Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida Alligatfr

Vol. 58, No. 104

- .. >r 4.
: ^'. J;V> JSSi n
~ ** OPEN DITCH IN FLAVETS

Director of Housing Harold Riker and Chairman
of Flavet 111 Problems Committee Walter (Bud)
Robison observe an open ditch in the Flavet Area.
Dean of Student Affairs Lester Hale and Student

Tigert Now 'Aware
Os Flavet Problems
By YVETTE CARDOZO
Alligator Staff Writer
UF administrators took a short walk yesterday through Flavet 111.
They walked through an oversized back lawn where three main maintenance
tenance maintenance men care for 428 apartments.
They walked by un unblocked ditch where Flavet children can find
an open pipe to crawl into.
They viewed the heavy fire extinguishers Flavet wives are supposed
to lug into apartments in case of a fire.

Mayor High
Here Today
By KAY COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Miami Mayor Robert King High
will carry his gubernatorial cam campaign
paign campaign to the UF campus today.
High will address the student
body at 3 p.m. in the Florida Union
Auditorium.
Leon Polhill. Highs campaign
manager, said that mayor 'Kill
HIGH day of campaign campaigning
ing campaigning in the Gainesville area.
The Miami redhead will arrive
at Gainesville Municipal Airport at
10:30 a.m.
From there he will motorcade
to his headquarters at 12 NVV 13th
Street, for a ribbon-cutting cere ceremony
mony ceremony to mark the official opening
of his county headquarters.
Polhill emphasized that students
will have a division in the head headquarters.
quarters. headquarters.
Following the ceremony High'
will go to the University Inn to
speak at a luncheon in his honor.
Polhill said the students are in invited
vited invited to attend the luncheon. Tick Tickets
ets Tickets are $2.
From the University Inn. High
will come to campus to deliver
hi-> speech.
At 4*30 he will have an exclusive
interview with the Editor Ed John Johnson.
son. Johnson. of The Gainesville Sun.

And they saw many other Flavet
problems which have been, until
now, unknown to Tigert.
Bud Robison, head of the Flavet
111 Problems Committee, explained
the Flavet maintenance problem to
Dean of Student Affairs Lester
Hale and Director of Housing Har Harold
old Harold C. Riker.
Two carpenters and a yard man
are expected to keep up the Flavet
111 grounds, he said.
They do a good job. said
Robison, but they just cant keep
up with it all.
The newer married student vil villages
lages villages are cared for by Plants and
Grounds. Flavet 111 does not have
tins care, explained Riker. because
the residents do not pay as much
rent.
Rent m Flavet 111 runs about
S3O-$35. Residents of the newer
villages pay so and up.
Robison said he was aware of
the fact that Flavet residents are
supposed to take care of most ot
their own maintenance.
But its hard to keep up the
spirit, he said, when you really
cant get the place to shine.
Robison and the Flavet com commissioners
missioners commissioners are, therefore, re requesting
questing requesting aid to help the place
shine more easily.
As far as appearance goes, the
Flavet people would like to see
something done about the Spanish
moss which hangs over trees,
clothes lines and spreads across
the ground.
They would like to have the
trees thinned out in order to make
mowing the lawn easier.
And, of course, they would like
to have a few more maintenance
(See TIGERT, Page 3)

University of Florida

Body President Buddy Jacobs accompanied the
pair on a walk through the Flavets arranged by
Jacobs so that all could see the problems there.

Henry Kissinger
Speaks Thursday
Noted political scientist Dr.
Henry A. Kissinger will speak in
University Auditorium Thursday
night at 8:1 D as part of Florida
Union Forums Committee presen presentations.
tations. presentations.
Kissingers analyses of inter international
national international affairs have appeared in
#*| | such magazines
1 4 as The Report-
per. Foreign As-
JRJU. He has
Hirer
11 including hl s
doctorate, from
KISSINGER Harvard.
The famous analyst is the author
of Nuclear Weapons and Foreign
Policy. A World
Politics of Conservatism in a Re Revolutionary
volutionary Revolutionary Age and The Troub Troubled
led Troubled Partnership: A Reappraisal of
the Atlantic Alliance.

Gen. Van Fleet To Speak Here

General James A. Van F leet, distinguished
leader in two World Wars and peace-keeping
missions around the world, will speak at the
UF' March 14 on the subject of Asia.
He will deliver the Benton Memorial Lecture
established by the family of the late J. R. Benton,
first dean of engineering at the University, to
bring outstanding speakers to the campus. The
lecture fund was endowed to commemorate
Robert Tyree Benton, a son of the late dean
and a high honors graduate of the UF in civil
engineering, who was killed while serving with
the U. S. Air Force in Germany during World
War 11.
The talk is scheduled for 8:15 p.m. in Univer University
sity University Auditorium.
Van Fleet, who headed missions to Greece
and Korea, was once Commandant of the Uni Universitys
versitys Universitys ROTC program and served as head
coach of the 1923 Florida football team which
was undefeated in conference play.
He was given an honorary Doctor of Laws
degree from the University in 1946 at special
Van FTeet Day ceremonies and was cited
for his accomplishments at the UFs Centennial
c lebration in 1953. He also holds Doctor of Laws
degrees from Columbia University, Long Island
University and the Seoul National University of
Korea.

j Wednesday, March 2, 1966

Listening Room
Equipment Stolen
By GENE PICCHI
Alligator Staff Writer
More than SSOO worth of new equipment lias been stolen from
the listening rooms on the librarys fourth floor in the last six
weeks.
Jack S. Funkhouser, assistant director of teaching resources,
said the library had been in the process of switching its music musiclistening
listening musiclistening equipment from monoural to stereo. Over SI,OOO has
been spent since the beginning of the trimester in switching to
the expensive Garrard equipment.
The plan was, Funkhouser said, to change to stereo equip equipment
ment equipment and records and then eventually change completely to tapes.
Plans have been changed because of the recent thefts. Now the
library is completely switching back to the cheap, one piece
monaural equipment.
Although the names of the people who use the reading rooms
are taken, Funkhouser said there is no way of stopping the
thieves unless you grab everyone bodily and frisk them and Im
not about to do that.
The reason why people take the equipment is because Garrard
stereo components are interchangeable with other brands and they
are small enough to put in your pocket.
The only thing that hasnt been taken are the amplifiers them themselves,
selves, themselves, Funkhouser said.
(See LISTENING, Page 3)

History Profs Speak
Only For Themselves
Three history professors who have announced theyre leaving
the UF this year told The Alligator Tuesday that no one in the
department was authorized to speak for them.
The three are Drs. Rembert Patrick, David Dowd and Frank
Haber. The fourth history prof who has indicated he plans to
resign is Dr. C. K. Yearley.
All three professors said they wanted it made clear that the
history spokesman quoted in previous Alligator stories was
not speaking for them.
Drs. Patrick, Dowd and Haber also indicated the reasons they
are leaving -- mainly because of higher salaries elsewhere and
the political interference currently existing in Florida universities.
They also said the blame for university troubles should be placed
not on the UF Administration but on the state government.
Patrick specifically complained about the budgetary setup,
whereby the state cabinet -- sitting as the Budget Commission
has the power to slash salaries and make other changes after
decisions have already been made on the university level.
Dr. John K. Mahon, head of the history department, also came
in for praise from Patrick.
Hes doing an excellent job. Patrick said. Hes trying his
best to get replacements, hes working carefully, and he considers
other peoples j>oint of view.

' J '.
He is a graduate oftheU.S. Military Academy
at West Point and saw action in World War 1 as
a commander of a machine gun battalion, being
wounded a week before the Armistice. In 1944
his Eighth Infantry regiment spearheaded the
4th Division m the assult landing at Utah Beach
in the Normandy invasion.
11l 1948, Van F leet was sent to Greece when
the security of that country was endangered and
under his direction the guerrilla forces were
eliminated. He commanded the U. S. Eighth
Army on the Korean battlefront and was pro promoted
moted promoted to the rank of four star general in 1951.
He retired with rank ,of full general in 1953.
General Van F leet undertook a survey of the
U. S. military assistance programs in the Far
East in 1954, traveling in a civilian status with
the rank of Ambassador, as special representa representative
tive representative of President Eisenhower.
His battle awards include three Distinguished
Service Crosses, four Distinguished Service
Medals, three Silver Stars,- four Bronze Stars,
two Air Medals, three Purple Hearts, the Dis Distinguished
tinguished Distinguished Unit Citation and the Combat In Infantrymans
fantrymans Infantrymans Badge. He has been decorated by
the countries of Greece. Korea, Iran, Ethiopia.
Thailand, The Philippines. Republic of China,
England, France, Belgium. The Netherlands and
Colombia.



Page 2

- lciridt Alligraaor Wednesdax L. lf6f

Internationa]
*- c Kl-i-i- . Hundreds of V. 5. Marines swept mianc Iron
iie sea or. &X C am munis: troops with n: place t: hide kHiec L f
ol ttierr ir Wood? fighpng only 4: miles south of the demilitarize::
zone dividing Tie: >in ar Americai military spokes it; at saic today.
Tht G OTnirumsts were trappec Perweer the Marines anc t Mocking
force o. Soutr y jetnamese troops ms: south- of trie ancient impena.
capita, o: Hue 4 A miles northeast of Saigor.. The r: ve rr.ine n: soldiers
it the pas: rw: days reported killing 145 Viet Cong it their phase of
the ope ration.
HILSO.V VICTORY SEEK . Political com comwit'Tu-dtovs
wit'Tu-dtovs comwit'Tu-dtovs or-, aic tea Tue saay an eas r > victors
for Prime Minister Harold H ilscm and the
Labor Party m the 31 general election, Bri Britain's
tain's Britain's 33 million voters looked fora no-holds
barrt a eam paign. Jhe c ountry neeas a got
ern.men: with unchallengeable authority redo
uhat nee as to be done. Wilson declared Mon Monday
day Monday nigh: on television after calling the elec election.
tion. election.
VISITS HCSSIa . reposed Chanaiat President Kwame Nkrumah
arrives it Moscow h\ air ear]} Tuesday Iron Peking where he re reiKirtedly
iKirtedly reiKirtedly vowed tie wouic returt t: his Aim car country t; crust, the
rehe.bor that topplec hi it iron office. Nkrumah was me: by Soviet
Foreign. Minister Andre: Gromyko wrier his plane landeo a: 12:1 f
a.m. 4:1: jam. EST. I: was helievec thai Nkrumah would asl the
S:-net grovernmen: Jot helg;.
i
National
MCPI LEATHERNECKS . Map Gen. Lewis *. Walt to; Marine
it W let Nan. said tie has told President a ohnsor .tie needs more leather-
for Pie ior tie has t; a: there. It a Pentagon news conference
said he neeaec more forces out trie re tc secure areas that
have beet cleared of Communis: Vie: Cong. Walt ius: nominated rx
Johnson for promotion tc lieutenant genera, was asket what the
'bottleneck was or. boosting his present J: roe of about 41 00C Mar.nes.
CONFESSES ML POLE . Taf mange Have: 14 one of Puree met
v.p the assassinatiot of Ma.jc.on X. reverse: tus testimony
at his first aegree murder trial Monday and confessed tie was pair
r black naponalist leader. Ir a dramatic surprise move .i
the seven-weefc-olc trial Haver aisc knowi as Thomas Hagrer. toic
the nine met anc thre* women mrors "1 ius: want Pie truP. tc r>e
knowt Piat 1 toot part it what happened.
CFLASH QUERY . Astronaut Alan Shepard
Jr. today headed an investigation into the crash
of a jet trainer which cla.im.ed the lues of two
fellou astronauts scheduled to try America's
longest 'walk in space this spring. Elliot M.
See Jr. and Chaii.es A Bassett 11. both crash
test pilots, were killed instantly Monday when
their T3B yet trainer crashed in rain a.nd fog
while attempting an instrument landing.
Florida
MISSING . The Coast Guarc plannee Tuesday tc
examine Pie wreckage of a iigrnt plane or. Port lngrlis Islanc north of
Tamjia wtucf. officials said my be the plane piloted by former Roar
Boarc member Mai. Brewer missing since Sunday. The wreckagre
spotter 0} a jirtvate jniot lap Monday afternoon could not be examit examiter
er examiter because the re mop area would have beer dare by the time search
aircraft readier the scene a Coast Guarr spokesman sain.
EEETE Ast . Testimony ir the Mossier murder tria_ cone]uder
Monday wop a stap wntness providing at. apparent time alih for a mar.
Pp defense salt migrht have kiiiec millionaire Jacoues Mossier. Fina.
arguments by the prosecution anc attorney* for the defendants. Mefvir
e'owe rs anc his blonde aun: Candy Mossier the victim s wndow
are tc Pegni Tuesday The case is electee tc gc tc the all-male yum
sometime Wednesday.
I j r -t-
Tfc StalUk AiUjatn veae-vet Uk Ttrti u repuian B ljymr~ >tii 11 tow o al iOw-ti.Tnpnt.- an
* c tmn co r wfcia 1 runs Men nmr.-'tioaaOlt
Mt Jh liOf X ClMh*HTt42 tatwr* estrat postuoi wll. k pin ampr poutw
to ux. Allimto: wll on coasias aaiustnvTii o! oavmaa to- aw aftv> -Uapmair mvolTtw tvnr tvnre-rammat
e-rammat tvnre-rammat tnaaruo; nww aottts a pw tt t aaaarUsiw -ry wlttui
*IW alUpato- wll on rrsooc-.tbk to mor.- tnat ow tacorrar inaertaDi o at
rrkHglir *i rm amra IliW:. koticei to rorrartw mus Wpm tottm w>x mwnim.
TK r UJBIl Aaunwroe u tw Ofliru sown waspapr a: ifc Uaiwralx o Fan no. .Br b
P llli "* 1 ,m u^? aup ournr ia\ .luw. aw Jut' warn t ts pabll&WK iM mWMWK Iwj
adlHiraal. wan aatta- at War Uaaaac State: Kwt Of,'u at laaamilh

LAUNCHED IN NOV

Reds Land Ship On Venus

MOS CO* UFI - The ?. us s: its
hsve landed an sirtorr.ktic spsot
Ship or. Pie plaihrt Vet ts toe
Soviet T ass news age no? annex,
Tuesday. ;
The stap or. was Veras 1 which
the ?: us s rar.s C x : .tie d last N: >. li.
T*tlr S; Vl&t Ilr TilS rAr DC T iSS
Simid **Tt r. VJi&C at A 2 -Tiz LA La
'*'enus it r :ot s.. Mos-.w tire
1 Li a.n.. EST Tue'Siii khr
.1
dt.nerec t: :ts strf it- ;>er ;>ernant
nant ;>ernant w:P the 'etc it :f arcs tithe
urjoi : T_ssaif trie kjtrtrati: stk stkt.-or
t.-or stkt.-or V-enus c" par taken- three
arc one half norths :: tr.kfe the
.louria;' ir e_rtr t; Pie plx.-t.
> ecus is the ;iatiet w:.:t tr.es
cj; set t: the carp... Whet, the cr crhitai
hitai crhitai pi.sitiniis c: n : .De is wttr wttrxr
xr wttrxr Lr tt rrC-es ,f Iktx. rx
thr S: net space step wrCtt.-ve
c: 'ere: k rr u: greeter iistahce
t: re a ct. ttie : t.
Tliere was nothing the Tass
e nn:un ce me: tit t: in z; r.k: e that V e th thus
us thus hod done kj'Piiiir rtiire tear
Judges Study
Reapportion
TALLAHASSEE TPI Flori Florida's
da's Florida's 1 Ht-i Leos.lature 1:11 Pie cas casdi
di casdi dates see king :ts off ices rested
todax as Arty. Ger.. Earl Faircl:P.
put it ir the boson of the feder federal
al federal court."
t a.rcioP e.xj*e:-ter tc ask the
special three fudge panel ir Mi Mian.;
an.; Mian.; tc >e: Pie est LerisLixe
have Pie last bite of Pie apjle"
T fT*! 4 U m. d
*- w - x la
react agrreement or a legislative
me mbe rehij f c r n 1 1 a that will
make every voters ballot carry
eruL weight.
.he au: rnex general said he
aisc wil; ast Pie court t: set
guidepnes or acceptable apper apperponment
ponment apperponment of Pie state Serate arid
House seats.

