA SHOWING* I
I A STORY OF FIANSE AND FDRY aers^'l
I WOMEN DRIVEN TO SHAME
I -SHE I mN HEATH BY
If NOW IT CAN BE 1 1
who defied "Love Lust and Co g"~ I
I
I FLORA ROBSON MlLnopri HIS W,LD GUN
I BETTY FIELD ANNA LEE E Fnmc n? CK their THRILL p *^ E upS I
eddie albert the blazing hold up
S " more ailv n e 9 than^l
CTi J

wanted |
WANT 10 SPEED OR LESS, Racing
Bike in good to fair condition. Call
Picchi, 378-4645 after 9 p.m. (C (C---1
--1- (C---1 3t-nc).
THE JONGLEUR. Jacksonvilles
unique coffeehouse offers top en entertainment.
tertainment. entertainment. Booking available to
qualified performers. Folk, Folk-
Rock. Comics, etc. Jongleur, 1514
Miami Rd.. Jacksonville, Fla. (C (C---110-st-p).
--110-st-p). (C---110-st-p).

wanted!
2 BEDROOM air onditionedH
or apt. for 4 men to rentH
July 18 31. Please conta
Greene, 3130 SW27thAve. ',fl
Fla. (C-107-4t-fj).
FEMALE ROOMMATE W
$32.50 plus util. No Fre
please. 372-122 G. After \ m
376-1131. (C-108-Gt-c). I



wanted
WOULD LIKE TO SHARE my home
with student or working girl. Call
372-3770 5 p.m. 536 NE 12th
Court. (C-107-st-c).
shop gator advertisers |
TONIGHT & SATURDAY!
11 HORRPRS of" 1 I
||gWDElStftfflj|

J£+ ROmN 1 I
TO THE CORE I
M ) HAVE YOU BEEN I
\\ / ROTTEN TODAY?
i \y
) SUNDAY I
DO ad jeamjoe BRiaiY and 3NN3 K3RIN3 I
aUJCGOODROHWe I
roman I
woman I
: LASHY, GAY, GIDDY, I
CONTAGIOUS JOY! I
. Time Mo gaunt 8
A Pathe Contemporary Retease
SihTC I

gator classifieds

[help wanted
FULLER BRUSH CO. needs part parttime
time parttime sales help, male or female,
with car. Average earnings $35-
SSO for 15 hrs. work. Write to H.
Silver, 1028 Clearwater Dr., Day Daytona
tona Daytona Beach, Fla. (E-85-ts-c).
WANTED: Accounting Major with
at least 6 hrs. of accounting. For
Assistant Business Manager, Stu Student
dent Student Publications. Now hiring for
the 1966-1967 school year. Apply
I Room 9, Fla. Union. Between 1
I p.m. 5 p.m. (E-104-tf-nc).
autos
I 1959 FIAT 600. Been in wreck.
I Engine, transmission, etc., still
I in exceptional shape. Make an
offer. 372-9713. (G-l 10-st-c).
I 1965 YELLOW GTO, SI,OOO off list
I price. Under 10,000 miles. In good
I shape. Please call evenings. 378-
I 1059. (G-109-3t-c).
I 1962 TR-3 ROADSTER. Wire
I wheels, reasonably priced. 1609
I NE 17th Place. 372-5160 or 372-
I 1145. (G-111-lt-c).
I 1956 OLDSMOBILE CONV. Power
I steering and brakes. You make
I offer. Call 378-2057.(G-111-2t-c).
I 1960 AUSTIN HEALEY. Must Sell.
I $895 or best offer. Excellent con-
I dition, white, wire wheels. See at
I 1231 SW 4th Ave. Call 372-4973.
I (G-108-4t-c).
I 1954 CHEVROLET. Heater, auto-
I matic transmission, dependable
I transportation. SIOO. Call 378-
I 2581. (G-110-st-c).
I TW I 3h? rentals
I Imurratiij 01?np
1620 W. Univ. Ave.

Friday, March 11, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

autos
1963 OLDSMOBILE. Steel blue,
4-door, FBS Automatic, radio and
heater. Call 378-3475. (G-110-
st-c).
1957 FORD. Mercury V-8 engine,
alternator in good condition. $275.
Call 376-0579. (G-110-st-c).
1961 PORSCHE SUPER. 33,000
miles, R & H, exterior and in interior
terior interior in perfect' condition. This
car is the answer to a Porsche
lovers dream. $2395. If interested
call 372-0295 after 5 p.m.(G-110-
3t-nc).
1960 PLYMOUTH, V-8. Automatic
transmission, 4-door, radio, heat heater.
er. heater. Call 376-9235. Ask for Ron.
(G-l 10-2 t-p).
1963 VW 1200, white, excellent
condition. Call H. E. Wilhelm.
Ph. 376-3261, ext. 2271. (G-107-
st-c).
1959 VW. Black with sun roof, new
radio. Call 372-4129 after 6 p.m.
(G-107-st-c).
TRIUMPH TR-4. S4OO andslo/wk.
can get you the car, fully equipped
with wire wheels, seat belts, heat heater,
er, heater, and other extras. See Don at
. 64 Buchman D or call 376-7807
after 5 p.m. (G-108-st-c).
1965 MGB. Still in factory war warranty,
ranty, warranty, less than 10,000 miles.
$2,000 cash or S2OO and take up
the payments. Service record if
necessary. 376-9723 or 378-2244.
(G-102-ts-c).
.
1959 PORSCHE, 1600 Coupe.
Radio, heater, new tires. Like
new condition and low mileage.
$1,650. Call Steve Moore, 372-
9307. (G-109-3t-c).
1962 CORVETTE 327. 4-speed
transmission, white sidewalls,
clean. $1,700. 376-9814. (G-109-
ts-c).
MUST SACRIFICE. Beautiful 1963
PONTIAC CATALINA Conv. 4-
speed, p.b., p.s., many other ex extras.
tras. extras. EXCELLENT CONDITION.
A steal at $1,495, FIRM. Call
Tim at 376-9793, 103 SW 12th St.
(G-109-3t-c).
1964 SUNBEAM ALPINE. Bright
red with black interior. Excellent
condition, low mileage. 376-1728.
(G-108-4t-c).
I7CTOX C6pfES|
1-19 Copies, lOy ea. 20&
Over, 9?
Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
EUROPE
21 DAYS ?CRQ
Esartd AlEipa
CWjjjUl ECONOMY TOURS
f Engl., Holl., Belg., Germany, Switz.,
i Liecht., Aust., Italy, Monaco, France.
OCPABTUHa WttKlT AW. to MOV.
for Fro* Brnrki.r
WORLD
V\\ \ 1777 travel
SERVICE
808 W. UNIVERSITY AVENUE
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA

Page 7

autos
LOOK. 1964 FAIRLANE 500.
Beautiful Burgandy and white. AT,
R and H, Excellent. Must Sell due
to purchase of new car. Call Col Collect,
lect, Collect, 486-2121. Will consider old
car in Trade. (G-108-4t-c).
lost-found
LOST BULOVA Self-winding
watch near Milhopper Sat. noon,
March sth. If found call Eddie,
376-0779. Reward. (L-111-st-p).
LOST Male Black Cat, white
feet, chest. Strayed 2 weeks ago
from NW 20th St. and Univ. Ave.
May have left in a car. Call 372-
7194 after 5 p.m. (L-111-lt-c).
LOST Ladys Elgin Wristwatch
somewhere between Winn-Dixie
and Yulee Area byway of 12th
St. Call Unda Grover, 372-9359.
REWARD. (L-108-3t-p).
LOST February 25th at Howard
Johnsons, black pattern purse with
small handle. Keep money but
please return immigration papers
and passport. Carmen Freitas,
376-9735. (L-109-ts-c).
LOST Lilac Siamese Kitten lost
in NW section near Cl on March
3rd. If seen or found, call 378-
4647. Reward. (L-108-4t-c).
LOST Solid Black Male Cat.
May still have red collar. Call
378-1750. (L-l 10-3 t-c).
services
DUE TO POPULARDEMANDTena
is extending her specialty, FROST FROSTING
ING FROSTING for average length hair. $lO.
Call Tena at Miladys Beauty Salon,
376-3802. (M-96-2tf-c).
NOW OPENING. Teddy Bear Nur Nursery.
sery. Nursery. 3 departments, complete in infant
fant infant department. Planned program
for children over 3. Central heating
and air conditioned. Ph. 376-0917.
1214-1/2 NW 4th St. (M-95-ts-c).
HORSE HAVEN RIDING SCHOOL.
Group and private instruction.
Hunt, seat and jumping. Excellent
pasture for your horse. Call 376-
0367 or 376-3494. Look for sign
6 miles west on Newberry Rd. op opposite
posite opposite store. (M-105-ltf-c).
real estate
, i.
HOUSE FOR SALE. No Qualifying.
3 bedrooms, 2 baths. S3OO down,
s9l per month. Highland Court.
Ph. 372-6985. (I-109-ts-c).
*
fmenOs, Romans,
countymen...
GATOR ADS SELL

SALES
' /
l
f
i

y
o
c
K
E
T
Use
Gator
Ads



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 11, 1966

Page 8

By MIKE MALAGHAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Number one in the entire coun country!
try! country!
The Billy Mitchell Drill team of
the UF placed first among 20 com competing
peting competing teams in the World Series
of precision drill teams during the
Mardi Gras at New Orleans.
UFs Gator Guard, last years
winners, finished second to arch archrival
rival archrival Billy Mitchell.
What type of individuals make
up a team of 32 men who are the
nations best?
One fact that Bob Gerber, in information
formation information services officer, and
Karen Read, one of the teams
co-sponsers, brought out was the
close knitness of the group.
It is much like a fraternity,
explained Miss Read.
Gerber stated Billy Mitchell has
an intensive rush each year as all
fraternities must.
Gerber feels one of the initial
drawing cards the group has is
the extensive broadening of educa education
tion education that results from traveling.
The New Orleans Mardi Gras
is an annual event. Billy Mit Mitchell
chell Mitchell made the trip to President
Lyndon Johnsons inaugaration in
Princess Weds
Ex-Hitler Youth
Mobs Riot
AMSTERDAM, The Netherlands
(UPI) Crown Princess Beatrix,
blonde heir to the throne of The
Netherlands, was married today
to a German diplomat whose Ger German
man German army ties chilled some Dutch
hearts and brought unruly out outbursts
bursts outbursts from young toughs.
But if the dimple cheeked 28-
year-old princess saw or felt any
of the resentment, she gave no
sign and smiled radiantly as she
have her ja (yes) to wed her
handsome German, 39-year-old
Claus von Amsberg.
Before the civil ceremony in
Amsterdams Town Hall Club
swinging police broke up a beat beatnik
nik beatnik mob of 500 youths shouting
fascists. There seemed to be no
generally organized demonstra demonstrations
tions demonstrations against the wedding in this
nation of 12.4 million.
Deep-seated were the memories
of many Dutchmen of years of
brutal Nazi occupation during
World War II and the deportation
and killing of 100,000 Jews from
this city alone.
The two chief rabbis refused
to attend the religious ceremony
in the 17th century Westerkerk
which was following the simple
civil ceremony. Twenty-one of the
45 members of the Amsterdam
City Council boycotted the contro controversial
versial controversial wedding.
But the majority of the nation
wished their tall, strong-minded
princess well in her marriage to
Von Amsberg, a former member
of the German army and of the
Hitler Youth.
With his ja, he became her
husband, a prince of the Nether Netherlands,
lands, Netherlands, a future consort to a queen
when Beatrix ascends the throne
and a member of one of the richest
families in the world. The ruggedly
handsome former German diplo diplomat
mat diplomat receives an annual allowance
of SBO,OOO.
a 9 U 1 ~
C GATOR ADS \
ARE DREAMY!^/
ii>

Mitchell Drill Team Like Fraternity

January, 1965 as the only official
representative group of the Sun Sunshine
shine Sunshine State.
Tampas Gasparilla is another
annual event Billy Mitchell doesnt
miss.
Besides these events Billy Mit Mitchell
chell Mitchell appears in numerous parades
in Florida.
Gerber was quick to point out
that while these trips might bring
in people, they dont guarentee it
will keep these fledgling cadets.
We start with a group of 50
each year and by Mardi Gras
time we are down to a corps of
30. The others just fall by tho
wayside when they find out tin
work that is involved.
Miss Read also noted that once
you are in the trips in them themselves
selves themselves provide very little moti motivation.
vation. motivation.
Miss Read declared that march marching
ing marching with the Billy Mitchell
precision unit gives a student,
identity with an elite group.
There is great amount of pride in
the organization and a strong de desire
sire desire to excell. I actually feel that
the boys really enjoy their march marching.
ing. marching.
She continued, This isnt like

! find the field you're
j whole career benefits An engineer whos at home in several specialties is a man
when you start in demand. LTVs cross-training and multiple projects
TT 555 r, §bt job produce well-rounded candidates for top-level positions.
: \La| \TH
j ;
LTV recugnix'es tiie wSt£t j T 1, J. ~ fH
; young engineer from 13 H|
v the start. Besides =1 S asltus m :
2 2 the satisfaction of jpsJ JH SOJTI6 fill
2 working on top-priority J B
given the opportunity I jym
to WOf k toward l sSS
; advanced degrees \R We re ready to talk, engineers about any ;
: through company \Uj question you ask. Training programs. Research ;
! sponsored programs. liW / V fac,litres. Company sales. Current' ;
v projects and plans for the future. And you. m

*
t 0 V ou>re ? hin w 8 f !i 3 Career of excitin 8 growth and accomplishment,
WJ Aerosoace Pn 0 8 3 COmpany with the same qualities. Here at LTV
in the fieiric rP f ra l 0n y un g engineers and the company are growing
Jmk serwces lsL *"T miSSileS : Space vehicles and range
aerodynamics men S diversified too. Th ey include such areas as:
design oron i aVIOniCS and instrumentation dynamics systems
;. S r Zt 'C 'CplacementOfhceee
placementOfhceee 'CplacementOfhceee the^schedule b 3 Wi,h LTV consult your
tive Or write Collpdp d an a PP m tment with our representa representatm
tm representatm Box a £?2'£ e A LTV C ~' P 0-
opportunity employer. LTV Aeros P ace Corporation is an equal
M CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
March 15,16
rriu.c.v , a WUOHI; ,rv C

J__ KENTRON HAWAII LTD .'

