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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
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Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
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Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
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01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Tigert Cooperation Made Debate Possible

Leon Polhill, Young Democrat
Club president, yesterday explain explained
ed explained the whys and hows of possible
gubernatorial debates.
Polhill, also campus director of
Robert King Highs campaign, said
some possible misconceptions had
clouded the issue of alleged pres pressures
sures pressures brought to bear on either the
administration or Gov. Haydon

The Florida Alligator

Vol. 58, No. 101

Committee
OKs Eight
Os Cabinet
By MIKE MALAGHAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Eight members of Student Body
President Buddy Jacobs cabinet
appeared before the reviewing
committee of Legislative Council
yesterday afternoon.
The committee was unanimous
in its approval of all those who
appeared except for Wayne
Thomas, secretary of organiza organizations.
tions. organizations.
Dave Vosloh, Decision Party,
and Mike Bowen, Student Party,
both cast negative votes on Thomas.
They explained that while Thomas
has sufficient paper qualifications
he also had a poor attitude to towards
wards towards the committee.
Thomas entered the hearing
room with a statement, How long
is this damn thing going to last?
Both Bowen and Vosloh questioned
Thomas about his attitude con concerning
cerning concerning the importance of the re reviewing
viewing reviewing committee.
Thomas explained that he thought
the idea of review was good but it
was at an inconvenient time.
The committee of five consisting
Rnwon Bill Hester,
Tom Carnes, Decision; and Sam
Block, Student, began the pro proceedings
ceedings proceedings by setting up the ground
rules.
Sam Block stated that cabinet
officers were invited by Leg
Council to appear and were not
compelled to attend. He also point pointed
ed pointed out that according to the con constitution,
stitution, constitution, cabinet officers must
have a 2.0 average and be a student.
The constitution doesnt go beyond
that, said Block.
Block also clarified the points
that only 13 cabinet officers that
were at the last Leg Council meet meeting
ing meeting were invited to attend the
hearings.
Bill Gregg, secretary of alumni
affairs; Bob Imholte, secretary of
academic affairs; JayScheck, sec secretary
retary secretary of interior; Bruce Rogow,
secretary of finance; Ed Koren,
secretary of mens affairs; Beau
Smyth, secretary of public rela relations;
tions; relations; and Bill Chiara, secretary
of international affairs, were re reviewed
viewed reviewed by the committee and
passed unanimously.
The committee will take its
reports to Leg Council Tuesday
night for final action.
It will hold another hearing
Tuesday for the cabinet officers
who werent present at the Thurs Thursday
day Thursday meeting.
Here are a few interesting facts
that came out of the hearings:
(See CABINET, Page 7)

Burns.
The administration at Tigert
has cooperated with us all along.
according to Polhill.
Here is the procedure used for
setting up the debate as outlined
by Polhill.
First, Polhill contacted the Pub Public
lic Public Functions Office to ask for use
of University Auditorium. That

University of Florida

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GIANT JUICE SQUEEZER
John Farone and George Tamalis look over an exhibit to be shown
at the Engineering Fair starting March 10. This device is used to
make concentrated citrus juice.
Dllly Mlrchell Drill Team
Takes First At Mardi Gras

The UFs Billy Mitchell Drill
Team has swept the All-American
Drum and Bugle Corps Champion Championships
ships Championships in New Orleans.
Marching in the Mardi Gras
Venus parade, the Air Force ROTC
Squad took first place and the na national
tional national championship competing
with twenty teams from around the
country.
The UFs Gator Guard, which
took the honors last year, was un unable
able unable to hold their crown and lost

Bob Hope To Perform Here

Comedian Bob Hope will make his first
appearance on campus April 2 under sponsor sponsorship
ship sponsorship of the Arnold Air Society.
Col. William N. Boaz, head of Air Force
ROTC, told The Alligator that Hopes business
manager confirmed the engagement Thursday.
Hope and a troupe of other entertainers will
put on two live shows both in Florida Gym.
Time and further details will be announced later
Boaz said.
Boaz said Hope plans to perform on a big
stage in the middle of Florida Gym, and will
play to audiences on all four sides.
All net proceeds from the show, Boaz
said, will go to the Dollars forScholars Fund.
fin the D-for S program, the federal government

office explained to Polhill that any
type of political meeting not held
in the Florida Union Auditorium
must be approved by the Board of
Regents.
Polhill proceeded to go to Tigert
to solicit help in the matter. Both
Vice-President Robert B, Mautz
and Dean of Student Affairs Lester
Hale received the debate idea

to their arch rival.
The squad will now receive a
3-foot high trophy and the right to
march next year as honor guard
in the King Rex parade, the Mardi
Gras grand finale.
The team, which is led by Capt.
Norman Farmer, tactical officer,
and William Muench, cadet com commander,
mander, commander, left for New Orleans last
Friday. While there they stayed
aboard the aircraft carrier Lex Lexington.
ington. Lexington.

Friday, February 25, 1966

will match $9 for every $1 contributed by the
UF.)
Boaz said hes been working on getting Hope
since last summer.
The fact the popular comedian agreed to ap appear
pear appear probably was due in no small part to his
connection with the Arnold Air Society. Hope,
Boaz said, is honorary president of the national
Society.
First, I felt that, since hed never appeared
in North Florida or on campus, it would be a
public service to bring him here.
Secondly, I felt it would be an opportunity
to make several thousand dollars for Dollars
for Scholars.

warmly and said they would talk
to UF President J. Wayne Reitz
when he got back to town.
Monday, Dr. Hale called Polhill
and described the role Dr. Reitz
took to receive permission from
the Board of Regents. Reitz talked
to Broward Culpepper and through
the Chairman of the Board of Re Regents
gents Regents received permission to use

Electrical Rate Probe
For Campus Dwellers
Gets Under Way
By MIKE MALAGHAN
Alligator Staff Writer

Investigation has begun on campus electrical rates following a meet meeting
ing meeting of the newly-formed Electrical Rate Investigation Committee
yesterday in the office of UF Business Manager William T. Elmore.
Elmore started the meeting by stating that his office wished to
cooperate in every way and was pleased he could offer it to the com committee.
mittee. committee. He then explained he wanted the committee to have a free
discussion and since he wasnt on the committee excused himself

for the duration of the meeting.
Dr. Williard Stone, chairman of
the committee and head of the
Accounting Department in the Col College
lege College of Business Administration,
began the discussion by asking ex exactly
actly exactly what was the purpose of the
committee.
Dave Vosloh, who sponsored the
legislation that helped create the
investigation explained, We need
to know how the university arrives
at the rate they charge on campus
housing and if that procedure is
fair.
Vosloh then pointed out the fol following
lowing following related problem areas:
The University buys their
power from Florida Power on a
sliding scale at commercial rates
and charges fraternities and
sororities and the new married
U,u,in half two-and-a-half cents per kilowatt hour.
The current rate structure
for students is based on a re research
search research report that is now eight
years old. Eight years ago there
were fewer electrical appliances.
Married villagers are
charged five dollars to have their
meters checked. However, if the
meters are defective they are re repaired
paired repaired free and the five dollars
is refunded.
Clyde Taylor, president of the
IFC, informed the committee that
he is checking with the city on its
rate structure. Taylor wants to
(See ELECTRIC, Page 7)

the auditorium for the debate.
Asked why Kelly and High were
contacted first, Polhill said he
didnt want to contact the incum incumbent
bent incumbent until he could assure Burns
that other participants would show.
Polhill continued to point out that
High has accepted unconditionally,
while Scott Kelly has said hell
come only if Burns and High agreed
to attend.
Polhill then emphazied that the
Young Democrats would sponsor
the event only if all three candi candidates
dates candidates agreed to appear.
Burns has been sent a letter
with ten dates available for selec selection
tion selection of the day the Governor finds
most convenient.
As soon as we hear from
Burns, concluded Polhill, well
know if we have a debate or not.

KISSINGER
Kissinger
Is Next On
Forums List
Political scientist Dr. Henry A.
Kissinger will speak in University
Auditorium next Thursday night at
8:15.
Kissinger is being sponsored by
the Florida Union Forums Com Committee,
mittee, Committee, which just last week
brought British author Colin Wil Wilson
son Wilson to campus.
The Harvard University govern government
ment government professor writes frequently
for The Reporter, The New York
Times Sunday Magazine, Foreign
Affairs and Harpers Magazine. He
has been interviewed on the televi television
sion television show, Face the Nation.
His most recent book The
Troubled Partnership: A
praisal of the Atlantic Alliance
is being widely discussed.
In addition to teaching at Har Harvard,
vard, Harvard, Kissinger is a consultant to
the U.S. Arms Control and Dis Disarmament
armament Disarmament Agency and a faculty
member at the Harvard Center for
International Affairs. He also is
executive director of the Harvard
International Seminar.
Kissingers book, Nuclear
Weapons and Foreign Policy, was
the outgrowth of his work as study
director with a group of experts
organized by the Council on For Foreign
eign Foreign Relations.
The book won the 1958 Woodrow
Wilson Prize as the best book in
the fields of government, politics
and international affairs.



Page 2

:, The Florida Alligator, Friday. Feb. 25, 1966

S'
M WORLD
International
BLAMES U. S. ARMS . The commander of the Laotian neutralist
forces said Thursday inferior weapons supplied by the United States
was one of the reasons his troops were driven back on the plain of
jars by Communist Pathet Lao and North Vietnamese troops last week.
Maj. Gen. Kong Le told United Press International in an interview
that guns given the neutralist forces were mostly below standard.
He termed American military aid was just good enough to allow his
forces to stay alive.
BATTLE RAGES . Heavy fighting was
reported raging Thursday near Bong Son be between
tween between Viet Cong regulars and American ca cavalrymen
valrymen cavalrymen for the second straight day. Delayed
reports said U. S Ist Cavalrymen walked into
an estimated battalion 5OO to 600 men
south of Bon Son, about 310 miles northeast
of Saigon Wednesday.
National
TAX HIKE DISPUTE ... President Johnsons $6 million tax program
for Viet Nam war costs moved to the Senate Thursday under storm
clouds which threaten to wash out his plan to hike telephone and auto
excise taxes. The House voted 246 to 146 Wednesday to approve the
bill after narrowly squashing a GOP effort to eliminate the excise
tax increases. The Senate Finance Committee planned to begin its
hearings on the measure today. Although the House okayed the mea measure,
sure, measure, rebellious Democrats and Republicans signaled their opposition
to increasing the excises.
CITES INFLATION . House Republican Leader Gerald R. Ford,
Mich., declared Thursday that inflation will be the major political
campaign issue of 1966. At the same time, Senate GOP Leader
Everett M. Dirksen, 111., accused the Johnson Administration of
promoting inflation as a step toward fuller employment. However,
Dirksen said, what they have not told the American people is the
extent and cruelty of the burden they have placed on the very poor
through this policy of printing money at a rate twice that of our
population growth.
WEATHER DELAYS . S. Space Agency, plagued by fickle
weather and a loose rocket cable, Thursday called off the launch of a
new weather satellite at Cape Kennedy. The maiden flight of Americas
first Apollo spaceship remains set for today. The postponement of
the storm-hunter satellite Essa 2 came after blockhouse instruments
gave a faulty indication of liftoff for the 90-foot rocket 44 seconds
before the planned blastoff.
\
MUSLIM SLUM PACT . The Rev. Martin
Luther King met with Black supremacist Elijah
Muhammad Wednesday night in Chicago and
cracked a joke about them Genrcrin
boys, and agreed to form a common front
with the Black Muslims to fight slums. The
agreement to cooperate in slums and areas
other than slums came at the first meeting
between the two men.
Florida
SKYWAY PROPOSAL . Gubernatorial hopeful Scott Kelly has
asked Comptroller Fred O. Dickinson and Treasurer Broward Williams
to back his proposal to delay a decision on refinancing the Sunshine
Skyway until after the spring primaries. Kelly, in a telegram to
Dickinson and Williams Wednesday, urged them to help delay a decision
on the proposed $26.5 million refinancing in the best interest of the
public. He also said the issue should be removed from the campaign
as an issue.
ADVOCATES MORE FUNDS . Education must be the first res responsibility
ponsibility responsibility of state government and the financial efforts now being
made in this field by Florida must be greatly increased, State School
Supt. Floyd T. Christian said in Tampa Thursday. Christian, in re remarks
marks remarks prepared for delivery to the Governors Conference on Educa Education,
tion, Education, said the increased financial effort must be made not only to
meet increased enrollment needs but to upgrade salaries, achieve
higher quality, and to expand educational offerings.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone o( all advertisements and
to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
HO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments ol payment for any advertisement Involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day a/ter advertisement appears.
The Flor'da Alligator will not be responsible for more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices lor correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of iht University of Florida ..nd Is
mdtllahrd five times weekly except during May, June, amt July when It Is published st mi-weekly. On);,
editorials represent the official opinions of tlietr authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class
matter it the United States Pool Office at Gainesville.
I~ J