University Sandwich Shop
- F a stest
li
in town
Try any of these
7 sandwich specialities
(V LB 4 V CUBA S' BREAD RFF
I RAM £ AMERICAS ZO ft?
J ) RAM £ SWISS 70 6O
if CHICKFS SALAD 65 %
%J / bologsa 50
T( .60 S O
H ROAST BEFF .00
LETTUCE £ TOMATO
Phone
8-1486 or 8-1487
OX MOKDAY S THROI\OI JV/n !/' KOM 4 rw to 1:30 A.M.

crash on to the surface of, Venus.
7 is v s the tech mo; ue used with
iaf. f;rst Bussian arid American
rockets which L;t one moon.
I: was the first time an;, vehicle
fr err u.e Earti. was reported to
;.,-,e hit an;- body in space other
thar. the moon.
On Feb. 3 the Prussians earned
their moon probes tig step fur further
ther further making a sost 1 landing
with Luna L The space station
t-evised pictures of hue moon's
surface back to earth.

GOP Assails Draft;
Inefficiency Cited

W ashington upi --a group.
; f He use Republic ans. : .ting vha t
in-;. termed -''mour.ting evidence
of gross .riefPciencv today call called
ed called for a congressional investiga investigation
tion investigation of P.e Selective Service Sys Syst
t Syst r rr..
The to provide mar.-
power tc fight the war in Viet
N arr. should be equipabie and effi efficient.
cient. efficient. We are concerned that it
is he;Pier Pie So GOP represen representapves
tapves representapves san in a statement issued
in advance of a riews conference..
Thr Reply'll cans cited several
pior.is P.e;. said warranted an m mvespgaticwu
vespgaticwu mvespgaticwu Among them:
The adnt.inistration of Pie
draft is inefficient. The papers
of thousands of men are bottled
ug in Pie bureaucratic pipeline. r
Nearly 445.G00 physically and
mentally qualified men will be
available P.rc-ugh June 30. r **hy
Pier they ask as it necessary
p previously disgua disgua.ified
.ified disgua.ified men a step draft director
-P Gen. Lewis 5. Hersbey re recently
cently recently announced.
-here dc>es net to be
a clear order of priority ir. which
the administration is considering

"lass auded: The precr-- ren
dezvoos oi the probe
plane*, was achieved as
ol a mid-course corre - > .v
ui Jig
flight trajectory -on Dec. .-
* j
Throughout trie flic:.:
radio conn unicatio; -
,
tamed vuth the probe : / r
TTiatXOl- V*l $ X 2 V£*C. L-_ r
approach of the proce
planet the comrouEicau:: z~ r a
at the final stage i :
place.

calling the various rutpiver
g roups lor serv : ce.
Tests designer tc .:;-i
draft boards ir dead:tig v-.e-.ner
a college student should rs.-.ve
a deferment are -- the ;d~. :on
ol Hershev -- easier 1c: .. : -.ce
students that those taking literal
arts courses.
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co.
7CT6X CopifcS
1-1 & Copies ib>- ea. 20 £
Over.
Copies Made While You Wait
Sendee Available Frorr
6 a.ir.. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
mo w. otverstty aye.



Tigert Now 'Aware 1
Os Flavet Problems

(From Page 1)
men. Presently, it takes the three threeman
man threeman crew two to three months to
make a complete round of the Fla Flavet
vet Flavet grounds, say Flavet commis commissioners.
sioners. commissioners.
One of the top items on their
request list is small hand-sized
fire extinguishers.
At present, fire-fighting equip equipment
ment equipment consists of a number of heavy
CO2 extinguishers, hanging in the
hallways of each Flavet unit.
How are the wives supposed
to lug equipment that a man would
have trouble with? asked the
Flavet commissioners.
So, the Commissioners are re requesting
questing requesting hand-sized extinguishers
to be placed in each kitchen. These
could be resold when the Flavets
are eventually torn down, they ex explained.
plained. explained.
Another item on the list is
fencing the ditch between the Fla Flavets

Listening Room
(From Page 1)
When asked whether the program would be continued if an
effective means of stopping the thefts could be found, he replied,
No, were just not going to do it.
F unkhouser said you hear a lot abojit the administration not
being concerned about the students, but the fact is very often
that the students dont deserve any better service or treatment
than they get.
We had a program through which we would lend equipment
to fraternities, but it was so badly handled that we had to dis discontinue
continue discontinue that also.
The music listening rooms will soon be moved downstairs to
the present Florida History room, where the equipment will
be set up similar to the language labs in the basement of Ander Anderson
son Anderson Hall. There a student will be able to listen to music through
earphones while sitting at a study desk.
Funkhouser said that it was utterly impossible to do anything
good for the students. The students who do these things ruin it
for the rest; they really dont care about anyone else.
^ r I w
T&W, LUco/V k <
01 |C EN TAIs V
Hutoram,
INTERVIEW^or:
This Program is designed to develop young men
for careers in life insurance sales and sales man management.
agement. management. It provides an initial training period of 3
months (including 2 weeks at a Home Office School)
before the men move into full sales work.
Those trainees who are interested in and who are
found qualified for management responsibility are
assured of ample opportunity to move on to such
work in either our field offices or in the Home Office
after an initial period in sales.
The Connecticut Mutual is a 119-year-old com company
pany company with 580,000 policyholder members and over
six billion dollars of life insurance in force. Ag Aggressive
gressive Aggressive expansion plans provide unusual oppor opportunities
tunities opportunities for the men accepted.
Arrange with the placement office for an inter interview
view interview with:
LOWELL D. EMBS, C.L.U.
March 7, 1966
Connecticut Mutual Life
INSURANCE COMPANY HARTFORD
r
re*

vets- Flavets and Hume Hall area to keep
the children out.
Children now can wander down
and play in the dirty water at the
bottom of this gully. In addition,
a large drainage pipe offers a
dangerous hide-away for the child children.
ren. children.
Weve caught a couple of kids
in the pipe, explained Robison.
So far nothing has happened and
wed like to keep it that way.
Also on the list of requests is
fencing to keep children from
crawling beneath the houses. Fla Flavet
vet Flavet homes rest on pilings anywhere
from a few inches to a few feet
above ground level. Some of these
are fenced off. But where there is
no fence or cement, children can
crawl beneath the buildings.
The Flavet commissioners say
they had written letters explaining
their problems, but that nothing
much had been done.

OUPf sP§ll!!!it
i; sk Me
? CONTESTANT
Wistful Sandy McGinnis, 2UC
majoring in Elementary Education,
is a candidate in the Engineering
Fair Queen contest.
Miss McGinnis, an AOP sorority
sister, is sponsored by the Insti Institute
tute Institute of Electrical and Electronics
Engineers.
Players Slate
Production Meet
Selection of a cast is pending,
but Florida Players Take Her,
Shes Mine still needs a good
turnout at tonights production
meeting in Norman Hall.
Auditions concluded last night
and the performers names will
be announced soon. Tonights eight
oclock gathering in Norman Au Auditorium
ditorium Auditorium is for those energetic
individuals who never squint be before
fore before the footlights, but who must
perform the all-important jobs of
construction, costumes, publicity,
lights, properties and house.
Its an open shop and all in interested
terested interested persons are invited.
The two-act comedy by Phoebe
and Henry Ephron, a long-running
recent hit on Broadway, will open
here March 31 and run April 1,
2,7, 8, and 9. Graduate students
in Speech 604 are, with faculty
assistance, directing and super supervising
vising supervising the entire production.
* *
Julian Casal, social chairman
for the IFC, announced that the
IFC is making an extra 300 tickets
available for the Johnny Rivers
frolics show. Tickets will be on
sale at the Public Functions of office
fice office in the Florida Union at noon
today.
* *
Circuit Judge Tyree Boyer will
speak tonight at 7:30 p.m. in Room
121, Law School, on Weighing
the Evidence in a Non-Jury Trial.
Boyer is a graduate of the UF
Law School and was elected to the
Circuit judgeship after serving two
years as county judge in Jackson Jacksonville.
ville. Jacksonville.

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Wednesday, March 2, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Parsons Heads
Burns Campaign
By MIKE MALAGHAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Stew Parsons, past president of Florida Blue Key, is the campus
mahager for Students for Burns.
Parsons, who originally was to head up the Broward Williams
campaign for the State Treasurers post and had been rumored as
being in the Scott Kelly camp, accepted his present position the last
weekend in January.
Joe Chapman, fraternity brother of Parsons and an aide to Gov.
Haydon Burns, asked Parsons to take the post.
It was Chapman, one of my closest friends, who persuaded me to
take on the job as campus manager for the governor, said Parsons.
Parsons continued to add. Now that Im working for Burns, I only
wish I had started earlier. He is quite an individual.
Parsons pointed out that his group of one, a month ago, has swelled
to a real organization now. Charlie Mitchell, president of the John
Marshall Bar Association; John Hume, John Ritch and Bob Kent are
part of the organizational staff which is mobilizing the campus for
Burns.
Other Burns Blitzers on campus are George Blaha, Charlie Ed Edwards,
wards, Edwards, John Forbes, Joe Coudon and Arnie Zimmerman.
The treasurer of the campus Burns organization is Bill Burns, who
also is the son of the governor.
Parsons explained that the Schooner Room is headquarters for the
Burns organization until it gets a full-time headquarters building.
Well have our own headquarters if the county organization sets
up downtown. says Parsons. Otherwise, the campus organization
will share space with the county people if they set up shop near the
campus.
Parsons explained that his organization was concerned only with
students on this campus. He was not setting up speakers bureau for
state tours or using his group as barnstormers for the Burns camp.
Parsons explained that his campus organization has the same status
as any county organization. However, he noted, I have two direct
lines to headquarters, one through Joe Chapman and the other through
the governors son.
You might say we dont have any trouble with cutting through red
tape, Parsons added.
Parsons described how Burns had divided the state into three
political market areas.
Burns, according to Parsons, has public relations firms in
Jacksonville, Central Florida, and Miami handling publicity for each
of these three areas.
One of Burns finest qualities and the one that costs him votes
is his candid sincerity.
Parsons discussed the straw vote on campus. Burns polled only
500 votes out of almost 4.500 ballots cast.
That vote reflects the incident in the fall concerning the budget
commission and President Reitz resignation, said Parsons. Burns
received the brunt of the attack that was aimed at the system,
emphasized Parsons.
Charges that Burns is not sincerely interested in the educational
welfare are unfounded. Burns is a victim of a system which he neither
created nor had the time to change, said Parsons.
Parsons pointed out that Burns held a successful three day confer conference
ence conference on education in Tampa. Two thousand state leaders, educators
and outside experts on the educational process were present. The
theme of the affair was the spirit ot 76.
The reason for the theme was that the conference was to discuss
the educational needs that might arise over the next decade.
Parsons stated that Burns will ask the Legislature to change the
law concerning fiscal responsibility of the universities. Burns feels,
according to Parsons, that the university presidents are best equi equiped
ped equiped to know the needs of their educational facilities.
The conversation switched to the defeat of the road bond amend amendment,
ment, amendment, which Burns supported last fall.
There is no doubt about it, said Parsons, the defeat has weaken weakened
ed weakened the Burns image, however it did not permanently hurt the campaign
of the governor.
Parsons then referred back to the campus campaign. He noted that
many of his friends were involved in campus organizations for the
other gubernatorial candidates, High and Kelly.

Study in
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Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 2, 1966

Jit^BOOK
I Sol Sloi
yWed., March 2, 9:00 AJVI.