CM
x. jiff dr
_ 'it, £
:,f uB U iIH H BmK flft.
mm x
DRILL TEAM CHAMPS

just drilling in regular ROTC;
precision drilling requires mental
awareness at all times so that
intricate maneuvers are perform performed
ed performed in perfect unison.
Gerber added, When I drilled
with this unit I received a great
deal of satisfaction. Perhaps, its

a little pride that I could persevere
in something that most students
would quit.
Miss Read also pointed out a
feature unique on our campusthe
intense rivalry of Billy Mitchell
and the Gator Guard.
Actually Miss Read poirted

out, Billy Mitchell concentrates
on besting Gator Guard rather
than finishing first. However
beating Gator Guard usually means
you have to finish first, i would
say that it works the same way
with Gator Guard. Perhaps, that
is why the two outstanding preci precision
sion precision teams in the United States*
practice on the same drill field.
Miss Kead pointed out Billy
Mitchell grabbed another record
while in New Orleans. The boys
captured 114 flags from the Mardi
Gras; thats double last years
catch, she said.
GET IT ACROSS^
WMML ilk'
if Gator Classifieds



t*lay In The Hay!!!!!!
Hume is covering their recreation hall with hay for a Play in the
ay party Saturday night at 9:00.
Fun in the hay begins with a movie starring Natalie Wood and Steve
McQueen in Strangers When We Meet.
Couples (only couples can attend) are encouraged to bring their own
jlanket.
After the movie there will be a dance for the hay players.
Admission for Hume residents is 255. Foreigners (those not living
n Hume) must pay 50£ for the privilege of playing in the Hume hay.
' ; '' i
Sanders SPECIAL
W SHRIMP DINNER R
if INCLUDES FRENCH I I
FRIES, COLE SLAW i or MMM B(C
HOT SAUCE & HUSH BB
PUPPIES
/I -AVAILABLE AT-
V, fried A**tan
5o Tender ** i -- v
So Tasty 214 NW 13th 376-6472
' 207 NE 16th Ave. 378-2959
OFFER GOOD FRIDAY ONLY

-
Pass this quiz and
Eastern will fly you to
your pick of 96 cities
for half fare.
Any 12 year-old can pass it.
_ -j
1. lam 12,1 3, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 years old. (Circle one.)
2. I would like to spend $3 for an Identification Card entitling me
I to fly at half fare when a seat is available on Eastern Airlines
Coach flights to 96 destinations. True False |
3. My name is (PIEASE PRIPj U
4. My home address islE PEE I!
| j (CITY) (STATEI (ZIP CODE) ;
j 5. I was born onlM9y T Tt) (DAY| - E R -* I
6. To prove the answer to Question 5, I will submit a photo-copy
of my: |
Birth certificate Driver's license Draft card j
Other IPLEASEl PLEASE EXPLA L N l -l
7. I am a male/female. (Cross out one.) j
] 8. lamastudentatLSCyomNAME) I
9. My residence address there isdlEffl 1
(CiTYI ..(STATE) (ZIPCODE)
10. Eastern Airlines should mail my ID Card to:
Home address School address
I attest that all answers above are true.
j (SIGNATURE)
| Now, mail the quiz, proof of age and as 3 check or money order I
(payable to Eastern Airlines) to: Eastern Airlines, Inc., Dept. 350, en
Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10020. Or take same to any of
I our ticket offices. in
I If you're 12 through 21 and qualify, you II s n 9f Yur ID
card. It entitles you to an Eastern Coach seat at half fare, on a
space-available basis. Except on April 7 and certain days during
the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, you can fly to any of
Eastern's destinations within the continental U.b. I
Including Florida. |
J
I
EASTERN
* t

if Ilf i
m ll* A
nJIII 1
jp Jtk *1 || *lv I
B Jj Mg
WOODROW WILSON SCHOLARS
Five students from the College of Arts and Sciences received graduate education grants from the
Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation.
From left are Herman F. Greene, Gainesville; Kenneth W. Allen, Dade City; Dr. Reitz; Wendell D.
Curtis, Miami; George A. Lyrene, Silverhill, Ala., and James W. Pipkin, Pensacola.

Number Os Bad Checks Increase

By JIMMIE D. DOUGLASS
Alligator Staff Writer
A national trend toward bad
check passing has come to Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville.

There is a definite increase in
the rate of bad checks in Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, said Roger Taylor, cash cashier
ier cashier for Citizens Bank and a UF
alumnus.

Friday, March 11. 1966, The Florida Alligator,

This statement was backed by a
survey which showed that $1,400
in bad checks had been passed in
January, 1965 as compared with
$11,200 in January, 1966.
Taylor said it is unlikely for
students to pass bad checks. He
attributes this to the honor system.
I think the problem is that the
merchants dont instruct their em employees
ployees employees well enough, said Taylor.
You must know whom you
accept a check from. It is up
to th£ merchant whether or not
to cash a check for a customer,
said Keith Barton, cashier at the
Florida National Bank.
I caught a fellow once who
tried to pass a check signed U.
R. Stuck, said Ralph Davis,
manager of the Dixie Minit Mart.
Most stores have a policy they
adhere to for cashing checks. Some
policies listed by merchants are:
proper identification, never cash
a check over $lO, personal recog recognition
nition recognition by the merchant, address on
the check, references and prior
business dealing with the custo customer.
mer. customer.
When merchants do receive
checks that they cant collect mon money
ey money for, they take the check to the
County Judges office and sign an
affidavit for a warrant on the per person
son person writing the checks.
The clerks in the judges office
send notices to the persons who
have written the bad checks. If
the person replys and comes in
with the money he can collect the
check at face value.
If the persons do not respond
to the notices then the checks are
turned over to the Court of Re Records.
cords. Records. A warrant for their arrest
is issued. The County Sheriffs
Department is responsible for ap apprehending
prehending apprehending the bad check passer.
Intent is determined by the mer merchant
chant merchant and clerks in the judges
office in order to charge the per persons
sons persons under the proper crime. In Intent
tent Intent to pay and cant constitu constitutes
tes constitutes a misdemeanor; intent not to
pay at* the time the check is
written constitutes a felony.
The final decision as to what
action will be taken against the
person is made by the County
Judge. Usually if the person has
intentions to pay and cant, the
penalty for the bad check will be
to pay the face value of the check,
pay restitutions payments and
court costs. In repeat cases more
severe punishments are involved.'

Page 9



Ihe Orancre

ADDRESS NOTICES TO ORANGE AND BLUE,
INFORMATIONAL SERVICES OFFICE.
Campus Calendar

PLEASE TURN IN ALL ITEMS FOR CAMPUS CALENDAR TO THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS OFFICE, FLA. UNION

GATOR GRAS VARIETY SHOW TRYOUTS: Today,
apply FU 315. Last day for tryouts.
STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT: Today, 9
a.m., Fla. Gym.
FLORIDA BLUE KEY: Today, 3:30 p.m., FU 324.
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BOARD: Today, 3:30
p.m., FU 212.
DECISION PARTY: Today, 3:30 p.m., FU 200.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT: Today, 4 p.m., FU 215.
Cabinet meeting.
ENGINEERING FAIR: Today, 4-10 p.m., Eng. Bldg.
MOVIE: Today, 6:45 & 9:45 p.m.. MSB Aud.. Bridge
On The River Kwai.
UF CHESS CLJJB: Today, 7 p.m., FU 215.
UF VETERANS CLUB: Today, 7:30 p.m., FU Aud.
Ratification of Constitution and election of officers.
All military veterans including non-members urged
to attend.
PANHELLENIC SADIE HAWKINS DANCE: Today,
8 p.m., Student Service Center Banquet Room. 50?
per ticket.

TIRES?
I WHICH SIZE? I
I WHICH GRADE? I
I WHICH PLY? I
9 required for your
I driving needs? Dont I
I be under or over I
1 sold. See the experts I
GAINESVILLE'S I
I independent!
I ALACHUA I
I FIRESTONE I
I SERVICE I
I CENTER I
I 615 N. MAIN ST. 1
I Ph. 2-3010 1
I NOW OPEN I
I SEVEN DAYS 1
I A WEEK I
I SERVING I
1 Lasagna 1
I Pizza I
I Spaghetti 1
I Ravioli
I Filet AAignon
(,ii^
I AMERICAN
I CUISINE
I 2204 S.W. 13th St.
Phone 376-1867

CASH
I CONSOLIDATE BILLS
I TRAVEL EXPENCE
I $25 S6OC
I Marion Finance Company Inc.
| 222 W. University Ave.