U.S. Troops, Cong Clash

SAIGON (UPI) U.S. and Au Australian
stralian Australian troops beat back ambushes
by Viet Cong desperately fighting
to protect valuable supply caches
30 miles from Saigon Thursday.
Teh Gls laid down a barrage of
artillery and machinegun fire that
Drug Addict
Revealed In
Mossier Trial
MIAMI (UPI) The states star
witness in the Mossier murder
trial was so addicted to narcotics
that he ran his children out of
the kitchen in order to shoot him himself
self himself with doses, a defense withness
testified Thursday.
Opening the 29th day of the first
degree murder trial of former
moder Candy Mossier and her
nephew, Melvin Lane Powers, the
defense continued picking away at
the character and veracity of con convict
vict convict Billy Frank Mulvey.
Candy and her alleged incestu incestuous
ous incestuous lover, Mel, are charged with
engineering the June 39, 1964,
slaying here of her rich husband,
Jacques.
Mulvery testified that two years
before the killing, Candy gave him
$7,000 in cash to have Mossier
murdered.
He also testified that Powers
told him in a Houston jail that he
had stabbed Mossier to death.
The defenses 22nd witness,
Robert Ray French of Houston, a
32-year-old former undercover
agent for the Houston Narcotics
Squad, testified that Mulvey had
been addicted to narcotics as
long as I have known him.

HHH Optimistic After
Viet Peace Mission

WASHINGTON (UPI) Vice
President Hubert H. Humphrey told
Republican and Democratic mem members
bers members of Congress Thursday he was
optimistic that U. S. objectives in
Viet Nam could be achieved but
there was no quick and easy
. v\
solutions.
The vice presidents report on
his 43,000 mile, nine-nation Asian
and Pacific tour drew praise from
members of both parties who at attended
tended attended the briefing at the White
Hmico
House GOP Leader Gerald R.
Ford said afterwards I believe
Republicans generally are
impressed with the administra administrations
tions administrations firmness against Commu Communist
nist Communist aggression in Viet Nam. On
the other hand, there is so much

Fidelity Union
Life
THE COLLEGE PLAN
Exclusively For
THE COLLEGE MAN
.. .Guaranteed By A
BILLION Dollar Co.
... Payments deferred
'til earnings increase
Campus Representatives
Mel Ward Geo. Corl
Dan Sapp
376-1208

killed 89 guerrillas and sent others
screaming into the jungle with their
clothing afire.
At one point, an American tank
commander called down small
arms fire on his own disabled
vehicle to knock off Communists
swarming over it in an effort to
cram hand grenades through its
openings.
Ir> the other major ground action,
U.S. Air Cavalrymen participating
in Operation White Wing battled
entrenched, hard-core regulars
near Bong Son about 300 miles
north of Saigon. They ran into such
heavy fighting they were forced to
pull back temporarily and leave
their dead and wounded behind.
Officials said casualties were
heavy on both sides.
U.S. officials disclosed these
and three other major hunt and kill
operations resulted in 189 guer guerrilla
rilla guerrilla dead Thursday and brought
the total for the current offensive
to 1,362.

Blaze Destroys Fra#
House At Penn State

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. (UPI)-
A fast spreading fire believed
triggered by faulty wiring destroy destroyed
ed destroyed the interior of a fraternity house
on the Pennsylvania State Univer University
sity University campus Thursday, injuring
three students and the house moth mother.
er. mother.
About 15 students and Mrs. Mar Margareath
gareath Margareath Yuengert, 67, the house
mother, were in the three-story
Sigma Nu fraternity house when the
fire broke out about 10 a.m., EST.
Mrs. Yuengert suffered from
smoke inhalation and was reported

diversity of opinion among Demo Democrats
crats Democrats in the Senate, and per perhaps
haps perhaps in the House.
Ford said The Democratic par party
ty party is badly split and I believe the
American people are somewhat
aghast that the Democratic party
is not unified in its position on our
policy in Viet Nam.

fe? ft
\ Youre having
l IjL v \ \ cocktails for two
I 1 £ V \ Youve arranged for a
\ private dining room
* V at newes supper
V, club n f wn Thought
of everything for a
l, memorable evening,
SO s^ort
* I/M with the suit you wear.
Show her that youre
I accustomed to these
/< situations. Wear a
' Jj 'Tropical
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0 suit. Cool, lightweight
f in the newest colors
and patterns.
Tradition styling by
Cricketeer and Deansgate
$59.95 and 65.00
/J 'DuPont Reg. T.M.
oihemcm
225 W. UNIV. AVE.
Free customer parking at rear of store.
l l ll "

Vietnamese special forcesoper
ating near Binh Tuh in the MekorJ
delta 60 miles southeast of SaigJ
killed 60 Viet Cong and found evil
dence that other bodies b ee l
hauled away. 1
U.S. Marines in Operation Do J
ble Eagle along the coast aboJ
350 miles northeast of Saigon killel
26 Viet Cong the first time thl
guerrilla forces they had been p Ur |
suing for four days decided to stanl
and fight. 1
The Ist Infantry Division J
Operation Mastiff, north ofSaiJ
gon, Killed 14 guerrillas insporaJ
die encounters. The operation ha]
yielded several large supply dump]
and a Viet Cong hospital hidde]
in the thick jungles and rubbed
plantations.
In the air war, bad weather over
North Viet Nam limited the num number
ber number of strikes to 10. But in the
south, U.S. planes flew 340combal
missions in support of grounc
operations.

in critical condition at Centre
County Hospital at nearby Belle-B
fonte. fl
Two students, Bryan A. Cir-B
costa, Washington, D.C., and Lewis
M. Powell, a senior from Temple
Hills, Md., were injured when
they leaped from windows on the
upper floors. An unidentified stu-1
dent was treated for a cut hand.l
Circosta, who jumped from al
second-floor window, was treated!
at the campus h?alth center and!
released. Powell had leaped from I
a third-floor window and landed!
in shrubbery. He was reported ini
good condition at the health center. I
John B. Hoyt Jr., a senior from I
Rochester, N.Y., was credited with I
discovering the fire in the base-1
ment of the luggage room. He
sounded the alarm to arouse the
other students.
The fraternity house, built in
1925, normally houses about 40
students, but many were in classes
when the fire broke out.
Firemen theorized that faulty
wiring in the basement, which had
recently been panelled with knotty
pine, caused the fire.



COUNTRY BOY PLANS LAW CAREER

Blaha Serves For The Fun Os It

By MIKE MALAGHAN
Alligator Staff Writer
George Blaha, a country boy
from Brooksville, was Secretary
of Legislative Affairs under Bruce
Culpepper and is president of the
University Religious Association.
Blaha has served the campus in
many capacities. Orientation,
homecoming, Florida Union Board,
Legislative Council, are just some
of his accomplishments in addition
to the top two positions.
What type of individual takes the
time to serve and lead in so many
areas?
When posed with this question,
Blaha said a combination of being
from a rural community and meet meeting
ing meeting the right people helped him
develop his potential.
A rural community encourages
youth to develop individualism in a
manner that an urban community
cant, Blaha observed. There
are only 17,000 people in all of
Hernando County, or the same
size as our academic community
in Gainesville.
Blahas parents are poultry
ranchers near Brooksville and
have always had an active interest

Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship
OF GAINESVILLE
SPEAKER: DR. WILLIAM DAVIS
HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT
TOPIC: "MATURAL LAW VS. MORALITY
IN 19th CENTURY AMERICA"
11 a.m., Sunday, FEB. 27, Room 324, Florida Union
EVERYONE INVITED

WtyM o| QpfyitiiMA
25 W. UNIV. AVE.
/. 'Trr HU /
; 8 Pil f v\ I
In Love With Things Authentic?
Th en See The Trim Young Shapes And I
Quaint Old Prints Os Our Just Arrived
Traditionals. Put Them Together In Lots Os
. Exciting Ways. Country Fresh Shades Os Blue, Mint,
Cornsilk And Pink. In Prints And Solids. Suits Coordnates,
Pants, Shorts, PoBoys, Blouses.
USE YOUR STUDENT CHARGE CARD. IF YOU DONT HAVE ONE.. .GET ONE.
FREE CUSTOMER PARKING ON LOT AT REAR OF STORE.

in the affairs of the community.
Mom was president of the PTA.
and in Brooksville that is about as
hot as a governors campaign,
he said.
His father, while never seeking
elective office, is a respected
businessman in this agricultural
community and usually takes a hand
in the election process.
Blahas first love wasnt always
politics and service. During his
early years in high school Blahas
main interest revolved around the
athletic field. At the time he had
only a passing interest in politics.
Blaha began his senior year with
high hopes in the sports arena.
He never played in competition that
year, breaking his ankle in football
practice.
Blaha sought and won the presi presidency
dency presidency of the student council his
last year at Hernando High School.
It is interesting to note that Bill
McCollum was president of Blahas
graduating class.
Between his junior and senior
years in high school, he met Buddy
Jacobs at the annual Florida Youth
Work Shop. At this work shop Blaha
first became interested in the con con\

\ con\ d-
M
M
GEORGE BLAHA
cept of leadership.
An awed country boy came to the
UF campus in the Fall of 1962.
He spent his first three months
at the student city as most fresh freshmen
men freshmen do and was satisfied in sur surviving
viving surviving the system.
He also renewed the acquain acquaintance
tance acquaintance of John Ritch, a budding
politico at the time. Blaha had
met Ritch at the youth work shop
and was impressed by the idea of
working in the upcoming political
campaign.
In December of that year he was
introduced to Byron Groves,pres Groves,presdent
dent Groves,presdent of Hume Hall and close asso associate
ciate associate of Student Body President
to be Paul Hendrick. Blaha said
hed be interested in organizing
half of Murphree Area on behalf
of Hendrick.
Hendrick won the election and
Blaha was included in his cabinet
as Undersecretary of Legislative
Affairs and Housing.