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20. THE CONQUEST OF PAIN. By
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22. THE BLIGHT ON THE IVY.
By R. E. Gordon, M.D., A Kather Katherine
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13. H. Allen Smith: ASHORTHE ASHORTHETORY
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24. GARDEN SMARTLY. By Nancy
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for beginning and experienced
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and care of vegetables, flowers,
fruit, trees, lawns and shrubs.
Includes advice on paste, diseases,
tools, and gardening practices In
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Pub. at $4.50. Sale .9$
25. Henry Miller -- ART AND
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26. TREE INJURIES: Tbelr Cause
and Prevention. By H. L. Edlln.
Describes 77 different injuries
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27. A MAN MUST CHOOSE. The
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28. BUSINE r .OURNALISM. By
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29. ENGLISH-ITALIAN DICTION DICTIONARY
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Special Import from Italy. Only .99

30. JAPANESE FLOWER AR ARRANGEMENT
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32. THE FAMILY COOKBOOK In
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From hora doeuvres to cake bak baking
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4. HOUBEWIVES GUIDE TO AN ANTIQUES.
TIQUES. ANTIQUES. By Leslie Cross. Every Everything
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16. PORTFOLIO L ART NEWS
ANNUAL #2. Fabulous Issue of
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80. HISTORY OF PAINTING IN
000 COLOR REPRODUCTIONS,
id. by Robert Malllard. One of the
nost beautiful and useful art re reerences
erences reerences ever published, featuring
1 000 of the most significant paint paintings
ings paintings In the history of Western art
-- all reproduced In magnificent
full color. Discusses every period
and every Important painter and
work, from the caves of Lascaux
to todays moderns. Pub. at SIO.OO.
Sale 7.95
61. MICHELANGELO. By Rolf
Schott. A major study of the su supreme
preme supreme genius of the Renaissance,
relating Michelangelos art to his
strangely tortured life. All the
great masterpieces -- the Pletas,
David, Moses, the Slstlne Celling,
many more are brilliantly an analyzed
alyzed analyzed and Illustrated. 128 repro reproductions,
ductions, reproductions, 15 In color. Only 5.95
62. DURER: His Life and Work.
By Marcel Brlon. 149 superb re reproductions,
productions, reproductions, 59 In full color. Both
a biography and perceptive analy analysts
sts analysts of the artistic style and sig significance
nificance significance of the painter, and an
astute commentary on the German
Renaissance" -- Publishers
Weekly. Illustrations are excel excellent,
lent, excellent, book production exemplary"
-- N.Y. Times. Only 5.95
63. DEGAS: His Life and Work.
By Jean Bouret. At long last a
comprehensive modern biography
and critical study of the great
French master, with 132 excellent
reproductions, 65 In full color, of
his finest pastels, paintings and
sculpture. Presents every detail
of Degas remarkable charuc.ter
talent friendships with famous
artists and writers -- and It Is
especially brilliant In Its discus discussion
sion discussion of the "superb draftsman of
movement whose pictures,
whether of ballet dancers or
horses, reveal a perfection of mo modelling
delling modelling and kinesthetic tension un unmatched
matched unmatched In the history of art.
Special Import -- 5.95
64. Simone de Beauvoirs THE
PRIME OF I.IFE. Long-awaited
second volume of one of the great
autobiographies of oui time. Here
are the years from 1929 to 1944
when Mile, de Beauvoir inined
forces with Jean-Paul Sartre and
emerged with him into Internation International
al International literary fame. Rarely has there
been a more exciting, more candid
account of a love and a partnership,
and all of It enriched with intimate
glimpses of GPl*'. Malraux. Camus
and others of IK>oks, plays. films,
of places, politics and life in
I ran*'* during the idealistic 3os
and the war-torn 4os. Pub. at
SO.9a. Sale 2.98
05. POIUI AR MATHEMATICS.
IK Denning MiJ'ler.Theciehtuinth MiJ'ler.Theciehtuinthi.ncilie
i.ncilie MiJ'ler.Theciehtuinthi.ncilie d In .inches 11oui a 1 ilhnietii
to calculus ale expl oil' d for actual
i 'll |t iV 111 1 tit c VVe|| ts jil.t'li* il
unde i t iialin and i|i|ili> dr n. 01 0
pie- i llu-11 I* I. 1 u i 5.00.
.a ,|. '.
66. INDIAN SC LI PITRE. Over
200 large photo-illustrationsbv W.
and H. Forman. Text bv M. M.
Deneck. A beautiful volume oil the
m jsterpleces of Indian. Khmer and
Cham sculpture. Incredibly sen sensual
sual sensual and lyrical yet steeped in the
mystic Influence of the country's
religions. 10 x 13. Pub. at $9.05.
Sale 3.88
67. HOW TO WIN IN THE CHESS
ENDINGS. By I. A. Horowitz. Three
time l'. S. Open Champion explains
the fundamentals of protecting and
planning mate tricks traps and
combinations. 171 diagrams. Pub.
at $4.50. Sale 1.98
68. A TREASURY OF FAVORITE
POEMS. A Personal Selection by
Frances Parkinson Keyes. A uni unique
que unique and heart-warming anthology
for every mood, event and ocra-

SAVINGS

slon with nearly 400 selections
from Shakespeare to Ogden Nash.
Pub. at $5.00. Sale 1.98
69. VESALIUS The Anatomy
Illustrated. Ed. by J. B. Saunders
and Charles B. OMalley. One of
the most remarkable works In the
whole history of medicine, art and
of Vesallus powerfulanddramatlc
woodcuts of the human figure, with
annotations, a discussion of the
plates and a biographical sketch
of the great 1 Cth century physician physicianartist.
artist. physicianartist. A classic, a scholarly
work, and a beautiful edition
N. Y. Times. Pub. at SIO.OO. Sale
8.05
70. HUNGARIAN AMERICAN
COOKBOOK. By Mme. Rbea Green.
From Goulash to Chicken Paprl Paprlkash
kash Paprlkash to nobosh Tort# and Tlroler
Strudel over 1,300 mouth-wat mouth-watering
ering mouth-watering affirmative answers to Jaded
appetites. Orlg. $3.50. Sale 1.98
71. The Constitution TO SE SECURE
CURE SECURE THESE BLESSINGS. By Saul
K. Padover. Masterful compilation
of the great debates (and com compromises)
promises) compromises) at the Constitutional
Convention. Exciting reading on
any level and the beat possible
Insight into the political sagacity
and tough-mlndness of Washing Washington,
ton, Washington, Franklin. Madison. Hamilton
and others who helped create our
basic historical document. 474 pp.,
87 engravings. Pub. at $7.50. Sale
2.98
72. The One and Only! MA CUI CUISINE.
SINE. CUISINE. By Auguste Escoffler.
Trans, by Vyvyan Holland, fwd. by
Andre L. Simon. The Incomparable
guide to French cooking by the
Master himself, perhaps the great greatest
est greatest chef the world has known.
884 pages packed with culinary
magic nearly 3,000 divine
but practical recipes for the
housewife on a budget." each
guaranteed to transform the most
mundane dish Into a work of art!
American measurements and al alternate
ternate alternate Ingredients throughout.
Special 4.95
73. John Humphrey Noyes' HIS HISTORY
TORY HISTORY OF AMERICAN SOCIA SOCIALISMS.
LISMS. SOCIALISMS. A reprint of the scarce
1870 edition of the first systema systematic
tic systematic study of Robert Owens Now
Harmony. Channlng's Brook
Farm." The Shaker, the various
Phalanxes and Noyes own fab fabulous
ulous fabulous Oneida Community. 678
pages. Pub. at $12.50. Sale 3.98
74. THE ILLUSTRATED BOOK OK
GARDEN PESTS AND DISEASES.
Ed. by T. H. Everett. Over 250
photographs and drawings 60 In
full color. Lists and depicts hun hundreds
dreds hundreds of plants and the enemies
common to each, the latest In Insecticides,
secticides, Insecticides, cures for plant
diseases, etc. Pub. at $5.00. Sale
1.98
75. SCIENCE AND LITERATURE
IN THE MIDDLE AGES AJvD THE
RENAISSANCE. By Paul Lacroix.
The entire range of Intellectual
activity from Charlemagne tq tCo tColumbus.
lumbus. tColumbus. In a massive survey of
universities philosophy, alchemy
natural sciences popular beliefs,
poetry, theatre, and other topics.
554 pp. 400 striking wood en engravings.
gravings. engravings. Puh. at SIO.OO. Sale 4.98
76. RAPHAEL. By Oscar Ftsehel.
Monumental study of the Renais Renaissance
sance Renaissance genius, lavishly illustrated
with over 300 lie.iutifully repro reproduced
duced reproduced drawings and paintings from
the worlds leading collections.
Special Import 0.95
75. I RAM I- IN IMF EIGHTEEN EIGHTEENTH
TH EIGHTEENTH < I NTI RY. B\ Paul Lacroix.
A '..ist coiiipilatinii of material --
will i |||*>| e 111. *ll 300 unusual wn*nl wn*nlcut
cut wn*nlcut Illustration- -- on tin lives
ol tin NiilnHlv iln t'leri'V; tlielr
Customs In..a Amusements
Dres. eii luring Hie (.Refill
century ol spendor and squalor.
1700-1789. IK pp. Pull, at $1(1.00.
Sale 1. 'H
78. Til) BERNARD BE HENSON
TREASURY. Ed. h\ H.iiin.i Kiel.
Intro. bv John Walker. Superb
selection |r>>Mi Hie lawk- and hi hitherto
therto hitherto unpublished writings let letters
ters letters anil diaries of the most
c Moated humanist and art his historian
torian historian id our times. H H.s lies!,
from IHB7 to lnr.H. on esthetics,
on personalities and achievements
in arl. Ille. and liter.iture from
the Renaissance to the present.
Pub. al 86.95. Sale 2.98
79. MONT BLANC . THE SEVEN
VAI LEYS. By Roger Frtson-
Hoche A Pierre Talrraz. Excep Exceptlonnllv
tlonnllv Exceptlonnllv lieauttful volume illusti.i illusti.i-ted
ted illusti.i-ted with 170 magnificent gravure
photographs of one of the world's
outstanding natural wonders. The
excellent text Is a combination
clltnliers-skier's-tourists guide
to Hie region's history, people and
legends. Puh. at *1 0.00. Sale 2.98
80. GILBERT STUART -- A Bio Biography.
graphy. Biography. By Clias. Merrill Mount.
Definitive work on Hie dashing,
enigmatic figure who Is generally
regalded as Americas foremost
portrait painter. Includes a com complete
plete complete catalog of Stuarts works,
many of them newly discovered.
Including his famous paintings of
George Washington. A full study
ol the man. Ills jrt. and the aris aristocratic
tocratic aristocratic Georgian world which his
canvases captured -- Christian

Science Monitor. Pub. at SIO.OO.
Sale 4.98
81. THE MARCH OK MEDICINE.
By H. S. Glassrhelh. M.l). Drama Dramatic
tic Dramatic account of the conquest of di diseases
seases diseases that have ravaged the human
race and of the doctors, both
the geniuses and "charlutons.
who contributed to the miracles of
modern diagnoses and treatment.
Illus. Pub. at $6.95. Sale 3.98
82. MILITARY AND RELIGIOUS
LIFE IN THE MIDDLE AGES AND
THE RENAISSANCE. By Paul La Lacroix.
croix. Lacroix. Vivid recreation of the two
most important professions of feu feudal
dal feudal times. Every aspect from foot
soldiers to tbe Inquisition -- with
chapters on chivalry, the great
heresies, religious leaders, mili military
tary military orders, war. etc. 400 unusual
woodcuts. Pub. at slo.oo.Sale 4.98
83. THE AMERICAN YEAR. Ed.by
Henry Hill Collins, Jr. Magnificent
collection of writings on nature

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across America through the four
seasons, by Audubon. Thoreau.
Burroughs. Muir, Mark Twain.
John Wesley Powell Joseph Wood
Krutch. E. B. White. Rachel Car Carson
son Carson and others. 48 pages of Illus Illustrations
trations Illustrations from Currier A Ives
prints. Pub. at SIO.OO. Sale 3.08
84. THE PRECARIOUS BALANCE:
lour Centuries of the European
Power Struggle. By Ludwig Dehlo.
Brilliantly analyzes tlie course of
history from Charles V |o Hitler
-- the emergence and collapse of
nations due to the Inherent weak weaknesses
nesses weaknesses of continental states vis visa-vis
a-vis visa-vis maritime powers. Puh. at
85.95. Sale 1.98
85. MAN RAY SELF PORTRAIT.
One ol the great living legends of
minlern art recreates his Incre Incredibly
dibly Incredibly colorful and varied life. Here
Is the pioneer Dadlst. surrealist.

OF 50%-70%

expatriate bohemian par excel excellence
lence excellence --free-wheeling In New York
and Paris with Picasso. Duchamp.
Hemingway. Brjncusl. Joyce. Dali.
Pound and others -- and relishing
each lively anecdote and vignette
nt lits fabulous career. 36 repro reproductions
ductions reproductions of Man Rays inimitable
photographs and paintings. Pub. at
$7.95. Sale 3.98
80. THE GREAT TRAVELLERS.
1- d. h\ Milton Kugoff. Incompar Incomparable
able Incomparable two-volume treasury of over
100 first-hand narratives of way wayfarer-.
farer-. wayfarer-. wanderers and explorers
in all parts of the earth from 450
H.<\ 'o the present. Pl/.arro cap captures
tures captures ,ii Inca King Baker explores
the Nile Dickens wanders down
Hpia'lw.iv Scott races to the Pole
Tte : Heyi-r lahl on Easter Island
- thrilling reading! over 125
illustt ,linns photos maps bibll biblliiTipliv.
iiTipliv. biblliiTipliv. 984 pages, handsome
slipi iso. Puli, at 812.50. The 2 vol.
set Sale 7.95

87. I MF HERITAGE OK PERSIA.
It'. If i cha i-1 N. I-rye. Opulent to
il ev. stimulating to the blind--'
i ii,ar ill Incut hl-torv of one ol
lll*' r leaf civilization- of the in in<
< in< n ni wi.rl'l. with 120 ifprodu*
1 11 n id iii.iderpli ic- ol Persian
all Ill'll' |N 'III Iv ni.iklli'.' fopillit fopillitllir.
llir. fopillitllir. Puli. ,il SI Sale 3.98
83. A WORKING I KIFNDSHIP: The
c oriespondence Between Richard
SI i aii-s .nail Hugo von llofiiialinstli.il.
Trail-. liv 11. Hummeliii.iiiii lasers. Exciting ex* haligesbetween
two great artists as the' > H ated
their classic operas. 558 pp. Puli,
at SI U.OO. Sale 3.98
89. Saints a. Sinners -- THE
TRIPLE CROWN. Bv Valerie Pl Plrle.
rle. Plrle. Classic history ol Hie Intiague,
corruption and violence that sur surrounded
rounded surrounded till- P jpal Conclaves lie liet
t liet ween the Ken ilssalice and the late
19th century. Vivid porti alts of the

Borgtas. Leo X, Paul IV Benedict
XIV. others. Illus. Special 1 ni|xrt
-- 2.98
90. The Noliel Savage IK.AN IK.ANJACgUES
JACgUES IK.ANJACgUES ROUSSEAU. Bv Fran* Is
Wlnwar. Ma|or biography ol the
romantic philosopher who was the
'conscience of his era fore forerunner
runner forerunner of the French Revolution,
and father of modern education.
Pub. at SO.OO. Sale 1.77
91. THE DOMESDAY DICTION DICTIONARY.
ARY. DICTIONARY. By 1). M. Kaplan A A. Sch Schwerner.
werner. Schwerner. Fascinating brilliantly 1-
ronlc lexicon. Defines key words
and names -- scientific, political,
psychoanalytical -- with terrifying
accuracy and honesty. Look up
Anomie. Entropy. Fall-Safe Kahn.
Overkill. Pschocliemlcals. Teller.
Van Allen Belt. Zero-Zero aixl
hundreds more -- and see why
this hook received rave reviews.
Pub. at $5.95. Sale 1.77