Administrative Notices To Students. Faculty & Staff

STUDENTS
PROGRESS TESTS
Students in the following courses are expected to take the
following tests. Each student must bring a No. 2 lead pencil
and will be required to use his University student number.
CSS 111 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday. March 'ls, 7 p.m.
All students whose last names begin with: ( A- L ) report
to Matherly 2, 3. 4, 5. 6,7. 8. 9, 10. 11. 12, 13, 14 or 16;
t M Z ) to Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116,
117, 118 or 119.
CSS 112 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday. March 15, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin with: ( A ) report to Floyd
106 or 109; ( B ) to Peabody 1.2, 4. 5,7, 10 or 11; ( C )
to Leigh 207; (D) to Building I 101. 103, 107 or 209;
( E ) to Tigert 331 or 357; ( F ) to Matherly 213, 216 or
219; ( G ) to Peabody 101 102, 112 or 114; ( H ) to Pea Peabody
body Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209; ( I J ) to Flint 110 or 112;
( K ) to Walker 301. 303, 307 or 308; ( L ) to Anderson 2,
4,5, 18 or 20; ( M ) to McCarty 2or 44; ( N ) to Leigh 142;
CO ) to Leigh 154; ( P Q ) to Flint 101 or 102; ( R ) to
Floyd 108; ( S ) to Walker Auditorium; ( T V ) to An Anderson
derson Anderson 112, 113 or 115; ( W Z ) to Walker Auditorium.
CET 141 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, March 17, 7 p.m.
All students whose names begin with: ( A- L ) report to
Matherly 2,3, 4,~5*, 6, 7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16;
( M Z ) to Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116,
117, 118 or 119.
CET 142 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, March 17, 7 p.m.
All students whose last names begin with: ( A ) report to
Floyd 106 or 109; ( B ) to Peabody 1,2, 4, 5. 7, 10 or 11;
( C ) to Leigh 207; ( D ) to Bldg. I 101, 103, 107 or 209;
( E ) to Tigert 331 or 357; ( F ) to Matherly 213, 216 or
219; ( G ) to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; ( H ) to Pea Peabody
body Peabody 201, 202, 205, 208 or 209; ( I J ) to Flint 110 or 112;
( K) to Walker 301, 303, 307 or 308; (L) to Anderson 2,
4,5, 18 or 20; ( M ) to McCarty 2 or 44; ( N ) to Leigh
142; ( O ) to Leigh 154; ( P Q ) to Flint 101 or 102;
General Notices
SEE SUGAR BOWL FILM: The Universitys new film high highlighting
lighting highlighting recent Sugar Bowl football game activities will be
shown three times in the Medical Sciences Building Auditor Auditorium
ium Auditorium on Thursday, March 17. Admission is free. The 28-minute
film will be shown at 7, 8 and 9 p.m. Narrated by sports an announcer
nouncer announcer Red Barber, a former University of Florida student,
the film features the preparations for the bowl game appearance
by the football team and the Gator Band.
PLACEMENT INTER VIEWS
(Sign-up sheets are posted in Placement Office, Bldg. H. All
are degree-level positions. Asterisk indicates summer em employment
ployment employment available for juniors. Interviews will be held in
Florida Union unless otherwise indicated.)
MARCH 16: JOSEPH C. SEAGRAM & SONS, INC. Chem.,
EE, ME, Acetg., Bact. RAILWAY EXPRESS AGENCY, INC. ~

TAX NOTICE
Tax Collectors office, Alachua County Court House, office hours: 8:30 to 5, Mon. thru Fri.
ARRANGEMENTS MAY BE MADE IN PAYING TAXES
Should any tax payer, those paying for the first time as well as those having a higher tax statement be short
of funds needed for these savings, Marion Finance Cc. has a loan plan of payday (short term) or monthly
plans to fit your budget. Loans of S2O to S6OO. Sample loan plan: S2B returned in 3 payments of $lO, $54
returned in 6 payments of $lO, $75 returned in 6 payments of sl4.

BADMINTON CLUB: Today, 8 p.m., Norman Hall
Gym. Coeds, everyone welcome.
COMMUNICATION SCIENCES LECTURE: Today,
8:15 p.m., 331 Tigert. Dr. James F. Curtis, State
Univ. of Iowa: Conceptual Models of Speech Arti Articulation.
culation. Articulation.
ENGINEERING FAIR: Sat., Mar. 12, 2-10 p.m.,
Eng. Bldg.
STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT: Sat., Mar.
12, 3 p.m., Fla. Gym.
CHILDRENS MOVIE: Sat., Mar. 12, 2 p.m., MSB
Aud., The Island of The Blue Dolphins.
MOVIE: Sat., Mar. 12, MSB Aud. Double Feature
6:30 & 10:05 p.m., God Is My Co-Pilot. At 8:15
& 11:40 p.m., High Noon.
GOLF: Sat., Mar. 12, 10 a.m., UF Golf Course.
INDIA CLUB: Sat., Mar. 12, 7 p.m., FU -Johnson
Lounge.
PI LAMBDA THETA: Sat., Mar. 12, noon, FU
Johnson Lounge. Luncheon.

and
BLUE BULLETIN

( R ) to Floyd 108; ( S ) to Walker Auditorium; ( T V )
to Anderson 112,113 or 115; ( W Z ) to Walker Auditorium.
PRE-MEDICAL GRADUATES: The American cancer Society
has made available two summer school research scholarships
to be awarded to graduates of the University of Florida who
have been enrolled in an approved medical school for the fall
term of 1966. Preference will be given to students admitted to
the College of Medicine at the University of Miami and the
University of Florida. Interested students should contact the
Pre-Professional Counseling Office, 107 Anderson.
TRANSFER DEADLINE: March 25 is the deadline for stu students
dents students to complete forms for transferring colleges for the
Spring Trimester. Students who plan to attend the Spring
Trimester and who plan to transfer colleges lower division
to upper division, undergraduate to graduate, etc. should
file application as soon as possible in order to prevent delays
in registration. Forms may be picked up and returned to 34
Tigert.
DONT FORGET PHOTO APPOINTMENT: All students are
reminded to keep their appointments for having identification
card photographs made. Students who fail to keep their appoint appointment
ment appointment will be charged a $5 fee to obtain identification cards at
a later date. The cards will become official University docu documents
ments documents in September, 1966, and will be necessary to obtain
football tickets and to check out books from the library.
Photographs are being made in Room 324, Florida Union,
during March. All students who plan to return to the University
in September will be required to have photographs taken for
identification cards. vL,
FACULTY
MEDICARE REMINDER: Medicare is available to virtually
all individuals age 65 or over, reminds the Personnel De Department.
partment. Department. Persons do not have to be retired or covered by
Social Security. Enrollment deadline is March 31; benefits
become effective July 1. Details may be obtained from the
Social Security Office, 411 SW 2 Ave.
.
Gen. Bus., Acctg. CHRYSLER CORP. AE, EE, ME, CE, Ps,
Math. WEST VIRGINIA STATE ROAD COMMISSION CE.
F. W. WOOLWORTH All majors. BLUE CROSS-BLUE
SHIELD OF FLORIDA, INC. Gen. Bus., Lib. Arts, Ed.
FLORIDA STATE ROAD DEPT. CE.
MARCH 16-17: AGRICO CHEMICAL CO. ChE, ME, IE,
Chem.
MARCH 17: FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK Gen. Bus.,
Agric., Lib. Arts., Ed., Journ. & Comm. U. S. PUBLIC
HEALTH SERVICE Lib. Arts, Ed., Gen. Bus. THE UP UPJOHN
JOHN UPJOHN CO. Gen. Bus., Lib. Arts, Ed. HAZELTINE CORP.
EE, ME. FMC CORP. ChE, EE, ME, IE. BURROUGHS
CORP. Gen. Bus., Mktg., Acctg. UNITED FRUIT CO.
Fin., Acctg., Econ., Agri., EE, ME. JEWEL TEA CO. Gen.
Bus., Mktg., Lib. Arts, Ed. ARMOUR AGRICULTURAL
CHEMICAL CO. -- Agri., Bus. Admin., Lib. Arts, Mktg.