Simultaneously Blaha was be beginning
ginning beginning another career in the field
of religion.
Blaha, a Lutheran, joined his
student center and served on var various
ious various committees. He also became
active in the University Religious
Association.
Blaha explained that during his
freshman year he worked in poli politics
tics politics committees just for the thrill
of it.
Not until his sophomore year
did Blaha take these areas of
service serious enough to tie them
in with his future plans.
Blahas sophomore campaign
was a personal success. He or organized
ganized organized the whole of Murphree
on behalf of Frank Harshaw. While
Harshaw was losing the election
by over 600 votes he carried
Murphree by a narrow margin.
But, Blahas party still con controlled
trolled controlled the legislature and he was
appointed to fill the post of some someone
one someone who couldnt serve.
Asked why he worked very little
in Homecoming, Blaha pointed out
that his first and only job was co cochairman
chairman cochairman of the homecoming con contest.
test. contest.
After working with those girls,
I wasnt interested in anything
else, he mused.
Last year Blaha worked closely
with Byron Groves in organizing
the independents for Bruce Cul Culpepper.
pepper. Culpepper.
After Culpepper won the elec election.
tion. election. Blaha was appointed Secre Secretary
tary Secretary of Legislative Affairs. It had
been two years since he had last
worked with the executive branch.
I was really amazed how the
Leg Council had matured during
that time. Blaha said. When I
first became a member of the
Council, the meetings were real
short, all the members had been
told how to vote in caucus, so we
didnt need to debate.
Such was not the case this year,
Blaha assured. Men like Bud Robi Robison
son Robison and Skip Haviser encouraged
and fought for a new emerging
legislative body that possessed a
personality of its own, and, more
important a mind of its own, Blaha
explained.
This emergence was one of the
brighter marks of Blahas dis distinguished
tinguished distinguished campus career.
Asked what was his biggest mo moment
ment moment on campus, Blaha said that
being tapped for Florida Blue Key

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Friday, Feb. 25, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

stood out the most. He continued
to add that his work in the URA
and orientation had given him the
greatest pleasure.
It isnt that Student Government
isnt service, but rather that URA
and orientation are more service
for the sake of service, according
to Blaha.
During the past campaign Blaha
was asked by Buddy Jacobs to head
the independents for Jacbos. It is
unusual for a member of Florida
Blue Key to play that type of role
in a campaign, and Blaha said he
would not have done it for any
other man on campus. His close
friend had asked him to do it and
he felt he could not turn him down.
Blahas influence in this ad administration
ministration administration will be felt for the
coming year. In choosing his cab cabinet,
inet, cabinet, the man most counseled by
Jacobs was Blaha.
Blaha will be entering law school
in the fall.
I want to concentrate on the
books for awhile. I have felt I am
capable of doing better than a 2.4
average and want to have the time
to achieve a 3.0 in law school.
Blaha has been mentioned as a
possible presidential candi candidate,
date, candidate, but hasnt given the idea too
much thought.
Im not the candidate type,
he explained. There are others,
however, who think he may be.
In answer to an inquiry about his
post college plans, Blaha said that
he wants to return to Brooksville
and practice law in Hernando
County.
The possibility of serving in the
State Legislature arose and Blaha
commented that he would enjoy
living in Tallahassee for a few
months representing the folks from
Brooksville.
Blaha feels that the primary
function of the leader is getting
along with people. Beyond that a
leader must be able to get others
to work with him. He pointed out
that his success is actually the
result of the people who have
worked with and helped him.
Blaha agreed that there are
probably others like him on cam campus
pus campus right now. He noted these
students may never have the op opportunity
portunity opportunity to develop into a position
of leadership because they didnt
meet the right people early or just
because they didnt take an in interest.
terest. interest.

Page 3



Page 4

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 25, 1966

ALLIGATOR
EDITORIALS
theres trouble
in River City
TJf heres trouble brewing right here in ol River
w City, ladies and gentlemen, and its Trouble
spelled with a capital T.
A mass exodus is forthcoming in one of the major
departments in the College of Arts and Sciences
unless something dramatic is done to prevent this
occurrence.
Several maybe more of the best professors
at this University in one of the best departments
in this University are planning on leaving what they
term the stagnant, regressive atmosphere that
surrounds our fair campus. Greener pastures are
beckoning them elsewhere.
And the greener pastures do not represent mere
money.
No, ladies and gentlemen in River City, money is
not the main reason these outstanding professors plan
on leavning. Money may not even be a reason at aIL
They are simply tired of someone in the UF Ad Administration
ministration Administration hiring what they call warm bodies to
fill positions within the department, without regard
to excellence and quality.
They are tired of the anti-intellectual spirit that
pervades the cool North Florida air.
They are tired of state politics and all the petti pettiness
ness pettiness that accompanies it.
They are tired of the undynamic, backward leader leadership
ship leadership provided by their spokesman in Tigert Hall.
(And this does NOT refer to UF President J. Wayne
Reitz.)
They are tired of the Haydon Burnses, the Ed
Balls, the Wallace Hendersons, the Porkchop legis legislators.
lators. legislators.
They are tired, period.
It is premature at this time to name the depart department
ment department or to name names. But this will come in time
and it may be sooner than the Establishment
thinks.
Something drastic had better be done, and done
fast.
If not, the Brain Drain will begin in full force at
the University of Florida.
two sergeants
owo men from the United States Special Forces
have made big news recently. Sgt. Maj. Donald
Duncan and Staff Sgt. Barry Sadler.
Duncan, just discharged, has many credentials of
a military hero and was the solider selected last
July to brief Defense Secretary Robert McNamara
on Special Forces Operations. But he has ironically
made news by publishing an article in the February
Ramparts magazine, charging that American ser servicement
vicement servicement are dying in Viet Nam for a lie.
Duncans article contends the war is basically an
indigenous rebellion, that the attitude of own white
soldiers toward both their own Negro compatriots
and the personnel of the Army of the Republic of
Viet Nam is characteristically racist, that the use
of air power is strategically ineffective and that the
segment of the population we are supporting is
self-serving.
Generals William P. Yarborough and Joseph
Stilwell Jr., have replied to the article, as has the
Defense Department. Stilwell and the Defense De Department
partment Department have concentrated on a brief passage
describing the teaching of torture methods in Special
Forces school which they, of course, deny. In
context, Sgt. Duncan explains there was a subtle
suggestion that the torture tactics studied might be
used in extenuating circumstances in the field.
Gen. Yarboroughs reaction to the article was
shock at the distortions, misstatements and dis disclosure
closure disclosure of sensitive information.
While individual reactions will vary, we urge Daily
readers to digest this article along with the amount
of salt each wishes to take. The challenges posed by
Duncan warrant more than blanket denials from those
at whom they are directed.
The second sergeant in the news is still serving
active duty, although for Sadler active duty means
strum ming the guitar and singing poor songs. Sadlers
Ballad of the Green Berets is a smash hit and has
sold over 700,000 copies. This is regrettable, for the
lyrics are only a glorification of militarism.
Marshall Graney, a research assistant for the
University of Minnesota Family Studies Center, him himself
self himself a veteran of six years in the armed services,
is circulating a petition asking local radio stations
not to play the song.
While we do not advocate banning the distasteful
ballad from the air as long as there are listeners
who truly enjoy it we cannot help but view it as the
sort of commercial propaganda that always arises
in time of war.
The Minnesota Daily

Tlie Florida Alligator
'A Ii 0 Pt/iAw. 'PIm Tli£ TtaA
" And When I Come Home Luci Baines, You'll
Be There To Fetch My Pipe And Slippers"
JIM MOORHEAD'S
thinking out loud
/|A ne of the first remarks I remember hearing here at the UF
vi/ when I was an entering freshman -- before even Hello
there, Im your Orientation leader, and Cmon, lets go get a
beer was, C-Coursesaargh!
Many of us had come from high schools which had given us
insufficient preparation for the comprehensive courses which
awaited us during our stay in University College-- an unfortunate
fact which only clarified our ignorance of and unexposure to the
basic liberal arts subject matter the C-Courses had to offer.
As a result, there were plenty who fell by the wayside, victims
of a not unreasonable academic view that all college students
should have at least basic groundwork in the various liberal arts
fields.
One friend of mine who was, as I recall, winner of the school
Math Award his senior year really took it on the chin. All the
poor lad wanted was a degree in engineering, a field in which he
showed sparkling potential. busted them cold, was forced to depledge his fraternity, had to
face a measure of shame and humiliation back home before his
family and friends, and had to start over again for the first
time in his scholastic life. (He later made it, but a lot of others
never did.)
This recollection came to mind as I read an article in the
Education section of this weeks TIME Magazine. The knowledge
exposure, the article states, has long ago forced colleges to
abandon the idea of teaching students everything, resulting in
todays required courses, i.e., the C-Courses.
And now, the article reveals, all over the U. S., colleges and
universities are scrutinizing the value of these lock-step require requirements
ments requirements and, to a surprising degree, are dumping them in favor
of letting students form their own education patterns.
Many examples are cited at Yale, Amherst, Notre Dame
Harvard, Colgate, Brown ... and at Florida Presbyterian and
Sarasotas New College.
It doesnt represent an abandonment of the need for liberal arts
exposure. Rather, the article explains, much of the move toward
freedom of choice for students comes from a recognition that
thousands of college freshmen, better trained in their high schools
do not need any traditional basic courses. (Whether this is true
of Florida high schools is open to serious doubt.)
Liberalization works out in three forms: abandonment of many
required basic liberal arts courses; expansion of independent
studies by undergraduates, sometimes omitting classes al
together; and widespread dropping of grades as barriers that
keep students from taking courses outside their specialties.
The several programs have reflected various drawbacks and
some school administrators have rejected them outright feeline
that many students do not have the self-discipline or perhaps the
insight necessary for study on ones own.
Another obvious drawback to such flexible programs is th*
difficulty and cost of administering them. 6
It is perhaps naive to suppose that the University of Florida
plagued as It is with heavy enrollment, funds shortage and oressi
staff problems could hope to embark on a very large-scale
program of liberalized individual study for those students canahle
of benefitting from it, butwithanoverhaulof curricula now neces
sary in face of the anticipated changeover to the quarter svstem
consider.'* Seem ** deSlrab,e Se " *> to at lea"i

RON
Spence
fltjfayne Morse is a political renegade, n man
iHtl who has served in the United States Senate
as, first, a Republican, then Independent, and now
at least nominally, a Democrat.
But Wayne Morse is primarily a Socratic
gadfly who refuses to allow the bureaucratic
nature of Washington to drag him down to
conformity and stifle his voice of dissent in a
city which places so much emphasis oncon onconformity.
formity. onconformity.
In 1964, Morse was one of the two Congress Congressmen
men Congressmen who refused to give President Johnson a
carte blanche on the Viet Nam situation by voting
for the Johnson directive giving the commander commanderin-chief
in-chief commanderin-chief virtual war powers in an undeclared war
situation.
Now these past two weeks Morse has risked
the darts of social ostracism to repeatedly ques question
tion question and test the assumptions and policies which
lie at the root of this nations position in Viet
Nam.
He has not always been right. In fact, he may
be entirely incorrect, but nonetheless he is
pressing the dialectical discussion of this
struggle, which each day grows and grows with without
out without a solution in sight.
He and William J. Fulbright, controversial
chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Com Committee
mittee Committee have asked questions which have prompt prompted
ed prompted many to place them in close proximity to
those bearded ones who parade in the streets
with signs of protest.
Yet Morse has done this with the avowed
purpose of taking his plea to the people. Like
such men as George Norris, who preceded him,
Morse has stood where controversy grows,
rather than sticking to the policy of an Ad Administration
ministration Administration which is evidently unsure of its
future path.
If there is war, then let us declare it, he
seems to say. Whatever the stance, he feels the
people have a right to first know what the status
of the war is and, secondly, that they also have
the right to denounce and repudiate the growing
battle, if it is their desire through the votes
of properly-elected U. S. Congressmen.
And whether or not his point of view is correct,
this dissent is worthwhile. It is necessary if the
public is to fully understand and fully back what whatever
ever whatever move is made.
It is also a welcome sight in an Administration
which increasingly was becoming one in which
dissent was frowned upon and consensus became
a concept overshadowing all else -- perhaps
even truth or correctness.
Such men as General Gavin, foreign relations
expert George Kennan and even Foreign Rela Relations
tions Relations chief Fulbright have serious doubts about
the virtues of expanding the war in Viet Nam or
the continuation of the present policy.
These men are not wild-eyed radicals, in incapable
capable incapable of rationality. They are men who share
sincere beliefs that all is not right with the
present policy, with a strong foreboding that the
situation is growing worse, not better. Until the
declaration of war is made, such men have the
right to discuss the merits of the American
presence in the war.
Unfortunately, the debate should have occurred
years ago. It is perhaps unfortunate that it is
so late. Agreement is needed and America needs
to be settled on its path in the growing brush brushfire
fire brushfire war. Important decisions must be made, ones
in which the lives of millions of Americans may
well be at stake.
Patriotism or blind followings of administra administrative
tive administrative or presidential policy cannot and should not
determine the future of America in a war long
past the time in which world wars can be fought.
Limitations are necessary, as well as the dis discovery
covery discovery that America cannot fight all wars at all
places against all foes at all times. As General
Gavin said, we can overcommit ourselves.
No, Virginia, neither President Johnson nor
Robert McNamara nor General Westmoreland
nor Wayne Morse nor Fulbright, nor anyone in
this nation has a monopoly on truth. If demo democracy
cracy democracy is to be the rule of this land, then let all
who are in the decision-making process have
their say, while there is still time to talk.
We thank those young men who are in ie
Nam giving their lives for this thing we call
freedom. We also thank those older statesmen
who question the basic premises behind our
position there, trusting that these men arc not
cowards nor traitors, but rather pragmatists
who have valid questions which must be an answered
swered answered by the Administration.
We can ask the Johnson Administration for a
frank discussion of Viet Nam. Morse and Ful Fulbright
bright Fulbright have.
They were no less American for so doing.
We should be thankful that dissent is yet possible
in a time when troubles grow by leaps and bounds.
Renegades and gadflies are necessary even
in a consensus society.