92. GREAT STORIES FROM THE
> WORLD OF SPORT. Ed. by Peter |
* Schwed A Herbert Warren Wind. I
1,000 page, three-volume sports- c
mans library containing four com- |
plete novels. Including Faulkners i
i The Bear and Joel Sayres Rack Rackety-Rax.
ety-Rax. Rackety-Rax. 32 short story classics, ]
and a dozen long excerpts from |
other famous novels. Every sport 1
you can name Is represented and (
. the writers include Hemingway, t
Wodehouse. Tunis. Runyon. Lard- j
ner. Wylie, Schulberg, many other £
observers of the human compe- 1
tltton. Handsome, boxed gift edi edition.
tion. edition. Pub. at $15.00. Sale 6.95 ]
i
93. THE HEARTOF BEETHOVEN. |
Selden Rodmans superb study of i
the great composers life and art. (
Interwoven with 48 magnificent |
lithographs by James Kearns. Dl- <
- arles, sketchbooks, conversations. <
- letters. LP discography a verl- |

Wednesday, March 2, 1966, The Florida Alligatoi, :

table encyclopedia of Beethoven Beethovenlana.
lana. Beethovenlana. Pub. at $7.50. Sale 2.98
94. SONG OF WILD LAUGHTER.
By Jack Couffer, director and
cameraman for Walt Disney Wild Wildlife
life Wildlife Productions. An unusual book
about the collaboration between an animals
imals animals and man -- and of the au authors
thors authors real friendships with all
sorts of wild creatures ranging
from bear cubs to sea Hons. 38
photos. Pub. at $5.00. Sale 1.77
95. MARSHALL OF FRANCE In
the Age of Louis XV. By J. M.
White. Amazing life, times, and
loves of Maurice de Saxe, com companion
panion companion of both Louis XV and Fre Frederick
derick Frederick the Great. Brilliantly cap captures
tures captures the glitter, decadence and
Immorality of European royalty.
111 us. Pub. at $6.00. Sale 1.77
96. T. E. Lawrence & GBS --
PRIVATE SHAW 4 PUBLIC SHAW.
By Stanley Weintraub. Vivid re recreation
creation recreation of the remarkable friend friendship
ship friendship l>etween the great playwright
and Lawrence of Arabia, shuwlntt
their developing relationship and
mutual influence from 1922t01935.
Pub. at $5.00. Sale 1.98
97. Flv Fishing to Faulkner --
Till. OPEN HEART. H\ Edward
Weeks. The delightful, altogether
captivating random papers of A Amerlea's
merlea's Amerlea's leading raconteur, editor
of the Atlantic Monthly. Whether
describing his adventures with a
fly rod in No a Scotia or his alter alternoons
noons alternoons with lolm Masefield. Mjx
Pei kins and other confidants all
ol Ins recollections are of apiece:
witty warm and completely ab absorbing.
sorbing. absorbing. Pub. at Sale 1.19
98. THOSE IN PERU oN THE.SI A.
By I.dollar I A.Staekpole. The most
exciting maritime adventures and
sea exploits ol Ivvclitv centuries--''
ill amatn ally told in first person
n il I athos hv seafarers Irom Ma-'
to llan |o ( ouste.nl, Jil7 pallium's
dl'-awing-., photographs and map
9 X IJ. Pull, at SIa.IIO. Sale 7.9a
99. PREHISTORIC SEA MONS MONSTERS.
TERS. MONSTERS. By Josef Augusta and
Zdenek Durian. Incredible plctor-
I il journey 190 million years back
to tbe Age of Reptiles. Striking
photographs and paintings. 22 In
full color, reconstruct the lives
of these monsters and their prey
-- the vicious battles, foraging
, for food, mating customs, oilier
I aspects of a strange and fascina fascinating
ting fascinating era. S|H'clal Import -- 5.95
100. SIXTY DAYS THAT SHOOK
THE WEST. The Kail of France:
1940. By Tar, pies Henoist-Mecbln.
Monumental studv of the Wehr Wehrmachts
machts Wehrmachts blitzkrieg across the low
countlres and F rance. 000 pages
of high drama, living history, andi
profiles of the major diplomatic
and military figures. Maps. Pub.
at $7.95. Sale 1.98
101. U S. CAMERA INTERNA INTERNATIONAL
TIONAL INTERNATIONAL ANNUAL Ed. by Tom
Maloney. Includes ten pages of
Kennedy pictures. Important peo people
ple people and events the world over,
plus portfolio sections on the work
of Horvat. lemas. Stelchen. Dun Duncan.
can. Duncan. Over 250 photos, many In
color. 1963 ed. 8-1/2 x 11-1/2.
Pub. at $4.95. Sale 1.77
102. TOLSTOY REMEMBERED.
By his son. Sergei Tolstoy. Inti Intimate
mate Intimate family, chronicle throwing
new light on the great writers
personality, writings, and Ideas.
Pub. at $5.00. Sale 1.77
103. HENRY JAMES AND THE
JACOBITES. By MaxwellGelsmar.
Highly controversial critique of
the entire body of James writings,
describing In detail the elaborate
screens of critical fantasy pro produced
duced produced by the authors cult to en enhance
hance enhance and to glorify the meaning
of his work. Here is a new view
of the Master." with some fresh
and fascinating conclusions about
his baroque temperament, and his
role as the literary symbol and
figurehead of our affluent society.
483 pp. Pub. at $7.00. Sale 3.08
104. LIKE UNDER THE MICRO MICROSCOPE
SCOPE MICROSCOPE With 400 Captioned
Photographs, 4 Full-Page Color
Plate*. By O. Jlrovec el *l, A
beautiful volume on the micro microscope
scope microscope and Its contributions to
mans knowledge and control of
nature, completely llluetratlng the
Infinite variety of forms found In
natures works of art. ranging
from unicellular organisms lo the
structure of the Individual organs
In the higher animals and man.
Briefly describes different types
of modern microscopes, pioneers
In microscopy, etc. 9 x 12. Pub.
at $9.95. Sals 5.68
105. THE GOLDEN ENGLISH ENGLISHFRENCH
FRENCH ENGLISHFRENCH DICTIONARY. More than
1000 words, 1500 pictures In full
color, 3000 easy to learn sen sentences,
tences, sentences, pronunciation. A lively,
picture-dictionary for children.
Site 10 x 13. Pub. al $3.99. Sale
1.98
100. ROBERT E. LEE. The Man
and Soldier. A Pictorial Biography.
By Philip Van Doren Stern. With
more than 350 lllus. ft 80,000 words
of text. A fascinating biography In
plcutre and text, a major portion
concerning his personal life from
childhood lo the achievements ol
his later years. 8-3/4 x 11-1/4.

Orlg. PiS>. at $9.95. New. com complete
plete complete ed. Ony 2.98
107. F.D R. Text by Roger Butter Butterfield.
field. Butterfield. More than 400 photos se selected
lected selected by Roiit. D. Graff 4> Robt.
E. Glnna. A memorable photo photographic
graphic photographic record of the remarkable
career of FDR from sheltered
childhood In Hyde Park to his death
with recollections of'government
leaders, friends, staff aiJl family.
Size 8-1/2xll-1/4. Pub. atSIO.OO.
Only 2.98
108. AUTOMOBILE YLAR *lO.
Ed by G. Molter h D. Armstrong.
Over 300 photos. 60 lij color. The
great annual about the great cars,
new developments In engineering,
sports and endurance competition,
the drivers and a special section
on the rise of the Japanese motor
car industry, a 50 ve.u history of
Alfa Borneo, etc. 9-1 2 x 12-3/ 4.
Pub. at $12.50. Only I.
109. DESTROYERS -- 60 YEARS.
By Capt. W. (. Schofield. Int rod.
by Admiral Arlelgh A. Burke. A
pictorial history with 200 of Hie
l>est ofticial Navv photos showing
the ilestrover In combat and on
world nit".siiins irom the first uss
H. orlg. rub. at $7.T4>.
New. complete ed. Only 2.98
I 10. SIIAKESIK \UE. Ten Givi
Plays. Hills.- bv Alice 4 Mart.il
Provenscii. Inti ml. by Sli Tyrom
Guthrie. A volume of extraordluarv
beauty wHlixajilor pictures of dazz dazzling
ling dazzling elegance cold.lining the com complete
plete complete texts ol Sli.iko'jM'.i i o-
masterwolks: MacNdli Hamlet
Romeo s Juliet Julius l ms. i
Henry V As Von Ilk H e>,
Size 8- { 1 x I. -I 1. pub. t s| 7
Only 5. '7.
111. THE SI AM. TRADE TODAY.
By Sean Ot allaghan. Sliorklne.o
eount of nourishing trade in whirl)
vouiu' Imiv-> and girls are lieiii!! sold
alul pi u eil ill brothels. 1 'lib. al
$3.05. Oldv 1.98
112. C AGE AND GARDEN BIRDS.
By G. Sletiibaelier. 250b1r,1s illus illustla
tla illustla ted In mini'. Comprehensive
guide to care, breeding, enclosures
from song-birds to seed-eatei s.
from tropleal to parrm-likebirds,
from pheasants lo birds ut prey.
Put), .it $6.95. only 2.98
M I
. v ; J1111*:.
113. EROTIC POETRY: AN UN UNINHIBITED
INHIBITED UNINHIBITED TREASURY. Edited,
with a running commentary by
Louis Untermeyer. Tin- worlds
grealesl erode.i In verse ranging
from the Bible lo the present day
-a flesh collection of the most
renowned poets from OvtdtnSwtli OvtdtnSwtliburne.
burne. OvtdtnSwtliburne. Chaucer to E. E. Cummings.
Wueen EBzalietli to Emily Dickin Dickinson
son Dickinson -- the outspoken sensuality of
lust and tlm earthy celebration of
carnal pleasure. In more than 600
poems. Puli, at $7,50. Only 3.95
114. THE MACMILLAN HtXiK Os
BOATING. By Wm. N. Wallace.
More than 200 superb Illustrations
plus 72 full pages In full color.
Tilts Is the great history of boats
and boating from Ceopatrasbarge
through the Americas Cup Races,
to steam yachts, schooners, sand sandbaggers.
baggers. sandbaggers. outlMiard runabouts and
cruisers, to sailing and power powerboating
boating powerboating today. Deluxe 8-1/2 x 12
format. Put), at $14.95. Sale 7.05
115. THE lOOM OE ART. By Ger Germain
main Germain Bazin. Chief Curator of the
Louvre. 433 Reproductions It
Drawings. 136 In full color form a
gallery of world art magnificent
In scope and In sureness of taste.
Not only a comprehensive history
of painting and sculpture of the
masters from the Lascaux Cave to
abstract expressionism but also a
visual storehouse of treasures of
craftsmanship In jade. wood. gold,
clay and jewels selected from more
than 100 museums and private
collectors from 27 countries. Size
II x 12-1/2. Pub. al $30.00. Only
17.95
116. INDONESIAN COOKERY. By
Lle Sek Hlang. Coconut fritters,
suateed eggplant, chicken stuffed
with shrimp, hundreds of other
palate pleasing delicacies which
made the Indonesian Restaurant
the sensation of the New York
Worlds Fair. Pub. at $3.95. Only
I.
117. THE BOOK OF THE HAND.
An Illustrated History of Palmis Palmistry.
try. Palmistry. By Fred Gettings. Profusely
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Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 2, 1966

ALLIGATOR
EDITORIALS
put the blame
in the right spot
(The following letter from Dr. Ernest Bartley
serves as todays editorial. We think Dr. Bartley
expresses a point of view very close to our own.
In fact, we are sorry if the tone of previous news newsstories
stories newsstories appeared to point at one man as the reason
for all of this Universitys trouble. We did not
intentionally point the finger at any one person,
for in fact no one individual could be responsible.
We simply wanted things brought out into the open,
because if they are not aired openly nothing will
ever be done.)
* *
TTT hat a serious problem exists at the University
vof Florida in retaining qualified faculty mem members
bers members Is not to be denied. The recent series of stories
and editorials in The Alligator demonstrate proper
student concern about the future of quality education
at this institution.
It is important, however, to put the proble~m into
its correct perspective. I regret the tone of The
Alligator stories. Blaming the administration for our
faculty members leaving for positions at other in institutions
stitutions institutions provides, at' best, but a very tiny part
of the answer. There are a number of other factors
involved which are of much greater importance.
If criticism is to be leveled at the fact that the
University is losing its better faculty personnel to
other institutions, then the blame should be laid at
the proper source.
You cannot expect to retain all of your faculty
anyhow. Competition for good faculty is too keen,
and there will be a natural attrition. Particularly,
however, you cannot retain faculty if your overall
salary scale (i.e., the dollars you have available
to pay faculty) is below that of your competitors.
The average salary for faculty at the University is
at the bottom of these public institutions in the na nation
tion nation having over 10,000 students enrolled and grant granting
ing granting more than 100 doctoral degrees in a calendar
year.
Our University administration receives its money
by virtue of an appropriation made by the State
Legislature. It must work within those funds. Given
our salary position among comparable national
institutions, how, in fairness, can our administra administrators
tors administrators be blamed when there are simply no funds
available to meet offers made by competing insti institutions
tutions institutions to our faculty members? Our administra administrators
tors administrators have, without exception since I came to Florida
in 1949, fought for more salary funds than the
Legislature has ever appropriated.
Rather than blaming the University administration,
The Alligator could and should properly charge the
State Legislature, and the people of the state, with
failing to give adequate support to higher education.
The Alligator would do well, as it has in some de degree,
gree, degree, to focus attention on the entire archaic, out outdated,
dated, outdated, anti-deluvian system of administration for
higher education in Florida.
The hard fact of the matter is that we must re recruit
cruit recruit faculty and retain our present personnel in a
rtational market. Never has faculty mobility been
greater. Never has the number of vacancies around
the nation been higher. Never has the competition
for academic personnel been keener. An individual
with only a slight academic reputation, or no academic
reputation, can very quickly obtain a number of
position offers, usually at salaries considerably in
excess of those offered at the University of Florida.
Until the Florida Legislature, the state administra administration,
tion, administration, and the people of the state recognize that they
are going to have to pay for quality education, the
unhappy events dramatized in the situation of the
History Department will continue. But to blame the
administration of the University of Florida for what
has happened simply does not provide an answer,
and it is not correct. To place blame for this situa situation
tion situation on the University is like blam blaming
ing blaming a man with a bucket for failing to bail out a boat
with no bottom in it.
I do not speak without knowledge, for I am presently
Chairman of the University of Florida Salary Com Committee
mittee Committee and have been a member of that committee
for a number of years. I have been a member of
the University Personnel Board and a member of the
University of Florida Budget Committee.
I have been critical of Tigert Hall on a number of
occasions. Criticize the University administration
when it deserves criticism. But simple justice de demands
mands demands that the administration be defended in this
instance. The problem is fundamentally one of too
few available dollars and far too many needs for
those dollars.
Ernest R. Bartley,
Professor of Political Science