The Florida Alligator, Friday March 11, 1966

HONOR COURT: Sat., Mar. 12, 1-1:30 p.m., FU
324. Selection of jurors.
HONOR COUKt: Sun., Mar. 13, 12:30 3 p.m.,
FU 324. Selection of jurors.
DUPLICATE BRIDGE: Sun., Mar. 13, 1:30 p.m.,
FU 215. UF students, faculty and staff only. 25? per
person.
ENGINEERING FAIR: Sun., Mar. 13, 2 8 p.m.,
Eng. Bldg.
FACULTY CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES: Sun., Mar. 13,
4 p.m., MSB Aud. All Mozart program.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Sun., Mar.
13, 7:30 p.m., FU Johnson Lounge. All International
students invited.
FU JAMAICA TOUR: April 23-29, 1966. $165.00.
Apply FU 315, deadline Mar. 31. Open to UF personnel
and general public.
FU EUROPEAN TOUR: June 21-Aug. 15. Apply
FU 315, deadline Mar. 15. Open to UF students,
faculty and staff only.

I THIS
I SPACE
I A
I A
I
I A
I B
I E
I CALL
I UNIV.
I EXT.
I 2832
WE GOT
SO DIG
I CAUSE WE
I CHARGE SO LITTLE
I rent a car from t
fCOMOCAHj
I -3 vlJ*
it We feature Valiants & ott>r 1
S CHRYSLER built cars Gas Gasif
if Gasif oil insurance all included! |
I PHONE 376-3644
I 637 NW 1301 St.

LOANS
SHORT TILL PAYDAY
BUYING SECOND CAR I
525-S6OO I
M irmn J iiuiHv ( (imp.my Inc. I
1' U ('*fiiM.'i i

Page 10



* £A^
\ A JU A
*& 'jti&sfkr &
IK l mL*f '"W ;
I
I M
§ ik %
flB r<'
HL wKwr'^msw^
?
f MfA^
. JflflHHf
~ *>/
I GENERAL J.A. VAN FLEET
I. . will give a lecture on Asia Monday night. He has been decorated
I several Asian nations for his military u and humanitarian service.
WELCOME
HIGH SCHOOL I
STUDENTS AND I
VISITORS I
/ * H 1
FLORIDA IMPRINTED I
SWEATSHIRTS I
Short & Long Sleeve I
12 Different Colors I
$2"
FLORIDA IMPRINTED I
T SHIRTS I
$1
GiTOE SHOP)
1710 W. UNIVERSITY AVENUE 11
ON THE "GOLD COAST" 11
ALSO: DEALER FOR H.I.S. SLACKS AND PANTS I I

Former UF Coach
Spejak s On Asia
Retired Army Gen. James A.
Van Fleet will discuss Asia Mon Monday
day Monday at 8:15 p.m. in the University
Auditorium.
Van Fleet, who has been decor decorated
ated decorated by several Asian nations for
his military and humanitarian
service in that area, will give the
Robert Tyree Benton Memorial
Lecture.
In addition to his war service
and peace-keeping missions in
Korea and Greece, Gen. Van Fleet
undertook a survey of U. S. mili military
tary military assitance programs in the Far
East, traveling in a civilian status
with the rank of Ambassador, as a
special representative of Presi President
dent President Dwight D. Eisenhower.
r x?
He is a former head of the UF
Reserve Officers Training Corps
and was head coach of the 1923
Florida football team the first
to go undefeated in conference play.
He was honored by the UF with
special Van Fleet Day cere ceremonies
monies ceremonies in 1946 and holds an hon honorary
orary honorary doctor of laws degree from
the institution.
Purim Dinner And Auction
Sunday March 13, 6 P.M.
Prizes donated by local
merchants to be auctioned
away dirt cheap. Al I pro proceeds
ceeds proceeds to charity. For re reservations,
servations, reservations, call:
Hillel Foundation
-2900

I ELECT FRED B. I
ARNOLD (74
I CITY COMMISSIONER, GROUP 2 \M I
I VOTE ON MARCH 15TH Tm| I
I "For A Businesslike Approach to Sound Government" I
I AAR. EDI ARE YOU A ME To DO NOTHING" CANDIDATE? I
I Question: The West Gainesville sewer project was completed approximately two years ago. Justified com- I
I plaints of many home owners were not handled properly and In most cases WITH TOO MUCH 8
I Answer: As mayor-commissioner was this not your responsibility? fl
1 Question: How can you take credit for the establishment of Gainesvilles Community Development De- 8
fl partment? fl
8 Answer: Wasn't the establishment of Gainesvilles Community Development Department not the result of I
I direct efforts of the other commissioners? fl
fl Election time appears to be the time that you take credit for every accomplishment over the past three years. fl
8 This Is an example of a me too -do nothing candidate. 8
I CHOOSE LOCOMOTIVE LEADERSHIP I
I OVER CABOOSE POLITICS! I
nn * nn
ELECT FRED B. ARNOLD
I CITY COMMISSIONER, GROUP 2 I
I (Political Advertisement Paid For By Fred Arnold Campaign Fund. Tom Dobson, Treasurer) 8
88 >. h
i V7;

Sleeps Researchers
Convene At UF


More than 100 of the worlds
investigators of the mysteries of
sleep converge on the UF campus
March 24-26 for an exchange of
information on current sleep re research.
search. research.
The researchers -- from major
sleep research centers in this
country, Germany, France and
Italy will gather for the second
annual symposium of the Asso Association
ciation Association for Psychophysiological
Study of Sleep, the only inter interdisciplinary
disciplinary interdisciplinary scientific body de devoted
voted devoted exclusively to the subject.
The four-day meeting opens at
8 p.m. on March 24 at the Ramada
Inn and will include some 75 papers
on current sleep studies ranging
from animal sleep, sleep in young
and old, sleeping positions and per personality,
sonality, personality, dreams and the effects
of sleep deprivation.
The UF one of the major sleep
research centers in this country
will be represented by six of its
scientists at the symposium: Dr.
Igatql
H AOS
REACH 1 J
(PEOPLE Wjf
H UNIY. Ex-. 2112 g

Friday, March 11, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Wilse B. Webb, chairman of the
Department of Psychology in the
College of Arts and Sciences; Dr.
Robert L. Williams, chairman of
the Department of Psychiatry in
the College of Medicine; Dr. Fred
King, associate research profes professor
sor professor of neurosurgery and psy psychology
chology psychology and director of the Uni Universitys
versitys Universitys Center for Neurobiolo NeurobiologicalSciences;
gicalSciences; NeurobiologicalSciences; Dr. Lamar Roberts,
professor of neurosurgery in the
College of Medicine; Dr. William
R. Fowler, Jr., postdoctoral fel fellow
low fellow in neuropsychology, and Har Harmon
mon Harmon Agnew, research associate in
psychology.
The foreign scientists will in include
clude include Dr. M. Jouvet, Lyon, France;
Dr. Dreyfus Brisac, Paris and
Inge Strauch, German Research
Foundation, West Germany.
The symposium is being held
in cooperation with the Depart Departments
ments Departments of Psychology and Psy Psychiatry
chiatry Psychiatry at the UF.
jprofits From Ball
The Board of International
Activities has donated the pro proceeds
ceeds proceeds of its International Ball to
Dollars for Scholars and WUS,
Bill Chiara announced today.
BIA gave SIOO to Dollars for
Scholars and $59.80 to the World
University Service. This consti constituted
tuted constituted the total of profits made at
the Ball, said Chiara.