Levin and Cross defend our rights

Ladies and Gentlemen
of the Academic Community:
The disciplinary probation
of Messers. Levin and Cross
is another page in the regret regretable
able regretable history of the fight for
academic freedom.
The issue of whether one
agrees with what these per persons
sons persons advocate has nothing to
do with their rights of free
speech and expression.
Personally, I find many of
the goals advocated at the
Florida Free Speech Area
either regrettably naive or
impossibly Utopian.
However, I feel that such
programs should find a sound
board in any university com community;
munity; community; and that persons who
advocate these doctrines are
entitled to exercise their
rights to freedom of SPEECH
AND PRESS on a university
campus as well as on a local
street corner.
Florida is supposed to be
an advanced southern uni-

Cason, RFK 'unaware

Comrade Editor:
In reference to Comrade Casons editorial of
February 23rd:
Pm quite sure that the editor is totally un unaware
aware unaware as I am quite sure Mr. Kennedy must
be, unless he is either ignorant of history or
working for the Communists of the manner by
which Communism takes over a country.
We may use for purposes of demonstration
the communist takeover in Central and Eastern
Europe after the Second World War.
It was well known, of course, that the Russians
were in control. However for appearances sake
they were forced to hold elections in these na nations
tions nations to elect parliaments and prime ministers,
etc.
In all nations the Russians posted soldiers at
the polls to help the populace make their selec selections
tions selections properly. This worked in most nations
where the people were used to being pushed
around for centuries.
In Hungary, though, where the people were
accustomed to more than 1,100 years of freedom,

to our readers
Dear Readers:
Many letters have been exceeding our
modest 250-word limit on letters. In the
interest of better letters, we're extending
this limit to 500 words, since the previous
limit was being ignored. This means you
can now have two double-spaced, type typewritten
written typewritten pages. Letters which exceed this
generous limit will be cut. If you wish to
write more than 500 words, submit your
article to the Speaking Out Editor. And we
still like short letters better than long
letters.
The Editors
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Speak i Out

versity. Word has it that we
are a trend setter in the south southeast.
east. southeast. Nevertheless, any edu educational
cational educational institution which re refuses
fuses refuses to tolerate persons who
choose to differ with
established policies is neither
just, academically sound, nor
a leader.
A university is the home of
ideas. No university should
censor ideas whatever their
source or nature.
Persons on a college level
should have obtained enough
maturity of intellect to decide
for themselves what is right,
and what is improper. The
idea that we must have our
sources of dissent and opin opinion,
ion, opinion, in effect, censored re reflects
flects reflects a juvenile and Victorian
attitude to all of us on the part
of the Administration.
Furthermore, there can be
no question but that the Ad Administration

the Russians were unsuccessful with this tactic.
Here is where I will draw my comparison.
The Communists were able to put only a few
men into the parliament, and by using the lie
that there should be some Communists in the
cabinet in proportion to the amount of commu communists
nists communists in the nation, forced Ferenc Nagy, the
Prime Minister, to put two Communists in the
cabinet.
Is this what we mean to accomplish by allow allowing
ing allowing the Viet Cong to participate in any South
Vietnamese government as Comrade Kennedy
wishes us to do? If it is, then there is no point
in having American soldiers fight and be killed
there. We should just hand Viet Nam over to the
Communists, as well as the entire world.
Communism is like a cancer, a cancer that
must be completely cut out or it will continue to
kill, maim, and destory the very life, the very
American Way of Life that allows people to be
free.
Peter G. Bakos, 2UC

ministration Administration is seeking to
do nothing less than close new
avenues of opinion open to us.
Certainly, Mr. Levin, Mr.
Cross and their ilk are not
being protected by the univer university
sity university for their common welfare.
On the contrary, they are be being
ing being oppressed, punished, and
academically molested be because
cause because they challenge the pow power
er power structure.
Lets not forget that our
forefathers fought for the very
freedom being denied these
students. Lets not forget that
these freedoms are guaran guaranteed
teed guaranteed to all of us in the U. S.
Constitution. Lets not forget
that men are dying in the rice
paddies of Viet Nam at this
very moment in an effort to
protect and enlarge the scope
of these sacred freedoms.
In the words of Voltaire:
I (may) disapprove of what

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you say, but I will defend to
the death your right to say
it.
Certainly, liberty of thought
is the life of the soul. We all
know that men are far more
likely to settle a question when
they discuss it freely than
when they must fight for even
the right to express their
ideas.
With these thoughts in mind
I urge all members of the
student and faculty bodies to
prevail upon the administra administration
tion administration to drop charges against

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Friday, Feb. 25, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Mr. Levin and Mr. Cross.
Lets establish a suitable
free speech area on campus,
where persons of all persua persuasions
sions persuasions may sound their opin opinions.
ions. opinions. Free speech is one of the
building blocks of our demo democracy.
cracy. democracy.
The time has come for the
University of Florida to grow
up. We must demand, free
speech now for these indivi individuals
duals individuals so that we may all share
of this right and liberty in the
future.
Harvey Martin Alper, 2UC

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 25, 1966

TALENT SHOW

G/77Y ILAMI
A persian dance described as
provocative by the photographer
was performed.

r vl
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:r
;'> JH .U L Vt_'^.3s^';t '-~''^.'.
H m- m al
. 9* BB
l|H M 8
V;:; -v
& w >
> H. l > ''' y: : '- imM
MARIA TORRES
Maria Torres danced Malaguena
with Juan Ponce. Both are mem members
bers members of the Latin American Club.

Worldly
Talent
Samples
-V .-
A variety of nationalities was
**
presented at the International Tal Talent
ent Talent Show last Friday in the Univer University
sity University Auditorium.
Trophies were presented to the
Campus Fire Singers for indepen independent
dent independent group act, David Miller for
independent single act, the Persian
Club for club group act and Nasar
Nathan for club single acting.
Aziz Shiralipour, director of the
show, said the attendance was
greater than ever before. The en entire
tire entire auditorium was filled.
International Beauty Queen
Jayne Sandefur and her court will
preside over an international ball
to be held tonight.

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Maurice Kadi, Naim Sarkis,
Ghassan Nachawi and Samir Itani
stepped out in a parody of a mid middle
dle middle eastern folk dance called Al-
Kabka.

SHAH SHARMA
Mrs. Shah Sharma danced the
Rajasthani which is known as
a dance for lovers. Mrs. Sharma
represented the India Club.

* nr *"*
ROLF TSENG
Song of Red Seeds, was sung
by Rolf R. Tseng of the Chinese
Club.

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(From Page 1)
find if off-campus fraternities are
listed as a commercial enter enterprise
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Tom Kennon, chairman of the
mayors council, has the job of
finding what is the average num number
ber number of kilowatt hours used by each
villager. This will be.broken down
for each village.
Stone summed up the efforts of
the hour-and-fifteen-minute meet meeting
ing meeting by arranging a list of infor informational
mational informational data that the committee

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\/ xuc Dion ic not availftb 6on April 7, November 3pplic3ble Isritt. i
northwest orient J (Application must be accompanied by $3.00) *| j
j Make check or Money Order payable to Northwest Airlines, Inc. j
'

Electric Rates Committee

will need before it can proceed in
making any recommendation.
Stone is asking Elmore for in information
formation information on how the rate structure
is arrived at, the type of-policy
plants and grounds has concerning
the repair of meters, the special
status of the Flavets, an invoice
of the last twelve months stating
the cost the university has paid
for all its power and what attitude
the business office has on the use
of a sliding scale for its customers.
Stone said he will also write

Florida State University and the
University of Miami asking what
policies they have for the estab establishment
lishment establishment of electrical rates.
After Stone, Taylor and Kennon
complete their homework, they
will meet next Friday at 3:30 p.m.
in Stones office.
Dean of Student Affairs Lester
Hale, another member of the com committee,
mittee, committee, was absent from the pro proceedings
ceedings proceedings because he was out of
town.
Alligator Makes
Military Fiasco
The Military Ball is not this Sat Saturday
urday Saturday as was stated in yesterdays
edition. It is Saturday, March 19.
Also the captions on pages 9 and
11 were reversed under the pic pictures
tures pictures of President J. Wayne Reitz
and military officers.
We apologize.

lIOPIC'A
AIIIQAtOR
For Best Ad Results
UNIV. EX: 2832

sessk I l
. w illiriiMria a ..
* I § |WCT|
n-tfc 4 vP*
i :
- Wy W|,
Bl Btfl
~ Bjk,
M hl
IVESTIGATION COMMITTEE
Special committee created by Legislative council and Dr. J. Wayne
Reitz to investigate electrical rates charged to on-campus housing
meets in William Elmors office. (L-R) Tom Kennon, Clyde Taylor,
Dr. Williard Stone, and Dave Vosloh.

Honor Court
Appointments
Announced
New Honor Court appointments
have been, anounced by Herb
Schwartz, recently elected chan chancellor
cellor chancellor of the Honor Court.
The appointments were made on
February 16.
Harry Meshaw and Dan Carl Carlton
ton Carlton were selected as Attorneys
General and Jerry Bennett as their
assistant.
Bill Goddard was chosen as Chief
Investigator for Prosecution.
Jim Harrison was appointed
Chief Defense Counsel with Wilson
Crump as his assistant.
Bill Camper was named Chief
Investigator for Defense.
FBK Applications
Can Be Picked Up
Applications for Florida Blue
Key, honorary leadership organiz organization,
ation, organization, can be picked up at the
Florida Union Information Desk
starting today.
The organization will tap new
members March 11.

Friday, Feb. 25, 1966, The Florida Alligator.

Cabinet
Hearings
(From Page 1)
Ed Koren, secretary of mens
affairs, is going to FSU to find out
how that campus has such a variety
of vending machines. Koren is
convinced that UF can have more
and better vending machines and
will report to a special committee
of Tigert administrators after Ips
return from Tallahassee.
Bob Imholte, secretary ofac-r
ademic affairs, is a member of
MENSA. That means he is in the
top two per cent intellectually on
this campus according to tests he
has taken.
Bruce Rogow announced that
organizations that submitted au automatic
tomatic automatic requests for funds were
no longer safe. He pointed that
the Engineers Fair is a self selfsupporting
supporting selfsupporting organization and he
expects there will be a few such
groups this coming year.
CHAIRMAN
ELECTED
Dan Carlton was elected
chairman of the Mayors
Council Thursday night suc succeeding
ceeding succeeding Tom Kennon. Remain Remaining
ing Remaining offices will be voted on at
next weeks meeting.
1 "I