6 r
Tlie Florida Alligator
'J\ vUdjMitj. Il Oltt PttiMl T'A
From The
:*:* '>
Editors Desk
:£ By BENNY CASON
.V
v Alligator Editor
loud Cheers, please, for the UnitedStatesSupreme
j£ W Court.
£ Once again the high court has stepped in where angels
£ and legislators feared to tread. Just when it appeared the
£ people of Florida were going to be forced to swallow an
£ unsatisfactory reapportionment plan, Earl Warren and his
X; courageous fellow justices told the state in no uncertain
X; terms to come up with another one a fair one, this time.
X- There have been cries, yes, from the vested interests,
£ all about the court usurping so-called states rights.
£ The Pork Choppers, most of them, are screaming their
£ bloody hearts out.
x The Jacksonville Journal, bless its reactionary, 19th 19th£
£ 19th£ century soul, came out with a front-page editorial, blasting
£ the Supreme Court in its own stereotyped fashion.
£ One North Florida politician, says The Miami News Bill
Baggs, growled over the telephone that this was but another :
demonstration that the court was trying
to take over the country
thing about communism, and in other
ways brilliantly exhibited the pine-and pine-andpalmetto
palmetto pine-andpalmetto logic which makes him a
stranger to realism these days.
Governor Haydon Burns, who went
fishing in the Bahamas when the Legis Legis£:
£: Legis£: lature needed his leadership last year, : :
CASON hurled a few ridiculous barbs at the high :
X court, called a special, unnecessary
x session of the Legislature and yelled about the state being
;£ in a crisis a crisis Mr. Burns helped to create. £
£ On and on the outcries went. :
X All the Supreme Court did, in fact, was what the legis- :
£ lators and the district federal court failed to do -- order a :
£ fair representation of the people in Floridas Legislature. >
>: The legislators, you may recall, carved out a 58-senator, :
£ 109-representative plan. Then the district federal court £
£ admitted the plan was unconstitutional, but approved it :
£ on a short-term basis. £
£ To think the Legislature can come up with an entirely £
£ fair plan in its special session is. says Baggs, about as £
£ realistic as expecting that Gov. Haydon Burns is going to :j
£ Join Martin Luther King in protesting de facto segregation :
£ in Chicago.
£ Minorities the almighty Pork Choppers -- currently :
£ dominate and control the Legislature. Certainly, the small, £:
£ rural-county legislators arent going to vote their own seats £
£ out f existence. In a race for survival, almost anyone will £;
£ go down fighting. The Pork Choppers are trying to survive, jij
£ f r sure, so you can bet theyll never approve a truly fair '£
£ reapportionment plan. £
£ There is only one place in which a completely fair plan £
£ can be drawn up and thats in the district federal court :j:
£ which failed to do so earlier.
£ Let s h P e the federal court judges will demonstrate a x
£ little dynamic leadership and a sampling of the courage >:
:£ shown by the justices on the Supreme Court. £
£ If we do not get action from the judges, democracy in £
£ Florida will remain but a sick ghost of itself. £
£ Meanwhile, thank God for the United States Supreme Court. ?
£ And sa y a few silent prayers for the Pork Choppers the 5
£ vested interests and Ed Ball. £
£ They need them. £
jjj
)
i ~

Confetti
77 he Alligator continues to make the rounds J
estate newspapers. On Monday, the St. Petersl
bur# Times quoted from Mike Garcias Florid!
Politics column, which ordinarily appears m TIJ
Alligator once a week. The Times quoted threJ
paragraphs from Garcias column, the most sig.l
nificant of which follows: I
Thus they (the UF students) are rallying behind!
(Scott) Kelly, who has demonstrated his interest ini
them and has professed some sound ideas on edu-l
cation. Ideological appeal is giving way to practical!
political facts. I
Garcia was attempting in his column to say that
UF students are rushing to the aid of Kelly because
they dont think Miami Mayor Robert King High
can win.
Well, a few facts are in order, so that The Times
and its readers do not misunderstand:
First, Garcia is actively working for Kellys
Go-Team, and naturally is expected to favor
/elly over High.
Secondly, in the straw vote during recent student
body elections, High edged Kelly. This seems to in indicate
dicate indicate there is actually more student support for High
than Kelly, contrary to Garcias contentions. (Both
High and Kelly, incidentally, garnered four times as
many student votes as did incumbent Gov. Haydon
Burns.)
Thirdly, many students DO believe High can win.
Fourthly, most of the students rallying behind
Kelly are members of Florida Blue Key, allegedly
a mens honorary leadership fraternity on campus.
Now its fine that the Blue Keys are taking an in interest
terest interest in the gubernatorial race. And its even more
encouraging most of them are working against Hay Haydon
don Haydon Burns.
But we wonder if their heart is with Kelly? More
than one Blue Key member has confided that, while
openly supporting Kelly, he plans to vote for High.
It seems it is not quite acceptable, at least in
the minds of FBK members, to openly support and
work for Robert King High. Why this bit of curious
thinking? Well, Confetti doesnt know the answer.
But it may be that Blue Key members who have
consistently shown theyre more interested in self selfperpetuation
perpetuation selfperpetuation and in self-service than in REAL ser service
vice service to the University of Florida are again demon demonstrating
strating demonstrating one thing they dont have: courage.
Now Confetti isnt knocking the many students
like Garcia who honestly believe Kelly is the man.
We encourage and support those students backing
both High and Kelly and even Burns if this is
what they sincerely believe.
What Confetti doesnt like is hypocrisy and lack
of courage.
* *
Students and faculty may be interested to know
that Daytona Beachs Fred Karl and education
has no better friend than Mr.. Karl -- is running for
the State Senate from Volusia County. Karl, you may
remember, ran for Governor in 1964 -- and finished
last.
He planned to run against Tom Bailey for State
School Superintendent this year. But Bailey resigned,
and Karl believes Baileys replacement -- Floyd
Christian is a capable officeholder.
It is interesting to look back to 1964, when Karl
attempted to soft sell Florida on quality education.
Now everybody, it seems, wants to get in on the act.
Confetti certainly hopes Karl makes it to the
Senate, so that education will have at least one friend
in Tallahassee. No matter what happens to the gentle gentleman
man gentleman politically, however, he will forever be remem remembered
bered remembered by the thinking people of Florida for his long,
often lonely fight for better education.
In fact, if no one else is going to suggest it,
Confetti would like to call for the University of
Florida to throw a Fred Karl Day sometime soon.
How about it, Dr. Reitz and Mr. Jacobs? If those two
gentlemen dont want to do it, how about it, fellow
students?
* *
Robert King Highs popularity among the younger
generation was demonstrated again in a straw vote
recently at the University of South Florida in Tampa.
The Miami redhead received 47 per cent of the total
vote. Scott Kelly ran a medium-to-close second and
Haydon Burns finished a distant third. High got 585
votes, Kelly 401, and Burns 88. UFs vote totals
were High 2,258, Kelly 2,032, and Burns 591.
* *
JUST WONDERING: How do you suppose Perrv
Moores watered-down 25-cent football game Cokes
taste in the off-season?



lets talk Food Services 'real issues

My Fellow Students, Faculty Members,
and other interested parties:
Large concerns such as Food Service
do own or at least receive a percentage
from vending machines in their opera operations.
tions. operations. To cite a few:
The A.R.A. Service which grossed $l9O
million in food services last year is the
largest contract feeder in the United
States. It has 600 food service contracts
in universities, hospitals, and business
and they operate their own vending.
Interstate United Corp., which grossed
SBS million in food service last year in
plants, office buildings and institutions,
including Brass Rail restaurants, oper operates
ates operates its own vending.
Hot Shoppes, Inc., which operates the
restaurants on our Sunshine State Park Parkway,
way, Parkway, receives profits from the numerous
vending machines located in its estab establishments.
lishments. establishments. I could cite many more.
The food vending in Gainesville. Fla.,
all totaled does not compare with the
total gross on the University of Florida
volume such as that pre-
sent on this campus.
If Food Service controlled vending on
this campus the profits could be retained
for the benefit of all students and would

(Third of a six-part
series by UF psychiatry
professor Dr. Marshall
Jones, in which he ex examines
amines examines administrative
areas of current interest.)
The Alligator for Friday,
Feb. 4, carried a page-one
story which was headed Dean
Hale Oks Hyde Park. A group
of Student Government people
headed by Bruce Culpepper
had submitted a petition to
Hale which called for the es establishment
tablishment establishment of a designated
area on campus for organized
groups or individual students
to use for free discussion of
topics of interest to student.
This area, the petition
read, would be used only as
a place of discussion and no
materials of any kind would
be sold there. Also there would
be no solicitation of donations
for any cause in this area.
The petition proposed the area
in front of the University Au Auditorium
ditorium Auditorium as a site.
What COULD a student do in
the Student Government free
speech area? Well he could
talk. The Alligator story didnt
say anything at all about tab tables
les tables or the distribution of lit literature.
erature. literature. Off-campus groups
and individuals would not have
access to it; nothing could be
sold; and donations could not
be solicited.
It is small wonder that Dean
Hale endorsed the SG pro proposal.
posal. proposal. It is totally vacuous.
Students could do nothing in
Culpeppers free speech area
they are not already free to
do in a non-obstructive way
anywhere on campus. In fact,
they might not be able to do
as much.
On Feb. 9, the SG Legisla Legislative
tive Legislative Council debated the Cul Culpepper
pepper Culpepper proposal and ended by
referring it to the judiciary
committee. It ought never to
be reported out. The SG pro proposal
posal proposal is a fraud.

SGs Hyde Park proposal 'is a fraud

Freedom-minded students
have many illusions. The most
pervasive is the idea that
young people, particularly
students, are inherently bet better
ter better disposed toward freedom
than older people. I can find
no evidence, on this campus
at any rate, to support this
* idea.
The debate in the Legisla Legislative
tive Legislative Council makes the point
quite clearly. One council
member. Michael Bowen, was
quoted as saying, The Ad Administration
ministration Administration has no objection
to free speech. It does object
to the selling of fruit or anti-
Viet Nam literature or the
Charlatan.
For free speech but against
anti-war literature, thats a
flat contradiction. And the
worst of it is that Bowen
probably doesnt realize it.
Skip Haviser was quoted as
asking, We are to protect
the rights and privileges of
those who want to set up this
area? What ajpout the other
98 per cent dont care
about the ideas mentioned in
the free speech area? They
might even find the activities
distasteful.

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Speaking Out

be seen in the form of quality food, and
maximum service at minimum prices,
plus major improvements in Foodservice
which Mr. Welborn attempted to make in
the past.
Mr. Gay Welborn, who was told by his
superiors to keep his mouth shut when he
tried to do something about the sickening
loss of funds, is a man of personal integ integrity
rity integrity and honor.
He was wholly for the students. He tried
for six years to put in a new Coed Club
Cafeteria in Broward Hall and eliminate
the miserable, inefficient mess that exists
there now. He even drew up complete
plans for it himself.
He put in training classes of all kinds
for managers, supervisors, cashiers,
cooks, etc. They included Sanitation Class Classes
es Classes and the new Safety Classes now being
held which he planned and arranged for
months ago, and which file present direc directors
tors directors are now taking credit for.
He compiled a detailed comparison of
the Food Service here and that at FSU in
hopes of bringing to UF similar benefits
that they have there.
He tried to set up an optional contract
system here, but it failed due to the lack
of cooperation from the Administration.
When the plans for Graham Area were
originally drawn up he told them the snack
bar planned was improper and inadequate,
and a larger efficient cafeteria
would be better. He was ignored.
He was excluded from meetings of the
University Presidents Vending Commit Committee
tee Committee when he was the only person on cam campus
pus campus who held degrees and credentials in

So what? The right to free
speech is not dependent on
majoritarian or consensal ap approval.
proval. approval. It makes no difference
if the whole campus consisted
of Skip Havisers (God forbid).
The majority, no matter how
great it may be, still has no
right to deny to a minority
the right to advocate its point
of view.
Some of the council mem members
bers members advanced the argument
that the free speech area
should not be permitted be because
cause because water bags and fire firecrackers
crackers firecrackers had already been
thrown into the area and some
arguments had come close to
fist fights. Who threw the
water bags and firecrackers?
Who picked the fights? Its the
oldest trick in the authori authoritarian
tarian authoritarian bag. If you want to
suppress somebody elses
freedom, create a violent in incident
cident incident and then suppress the
other guys activities because
they might lead to violence.
The motivation behind most
of the debate came out nicely
in a remark made by SG Vice
President Dick Thompson: A
number of people are affected
by the protest just by passing

Food Service and vending, and had facts
and figures showing the impracticality to
the University of the present vending
system.
He designed the kitchen and food layout
for the new Union building.
500 Luau booklets were sold at $1.50
each and, contrary to what some may think,
every penny went back into Food Service.
When Mr. Welborn came to the Univer University
sity University in 1960 the Food Service Division was
$124,000 in the red. At last report the
division had SBO,OOO in a RESTRICTED
usage Cash Fund. I could continue with
many more examples.
What are some other reasons why we
students must pay the same for food on
campus as we do at off-campus, profit profitmaking
making profitmaking establishments?
The Faculty Club recorded a loss of
$1,564 in one two-month period and con continues
tinues continues losing approximately S2OO per week.
Food Service must subsidize events like
the Blue Key Banquet which lost $430
this past year.
Milk must be purchased at per car carton
ton carton from the university dairy when milk
is available at lower cost from profit profitmaking
making profitmaking concerns. Eggs are purchased in
the same manner at 4? a dozen too much.
Free meals are served from time to time
to faculty members and written off as
research projects by the Animal
Science and Poultry Departments.
Contrary to what some may think, the
$2,000 frames put up in the Campus Club
were not put up by order of Mr. Welborn,
but by Ellis Jones, University business
manager at the time, while Mr. Welborn

by. If the area is moved to the
Plaza it will diminish the ac activity
tivity activity quite significantly.
In short, SGs suggestion
that the area be moved in
front of the Auditorium was
intended to reduce the activity
and its effect. Free speech,
yes, but as little of it as
possible.
If a free speech area is to
have meaning,, it must be a
place where options exist IN
ADDITION to those which ob obtain
tain obtain elsewhere on campus. In
a free speech area, OFF OFFcampus
campus OFFcampus groups and individuals
should be free to speak, cir circulate

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JU NNOUNCES
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Wednesday, March 2, 19GG, The Florida Alligator,

was on vacation.
With all this going on, why does present
Business Manager William E. Elmore con continue
tinue continue to serve luncheons for groups at the
students expense? At least four such
luncheons have been served since Feb.
10, 19G6.
Why does Mr. Elmore and other officials
involved refuse to give any statements on
the issues, much less an explanation which
is certainly due?
Should we be satisfied with ridiculous
pacifiers such as silverware wrapped in
napkins, and drinks, rolls, and salads
being handed to us, when the real issues
that are draining our pockets continue to
be avoided?
I leave you with these questions. I hope
Buddy Jacobs has read this carefully. Duty
certainly calls him in this situation. I also
remind all my fellow students that Mr.
Welborn will meet with any interested
student who wishes to understand these
issues better or hear more information on
the subject. Believe me I have only touched
the surface in this column.
I wish to take this opportunity to thank
The Alligator editors, and especially Jim
Moorhead, for giving me the opportunity
to present these issues to the student body.
William L. Hardy, 4AS
(EDITORS NOTE: This is the
second and concluding article on
Food Service written by William L.
Hardy, pre-med senior from Fort
Lauderdale and a transfer from St.
Louis University.)

culate circulate petitions, set up tables
and distribute literature. They
should be able to sell litera literature
ture literature they advocate, subject to
the same procedural require requirements
ments requirements that hold for students.
It should be possible to solicit
for donations in a free speech
area. (Again, for those who
are hung up on fruit stands,
commerical sales are not an
issue in the free speech area
or anywhere else on campus.)
Unless these additional op options
tions options are made available in
the free speech area there is
no point in having one.