Page 11



i. The Florida Alligator. Friday, March 11, 1966

Page 14

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'',l, rfv:.'..;,, Mtafiatsf* 4 -f" 'Yw.-ig, jiW' ' '- > j *-\ ;>aN .. t v
-*8 __ f
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- V-...

Some people will use any old excuse to get the chance to go fishing in the pond next to the Architecture
and Fine Arts Building. But this time they were fishing for George Cappys glasses. From the left: Ken
Johnson, Cappy, and Rick Fey.

King Olivers Count 'Swings For Military

The count of classical jazz,
Count Basie, and his orchestra
will swing into Gainesville on
March 19, to perform at the annual
Military Ball.
With the Jackie Gleason Band,
Bert Kaemphert, and three other
bands as possibilities, a landslide
vote by the 1800 cadets decided
on Basie.
Basie is remembered for his
band of the forties which aroused
fervent enthusiasm over the
swing movement, a delirium
very similar to the temporary
insanity of Beatlemania.
Some of his big hits were Texas
Shuffle, Panassee Stomp,
Love Jumped Out, and Nobody
Knows, the orchestras master masterpiece
piece masterpiece of the slow tempo.
The sixty-one-year-old native
of Red Bank, N. J. has played in
many places and has received num numerous
erous numerous awards. He received the
All-American Jazz Band Award
of Esquire magazine in 1945. He
got the Jazz Merit Award of the
Florida Union
Trip To Europe
The annual group flight to Europe
for university students, faculty and
staff is a saving of $174.50 com compared
pared compared with regular fare. The
group flight fare is $310.00, New
York, and is a
regularly scheduled flight.
The group leaves John F. Ken Kennedy
nedy Kennedy Airport June 21 and will
return August 15.
The flight takes six hours on
the Alitilia Super DC-8 jet and
offers first class meals. Space
may be held with a deposit of
$125.00 at the Union program of office,
fice, office, Rm. 315. Campus phone 2741.
FIDELITY UNION
LIFE
BUS
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co.
. . From Coast-to-Coast
The Leader In Sales To
COLLEGE MEN
. . Payments Deferred Til
Earnings Increase
... No War Clause
Campus Representatives:
Mel Ward Geo. Corl
% Dan Sapp
376-1208
_

GONE FISHiw

Lamplighter, also in 1945. Most
recently the Count was the Down
Beat International Critics Poll
winner (1952-56).
The name and sound of the Basie

|{j SPARKLE

band has filled the concert halls,
has breathed life into the hot
nightspots, and has spanned the
country through the tubes of radio
and television.

Alumni Classes Return

UF alumni return to the campus
March 18-19 for their annual re reunion
union reunion and spring assembly.
During the weekend the alumni
will install Florida Supreme Court
Justice Stephen C. OConnell as
the new president of their asso association.
ciation. association. He succeeds Jacksonville
attorney Nelson M. Harris Jr.,
who now heads the organization
which includes local alumni clubs
throughout the world in addition
to 36 in the state of Florida.
Selection of a president-elect
will take place during the annual
business meeting on Saturday
morning, March 19. Nominees for
the position are Maxwell W. Wells
Jr., Orlando, and William O. E.
Henry, Bartow.

Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship
OF GAINESVILLE
SPEAKER: Dr. Edward M. Fearney, Professor of
Architecture
TOPIC: "PROTESTANT CHURCH FORM"
March I. 1966
11 a.m., Sunday, Room 324, Florida Union
EVERYONE INVITED

Six classes will hold joint re reunion
union reunion activities on Friday. They
are the classes of 1916, 1921,
1926, 1931, 1936 and 1941. A re reception
ception reception and banquet in their honor
will be held Friday evening. The
Class of 1916 has planned an in informal
formal informal stag breakfast early Sat Saturday
urday Saturday morning.
Other weekend activities include
campus tours, a faculty-alumni
barbecue and the annual intra intrasquad
squad intrasquad Orange and Blue football
game.
Reservation for the weekend ac activities
tivities activities can be made through the
Division of Alumni Services on the
UF campus.



The Florida Alligator J

Friday. March 11. 1966. SPRTS

I Can Bill Veeck Wreck
I Atlanta Braves Defense?

MILWAUKEE (UPl)The state
HHcl the defense clashed Thursday
j| whether former major league
Mner Bill Veeck, currently one
baseballs most outspoken crit-
JB |s, would be a witness in the
iH'aves antitrust trial.
JBwillard Stafford, special coun-
Bl for the state, sought to make
JBrt of the trial record testimony
IHken from Veeck in December
19 which he said it would be fea fea|B)le
|B)le fea|B)le for the National League to
Bpand in 1966.
testimony formed part
the states pre-trial base which
]9d to a temporary injunction or-
the Braves to make plans
9 play in Milwaukee this season
Hid the league to file an expansion
|Han with the court.
9 The states unprecedented suit
Bainst the Braves, the league
IBd its other teams seeks the
|9turn of the Braves from Atlanta
Hiless Milwaukee gets an expan-
Hon franchise. The suit charges
Holations of Wisconsins antitrust
Bid common laws in which the
Haseball monopoly conspired to
Butout Milwaukee.
9 Ray McCann, an attorney for
Be Braves, objected to Staffords
Hove, calling Veeck that char-
I CAMPUS SPORTS
I BRIEFS
The UF tennis team plays host
the UM Hurricanes Saturday at
3O p.m. The match will be
Bayed at the varsity courts next
B Beta Field. Coach Bill Potter
Bnphasized that spectators are
Helcome.
HH
B The Baby Gator tennis team,
Beralded as one of the best in
Bchool history, continued on its
Binning ways Wednesday with a
B-0 victory over Bolles High School
Bf Jacksonville. The victory was
Be teams fifth in as many match-
Bs.
B The varsity didnt fare as well,
Bosing to Rollins College 7-2.
I Tolbert Area Council will hold
rally for cars, motorcycles and
Bcooters on Sunday, March 13.
B will start from the parking lot
Bn Woodlawn Drive behind the
Back and field stands at 1 p.m.
Brophies will be awarded. Con-
Bet Ray Salem in 725 Tolbert
B>r an early start time.

It's the Natural Look.
Joplin is in a class by itself. Its a superior blend of w
wrinkle-free dacron* and cotton fabric that gives K l
a soft, lustrous look and feel to a traditional f M. nj"
favorite. Tailored lean and trim for young men. \
All of your favorite shades including the new \
yellow . Just come in and call for the tradi- ' &
tional poplin. Sizes are 28 thru 42. Just a M \
modest $9.95 per pair. Alteration free, of r m IV
course, and you may park at the rear of our
store for one hour at no \ t >
225 W Univ. Av.
V -.-

acter and contending he couldnt
expect the former owner ot tne
Chicago White Sox. Cleveland In Indians
dians Indians and Old St. Louis Browns
to say the same thing on two
occasions.
The head of a group which sought
an expansion franchise for Mil Milwaukee,
waukee, Milwaukee, which was rejected by the
League, denied Thursday Milwau Milwaukee
kee Milwaukee county and a brewery would
subsidize such a team operation
if a franchise were granted.