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 25, 1966

Igator classifieds]

for sale
1966 DUCATI 350 cc Sebring, 32hp,
5-speed, 15 miles, fully guaran guaranteed,
teed, guaranteed, save SIOO off regular list
price. Sale price $649. Easy terms
available. The Cycle Shop, 324 NW
Bth Ave. 378-3660. (A-100-3t-c).
CORVAIR 4-bbl Carburetor, com complete
plete complete with adapter. Ready to install.
Call Carl Heishman at 378-3384.
(A-100-2t-p).
i.. f
1965 MOTOROLA STEREO. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition, new diamond
needle. Call 372-9268, rm. 557
Murphree J. $55. (A-100-3t-p).
BARKLESS BASENJI PUPS. AKC
registered. Grand sire champion
CH, Fulahill of the Congo. Excel Excellent
lent Excellent termperament. Males SIOO and
up. 472-2408 after 5. (A-100-st-c).
H-Modified, full SCCA Specs, new
ABARTH engine and Blue Streaks.
Also trailer. Must sell to finance
Formula Vee. Call 378-4973. (A (A---100-3t-nc).
--100-3t-nc). (A---100-3t-nc).
EXTRA CLEAN MODERN trailer.
Air conditioned, carpeting
throughout. Awning excellent
home for couple or student. SISOO.
Must sell immediately. Call 376-
1350 after 5:30 p.m. (A-97-ts-c).
for rent
AVAILABLE NOW. 1 bedroom
modern air conditioned apt. Near
Univ. and Medical Center. Adults
only, no pets, lease required. S9O.
Ph. 372-3488 or 376-4360. (B-98-
ts-c).
NICE CLEAN LARGE APT. Avail Available
able Available now. Near campus, water fur furnished.
nished. furnished. $65 monthly. Call 376-
8819. 17 SW 24th St. (B-98-4t-c).
ONE BEDROOM air conditioned,
fully furnished apt. Convenient to
campus. S9O monthly. Call 376-
3211, ext. 5226. After 5 p.m.,
372-6417. (B-99-st-c).
COMFORTABLE ROOM, light kit kitchen
chen kitchen privileges, use of phone; by
day, week, or $28.50 per month.
2 blocks Cl. 378-4645. (B-100-
2t-c).
STUDENT ONLY. Air conditioned
efficiency apt. or trailer. Single
students or married couple. Near
Univ. $75 per month. Ph. 372-
5182. (B-99-3t-c).
NICE CLEAN 3 ROOM APT. Pri Private
vate Private bath and entrance, water fur furnished,
nished, furnished, near campus. $65 month.
1813 NW 2nd Ave. 372-0139 or
372-2946. (B-99-st-c).
BRICK HOME. 2 large bedrooms,
utility room, separate dining room,
close to Univ. 26 SW 24th St.
Available March 3rd. Call 372-
6254. (B-101-lt-c).
' 4*- .-£
AIR CONDITIONED 3-BR House.
April occupancy, near campus.
3 or 4 males or females. Call
Charlie Mayo, Town & Country
Realty, 376-4664. (B-95-ts-c).
lost-found
LOST Black wallet with personal
papers. May keep money. Contact
C. A. Robuck, 1240 SW 14th St.
(L-99-3t-p).
LOST Small Green Box with sil silver
ver silver charm bracelet and charms.
Reward. Contact Marsha Laite,
372-2759. (L-99-3t-c).

wanted
RECEPTIONIST. Residency of 2
years or more required. Typing
needed, state qualifications and
references. Write P.O. Box 12427
Univ. Sta. (E-93-ts-c).
ACCOMODATIONS WANTED for
single male older student living
alone. Any quiet, private location
for trimester 3-B. Contact: Arnold
M. Kramer, P.O. Box 541, East
Palatka, Fla. 32031. Or call col collect,
lect, collect, 325-3912. (C-97-st-c).
Kelp wanted
FULLER BRUSH CO. needs part parttime
time parttime sales help, male or female,
with car. Average earnings $35-
SSO for 15 hrs. work. Write to H.
Silver, 1028 Clearwater Dr., Day Daytona
tona Daytona Beach, Fla. (E-85-ts-c).
PART TIME HELP. Morning or
evenfhg, $1.25 per hour. Call Ed
Wyatt, between 6-8 p.m. Ph. 372-
3082. (E-99-st-c).
FEMALE GRADUATE STUDENT
to share home. Must have own
transportation. $35 a month. Call
372-1859. (C-100-7t-c).
services
UNITED RENT-ALLS. We rent
most anything. Roll-away beds,
trucks, all tools, party equipment.
Call us for all your needs. 376-
2835. 626 NW Bth Ave. (M-75-
ts-c).
NOW OPENING. Teddy Bear Nur Nursery.
sery. Nursery. 3 departments, complete in infant
fant infant department. Planned program
for children over 3. Central heating
and air conditioned. Ph. 376-0917.
1214-1/2 NW 4th St. (M-95-ts-c).
DUE TO POPULAR DEMAND Tena
is extending her specialty, FROST FROSTING
ING FROSTING for average length hair. $lO.
Call Tena at Milady's Beauty Salon,
376-3802. (M-96-2tf-c).
LIKE CHICKEN? Sigma Phi Ep Epsilon
silon Epsilon is selling box dinners Sun Sunday,
day, Sunday, Feb. 27, 12-6 p.m. Eat at
the House or have it delivered free.
SI.OO donation, proceeds go to
Alachua County General Heart
Fund. (M-101-lt-p).
personal
LAST EVENING'S meeting of the
Denis Diderot Society of Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville will be unavoidably cancelled.
Everything is written up yonder.
(J-101-lt-p).
iticM
TONIGHT & SATURDAY!
Wjt I BLOOD-LUSTING ll
*t SPINE-TINGLERS SI
I CALTIKI I
I 'TORMENTED I
I MACABRE I
Ihypnotic eye|
I SEE IT WITH I
I SOMEONE WHO CAN §
cARRYYOUHOME^I

I personal
TO BERNARD. HAPPY BIRTHDAY
TO A GREAT BROTHER AND
SON. DAVID, MOM AND DAD.
(J-101-lt-c).
real estate
NW SECTION, central air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home.
On high wooded lot. Reasonable
down, no qualifying. Call 372-5209.
(1-96-1 Ot-c).

t|N.W. 13th St at 23rd Road I
[ Telephone 378-2434 |
STARTS TODAY
lataue wood
puimmeii
f mono Daisy cun/er ]
l ED BB
Marls lonile
top First Area
1 hits Showing |
I 16 stjSbtloo [
m, fmmmmuWam
I Most 8 | (?K flA v HU# SEIMI jQr
Ir 5 We.
I £ FRANK m 3 IT DARES TO PROBE I
IfS SINATRA ** A WOMANS INTIMATE DESIRE'I

| real estate]
APT. HOUSE. 4 blocks from cam campus.
pus. campus. 9 furnished units. Owner can
live in one apt., rent free, manage
the others, and have monthly in income.
come. income. Present gross monthly rents
are $560. Reasonable down pay payment.
ment. payment. Call W. D. Mason, Realtor,
c/o Ernest Tew Realty Inc., 376-
6461. (1-93-ts-c).
THE BEST TO YOU FROM DOB DOBSON.
SON. DOBSON. Personal and complete real
estate and insurance service. TOM
DOBSON AGENCY, 2908 NW 13th
St., 372-1473. (1-72-ts-c).

autos
1961 MERCURY
tomatic, radio, heater, S6OO. Also
1964 Ford Pickup, take up pay.
ments. Call 376-0854 after 6 d m
(G-101-st-c).
1965 VW, excellent condition. p*.
relli radial tires, rear stabilizer
bar, radio. Call 372-4637 (G
101-3 t-p).
1956 T-BIRD CONVERTIBLE.
Price $950. Jim Thornton Motors
2008 NE 23rd Blvd. 376-9706
(G-101-st-c).



CLASSIFIEDS

autos
*
1957 CHEVROLET V-8, 4-door
sedan, automatic transmission,
power brakes and steering, heater.
Excellent transportation. $l5O.
Call Lawrence, 378-4838. (G-101-
2t-c).
12:45-3:30-6:20-9:10
JOSEPH E LEVINE #
HAUCUIO' Mastroianni
o\^Jj e Jhtalian
Style
to (MAUI NCTUMS IMAM CMHKS ST'VAI 0 MSI COtolD"
AT 2:45-5:35-8:25 ONLY
CHPTS. 9-10-11
IRON,CLAW
m §
c\ wornaiVs
chAStity is
I a sty in the 1
OOVIIS tWO
|§ 010 lUISII PROU'CI'
il SUN-MON
| ONLY I
1-3-5-7-9
L#
inqmac Beqnuns
Hadei/ifeEye
' 'Plus !
THE "STRING BEAN" I

YOU WILL BE GRIPPED BY
burton's acting and
ritts direction!"
SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER
s great
as realistic and believable!' 9
: mjmMsk -new YORK times
.? f|!| f,|-r' A film without a flaw!
LONDON DAILY SKETCH
Get out of the cold and
see it* Its brilliant!
EVERY RESPECT
admirable,
masterly portrait."
Br n THE NEW YORKER MAGAZINE
Ww The Spy Who Came In From
' W: the Cold'crackles excitingly
(V with suspense. Coosepimples!
'Hk'f I. %MT Chilling!" MIAMI HERALD i
107 3:07 A BEAUTIFULLY MADE
HHMHMj 5:07 7:07 THRILLER. SPLENDIDLY
I J Jfl I 9:07 ACTED!" SEVENTEEN MAGAZINE I

autos
1962 VW. Excellent condition. En Engine
gine Engine just rebuilt. New white side sidewall
wall sidewall tires, radio and heater. $325
equity and assume $36 per month
payments. Call 372-0755 after 5
p.m. (G-87-ts-c).
1962 MERCEDES B. 2205, 1960
MERCEDES BENZ 190 SL sports
car convertible. Bargain. Call 376-
8869. (G-90-ts-c).
*
1958 CORVETTE, 4-speed trans transmission,
mission, transmission, fuel injection engine, good
tires. Must sell. Call 378-4189.
(G-99-3t-c).
*
1964 WILDCAT CONVERTIBLE.
Sharp. White with black top and
interior. Loaded, including air
conditioning, bucket seats. New
condition. $2,400. Listed new at
$5,400. Will trade. Call Buzzy
Green, 376-2597 or 376-9666. (G (G---99-st-c).
--99-st-c). (G---99-st-c).
1955 CHRYSLER V-8, 4-door, au automatic
tomatic automatic transmission, radio, heat heater,
er, heater, $l5O or best offer. Call 378-
4993. (G-99-3t-p).
*
NEED CASH
IN YOUR POUCH?
JL
£ELL THOSE THINGS
YOU DON'T NEED
WITH

Blue-Eyed Blonde Follows
Roommate Beauty Queen

A blue-eyed, blonde-haired
pussycat from Tiger Country"
captured the Miss International
Beauty Contest.
: I was so excited so sur surprised
prised surprised I forgot about everything
else, said Jayne Sandefer, the
20-year-old honey from Alexan Alexandria,
dria, Alexandria, La.
Jayne was chosen queen over
17 other girls entered in the con contest
test contest in University Auditorium Mon Monday
day Monday night. Friday night 10 girls
were advanced to the finals.
Second and third place winners
*
forming the queens court are
19-year-old Jacquelyn Modessit,
representing Kappa Delta, and 21-
year-old Patty Effron, represent representing
ing representing Decision Party.
Diane Mims, an 18-year-old,
representing Pi Kappa Phi placed
fourth and fifth was 20-year-old
Linda Lou Graves representing
the Persian Club.
The contest was based on talent,
beauty and personality. It was the
second time the contest had been
held by the Board of International
Activities and the second time a
Delta Delta Delta girl won.
Last years queen was Suz Ann
Hull. Jaynes roommate. I
I studied dancing when I was in
grade school and high school and
thought I would do a pantomine
dance of Eliza Dolittle taken from
George Bernard Shaws My Fair
Lady, said Jayne.
When Jayne went on stage to
perform her dance the record
player would not cooperate and she
admitted being furious and con confessed
fessed confessed she was tempted to go
storming across stage to get it
started.
When asked by master of cere ceremonies
monies ceremonies Bob Norris what advice
she would give to girls entering
college she said. I would tell
them to be themselves and not to
go running after the stereotype
image of a campus coed.
At first my mind was a com complete
plete complete blank, but then I remembered
what I used to tell the freshman
girls at Louisiana State Univer University
sity University when I was a freshman coun counselor
selor counselor during my sophomore year,
she said.
Jayne transferred here in Sep September
tember September as a junior and is majoring
in advertising. After graduation
she hopes to serve as an airlines
hostess on an overseas airline

company for a few years before
settling down to a job with a com company
pany company or magazine.
This certainly has been the
best Valentines Day Ive ever
had, she said.
In addition to receiving a trophy

YOU CANT DRIVE A
RAILROAD SPIKE WITH A
BAG OF MARSHMALLOWS
o-
IT'S A PRACTICE FROWNED UPON IN
TRACK-LAYING CIRCLES. NINE OUT
OF TEN RAILROAD EXPERTS AGREE :
WHEN DRIVING RAILROAD SPIKES,
USE A HAMMER. IF YOU WANT TO
GET A JOB DONE RIGHT, USE THE
PROPER TOOLS. THE SAME PRIN PRINCIPLE
CIPLE PRINCIPLE APPLIES TO ADVERTISING. IF
YOU HAVE A PRODUCT OR SERVICE
TO OFFER MEMBERS OF THE UNI
VERSITY COMMUNITY, THE PROPER
TOOL IS THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR.
The
1
Alligator

Friday, Feb. 25, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

and a bouquet of red carnations,
Jayne won more than SSO in prizes
from local merchants.
Ill have to take the trophy
home for the summer. Mother
would have a fit if she didnt see
it, she said.