Page 7



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Here's one coed who has the right idea!
Dressed in one of the many examples of
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multitude of the latest styles in clothes.

***

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The warm greeting you receive at House of Travel is the
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These three lovely lasses probably have three different
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>*
IGATOR CLASSIFIEDS I

for sale
MUST SELL. 1964 250 cc ZUN ZUNDAPP
DAPP ZUNDAPP Trophy. Good condition.
$175. Call 376-4959 after 5. (A (A---102-st-c).
--102-st-c). (A---102-st-c).
BOLEX Bmm MovieCamera(DL),
3-turret, superb condition, three
good lenses, filters, carrying case.
$125. 376-4096. (A-103-ts-c).
1964 TRIUMPH TR-6, 650 cc. Bri British
tish British racing green. West Coast
pipes, engine just rebuilt. Excel Excellent
lent Excellent condition. Very reasonable
price. 378-4423 after 7. (A-103-
3t-c).
BARKLESS BASENJI PUPS. AKC
registered. Grand sire champion
CH, Fulahill of the Congo. Excel Excellent
lent Excellent temperament. Males SIOO and
up. 472-2408 after 5.(A-100-st-c).
61 NORTON 500 cc. Big bike power
& handling. Reliable, low upkeep,
very good condition. $450 firm.
Call 372-5792. (A-99-Bt-c).
CUSHMAN EAGLE. Graduating,
will sell to highest cash bidder.
See at 803 SW sth Ave., or call
Bill Marshall, 372-3540. (A-104-
3t-c).
1962 TRIUMPH MOTORCYCLE
(Bonneville), best offer over SSOO.
Contact the Hunter at the Pub.
(A-l 04-3 t-c).
1962 TRIUMPH 650 cc TROPHY.
Needs SBS worth of work to put
in perfect shape. Good tires, paint
& upholstery, $450. Ph. 378-2125
after 7 p.m. (A-104-3t-c).
MUSTSELL, LEAVING COUNTRY.
Baby stroller $8; fan forced elec electric
tric electric room heater $5; AM-FM 9
transistor radio SB. 1955 Ford
Stationwagon, 6 cyl., automatic,
radio, heater, good condition. $l5O.
Ph. 372-5781. (A-104-3t-p).
for rent
SUBLET 2 BEDROOM APT., Sum Summer
mer Summer trimester, for four, Village
Park. Air-conditioned, pool, S4O/
mofith each. 378-1019 after 6 p.m.
(B-102-st-p).
AVAILABLE NOW. 1 bedroom
modern air conditoned apt. Near
Univ. and Medical Center. Adults
only, no pets, lease required. S9O.
Ph. or 376-4360. (B-98-
ts-c).
AVAILABLE NOW. Newly decora decorated
ted decorated 2 bedroom apt; small sun room;
a/c by April 30th. Close of Univ.
1930 NW 2nd Ave. 376-6671. (B (B---102-3t-c).
--102-3t-c). (B---102-3t-c).
COMFORTABLE ROOM. Lava Lavatory,
tory, Lavatory, 2 closets, kitchen use, 2
blocks Cl. Garage also available.
Special rate. 378-4645. (B-103-
ts-c).
AIR CONDITIONED APTS, for me
Summer. Suitable for 2 or 3, $65
or $75; suitable for 3 or 4, S9O.
Call 376-8990, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. or
7 p.m.-10 p.m. (B-103-2tf-c).
lost-found
LOST Pinx Wallet, keep money,
need identification. Contact Pam
Tomlinson, 378-3013. (L-102-
3t-c). ....
FOUND DAVE BRE VNING, I have
your wallet and all contents. Call
me, Carl Brown, at 378-3336. (L (L---104-lt-p).
--104-lt-p). (L---104-lt-p).

lost-found
LOST Dark Brown Shaffer white
dot desk pen without base. Lost
Sat. in or around library. Senti Sentimental
mental Sentimental value. Reward. Charlie,
372-6938. (L-103-3t-c).
FOUND Dreux American High
School Ring, 1962. Found near
Graham Area cycle parking. In Inquire
quire Inquire Rm. 126, East Hall or Ph.
2-9128. (L-104-3t-p).
" " 1 T i
wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
for A &/or B Term. Modern air
conditioned apt. Good location.
Unusually low rent. Call 378-4296.
(C-l 04-3 t-c).
WANT TO BUY, Law Books deal dealing
ing dealing with International Law and
Foreign Relations of United States.
Call Barry, 378-4521. (C-104-st (C-104-stc).
c). (C-104-stc).
RIDERS WANTED TO COCOA and
points between. Leave Friday, 5
p.m., return Sunday afternoon.
$6.00 round trip; $3.50 one way.
Call 372-6450, Mon.-Thurs., after
6 p.m. (C-104-lt-c).
FEMALE GRADUATE STUDENT
to share home. Must have own
transportation. $35 a month. Call
372-1859. (C-100-7t-c).
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE im immediately
mediately immediately for Danish Modern
Wood-paneled Apt. Near shopping
center, a/c, patio. Call 376-1463.
(C-103-3t-c).
.services
RUBY'S ALTERATIONS. 1238 SW
3rd Ave. 376-8506. (M-89-lt-c).
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Done
on a new IBM Selectric, Courier
lettering. Im on approved Grad Graduate
uate Graduate List and have passed Medical
Terminology. Call Mrs. Lyons,
anytime. 376-7160. (M-103-lt-c).

Mataue wood \
m*fam' CHmstopHer \
Hrl rsssr &\
I lll§IUtS r I
I TECHNICOLOR" PANAVISION |l9|Q|| fllf Olt M I
y RUTHGOOT 1 ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE At>/
STARTS FRIDAY- WORLD PREMIERE
What was her sin
Loving too much
turner
suL X"
W*%s TECHNICOLOR
MffiJk JOHN FORSYTHF... KFIR Dl 111 Ffl
V RTBpiWOKWIffR

Page 10

), The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 2, 1966

services
NOW OPENING. Teddy Bear Nur Nursery.
sery. Nursery. 3 departments, complete in infant
fant infant department. Planned program
for children over 3. Central heating
and air conditioned. Ph. 376-0917.
1214-1/2 NW 4th St. (M-95-ts-c).
TYPING. Electric typewriter,
graduate school approved. Call
Mrs. Cameron, 376-3609.(M-102-
st-c).
RADIO TV STEREO REPAIRS.
FREE estimates (on campus only).
For Sale. Heath Kit oscilloscope,
$25; 14 RCA TV, S3O; record
players. Call Wayne Howlett, 378-
4626. (M-103-3t-p).
help wanted
FEMALE CASHIER, Full Time
shift work at McCollum Drug West.
1124 W. Univ. Ave. Apply in per person
son person only. (E-104-3t-c).
WANTED: Accounting Major with
at least 6 hrs. of accounting. For
Assistant Business Manager, Stu Student
dent Student Publications. Now hiring for
the 1966-1967 school year. Apply
Room 9, Fla. Union. Between 1
p.m. 5 p.m. (E-104-tf-nc).
FULLER BRUSH CO. needs part parttime
time parttime sales help, male or female,
with car. Average earnings $35-
SSO for 15 hrs. work. Write to H.
Silver, 1028 Clearwater Dr., Day Daytona
tona Daytona Beach, Fla. (E-85-ts-c).
' ,l 11,1 11 ' 1 11
personal
SUMMER IN EUROPE. Charter of.
40 or more students, from New
York to London. Roundtrip, S3BO.
includes free week in Paris. Save
over SIOO. Leaving April 30th
returning July 25th. Will supply
information on tours and JOB OP OPPORTUNITIES.
PORTUNITIES. OPPORTUNITIES. Organized by
COLLEGE STUDENTS through re reputable
putable reputable travel agency. Call 378-
3752 after 3 p.m. (J-104-2t-c).

real estate
APT. HOUSE. 4 blocks from cam campus.
pus. campus. 9 furnished units. Owner can
live in one apt., rent free, manage
the others, and have monthly in income.
come. income. Present gross monthly rents
are $560. Reasonable down pay payment.
ment. payment. Call W. D. Mason, Realtor,
c/o Ernest Tew Realty, Inc., 376-
6461. (I-93-ts-c).
NW SECTION, central air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home.
On high wooded lot. Reasonable
down, no qualifying. Call 372-5209.
(1-96-1 Ot-c).
autos
1965 MGB. Still in factory war warranty,
ranty, warranty, less than 10.000 miles.
$2,000 cash or S2OO and take up
the payments. Service record if
necessary. 376-9723 or 378-2244.
(G-102-ts-c).
-
1961 MERCURY MONTEREY, au automatic,
tomatic, automatic, radio, heater, S6OO. Also
1964 Ford Pickup, take up pay payments.
ments. payments. Call 376-0854 after 6 p.m.
(G-101-st-c).
1956 T-BIRD CONVERTIBLE.
Price $950. Jim Thornton Motors,
2008 NE 23rd Blvd.
(G-l 01-st-c).
1955 4-door CHRYSLER V-8.
Radio, heater, SIOO. 908 SW 7th
Ave., Apt. 2. Call 378-4993. MUST
SELL. (G-103-st-p).
1961 MINI-MINOR MORRIS 850,
S3OO firm. Call 372-6018 after
5:30. (G-103-3t-c).
I M
I THE SPY WHS
CAME IH FROM
I THE com
TO GET THE FULL SHOCK
OF THE ENDING YOU MUST
SEE IT FROM THE START!
I 1:07-3:07-5:07

THRU FRI AT 3:10-6:15-9:20
I SATURDAY 12:10-3:10-6:15-9:20 | j|inr [
PLUS LAST 3 CHAPTERS
YOUR FRIEND
andmine 'THE IRON CLAW

Don't Sell Gator Ads
SHORT
1 1
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'
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MONUMENTAL
Job
I ROWTAYLOR I
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PLUS 2nd color hit!
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SCARED? NOPE!
Lynda Hargett may be running from Bob
cClintock (above), but Linda McNulty (right)
nt afraid of a thing. The thing in question
Larry Presley who deserves the name
?ast -- right now at least. Another beast
s been seen walking around the UF campus
th six pounds of peanut butter spread over
s body.
TOTAL AMOUNT COLLECTED g
faculty $59.12
Delta Sigma Phi Iff |
Lambda Chi Alpha J,' s
lpha Delta Pi If f gi
1 Lambda Phi V ffl :g
*eta Theta Pi $ 9,65 $
E Psilon Phi |
elta Tau Delta g
Jelta Chi £
I .**

. c,.' I. xBBFiHi rff i^^^B
iiJ^ # \KVh aw aw.
. aw. : : 3 ; ; j wV M!
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TURN THE TABLES
Beauties seem to be attacked all the time
on the UF campus, but the Beauty being at attacked
tacked attacked at left has a purpose. She wants to help
students in foreign countries through the World
University Service. Caroline Maslanka and Bob
McClintock are collecting money for the Beauty
and the Beast contest to help others help them themselves.
selves. themselves. Above Lynda Hargett and Linda McNulty
turn into beasts as Larry Presley attacks his
raw chicken. Larry has been seen around cam campus
pus campus with long silver hair, a club and a dead
chicken dripping with blood Contribute to the
Beauty and the Beast Contest -- anyone?
BEAIITV AND
THE BEAST
'./"

Wednesday, March 2, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



This
Space
A
v
? A
1
a v
b^oe
1 r
e t
i
s
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r
s
Call
Univ.
Ext
2832
Ask
For
D
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P v
1 e
a r
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n
8

SLOANS TO S6OO MARION FINANCE "Since 1945"
222 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.
376-5333

urancre
ADDRESS NOTICES
!HEE" onaI BLUE BULLETIN

Campus Calendar
Turn in Campus Calendar items to Public Function
Office, Florida Union.
GATOR SAILING CLUB: Today, 7:15 p.m., FU 215.
MENS INTERHALL COUNCIL: Today, 6:30 p.m., FU 123.
FLORIDA SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY: Today, 7 p.m.,
FU 212.
TUTORING SESSIONS: Today, 3:40-5 p.m., 13 Matherly.
Sponsored by Beta Alpha Psi for Accounting 211 & 212.
FLORIDA CHEERLEADER CLINIC: Today thru Mar. 11,
3:30-5 p.m., Florida Field.
INTERNATIONAL DINNER: Today, 6 p.m., FU Social Room.
Ticket sales: Today, Intl Center & FU 315. $1.50 per person.
U OF F VETERANS CLUB: Today, 7 p.m., FU 208.
GAMMA BETA PHI: Today, 7:30 p.m., FU 116.
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS: Today,
7:30 p.m., 334 Engineering Bldg.
LATIN AMERICAN COLLOQUIUM: Today, 8 p.m., FU 215.
Dr. James C. Dixon, Dept, of Psychology: The Measurement
of Spanish Language Usage & Certain Aspects of Personality
Structure.
LATIN AMERICAN CLUB: Today, 8:30 p.m., FU 324.
STUDENTS FOR HIGH: Today, 3 p.m., FU Aud. Mayor Robt.
King High will speak.
PROPELLER CLUB: Thurs., Mar. 3, 7:30 p.m.. 18 Mather Matherly.
ly. Matherly. Mr. J. E. Masson: Tourism & Trade-Trends & Impli Implications.
cations. Implications.