I Chevelle .SS 395.
Corvair Monza Sport Sedan. Chevy D Nova SS Coupe.
I Starting now-Double Dividend Days at your Chevrolet dealers! (£?££ Z ZT )
/ in r-j- "Right now youll get a mighty handsome buy at your Chevrolet dealers
/ r.HKVRm.ET during Double Dividend Days. Pick from 45 great models of Caprice,
/ vIIUWIvv&UJI Chevrolet, Chevelle, Chevy II or Corvair with a huge selection of colors,
/ ImllKljfi custom touches, engines, interiors. Availability, variety and buys have
jm mnaa never been better. Hurry in to your Chevrolet dealers now!
I a DIVIDEND DAB! i ..n
I \ i NO. 1 BtUS NO. 1 CARS fai/StUiT'" JMS.SX fiN
I Wow at your Chevrolet dealer s them b e f ore starting.
I All kinds of good buys all In one place... at your Chevrolet dealers-Chevrolet Chevelle Chevy D Corvair Corvette

RALEIGH. N. C. Who says ratings are
no good? 0
Only five Eastern basketball teams were ranked
in the nations top 20 and four of them made it to
the NCAA regional playoffs which open here Friday
night.
Second-ranked Duke opens the playoff against
sixth-place St. Josephs at 7 p.m. and 16th place
Syracuse meets 18th place Davidson at 9 p.m.
The only other Eastern team rated in the top
20, tenth ranked Providence, made it to the elimina eliminations
tions eliminations at Blacksburg. Va,. Monday and fell to St.
Josephs. 65-48.
Thus the ratings, in this case, accurately foretold
the shape of the regional tournament.
If the ratings hold true. Duke should defeat St.
Joseph's and Syracuse ought to beat Davidson. This
would set up a wingding battle Saturday between the
talent-loaded Blue Devils and Syracuse, led by first
team All-American Dave Bing.
St. Josephs and Davidson, of course, will have
something to say about that. All four teams worked
out on the Reynolds Coliseum floor Thursday after afternoon
noon afternoon and all were found to be healthy and ready to
play.
St. Josephs relies on quickness, the fast break
and precision plays set up by the passing of second
team All-American Matt Goukas Jr. Bones McKin McKinney.

Page 15

NCAA Regionals Open Tonite

ney. McKinney. uie former Wake Forest basketball coach, said
the last time one of his teams played St. Josephs
the Hawks breezed by his players so fast it gave his
players a cold.
Duke is more deliberate, but any of its starting
five players can and does often score 20 or more
points a game. And Duke has five more players
on the bench almost as good as the starters. Guard
Bob Verga and forward Jack Marin made the second
and third All-American teams, but six-foot-seven
sophomore Mike Lewis is just as valuable on his
rebounding and layups from the circle.
Duke Captain Steve Vacendak was named the most
valuable player in the Atlantic Coast Conference.
Syracuse has great team speed and Bing, and thats
a lot. The 6-foot-3 center is the heart of the Orange Orangemen
men Orangemen with his playmaking, passing and dead-eye
shooting at a 55 per cent accurate rate. He is said
to be one of the top two or three professional pros prospects
pects prospects in the country.
Davidson has high scoring stars of its own in Dick
Snyder, second team All-American and sophomore
Rodney Knowles, who scored 39 points against Rhode
Island while Snyder sat out foul trouble. In contrast
to Syracuse which likes to shoot from outside. David Davidson
son Davidson is a big, tough squad with players who drive for
the basket and drill in shots.



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 11, 1966

EDDIE
Sears
ALLIGATOR COLUMNIST
This years spring training isnt made of sugar and spice and
everything thats niceat least as far as the football players
are concerned.
Old timers agree that this is one of the hardest practices the
Gators have ever been through.
Talk about knocking heads. Chip Hoye and Don Barrett are out
for the remainder of practice. The pair of first string defensive
ends were both injured within two days of each other.
Hoye has a broken leg and Barrett has knee problems.
Sophomore quarterback Larry Rentz is also on the casualty list
with a broken nose.
Spring practice certainly should not be rated by the number of
dead bodies on the field, but it serves to point out one fact factthose
those factthose guys are really hitting.
The practice schedule reads like this: Monday, Wednesday,
Friday and Saturday, dress out in pads; Tuesday and Thursday,
lift weights and run a mile; and Sunday, meeting in the stadium.
It is also a credit to Ray Graves that the practice is so tough.
There are rumors that the Bull Gator is cracking down on his
troops.
Graves has a rebuilding year and the way hes doing it is to
be admired. He isnt crying over the loss of Casey, Brown,
Gagner and Co. Hes building with what hes got and hes getting
tougher on the players.
And Graves has the leaders on the team that can help Florida to
build some tradition (for a change). Men like center Bill Carr
and Rentz are dedicated athletes and play because they like the
game.
One Gator coach in particular has complained that Florida
does not have any tradition. Most people agree.
But heres a chance to change things.
DOTS AND DASHES . Defensive players rate sophomore
Larry Smith as another Donnie Anderson. The kid runs like a
bull and will be a good one next year. He should be the starting
tailback . Trainer Jim Cunningham gets a kick out of the
yearly stories about all his bandages. Shoot, I know exactly
what to say when some reporter interviews me, he grinned.
How many feet of tape I use every year, how many bodies I
bury, etc. Cunninghams quite a ham if he wants to be.
Glory Be! Ft. Lauderdale High finally made it into the state
basketball finals. Why the last time the Ls were up here (and
won) was in 1953 when (now coach) Bill Huegele was on the
team . They will be the team to watch after upsetting Miami
Curley last weekend for the state bid-
Bob Lynch, Informational Services director, has just released
a film on the Sugar Bowl. Its a good one worth watching (for
free) and will be shown at the Health Center Auditorium Thursday
night at 7, 8 and 9.
Cage Tourney Begins
Today and tomorrow the hard court will resound with action
in the Florida High School State Tournament. Action will take
place in four classifications: AA, A, B and C.
The first game, a class C affair, begins at 9 a.m. and matches
defending champion Cedar Key, (22-3) against Poplar Springs
(23-5).
Defending champion Chatahootchee (27-1) battles undefeated
Macclenny (29-0) in class B competition at 10:30 a.m. to close
out the morning session.
In the afternoon, Havana (13-13) meets Laelle (20-3) in C
at 1 p.m. and Jupiter (14-11) goes against Zephyrhills (20-7) in
Class B at 2:30 p.m. Niceville (26-5) faces Dunedin (17-11) at
4 p.m. in a class A match.
In the evenings action Cocoa (23-1) faces Tampa Hillsborough
(28-0) in AA competition. At 8 p.m. Orlando Bishop Moore (17-11)
tilts with Hollywood Chaminade (22-4) in class B.
The final action of the evening pits Pensacola (28-0) against
Ft. Lauderdale (19-9) in an AA affair.
FOREST PARK
BAPTIST
CHURCH
1624 NW sth AVE
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 AM
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 AM
TRAININ6 UNION 6:30 PM
EVENING WORSHIP 7:45 PM
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MONKEY ON MY BACK

Sigma Chis Scott Hager seems to have an SAE
climbing up his back in Wednesdays Orange League
championship. Hager was fouled and went on to

League Fight
Goes To Wire
SAE moved a step closer to the
coveted Presidents Cup Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday night as they won the Orange
League basketball championship.
The Lionmen are currently in first
place in the league, a few points
ahead of Tau Epsilon Phi.
The race should go down to the
wire as softball starts Monday in
fraternity leagues. A good finish
by the Lionmen in softball would
give them the crown, but theTEPs
arent out of it. If they can win
two more games than the SAEs,
the Orange League title will be
theirs.
r~- .
As one intramurals veteran said,
this is the closest race for the
Presidents Cup in years.