Page 9



Page 10

I. The Florida Alligator. Friday. Feb. 25. 1966

* ,. m. M.^SSni
-
r MT JgplHi z iMB^-
? ; lm 1 T^W^r
* | > # r w \

Crowded living conditions have forced refugees in
Hong Kong to build homes on Diamond Hill. This
living area is usually wiped out when typhoons strike
the small country. WUS helped this settlement by
organizing a student workshop to help relocate the
refugee families. These homes are overrun with

TUBERCULOSIS IS GREATEST PROBLEM

This Japanese tuberculosis patient was a student
at a WUS school and is now being treated at the WUS
WARD IN THE Murayama Sanatorium. The Japanese
WUS committee estimates that at least one per cent

HELP OTHERS--

WUS HEtPS PEOPLE

disease and most of the families are starving. WUS
executive Makoto Fujita took these photos last year
on a trip through Asia. In India, students can live
comparatively well on the United States equivalent
of 10 cents a day. The cost of living in Asian coun countries
tries countries is very low and donation from the United States
send thousands of students through school.

of the 720,000 students in Japan need chest X-rays
and a number will subsequently need treatment. WUS
is trying to raise money for X-ray exams and treat treatment
ment treatment of needy students.

'^l^B
:.V. '*.r , 5, \ *' v/
i,SL\v .> \? V % :--"
STUDIES ON COT
Poverty and lack of housing do not dim the spark of learning in India.
By day, this young Indian student uses his cot for a chair and his chair
for a desk. Other Indian students are housed by WUS from funds raised
by American students. WUS recently contributed $4,400 for an X-rav
unit which was installed in the Medical Faculty of Allahabad University.
This will piovide medical care for a student population of more than
7000 students.

WORLD
UNIVERSITY
SERVICE
By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Most beauty contests judge beauty and make money
for the sponsors.
The Beauty and the Beast Contest also makes money
and thats how the winners are judged. The Beauty
and Beast team which raises the greatest amount of
money will win trophies for their fraternity, sorority
or dorm area.
The money is given to a good cause. The World
University Service, recipient of over $2,000 from
UF students last year, is a world-wide organization
which builds dorms and supplies food and books for
students in foreign countries.
World University Service (WUS) Week starts next
Monday and UF students will be asked to donate funds
to WUS. The money will be distributed by Interna International
tional International WUS for needy students and universities all
over the world.
WUS has been doing most of its work in the Asian
countries. Recently it moved into South America.
There, higher education faces three major problems.
They are a general shortage of funds, the lack of
planning and coordination and the lack of contact
between the different sections of the university com community.
munity. community.
In Latin American there are over 190 million
people. Over 70 million of those over the age of 15
cannot read or write. WUS would like to change this
educational deficiency.
High in the Andes Mountains of Peru, an exciting
experiment in higher education is taking place. The
University of San Cristobel de Huamanga, founded
in the Spanish colonial period, is making a great
effort to adapt itself to the needs of the backward
region. WUS is lending a helping hand.
The university was reopened in 1958 when the city
of Ayacucho became populated after it had been dead
for several centuries. WUS has helped to build dorms
and supply food and materials to the students.



I Thant Asks
kid To Education
I The General Secretariat of the
Inited Nations, U Thant, said the
96 os were the Decade of Devel Development.
opment. Development.
IHe challenged organizations,
luch as WUS, to recognize the
l-eedom of resources and use
It wisely.
I I believe our enemy is ignor ignoring
ing ignoring ignorance of the scale
If our resources, ignorance of the
lew techniques of growth, ignor ignortnce
tnce ignortnce of the possibility of a bold
lew crusade for humantitysphys humantitysphysical
ical humantitysphysical liberation.
[ U Thant, in a speech before a
banish student organization, said
[he difference between the rich and
[he poor in the world was becom becoming
ing becoming more widespread and was im impressing
pressing impressing itself deeply upon man mankind
kind mankind as a whole.
Investment in resourses is in inseparable
separable inseparable from investment in
men, U Thant said. He called for
education on a mass scale to go
along with material development.
In the words of the poet Auden,
We must love each other or we
must die, U Thant told the Dan Danish
ish Danish students.

STUDENTS HELP BUILD DORMS

Students at WUS schools often
work part-time to put themselves
through college. The picture was
taken in Korea where girl students
work in a box-making factory for

Health In Asia
By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Tuberculosis isnt very much of a problem in the United States any anymore.
more. anymore. But, WUS is still concerned with it.
The most serious problem facing students in the Asian coun ries
TB. The disease strikes hardest in the crowded cities of Hong Kong,
Thailand and Singapore.
Starvation and gross lack of food intake are not longer ourn amo
the students of the countries represented, but calorie-intake s 1 re
mains sub-normal in many countries.
WUS has found student nutrition is generally good among s u e
residing in university housing, often bad among non resi e >
Students often suffer from psychological problems at foreign uni
sities. There is a great need for qualified counselors and adequate
psychiatric facilities. The language barriers in foreign coun ries a
contributing factor to the students' proniems.
WUS officials met last year on the campus of the Lniversi y o
long to discuss student health services in Asia. e> ma
recommendations to universities and set up gui e ines
follow. The recommendations include:
Data on TB collected systematically. -nnnpra-
Universities should appoint qualified dieticians, u e r jt'ibnal
Uve canteens can contribute significantly to the solution of nutritional
problems. , nf
Health education should preferably be imparte m form
seminars and students should be required to take pa
of physical training or recreation.
Governments and universities should be made awareoMhe
for comprehensive student health programs and encouraged
their development. WUS should continue to suppor ca r shogld
rent costs of various health programs in Asia and in p
act as a clearing house for information and advice on a wide range
health and medical facilities.

HELP THEMSELVES

. 'Jr 2
- .
; a
* , & i.
NEW UNIVERSITY FOR PAKISTAN

The new WUS Centre at the University of Karachi
will house foreign and Pakastani students. Construc Construction
tion Construction was financed by students in other countries.
The Center will include a reading room, cooperative

scholarships. The work center
opened in 1963 to provide work and
to produce income for an expanded
scholarship program.

studentThave health problems

Health is one of the greatest problems facing stu students
dents students in Asian schools. WUS has made available
medical equipment and supplies to assist health
services. Here a student patient is examined in the

stores and common room facilities. Pakastani stu students
dents students are also helping in construction of a hostel for
25-30 students. International WUS has contributed
over $20,930 toward the new school.

a M J. J
GIRLS WORK FOR SCHOLARSHIPS

The newly opened University of
San Cristobal at Huamanga was
built mostly from funds raised by
WUS. The University is located
high in the Andes Mountains of

Friday. Fpb. 25, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

WUS dispensary at Rajshahi University in Pakistan.
WUS has made proposals for better health in the
schools.

Education The
Key To Hope
A wind of liberty is blowing
irresistibly in our continent, said
Professor Mauricio Lopez, South
American Secretary of the World
Student Christian Federation in a
speech delivered in Geneva.
Great numbers of Latin Ameri Americans
cans Americans are fed up with the colonial
role that history assigned them so
long ago. They want to move fast,
Lopez said.
WUS has moved into Latin Amer America.
ica. America. It can play an important role in
helping the universities break down
the walls each has built up to pre preserve
serve preserve its autonomy, according to
Hans Dali, WUS general secretary.
Very few staff members are em employed
ployed employed full time. The professors
arrive to give lectures and then
leave to attend to private jobs.
There is very little feeling of be belonging.
longing. belonging.
There is no doubt in my mind
that WUS can bring real contact
into the university system and play
an important part in the future of
higher education in Latin Amer America,
ica, America, Dali said.

Peru and is dedicated to teaching
its students practical subjects to
help them develop their communit communities.
ies. communities.

Page 11



I This
I Space
| A
Iv
la |
I i
1 *
a v
lb To el
1 r
e t
I 1 1
I s I
I e
'3 AA
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I s
Call
lUniv.
I Ext I
2832
Ask
I For
D
| i A |
Is d
P v
1 e
| a r |
y t
I |
s
i I
n
8

SLOANS TO S6OO MARION FINANCE "Since 1945
"f--222
-222 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.
376-5333

Oran ere

ADDRESS NOTICES
TO ORANGE AND
BLUE, INFORMATIONAL
SERVICES OFFICE
Campus Calendai

Turn in Campus Calendar items to Public Functions
Office, Florida Union.
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS ELECTORIAL BOARD: Today,
3:30 p.m., FU 212.
MOVIE: Today, 7 & 9:30 p.m., MSB Aud.. Oklahoma.
U OF F CHESS CLUB: Today, 7 p.m.. FU 215.
FLORIDA BLUE KEY: Today, 3:30 p.m., FU 324.
GYMNASTICS MEET: Today, 3:30 p.m., Fla. Gym. Florida
vs. Dade County Jr. College.
WRESTLING MATCH: Today, 7:30 p.m., Fla. Gym. Florida
vs. Dade County Jr. College.
BADMINTON CLUB: Today, 8 p.m., Norman Hall Gym.
Everyone welcome; for information call 372-6354.
FLORIDA CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: Today, 7 p.m., FU
Johnson Lounge.
TOLBERT-YULEE HAYRIDE: Today, Circle M Ranch,
7-12:30 p.m. Open to everyone. Area residents $2.50 per
couple, others $3.00 per couple. Transportation provided
from Alberts Pen at 7, 7:30, 8 p.m. Tickets available in
Area Offices & Alberts Pen. Includes: dance, bon-fire,
food, hayride.
LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL: Today. All Legislative Council
members must turn in their affiliations to Student Government.
FU 309, by 5 p.m. today.
PANHELLENIC RUSH: Rush will be extended until Feb. 25.
GYMNASTICS MEET: Sat., Feb. 25, 7:30 p.m., Fla. Gym.
Florida vs. Furman.
SIGMA CHI DERBY: Sat., Feb. 26. Broward Field. Parade Parade-1
-1 Parade-1 p.m., Derby-2 p.m.
SWIMMING MEET: Sat., Feb. 26, Fla. Pool. F'lorida vs.
FSU. Freshman 1:30 p.m., Varsity 4 p.m.
MOVIE: Sat., Feb. 26, 7 & 9:30 p.m., MSB Aud. Run Silent
Run Deep.

Administrative Notices To Students, Faculty Sc Staff

STUDENTS
PROGRESS TESTS
Students in the following courses are expected to take the
following tests. Each student must bring a No. 2 lead pencil
and will be required to use his University student number.
MS 206 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, March 1,7 p.m.
Students whose last names beging with: (A- L ) report to
Matherly 2, 3. 4, 5 6. 7,8, 9 10, 11, 12, 13. 14 or 16;
( M Z ) report to Matherly 102, 105. 108, 112, 113, 114,
115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
MS 207 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, March 1,7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin with: (A- L ) report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (M- Z ) report to Peabody
101, 102, 112 or 114.
MS 109 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, March 3,7 p.m.
All students will take the MS 109 Progress Test in Walker
Auditorium.
MS 205 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, March 3,7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin with: ( A- L ) report to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16;
( M Z ) report to Matherly 102. 105, 108, 112, 113, 114.
115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
MS 208 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, March 3,7 p.m.
All students will take the MS 208 Progress Test in Walker
Auditorium.
General Notices
ENGINEERING FAIR EXHIBITS: Engineering societies and
individuals planning to have exhibits in the 1966 Engineers
Fair scheduled March 11-13, should submit a brief outline of
plans, along with space requirements, no later than 5 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 28.
DANCE TONIGHT: There will be a dance tonight, 8 12 p.m.,
in the Broward Hall Recreation Room. Music will be by the
Playboys. Admission is 35? for all males, except those from
Hume Hall.
PL A CEMENT INTER VIE WS
(Sign-up sheets are posted in Placement Office, Bldg, H. All
are degree-level positions. Asterisk indicates summer em employment
ployment employment available for juniors. Interviews will be held in
Florida Union unless otherwise indicated.)