Administrative Notices To Students, Faculty & Staff

STUDENTS
PROGRESS TESTS
Students in the following courses are expected to take the
following tests. Each student must bring a No. 2 lead pencil
and will be required to use his University student number.
MS 109 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, March 3,7 p.m.
All students will take the MS 109 Progress Test in Walker
Auditorium.
MS 205 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, March 3,7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin with: ( A- L ) report to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16;
( M Z ) report to Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112, 113, 114,
115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
MS 208 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, March 3,7 p.m.
All students will take the MS 208 Progress Test in Walker
Auditorium.
CBS 261 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, March 8,7 p.m.
All students whose last names begin with: (A- L ) report
to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8, 9. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16;
( M Z ) report to Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112, 113, 114,
115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
CBS 262a (Evolution) PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, March 8,
7 p.m. All CBS 262a students will take the Progress Test in
Walker Auditorium.
CBS 262 b (Man and Nature) PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday,
March 8,7 p.m. Students whose last names begin with:
(A- L ) report to Peabody 1,2, 4. 5, 7,10 or 11; (M- Z )
report to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114.
MID-TERM COUNSELING: University College Students
should report to the appointment table outside Room 358,
New General Classroom Building, for a mid-term appointment
in accordance with the schedule below. At the counseling ses session
sion session students will work out a program for the next trimester
General Notices
UF GOLFERS: Students and faculty golfers who wish to
play on the University golf course need reservations for
Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Reservations can be made
by calling 2-7825 after 7:30 a.m. Wednesdays.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
(Sign-up sheets are posted in Placement Office, Bldg, H. All
ary degree-level positions. Asterisk indicates summer em employment
ployment employment available for juniors. Interviews will be held in
Florida Union unless otherwise indicated.)
MARCH 4-7: HUDSON PULP & PAPER CORP. Chem.
ChE.

Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 2, 1966

. AGRICULTURE CONVOCATION: Thurs., Mar. 3, 8 p.m.,>
McCarty Aud. Awards will be presented by Agriculture Council.
FU FINE ARTS COMMITTEE: Thurs., Mar. 3, FU 116. All
members required to attend; pictures to be taken.
FU FORUMS LECTURE: Thurs., Mar. 3, 8:15 p.m., Univ.
Aud. Dr. Henry A. Kissinger, Harvard University: America
& Europe: A New Relationship.
CIRCLE K CLUB: Thurs., Mar. 3,7 p.m., FU 212. Extends
an invitation to any interested Florida man to attend its regular
meetings each week.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: Thurs., Mar.
3, 5 p.m., 4th Floor, Library. Prayer meeting.
ACCOUNTING LECTURE: Thurs., Mar;,. 3, 3:40 p.m., 18
Matherly. Mr. James Mahon: International Accounting.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Thurs., Mar. 3,
5:15 p.m., FU Aud.
ROTC MILITARY BALL: Sat., Mar. 19, 9 p.m., Fla. Gym.
Ticket Sales: Today thru Mar. 19. Cadet & Spectator FU
Box Office, noon 5:30 p.m. Tickets also available at Army Hq.
IFC SPRING FROLICS: Sat., Mar. 5, 8:15 p.m., Fla. Gym.
Ticket Sales: Today, noon-5:30 p.m., FU Box Office. $2.00
per person, no IDs needed.
PHI CHI THETA: Thurs., Mar. 3,7 p.m., FU 208.
FIRST AID CLASS: Thurs., Mar. 3,7 p.m., FU 200. Spon Sponsored
sored Sponsored by Florida Speleological Society.
FREE DANCE: Fri., Mar. 4, 8-12 p.m., FU Social Room.
Featuring The Dynamic Interns.

or term that they will attend the University. Students with an
overall average of 2.6 for work taken at the University will
receive notice of privileged registration and will not be
required to make a counseling appointment. Students whose
last names begin with: (A- D ) report March 7; (E- H )
report March 8; ( I M ) report March 9; ( N R ) re report
port report March 10; ( S Z ) report March 11. Pre-registration
counseling begins Monday. March 14, at 8:40 a.m.
ID CARD PHOTOS: All students who are returning to the
University in September will be required to have photographs
taken for identification cards. Starting in September, 1966,
the identification card will be an official document of the
University and must be used for certain activities on campus,
including procuring football tickets and checking out books
from the library. Students will receive notification of their
photo appointments. Failure to keep the appointment will result
in a $5 charge at a future date. The identification card will be
used for the entire time a student remains on this campus.
Students will be photographed this month in Room 324 of
Florida Union, according to the appointment schedules.
FINANCIAL AID: Applications blanks are available at the
Student Financial Aid Office, 124 Tigert, for twos2so scholar scholarships
ships scholarships sponsored by the Carolina Freight Carriers Corporation.
They will be awarded on the basis of academic record, finan financial
cial financial need and recommendation by counselor.
FACULTY & STAFF
FACULTY CLUB: The UF Faculty Club has five private
dining rooms available at no cost to members. Call Ext. 2561
for reservations. Thursday night features a buffet supper,
6:30 7:30 p.m., followed by a bridge party on the first
Thursday of each month.
MARCH 7: CONNECTICUT MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE
CO. -- Mktg., Ins., Mgmt., Gen. Bus. AMERICAN INSTITUTE
FOR FOREIGN TRADE -- All majors. CONTAINER CORP.
OF AMERICA ChE., ME, EE, Acctg. FLORIDA POWER
CORP. EE, ME, CE, Bldg. Const., Arch. DEPT. OF
HEALTH, EDUCATION & WELFARE Biol., Chem. USDA USDASOIL
SOIL USDASOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE Agr. Eng.. Soil. Sci.,
Agron., Soil Conserv. SYSTEMS ENGINEERING LABORA LABORATORIES,
TORIES, LABORATORIES, INC. EE. ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK OF
JACKSONVILLE Gen. Bus., Lib. Arts, Fin. W. T. GRANT
CO. Gen. Bus., Bus. Admin., Mktg. ELECTRONIC COM COMMUNICATIONS,
MUNICATIONS, COMMUNICATIONS, INC. EE.*
MARCH 7-9: GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. Gen. Bus.,
Ind. Mgmt.

TIRES?
WHICH SIZE?
WHICH GRADE?
WHICH PLY?
is required for your
driving needs? Dont
be under or over
soldJSee the experts
GAINESVILLE'S
INDEPENDENT
ALACHUA
FIRESTONE
SERVICE
CENTER
615 N. MAIN ST.
Ph. 2-3010
I l
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SEVEN DAYS
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SERVING
Lasagna
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fl ITALIAN
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2204 S.W. 13th St.
Phone 376-1867
f -S
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We feature Valiant* A other
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PHONE 376-3644
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>
-



Dr. Carson Is Artist Musician

jeraldine w. brown
Alligator Staff Writer
|Hnd music are the tools that
|Mhert E. Carson, accomplish-
H ls t and musician, employs
|Bmote good student-teacher
|Bnships.
painting and music stimu stimu|Budents
|Budents stimu|Budents and give them a new
Hence, Dr. Carson said as he
a park bench near the Col-
H Law.
Explained that he plays music
his English writing-lab stu-
Ha unique motivation to write,
Hided that he plays and paints
H humanities students toem-

Charcoal Broiled
i) Filet Mignon ()
I With Tossed Salad, French 1 C
I Fries, Hot Buttered R 0115... Jr
5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m. Wednesdays
RESTAURANT, 0 \
VI/ J (ADJ. MANOR MOTEL) V T B J
' y NW 13thacross from new Sears V y

Electronic engineering opportunities
Interviews Scheduled Here March 7

jmjijg r
m \
B Hi
\ :>C : HHHHHHHi^H
I JERRY MOORE, Florida SB, has been
I deeply involved with communication sys-
I engineering for military command
I and control programs. During the past
I year he traveled extensively for ECI in
I Europe and the Pacific in connection with
I Communication programs.

'
ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS, INC
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA

phasize the art and music that they
study.
The gray-haired, soft-spoken
professor has performed an hour
every term for each of his classes
since he began teaching at the UF
in 1946.
It would amaze you how stu students
dents students always remember my class classes,
es, classes, Carson said, referring to
former students who often greet
him when he travels throughout
the state.
Students carry art and music
with them from humanities because
they have seen the arts per performed,
formed, performed, Carson added, empha-

sizing the point with his expressive
hands.
Carsons vivid memory enables
him to know all of his students by
their names on the first day of
classes.
This, too, adds to the student studentteacher
teacher studentteacher relationship. he ex explained.
plained. explained.
Carson responds to frequent in invitations
vitations invitations to perform at dormitor dormitories,
ies, dormitories, and sorority and fraternity
houses. He is faculty advisor for
Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity.
Some students report acquiring
a motivation to do well which
Carson encourages through his
genuine interest in them.
One student said, He shows in interest
terest interest in our spirits when he
plays and paints for us after a
progress test.
Carson has played the violin
since he was four and one-half
years old. After becoming a hu humanities
manities humanities teacher, he forced him himself
self himself to learn to paint at the age of
34. Gipson Danes, dean of the
School of Architecture and Fine
Arts at Yale University, has helped
Carson develop his painting poten potentials.
tials. potentials.
In addition to his university university-1
-1 university-1
centered activities, Dr. Carson
works with the youth in the Epis Episcopal
copal Episcopal Church and is a lay reader
there.

This may be the chance you have been
waiting for an exceptional professional
opportunity with an industry pace-setter on
Floridas West Coast.
Electronic Communications, Inc. (ECI),
of St. Petersburg is seeking graduates with
bachelors or masters degrees in electri
cal engineering. For those who qualify,
there are outstanding career opportunities
in space instrumentation, transmitter transmitterreceivers,
receivers, transmitterreceivers, microelectronics and commun communications
ications communications science.
ECI is a recognized leader in command
and control systems, miniaturized trans transmitters
mitters transmitters and receivers, multiplex systems,
space instrumentation and in advanced
communication areas.
With more than 1600 employees, ECI is
large enough to offer the facilities, pro programs
grams programs and security you are seeking, but
small enough to give you every oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to realize your capabilities to the
fullest.
As a member of ECls professional
staff, you will be encouraged to continue
your education with postgraduate studies.
ECI offers a full tuition refund.
Visit the placement office today and
make an appointment to talk with Elec Electronic
tronic Electronic Communications, Inc. on Monday,
March 7 at the Student Union. If this is
not convenient, call us collect to arrange
another interview date. Phone (813) 347-
1121 in St. Petersburg and ask for Ken
Nipper. (An equal opportunity employeir.)

Wednesday, March 2, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

f 'rma
> 'WmBKKmMKmm^ uJtr /
TALENTED HUMANITIES PROF
Dr. Robert E. Carson of the Humanities Department pursues his
hobby of painting in Jamaica. Photo by H. G. (Buddy) Davis.

What Is The
Miller Memo?
By ALAN BURTON
Alligator Staff Writer
Two students were brought be before
fore before the Faculty-Student Dicipline
Committee recently on a charge
of defying the principles of the
Miller Memo.
Lucien Cross and Alan Levin
sold freedom buttons, Charlatans
and honor bannanas in front of
the main library. They did not have
a permit.
A copy of the Miller Memo cannot
be found in the Main Library or
in any of the other various librar libraries
ies libraries on campus. Most likely, the
memo is not available in any
library in the entire state of
Florida.
What is the Miller Memo?
The Miller Memo is an un unpublished,
published, unpublished, unrecorded, uncata uncatalogued
logued uncatalogued office memo written in 1949
by J. Hillis Miller, UF president
at the time.
On campus the memo may be
found only in Tigert Hall. It is
not published for students.
Dr. Marshall Jones, researcher
in differential psychology, has been
a passive spectator for Levin and
Cross in this case. He is one of
the few persons outside of Tigert
who knows the contents of the Mil Miller
ler Miller Memo.
According to Jones, the three
parts of the memo state:
1) Solicitors and tradesmen are
prohibited from entering the
grounds or buildings of the Univer University
sity University for the purpose of transacting
business with faculty or staff mem members
bers members unless they have been issued
a permit for this purpose.
2) Permits to transact business
exclusively in housing areas are to
be controlled by the dean of student
personnel.
3) Permits to transact business
in other areas of campus are to be
controlled by the business man managers.
agers. managers.
How does a student acquire a
permit? Jones points out that the
administration contradicts 'the
Miller Memo by not issuing per permits
mits permits to students to carry on any
business transactions whatsoever.
A letter is submitted by a stu student
dent student to the appropriate authorities
stating what he desires. A discus discussion
sion discussion follows with the dean of men.
The dean of men and either the
dean of student personnel or the
business manager then decides
what course is to follow.

Page 13



Page 14

[, The Florida Alligator. Wednesday, March 2. 1966

j A Little Trouble
With The
Family Name
j:j: By EUNICE I. TALL
X Alligator Staff Writer
j* UF Humanities professor William Goldhurst says its
X; very confusing to be in his family because you dont
know what your name is.
His father is Harry Golden, noted syndicated colum-
X* nist and editor of the Carolina Israelite and is known
:£ as the Golden Goldhurst; his brother is Harry Golden
& Jr., feature writer with the Detroit Free Press.
:$ Another brother is Richard Goldhurst (called the
x Oldest Goldhurst) and is free lance writer.
X But the Goldhurst living in Gainesville is a 36-year 36-yearX
X 36-yearX old English graduate (Ph.d) from Tulane University. He
X has been teaching at the UF for 2 1/2 years.
X An author in his own right, Goldhurst explained that
j* his father changed his name for journalistic reasons
X; when he started to edit his small paper 20 years ago.
I remember visiting Dad in his newspaper shop when
X; I was 14, Goldhurst said.
He used to set type, do all the paste-up and put the
x paper together all by himself.
x Beginning then Goldhurst became interested in writing,
x however, I wouldnt say that I was a book worm as a
kid. I wasnt a haunter of libraries, stated the instructor
£ who has just completed two years editing of a freshman
$ English reader, Contours of Experience(Prentiss Hall,
£: publishers).
X In 1963 Goldhurst published a book entitled F. Scott
X; Fitzgerald and his Contempories from his doctoral
X research at Tulane.
When writing, an author should try to reach his
readers on their level, Goldhurst commented. Thats
what I try to do.
x He thumbed through a book on the desk in his Building
$: D office and adjusted his blue vest sweater.
X; He said his freshman English reader is the kind of
X reading I think is directed more to the students inter interx
x interx ests, instead of the professors.
ix I think you have here a collection of opinions repre repreX
X repreX senting American experience, a picture of the nation
X today, he noted.
X; Goldhurst said he began reading intensively when he
$: a senior at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio.