University I
8 7
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8 Shop 6
Dial Either Number And Then Just Relax
There 7 s Some Mighty Fine Eating On Its Way

r You r
I You need TED WILLIAMS on the city commission for a better I
I city government. He has the essential political associations 1
1 and qualifications for winning election to office. He is an em- I
I ployee of the Southern Bell Telephone Company, married with I
I three children, an active member of the Lutheran Church, and 1
I a resident of Gainesville for 28 years. He needs YOUR support I
1 on Tuesday, March 15th. 1
I VOTE FOR TED WILLIAMS I
I City Commissioner, Group 1 I
I (Paid Political Advertisement) 1

make the free throw, but the SAEs were too much
for the Sigma Chis as they edged by 25-24 for the
victory.



EngineersFair: A Look Backward

I By AGNES FOWLES
I Alligator Staff Writer
I On April 20, 1934, the first Engineers
1 Fair was held on Campus. A senior in
1 engineering at the time, Charles W. Triest,
I originated the idea.
I Projects at that first Fair werent as
1 complex as those scheduled for this year.
I Exhibits included: an ultra-short wave
two-way communication radio, a machine
that stretches metal as easily as a person
stretches chewing gum, electronically
trained ducks and X-ray apparatus.
Florida Gov. Fred Cone opened the fifth
annual Engineers Fair. At that time the

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HARBOR MODEL
The civil engineers are building a model of the ideal harbor
in Florida. The only thing missing from this ideal harbor is
a little sand and the Edon Roc Hotel. (Exhibit 1)
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MONITORING THE NUCLEAR REACTOR
Jim Hollis, in the control room of the nuclear reactor, is monitoring reactor operations. This panel
regulates the power output of the reactor. (Exhibit 27A)

Fair was held across campus from Benton
Hall, which then housed the College of
Engineering, to Murphree Area.
Cone pulled the switch that lighted this
entire area to officially begin the Fair
activities.
Approximately 6,000 people attended the
Fair in 1936, scheduled for a one-night
stand.
Last years Fair was attended by almost
35,000 persons. Approximately 50,000 are
expected to view the Fair this year,
according to Fair Chairman Chuck Dan Daniher,
iher, Daniher, SEG.

Forty high schools throughout the state
are sending representatives to the Fair, he
said.
Although the Fair has grown in its
size and scope, its purposes have re remained
mained remained the same throughout the years.
The Fair is presented to explain some
facet of engineering to high school students
and to the general public Daniher said.
It is part of the engineering students
professional development, he said.
Explaining ideas to non-professionals
is exactly what will be done when ideas
are sold as an engineer, he added.

Friday, March 11, 1966, The Florida Alligator, ]

On Display
At The Fair
A mechanical celery harvester that will save approximately
35 man hours per acre will be on display in the Florida Agri Agricultural
cultural Agricultural Engineering Building during the Engineering Fair this
weekend.
Another research project to be featured concerns the mech mechanical
anical mechanical processing of the pulp left from oranges after the juice
has been removed. The pulp is now bagged by hand and may
undergo chemical changes causing it to burst into flames while
in storage.
Muck soils, black soils found in the lake regions of Florida,
require special harvesting equipment which will be shown as
part of a third research project in the Fair.
The specifications for the celery harvester were the subject
of a report presented to the 1965 meeting of the American Society
of Agricultural Engineers last December by James F. Beemen,
assistant professor and assistant agricultural engineer; and
Lawrence H. Halsey, assistant horticulturist in the Department
of Vegetable Crops with William W. Deen, Jr., assistant in agri agricultural
cultural agricultural engineering at the Everglades Experiment Station in
Belle Glade.
Almost 500 acres of celery grown in Florida in 1964-65 were
not harvested mainly due to the shortage of harvest labor,
according to James F. Beeman. The machine, still in the exper experimental
imental experimental stage, will help alleviate the problem by harvesting 134
plants per minute.
The Agricultural Engineering School has 15 students and seven
professors.
According to D. T. Kinard, chairman of the Department of
Agricultural Engineering, students aren't attracted to this phase
of engineering because they dont know what it is and have no idea
of its importance.
*One farmer in the United States can feed himself and 30
other people because of the advanced technology he employs,
said Kinartf. ' '
This school has more job offers for graduates than can be filled,
according to Kinard. Salary offers usually begin at $7,200.
Technical training in both engineering and biological sciences
is required for the students who will later tackle the problems of
drainage, irrigation, and imoroved harvesting machinery.

The Fair also serves to acquaint indus industries
tries industries employing engineering graduates
with the caliber of the students and train training
ing training received at UF, Daniher said.
Exhibits are designed and built by engin engineering
eering engineering students and are presented by
industrial exhibitors. Work on the Fair
began in January. The 21st annual Fair
opens today.
The area will be open today 4 p.m. to
10 p.m. Saturday exhibits may be seen
2 p.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday 2 p.m. to
8 p.m.

Page 3-A



Page 4-A

i 9 The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 11, 1966

FAIR EXHIBITS IN PICTURES

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CHECKING THE ACCELERATOR
Ira TThierer gives a last minute check to the Van de Graaf
Accelerator. If there is anyone who doesnt own a Van de
Graaf Accelerator it is a high-energy particle accelerator used
to study atomic structure. This little gadget accelerates
electrons and bombards the target with them. The smashing
of the atom emits radiation which is an energy equivalent to
several million electron volts.

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' TEACHING iHERMAL DYANMICS
Dr. John Gaiter is teaching thermal dynamics of fluid flow,
using the Genesys studio.
The TV camera picks the desk of Dr. Gaiter as he writes
notes. Students can press a button in Cocoa or Orlando and
talk to Dr. Gaiter if they have a question or comment.

<
-t
More Than 100,000
Expected For Fair
By TONY DE LOS SANTOS
Alligator Staff Writer

Radiograms sent anywhere in the United States
free of charge, musical arrangements produced by a
computer and the concept of microwave power trans transmission
mission transmission will be on display this weekend in exhibits
produced by students during the 21st annual Engi Engineers
neers Engineers Fair, said Chuck Daniher, SEG, Fair chair chairman.
man. chairman.
An expected 100,000 people will view the all-student
sponsored event held this year in the Engineering
Industries Building and the UFs Computing Center.
It will get underway Friday at 4 p.m. when UF Pres President
ident President J. Wayne Reitz cut the ribbon that officially
opens the Fair.
The Gator Amateur Radio Club will display an
operating amateur radio station. These students
will send the free radiograms for visitors to the
Fair anywhere in the continental United States.
Open House at the UF Computing Center will
provide guided tours for the general public. The
IBM 709 Computer will be your host and take on
of-

Photos By
Nick Arroyo

i i iinP
*. . : ...-, V ' > ,>--
IN THE WIND TUNNEL
B. J. Payne and Tony Clemente are checking calculations
in the subsonic wind tunnel. This is the fan section of the
unit that generates the flow through the test section.
Using this device, engineers evaluate air flows over a wing.
This tunnel brings the air to the wing instead of trying the
wing in the sir. (Exhibit 26A)

all challengers in computerized games of checkers
and tic-tac-toe. Among the mental skills of the
machines presented will be a computer program that
will produce complete musical arrangements played
on the Centers high speed printer, said Daniher.
The American Nuclear Society, will offer a tour
of the UFs reactor and demonstrate the techniques
used in operating mechanical hands that touch radio radioactive
active radioactive materials.
Microwave power transmissions, a concept that is
being developed for future generations, entails such
things as electric motors driven directly and without
the use of wires. Electricity without wires, a service
for the future, will be displayed by the Institute of
Electrical and Electronic Engineers, he said.
Opening ceremonies will be held at 4 p.m. in the
Engineering Industries Building. Exhibits will be
displayed Friday until 10 p.m., Saturday from 2 p.m.
to 10 p.m. and Sunday from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m.