BLUE BULLETIN

Page 12

CHILDRENS MOVIE: Sat. Feb. 26, 2 p.m., MSB Aud.
Mr. Magoo, and 1001 Arabian Nights.
DUPLICATE BRIDGE TOURNAMENT: Sun., Feb. 27, 1:30
p.m., FU 215. Students, Faculty, and Staff. $.25 per person.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ORGANIZATION: Sun., Feb. 27,
6 p.m., Lutheran Student Center. Organizational meeting for
election of officers.
FLORIDA HUMANITIES SOCIETY: Sun., Feb. 27, 8 p.m.,
203 Anderson. Discussion: The Day of the Locust. by
Nathaniel West. Faculty & Students invited.
JUDO INVITATIONAL: Sat., Feb. 26, all day, Fla. Gym.
FLORIDA CHEERLEADERS CLINIC: Feb. 28 thru Mar. 1
3:30 p.m., Fla. Field. (In case of rain, Fla. Gym.) Questions
will be first day of clinic.
ANr AL STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST: Mon., Feb.
28, is .ast day to enter photographs. Apply FU 315.
irC SPRING FROLICS: Sat., Mar. 5, 8 p.m., Fla. Gym.
Ticket sales: Mon., Feb. 28, noon 5:30 p.m., FU Box Office.
General public $2.00 per person. No ID needed.
ROTC MILITARY BALL: Mar. 19, 9 p.m., Fla Vi Gym.
Ticket sales: today thru Mar. 19, noon 5:30 p.m., FU Box
Office; Cadet & Spectator. Tickets also available at Army Hq.
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: Sun., Feb. 27, 3:30
p.m.. Fla. Gym. Ticket sales: today, 9:30- 5:30 p.m., FU Box
Office.
ORIENTAL DINNER: Wed., Mar. 2, 6p.m., FU Social Room.
Ticket sales: today thru Mar. 2, Intl Center & FU 315. $1.50
per person.
CLERAMBARD: Today & Sat., Feb. 25& 26, 8 p.m., Norman
Hall Aud. Ticket sales: today noon till curtain time; Sat.,
6 p.m. till curtain time. Norman Hall ticket office.
BIA INTERNATIONAL BALL: Today, 8 p.m., Ramada Inn.
Ticket sales: today, Intl Center and at door. $1.50 per couple.

JOBS AVAILABLE: The Student Employment Office, 124
Tigert, has jobs available in Food Service. Hours can be
arranged. Also, job available for research assistant, junior
or senior with science background, to work for chemical
engineering. Students interested in these jobs should contact
the Student Employment Office.
DEADLINE FOR APRIL GRADUATION: Monday, Feb. 28, is
the deadline for removing grades of I by candidates for
April, 1966, graduation.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION: The Graduate Record
Examination will be given Saturday, Feb. 26, by the University
Board of Examiners in Walker Auditorium.
SUMMER CAMP WORK: Students interested in summer
camp work should contact the State 4-H office on campus "by
early March.
FACULTY & STAFF
HOSPITALISATION BOOKLETS: Revised Blue Cross
Blue Shield hospitalization booklets are now available to all
current members at department sign-up stations. These
booklets show the benefits effective Jan. 1, 1966. Booklets
are also available at the Personnel Office, 109 Tigert.
FACULTY CLUB LUNCHES: The UF Faculty Club is open
five days a week for members to have lunch, 11:30 a.m.
1:30 p.m.
MARCH 1: TORN WALL, LANG & LEE (CPA) Acctg.
NORFOLK NAVAL SHIPYARD ChE, CE, EE, IE, ME, NE,
Met. E. NASA EE, AE, ME. IE, Math, Ps. SWIFT & CO.
-- Agri., Fruit Crops, Soils, Ent.. Veg. Crops, Agri. Econ.
CENTER FOR NAVAL ANALYSES -- Math, Ps, NE, EE, Stat.,
Econ. and related areas.
MARCH 1-2: ALLSTATE INSURANCE CO. -- All majors
(including LLB) interested in the training and developing
program.
MARCH 1-2-3: GRAND UNION CO. -- Any major. CORN CORNING
ING CORNING GLASS WORKS -- All Engineering, Math, Ps, Chem.,
Acctg., Econ.. Bus. Admin.
MARCH 2: GEORGIA STATE HIGHWAY DEPT. -- CE.
SWIFT & CO. ChE, ME, Chem., Ent., EE, IE, Agri.
SUN LIFE ASSURANCE CO. OF CANADA -- Any major.
SCOTT PAPER CO. -- ME. ChE, Bus. Admin., Acctg. BUR BURROUGHS-WE
ROUGHS-WE BURROUGHS-WE LLCOME & CO. -- Any major with background
in biol., pharm., chem. CAMPBELL SALES CO. -- Mktg..
Gen. Bus., all majors interested in sales.

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 25, 1966

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Wilson Asks 'Why Isnt Man A Gad?

I one of Britains most colorful literary figures, Colin Wilson dis discussed
cussed discussed his existentialistic philosophy last Thursday in University
auditorium. Guest of the Forums Committee, this young innovator
Ihilosopher and writdr has been called the most worthy thinker
lince D. H. Lawrence or Huxley.
I Referring to ;( his greatest works, The Outsider and Beyond the
Outsider, Wilson described a great revolution that has been quietly
taking place in science and technology. He proposed a new existen existentialism
tialism existentialism in simple, everyday terms.
I Man is not, as Sartre says, a useless passion, but something that
Lan make the mind self-stimulating.
The human race is at the moment on the point of some evolutionary
leap to a completely new stage, began Wilson. He claimed man is little
Lore than an animal -a mind trapped with the business of mere
[physical existence. He must recognize that the freedom of the mind is
so tiny it hardly exists and must try to discover instead of simply
[accepting from others.
Wilson claims this change will begin with the dominant minority,
the intellectual spearheads who constitute not more than five per cent
of the population.
Now this dominance is hard to express. There is no adventure,
little pioneering left. Man cannot survive without adventure. Much of

I Sigma Chi
I Derby
Sigma Chi Derby will pre pre
pre sent a show of UF sorority
H girls talents and beauty Sat-
I urday at 2 p.m. The Derby
I will begin with a parade from
I the ROTC fields to Broward
Field where the action will
I take place.
Derby is the UFs nationally
known field day for beauties
and brawn, where sororities
I compete for trophies and the
I Sweepstakes Trophy.
I Sigma Chi invites all the
I campus to Derby. In case of
I rain the Derby will be held in
the Livestock Pavillion.,
_
| CORRECTION §
Yesterdays Alligator Reported
Incorrectly That Alison Conner
Was Running Unopposed For Vice-
President Os WSA. She Is Opposed
By Irene Minkoff.

ill J in the
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I Weekenders
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H I B up to any Avis counter or reserve
k ahead, as most Avis Weekenders
k B H I k do In a matter of minutes youre
on your way you, your guests,
your family, in a new Plymouth or
other fine new car. Yours for a weekend of fun!
Avis Weekenders enjoy a special rental rate,
too 1 This one low rate covers all your costs I \MM C
msur anoegasoline, oil even what you may W m
need along your weekend way! RENTA CAR
a| l Avis today. Join the Avis Weekenders
Membership drives start on Fridays as a rule!
fss PER DAY-1H HR Mllf]
UNIVERSITY INN MUNICIPAL AIRPORT
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-

Applications Available
For Study In Italy

Applications are now being
accepted by FSU for study at its
new University Study Center in
Florence, Italy, from Sept. 1. 19G6.
through March 31. 1967.
Enrollment is limited to 100
120 state university students and
is restricted to sophomores, jun juniors,
iors, juniors, seniors and a few graduate
students. The fields of study will
be art, Italian language. English
literature, history. classics,
humanities, religion and philos philosophy.
ophy. philosophy.
Students must have at least a
2.5 average, must show elemen elementary
tary elementary proficiency in Italian, must
have approval of parents if under
21 and the approval of the depart department
ment department chairman in their present
major area of study.
Applications should be made to
Dean E. L. Chalmers, Jr., of the
College of Arts and Sciences.
Those received after March 15
will be considered on a space
available basis.

our criminal trouble, neuroses and anxiety results from this five per
r:ent going to pieces without an external stimulus.
Why is man not a God? Wilson asked. We continuously look to
something else tor inspiration... Christianity has served its purpose;
it is dead but refuses to lie down.
Man is becoming the dominant one in a new dimension -- the mind.
It started with Newtons scientific thought process. Some of us are
now capable of purely intellectual responses for an hour or two, but
len we get caught up in routines reverting to animal processes again.
Art. music and orgasm are small parts of the complete separation
from the mortal, accidental, physical environment we seek.
Wilson feels the only way to reach this new stage is through com complete
plete complete disregard of physical self-indulgence and physical language. A
whole new communication is needed.
All language, hence ideas, today related to the mind are so sloppy
and vague. We have no meaningful abstract language. Eastern thought
is devoted to feeling and purpose. The West has science and reason reasoning.
ing. reasoning.
I am trying to combine the language and thought processes of both,
so that the everyday man can repair his engine, the physical world and
his mind, Wilson concluded.

Students will pay fees totaling
$1,152 for the seven months of
study. These will cover registra registration.
tion. registration. insurance and room and
board. In addition, round trip
chartered plane fare will be
approximately $325 a student.
Deadline Today
For URA Offices
University Religious Associa Association
tion Association (URA) will elect officers for
the coming year this Sunday at 2
p.m. at the annual URA Assembly Assemblymeeting
meeting Assemblymeeting in Room 208. Florida
Union.
Following past URA policy, nom nominations
inations nominations from the floor will not be
allowed, and candidates for office
must fill out a nomination form in
the Department of Religion Office.
Room 207. Florida Union. The
deadline for submitting nomina nominations
tions nominations is 5 p.m. today.
Present URA president George
Blaha invites any UF" student with
a 2.0 average who is interested
in the URA to apply.
Friend In Need?
MADERA, Calif. (UPI) Dennis
Wisener will think twice before he
testifies in court on behalf of a
friend again.
Wisener told the court that a
friend, accused of parole violation
for drinking in a bar, couldn't
possibly have been in the tavern
specified in the charge, because
they both were in another bar. The
judge fined the friend SIOO and
sentenced Wisener, also a parolee,
to 90 days in jail for drinking in a
bar.

FOREST PARK
BAPTIST
CHURCH
1624 NW sth AVE
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 AM
MORNING WORSHIP || : 00 AM
TRAINING UNION 6:30 PM
j EVENING WORSHIP 7:45 PM

ji ,n
AWARD PRESENTED
Dean Thomas L. Martin (right) receives the Distinguished Service
Award from State Road Board Chairman Floyd Bowen.