' :>*.. trllj
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* jj||| s Slj
He's Dr. Goidhursl To UF Students.., x

Dad used to read Shakespeare to all his sons wnen
we were young, he said. The memories brought a
pleasant smile to his face.
He described his dad as a man who greatly influenced
his interest in English and writing. And Harry Golden
still remains one of Goldhursts favorite critics and
advisors.
I get nothing but encouragement from all sides of my
family, he said. Theres absolutely no professional
jealously between any of us.
He looks at his teaching career as a great education
for the professor.
The humanities provides a foundation of past experi experience
ence experience that can change a persons life, inform him, help
him to think for himself, and understand the past and the
present.
In our knowledgeable faculty here we all borrow from
each other. I learn from the professors and students in
my classes.
Goldhurst believes the humanities is more closely
involved in the students approach to living and there therefore
fore therefore has more relevance for them than any other course.
He teaches one honors section where he has more in independence
dependence independence to choose his own subject matter.
The humanities as a major, he says, is an impossible
ideal. One needs a well-rounded background, and know
diverse fields.

Tyree Needs Students To Help
With Union Activities Board

By MIKE MA LAG HAN
Alligator Staff Writer
New man behind the presidents
desk at the Florida Union Board
of Student Activities is Larry
Tyree.
Tyree has a staff of 118 stu students
dents students working under his gui guidance.
dance. guidance. Tyree explained the or organizational
ganizational organizational structure: Five di directors
rectors directors report to him directly,
and each director has responsi responsibility
bility responsibility over three or four chairmen.
The chairmen have staffs varying
from three to eleven students.
The UF Board has nine different
committees handling everything
rom films, to
lances to speak- jHpyjfj
ers forums to jp^
fine art displays, ilp*
president hn '\ *!\
primary respon- i Y KEI
is coordinating the dif different
ferent different committees through his di directors.
rectors. directors.
He mentioned that he spends
about a fifth of his time recruit recruiting
ing recruiting personnel for the union board.
We could absorb about 50 stu students
dents students right now, Tyree said.
I feel there are many students
who would be working for the board
right now if they knew the oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity was here,* he continued.
I Furthermore, he atlded, many
students feel that you have to have
[ a special in to work up here on
the third floor.
That just isnt true. I need
people right now to work. They
will have a choice of many areas
to select from, he said.

The son of an Irish mother (Genevieve) and a Jewish
father, Goldhurst was raised as a Catholic. There was
no religious conflict in the family, he said. It was all
very liberal.
The foods the Jewish culture anywayits what you
eat, jokingly said the man whos tasted plenty of Kosher
pickels and matzoh ball soup.
Elected to Whos Who in America as an author and
educator. Goldhurst was invited to join the Authors
League of America; he is listed in Whos Who in the
South and Southeast, and Comtemporary Authors.
He received a Southern Fellowship for 1959 and 1960
when he did most of his reading for his dissertation.
The man who received his masters degree at Colum Columbia
bia Columbia University in New York City, has now embarked
upon a new writing project in an attempt to bring the
humanities curriculum up to the present time.
He will be the editor of a humanities study handbook
collecting essays on the current scene in America from
experts in various fields of study at the university.
It will concentrate on the cultural activity in Americai
today, Goldhurst stated, and will contain contributions in
art, philosophy, humanities, music and literature.
But for the time being its teaching that will occupy
most of his time. This week its Madame Bovary
in third period, and Art Through the Ages in seventh.

Tyree was one of three men
interested in the post of president
this past year. All three had talked
at length with Bill McCollum, past
president.
Tyree decided to stay in the
race when the other two younger
applicants went on the take other
posts on the executive board of
the Union.
Tyree stated that all chairmen,
directors and members of the
executive board are eligible to
vote. Tyree emphasized that all
these voting members came up
through the ranks.
When asked why he spends so
much time in campus activities,
he said all students have a prior priority
ity priority list of what they feel is im important.
portant. important.
I ranx academics, co-curn co-curncular
cular co-curncular activities and socializing
in that order. I put quite a bit
of emphasis on co-curricular ac activities
tivities activities because I feel they are
an integral part of the education educational
al educational process. Tyree added: Be Besides,
sides, Besides, I like to be part of the in

UF Debaters Finish Third
The University of Florida's debate team finished third in a
contest at Florida State University recently.
This has been the best performance of the year, according
to Howard Freeman, varsity debater.
There were eleven colleges represented in the senior tourna tournament.
ment. tournament.
UF debaters were John Delanceet, Norm Koestline, Richard
Quianthy and Freeman.
Freeman explained that the UF team finished ahead of Clem Clemson,
son, Clemson, Mercer and Georgia.
Quianthy finished in the finals in impromtu speaking.
Delanceet and Richard Smith will be going to the tournament
at Duke University this weekend.

->
group which makes the decisions.
Tyree came to the campus in
the Fall of 1964 after two years
of college in Birmingham, Ala.
At UF he renewed an old ac acquaintance
quaintance acquaintance from his high school
years Dick Thompson, who
was destined to become SG vice
president. Tyree and Thompson
had been roommates at a leader leadership
ship leadership workshop in Tallahassee for
high school leaders.
Thompson soon got his old
friend Tyree interested in the FU
Board.
Tyree served as treasurer and
chairman of the dance committee
before assuming the post of pres president.
ident. president.
Tyree credits McCollum as the
one person who, more than any anyone
one anyone else, has helped develop him
for the role his is now playing
on the Board.
Tyree is also serving in Buddy
Jacobs Student Government Ca Cabinet
binet Cabinet as Secretary of Inter-Uni Inter-University
versity Inter-University Affairs.



Rifles Continue Winning Ways

B\ JF FF DE NKEW A l TEH
Alligator Staff Writer
vVl tn some clutch shooting from
o-Captain Jon Gordon and Lee
oun g the Florida Rifles con coniuk,d
iuk,d coniuk,d their winning ways last
eekend at Lakeland.
The Gator marksmen tapped the
[fle ia Floria southern in a fiercely-con fiercely-conned
ned fiercely-conned match. The Florida Rifles
3 w sport a 16-1 record.
A.s the final two sharpshooters
oni each school took the firing

Alitz Will Coach UF Clinic
Leoy Alitz. Coach of the Wrestling team at West Point, will be
onductmg this years Wrestling Clinic at the University of Florida.
) be held this Saturday. March 5. in Florida Gym.
The clinic wall be in progress from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. All those
ntere'ted in wrestling are invited to attend.
Alitz is in his twelfth season as coach of the U. S. Military Aca Acaemy
emy Acaemy at West Point, and placed fourth in the 1948 Olympics tryouts
rhile competing at the 191 pound level. He spent his undergraduate
ays at State College of lowa and started his coaching career at
Isage. lowa, at the high school level. He held that position for six
ears, developing seven state championships, several conference
unners and never finishing lower than second in conference com cometitions.
etitions. cometitions.
Coming to West Point in 1954. he opened his career with a win
ver Navy and in 1958 became thepresident of the Eastern Inter Interollegiate
ollegiate Interollegiate Wrestling Coaches Association.
The clinic is being sponsored and underwritten by the UF College
f Physical Education and Health through the Department of Intra Intranural
nural Intranural Athletics.
Attention SENIOR & GRADUATE MEN Students-U.S. Citizens
NEIDINO NOMINAL FINANCIAL HUP TO COMPLETE THEIR EDUCATION THIS
ACADEMIC YEAR AND THEN COMMENCE WORK COSIGNERS REQUIRED.
SEND TRANSCRIPT AND PULL DETAILS OP YOUR PLANS AND REQUIREMENTS TO
STEVENS BROS. FOUNDATION, INC.
610-All ENDICOTT BLDG., ST. PAUL 1, MINN. A NON-PROFIT CORP.
UNDERGRADS, CLIP AND SAVEmmmmJ

In the DARK about
advertising ?
t
Univ Ext H H Florida
2832 H Union
jjl
PROFESSIONAL ART,
IDEAS AND SERVICES
FROM GATOR EXPERTS

line, tlie Gator marksmen and a
much-improved Florida Southern
squad stood dead-even in total
points scored.
Gordon and Young each shot a
257 score out of a possible 300.
This gave the Florida Rifle;- the
needed points for victory and push pushed
ed pushed them to a 1285 to 1270tnumph.
Miami's marksmen placed third
with 1229 points.
Top gun for the Rifle.'- was Jim
Waugh with 261 points. Gordon and

Young followed with _> 277 each,
co-captain Toby Muir fired a 256.
and Bob Moeller shot a 254 score.
I was ver> gratified to get
these wins." said Major Harley
Dick advisor to the Florida Rifles.
This Florida Southern ride -quad
is at least 70 points better than it
was at the beginning of the year.
They're going to be a troublesome
opponent for many rifle teams the
rest of the season."
Sgt. Joe Nave, coach of the Ga Gator
tor Gator sharpshooters also said he
was pleased with the victories.
lm happy the men shot as
well as they'did." said Nave. The
long traveling hours we spent driv driving
ing driving to Lakeland, plus the fact that
we shot late at night took a. toll
on their shooting sharpness."
This Saturday the UF marksmen
will host the state's top college
rifle teams in the All-Florida
Match. The competition will in include
clude include squads from FSU. Florida
Southern. Florida A&M. Miami,
and Stetson.
The Gator sharpshooters are
defending champions of this tour tourney.
ney. tourney. However, strong opposition
is expected from the Seminole
squad.
Y'ou can always expect a rough
match from FSU, said Dick. And
theyll be especially looking for our
scalp because of the defeat we gave
them earlier this year.
The Seminole slate stands at
27-1 going into Saturdays match,
the only loss coming at the hands
of the Gators. Benny Hainovitz.
Jeff Long and Warren Niles are
the mainstays in the FSU attack.
The Gators will counter with
Waugh, Muir, Young, and either
Gordon or Moeller.
To the winning team in the tour tourney
ney tourney will go a replica of the Theed
Memorial Trophy.

The Florida AlligatorJ

'. o
Wednesday. Nfarch 2. 1205 SP
W v ,. s
L
HERE WE GO AGAIN
The action was furious last week as Phi Kappa Tau edged by TEP
in Orange League murals play. Monday night. Sigma Chi defeated
Phi Tau. throwing the bracket into a three-way tie for the second
time.
The first time around, all the teams defeated AEPi and ended up
with identical 2-1 records. In the round robin play-off that ensued,
all three teams finished with 1-1 records. As one weary basketball
Tfr*
player said. Here we go again.
UF Fencers Need Money
Transportation money is apparently unavailable for one of the top
fencing teams in the Southeast to attend the National Collegiate
Athletic Association (NCAA) tournament at Duke, March 25-26.
Florida Fencers want to send a member to compete in each event,
but their funds are depleted from purchases of new equipment,
according to Jose Sasek. president and coach.
Sasek said that one of main objectives was to make Florida
Fencers the top collegiate team in Florida.
In a four-way meet in Atlanta in January. Florida defeated the
former crownholder of the Southeast, Georgia Tech, as well as Van Vanderbilt
derbilt Vanderbilt and Clemson. to take the entire meet.
An additional reason for going to the NCAA tournament would be
to test the ability of Sasek against the perennial favorites in NCAA
play -- University of Pennsylvania, Columbia. Harvard. Princeton,
Yale and other Ivy League schools.
Sasek has run out of challenging opponents locally and spends
most of his time coaching. His interest in fencing only goes back five
years, but he has already attained the titles of state foil champion
and divisional epee champion.
Left-handed fencers are the deadliest in the world, fencing
master Bela de Tuscan told Sasek when he introduced him to the
sport. De Tuscan, a Hungarian who was regarded as the number one
sabre coach in the country until his death in 1963, coached his pupil
for six weeks.
I always refer to fencing as the chess of all sports. For every
move a man makes, you have a countermove, Sasek explained.
Presently, Sasek is regarded as a contender for an Olympic berth
in 1972 or 1976. Whether or not he makes it depends on his oppor opportunities
tunities opportunities to fence against the best in the nation.
The NCAA tournament would be the best place for me to test
myself. Sasek added, and wed like to go even if we have to walk.
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Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday. March 2, 1966

MURPHT^^^
mi'iim SPRING SALE for the HOME
SALE STARTS THURSDAY, MARCH 3rdls SELLING DAYS

SHIRTWAIST
w /^r L I
2 s 5 sjflMk
Prints, check. itripts, plaids / )
as well as sc "I colors of / /
Dan River and Zentrel fab fabrics
rics fabrics make up these beauti beautiful
ful beautiful dresses. Women's and
Misses' sizes 12 to 20 and? §fw*ltf&W
l6i/ 2 to 24/ 2 Q'S
TWIN PAK
FLASHLIGHTS *Cnos>
with batteries SPECIAL
99 c
One regular and one / / Mtgfm S /
unior size on card. I Rj am ml m
Hard rubber with UJU amjm** j /
lang-up rings! / /

69c to 98c AEROSOL 4mnwh
SPRAY ASSORTMENT SPECIAL
9 $ 1 57. Ira
for A EACH OL^|
Choice of window cleaner,
wax, disinfectant, Stop-dust,
air fresheners, liquid starch |y|jji
and many others.

Chrome Plated or Bright Wire AITf 2-piece set 18-gauge aluminum CA^ 1 ?
CLOSET ACCESSORIES ...... moH TEFLON SAUCE PANS set
Regular 69c roll white A || REG. $1.29 TEFLON TREATED AAm
SHELF LINING PAPER £ rolls N '| IRONING PAD and COVER QO
Reg. 98c "Shelflex" Large Assortment of Handy M
LINING and EDGING OO PLASTIC HOUSEWARES each 94 C
Regular 69c "Firmgrip" A*lc 4 lb ba 9 ( a PP- 800 s< *- feet) AAm
RUBBER GLOVES pr. "FAS-GRO" GRASS SEED 99 C
Realistic but washable AIYm 12-qt. size lightweight AA
PLASTIC ROSES "* Oi PLASTIC PAIL 2 C
REG. 69c 42" white plastic A AAm 19" square Cordana covered A A
DRESSER SCARVES £ 16x20-inch wood framed AAm 36" length Fiberglas Tailored m mm
PICTURE ASSORTMENT OQ* TIER C.URTAINS pair
Polished Cotton Bib or Half M 60x11 -inch Fiberglas m
REGULAR 79c APRONS M MATCHING VALANCE 84
s i .

BEDSPREADS
Twin and full sizes
6-TRANSISTOR
RADIOS
Originally $ 99
$5.99
J\W*\ V So tiny ... yet so power powerfj
fj powerfj n. ful with a clear, true tone!
Plastic carrying case has
Spring salN handle and comes with ear-
SPECIAL phone and battery!
CARPETING RUNNER Ca'rpETi'nG
Continuous filament
100% nylon with rubber *Qf; I*l
backing. mnvTA