Student Engineers
Attend Breakfast

Thursday Tau Beta Pi and Sigma
Tau engineering fraternities spon sponsored
sored sponsored a scholarship breakfast for
203 upper divisionengineering stu students
dents students who made the Deans list
last fall.
These students represented 20%
of the entire upper division of the
engineering college.
The breakfast, held at the Hub,
featured as guest speaker Florida
State Road Board Chairman Floyd
Bowen. Bowen praised the honored
students for their academic

'ls God Dead? 1 Topic Os Lecture

Are our concepts of God out outdated?
dated? outdated? Do we need new ones? How
can we know or experience God
personally? Is God dead?
Tonight these questions cur current
rent current among both college students

Friday, Feb. 25, 1066, The Florida Alligator,

I w~*
British philosopher and writer
spoke as guest of the Forums
Committee. He has been claimed
the most worthy thinker since
D. H. Lawrence.

acheivement and remarked that
the State of Florida will look to
you to assume a large part of the
responsibiltiy for continued growth
and expansion.
Bowen later received the College
of Engineering Distinguished Ser Service
vice Service Award which was presented
by Dean Thomas L. Martin. The
engraved medallion and citation
which Bowen received is the first
of its kind awarded by the College
of Engineering.

and theologians will be dis discussed
cussed discussed in Johnson Lounge, Florida
Union at 7:00 p.m.
This is the last of a series of
lecture-discussions led by Bob
Letsinger.
Over 100 students have attended
the first two lectures, which are
presented by Inter-Varsity Chris Christian
tian Christian Fellowship. Tonight future
plans, dorm discussions, and so social
cial social activities will be announced.
Refreshments will be served.
PATRONIZE
GATOR
ADVERTISERS
£ /M / /i /#. / in
THEYRE A
l GOOD GROUP

Page 13



Page 14

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 25, 1966

SPORT PROFILE

UF basketball coach Norm Sloan, not the kind of
fellow who plays favorites, admits nobody has ever
come closer to being the apple of his eye than Paul
Morton.
Morton, a senior Gator from Rochester, N. Y.,
has earned Sloans respect over the years and
more so this year than ever before.
This boy is the type you would want every ath athlete
lete athlete to be, the type you would want your son to
imitate, says Sloan. Hes not a great athlete by
any stretch of the imagination but he does more
with his ability than any boy Ive seen in a long,
long time. You have to admire and respect Paul and
his story is certainly a good example to young boys
about what can be done with the right attitude.
Morton has scored 37 points and grabbed 18 re rebounds
bounds rebounds in the last two games, rugged encounters with
national powers Vanderbilt and Tennessee. Against
the fifth-ranked Commodores he garnered a career

UF Will Host
Judo Tourney
The UF Invitational Judo Tourn Tournament
ament Tournament will be held tomorrow morn morning
ing morning starting at 9:30 in the south
end of Florida Gym.
A special judo clinic will com commence
mence commence at 9:30, followed by the
invitational intercollegiate com competition.
petition. competition.
The clinic will be conducted by
Harvey Agee, a second-degree
black belt and retired U.S. Marine.
Following the clinic will be com competitions
petitions competitions in the following weight
divisions: 135, 150, 165, 180,
195, unlimited.
Participating in the tournament
will be the University of Florida,
Florida State University, the Uni University
versity University of South Florida, Broward
County Junior College, St. Peters Petersburg
burg Petersburg Junior College and Miami-
Dade Junior College.
Outstanding UF contestants will
be Kayo Saji, who has won more
championships than any judoist
who has ever attended the UF;
Doug McDilda in the unlimited
division; Martein Carroll in the
180 lb. division; Jack Haney in the
165 lb. division and Charles Jones
in the 150 lb. division.
Assisting in the direction in the
tournament are Mike Powell and
Chuck Hoag.
UF Judo coach Richard Reisin Reisinger
ger Reisinger invites all interested students
and spectators to attend. There will
be no admission and stands will
be set up for spectators.
Coach Reisinger said it will be
the biggest judo event of the year
at the UF. There will be some
really excellent and exciting com competition
petition competition I know few people will want
to miss.
Sporfs Briefs
UFs swimming Gators gets an another
other another crack at FSU this Saturday
in Florida Pool. Coach Bill Har Harlans
lans Harlans tankers hope to square ac accounts
counts accounts for a lopsided loss early in
the year in Tallahassee. The meet
starts at 1:30.
Bob Murphy, National Amateur
golf champion, will lead the un unbeaten
beaten unbeaten Gator golfers into the two twoday
day twoday Florida Intercollegiate Tourn Tournament,
ament, Tournament, which gets underway today
at Cape Coral. The Gators have
won eight straight matches going
into their first tournament of the
year.
Coach Jimmy Carnes takes the
track team on the road for the
first annual Jesuit Invitational in
Tampa. The meet promises to be
loaded with top track talent, in including
cluding including Floridas Scott Hagar and
Billy Tucker, among others.
*
Coach Bill Potters tennis team,
which has lost only to the rain thus
far this season, journeys to Winter
Park Saturday to face the Rollins
netters.

Paul Is A Hustler

I SOME CHICKS I
I will I
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I For ,nner At I
I NOW at I
J Corner of NW Uth St. & 16th Ave. I

high 25 points and added 10 rebounds.
Paul is a senior, a boy who has been around
here a long time and has had to work for everything
hes gotten, Sloan. This year I started him
early and he was in a slump so I was forced, reluc reluctantly,
tantly, reluctantly, to bench him. He could have ruined our basket basketball
ball basketball team by hanging his head and becoming a
senior club-house lawyer. Instead, he just worked
harder and fought his way back onto the first team.
Hes a leader when he is on the first team and
just as much of one when he isnt. Whether he plays
first team and scores 25 points against a team like
Vanderbilt, or doesnt even play, Morton is a valu valuable
able valuable member of our team.
Running into scholastic trouble, he was forced to
drop out of school after his freshman year. He went
into the Army, making several all-service teams in
football as an end, and came back to Florida after
his discharge.

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Greenies Greet Gators

By BOH MEN AKER
Alligator Staff Writer
The Gators, fresh from a 67-63 victory over
ennessee, will turn their attention to New Orleans
aturday when they meet the Tulane Green Wave.
With only three games left on the schedule, Coach
[orm Sloan feels the Gators may have picked up some
3uch-needed momentum after two fine games against
anderbilt and Tennessee.
Tulane is the perennial cellar dweller of the SEC.
jter Wednesdays 91-70 loss to Mississippi, the
'reenies stand 8-13 overall and 4-8 in the confer confernce.
nce. confernce. Last years team finished with a 3-22 record.
Tulanes hot shooting guard A1 Andrews, with a
9.6 average, is the Waves top scoring threat.
A1 is a much-improved player defensively and is
Iso improving as a playmaker, says Tulane Coach
talph Pedersen. Hes contributed 45 assists already
his season, and I dont believe he had that many all
Df last year.
Craig Spitzer, 7-0 center, is a threat from the
low post, currently hitting for a 12.2 average. The

Richards Looking For A Job

By MILT RICHMAN
UPI Sports Writer
Paul Richards shows up at the
all park bright and early every
lorning, partly out of habit, partly
ut of necessity and partly out of
ostalgia.
Unemployed and without a base baseall
all baseall connection for the first time
the colors are just what [I
you re looking for . i f
var| ed combinations of
y el| ow, pink or blue.
r zes are right, too .
51 5 $15.00
* CHERBERG
-tag n Srag
13 W. UNIV. AVE.

in 40 years, Richards is making
the rounds of all the training camps
in an effort to hook on again.
The distinguished-looking 57-
year-old former Houston general
manager talked with the Baltimore
Orioles Tuesday and will try the
Cincinnati Reds next. Richards is
trying them all.
If youre going over to Pom Pompano
pano Pompano Beach, tell George Selkirk
Id like to have a talk with him,
he told one \yriter, who was on
his way to see the Washington Sen Senators.
ators. Senators.
What do you want to talk to
Selkirk about? Richards was ask asked.
ed. asked.
Pm looking for a job, he re replied.
plied. replied. Im pretty close to being
on the bread line.
That statement about the bread
line was a obvious gag; but the one
about looking for a job was not.
Financially, Richards is fixed
so that he could still live well
enough even if he never worked
another day in his life. There also
is a matter of some $300,000 which
he claims Houston owner Judge Roy
Hofheinz owes him on the unexpired
portion of a seven-year contract.
Richards was getting an esti estimated
mated estimated $55,000 a year from the
Astros as general manager when
Hofheinz let him go last Dec. 16.
His contract still had five years
izir n co h^ he teiits
took his case to the commissioner
and hinted he would even go to
court to press his claim.

FB?2^
Palm Bectola.
Rgoeway
,T 710 IIIUHI IOHWfWH' 7AtM

Greenies other starter in double figures is forward
Dan Moeser, averaging 11.1 points per game.
Junior Gary Keller, who has put two outstanding
games back-to-back, upped his hooting average to
16.7 and is still Floridas top rebounder and third
best in theSEC, pulling down better than 13 per game.
Big Jeff Ramsey is second to Keller in Gator
scoring with a 9.2 average. Paul Morton, after hitting
for a total of 37 points against Vanderbilt and Ten Tennessee,
nessee, Tennessee, has upped his average to 8.5.
David Miller is next with an 8.3 average, Harry
Winkler, with 8.2, Skip Higley with 7.1, and Gary
McElroy, 6.0, rounding out the top seven Gator
scorers.
The Gators still lead the SEC in rebounding,
helped by Gary Kellers 20 rebound effort against
Tennessee.
The UF cagers currently sport a 14-9 record
overall and stand 7-6 in the SEC. The team remains
in Louisiana after Saturdays game to face the LSU
Tigers Monday night in Baton Rouge.

Standing outside the Orioles
clubhouse, Richards, who once
served as combination general
manager and field manager of that
club, conceded there seems to be
relatively few openings available
to him.
Id be willing to do most any anything,
thing, anything, from handling a team in a
rookie league on up, said the man,
who generally is believed to own
one of the sharpest baseball minds
in the entire business.
You dont go around telling
people what you can do for them,
he said. They have to have some something
thing something in mind that you can do help
them. I talked with Harry Alton
Baltimores new general manager
and he said hed let me know. So
have a couple of other people.
Richards isnt used to going
around with his hat in his hand,
begging for a job. As recently as
six months ago he was being be besieged
sieged besieged with managerial offers.
I was contacted by three or
four clubs about managing just
prior and during the World
Series, he explained. But I was
unwilling to break my contract
with Houston despite the fact I
didnt think my association would
last too long under the present
ownership.
u . , w vuuise,
and Richards said he would have
given those managerial offers a
lot of thought had I not been tied
to a contract.

El jr M
Bk
** *; iff
m
TULANES AL ANDREWS

The Florida AlligatorJ

Friday, Feb. 25, 1966 SPORTS

Booters Face Embry Riddle
The UF Soccer Club, still undefeated with an 8-0-2 record will take
on the Embry Riddle Aeronautical Institute Saturday at 2:30 p.m. at
Fleming Field. Embry Riddle, a relatively new team from Daytona,
has several international players from South America and the Car Carribean.
ribean. Carribean.
The Gator Booters saw no action last Saturday, beating the Brumos
Spyders by default, but they have practiced several times this week
in preparation for Embry Riddle. The team will greatly miss the
efforts of All-State center forward Mario Leiva who is out with an
injury he suffered in the FSU game two weeks ago.
After this weeks match, the team will journey to Winter Park to
challenge the Orlando Orangemen.
r: n oft/fecr or T

CHICAGO (UPI) Boxer Cassi Cassius
us Cassius Clay will try to keep out of
military service by claiming his
membership in the Black Muslims
DELTS BEAT BETAS
Delta Tau Delta captured bracket
honors in murals basketball with a
28-25 victory over Beta Theta Phi
in a nip-and-tuck battle Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday night.
The Delts won a come-from come-frombehind
behind come-frombehind victory behind the strong
shooting of Joe Seminak and Mike
Mac Caleb and the rebounding of
Steve Collins. High scorer for the
Delts was Mac Caleb who iced the
game with a three-point play in
the final seconds of action.

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SPECIAL $ 1 59
Child's Plate, 89<
5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m. Fridays
MANOR Cn
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NW 13th, across from new Sears

makes him a conscientious objec objector,
tor, objector, a Chicago newspaper said
today.
Chicagos American, in a story
signed by Jack Mabley, said Clay
does not plan to make his plea
for deferment until after he meets
Ernie Terrell in a scheduled box boxing
ing boxing match here March 29 for the
heavyweight championship of the
world.
The Illinois Boxing Commission
meets Friday to decide if the match
should be held as scheduled. Illi Illinois
nois Illinois Gov. Otto Kerner and other
officials, including Mayor Richard
J. Daley, have objected to Clays
unpatriotic complaints about the
possibility of getting drafted.

Page 15



Page 16

5, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 25, 1966

PLAYER OF THE WEEK
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