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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Is 'Blacklisting In UFs Academic Future?

What are the consequences of the Za Zabeeh
beeh Zabeeh case? Part 5 of this series shows
one possible outcome.
* +
By YVETTE CARDOZO
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Farhang Zabeehs case is the UFs
entrance key to an exclusive but not very
popular fraternity. The depledgingpro depledgingprocedure
cedure depledgingprocedure consists of a hearty meal of the
UFs own words.
This fraternitys title is AAUP
Blacklist, and all the UF needs for
admission is a proven case of academic
freedom violation.

Tlie Florida Alii gat#r

a Jif f
Jfc mji f
lji fLj
mm - a / i fm.
f J|B#: i I & IB
El pMK hgg|T. j Bi #
i mJm zJpBKHb' *
a 'BP* V"
i Pi 1 \
ITS DERBY TIME
Beth Fields, Alpha Delta Pi (above), is one of the girls slated to participate in a mystery
event in Saturdays Sigma Chi Derby. Admiring Miss Fields are (kneeling) Donnie Hicks and
Ken Howell; (standing) Wayne Johnson, Jim Handy, Walt Stein, Buz Etheredge and Ken Mc-
Lathchey.

MATTHEWS FAVORS ESCALATION

By MIKE MALAGHAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Rep. D. R. Billy Matthews
declared his support for current
U. S. policy in Viet Nam at a
Sunday reception at the Sigma Phi
Epsilon fraternity house.
The reception was attended by
UF President J. Wayne Reitz,
Student Body President Buddy Ja Jacobs,
cobs, Jacobs, Vice President for Academic
Affairs Robert B. Mautz, Florida
Union Director Bill Rion, Dean of
Student Affairs Lester Hale and
Bruce Culpepper, past SG Presi President.

Vol. 58, No. 97

Academic Freedom:
Fact Or Fantasy?

The Zabeeh case could provide that
violation.
The local chapter of AAUP (American
Association of University Professors) has
been investigating the Zabeeh case for
months. Its report is expected sometime
during the next few weeks.
If the local AAUP decides academic
freedom was not upheld in Zabeehs denial

dent. President.
Asked what he thought of Sen Senators
ators Senators Morse and Fulbrights views
on Viet Nam, Rep. Matthews said,
I am sure that these men are
sincere in their beliefs, but I cant
help but think that they are giving
some comfort to Hanoi. Personally
I agree with Senator Symingtons
view of escalating the conflict to
include bombing of power and mu munition
nition munition facilities.
President Johnson is on top of
this thing (Viet Nam) and has the
Ibnost knowledge and so he has my

University of Florida

one hundred per cent support, he
added.
In reply to another question,
Matthews, in the midst of his
toughest campaign to date, ex explained
plained explained he is in favor of a four fouryear
year fouryear term for Congressman.
I dont think all Congressmen
should be elected in the same year
as the President. What Im asking
in Congress is that half the House
of Representatives be elected
every two years.
(See MATTHEWS, Page 11)

of tenure, the UF could eventually windup
on the national AAUP blacklist.
Academic freedom, according to the
Faculty Handbook, includes the right of
the faculty member to pursue, acquire
and disseminate knowledge freely.
If it is proven that Zabeehs right to
this freedom was violated and that he was
unjustly denied tenure, the UF would have
to eat its words and offer Zabeeh his
tenure to get off the blacklist.
What does membership in the blacklist
club mean for a university? The Alligator
asked one member of the AAUP, Prof.
Stanley Laughlin, head of the state com committee
mittee committee on Academic Rights.
It does not forecast inevitable collapse
of the institution, according to Laughlin.

Monday, February 21, 1966

Definite Schedules
For Cabinet Officers
Slated By Jacobs
By YVETTE CARDOZO
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body President Buddy Jacobs looks at his Legislative Council
from the opposite side of the political fence. But he is confident the
path of this years UFs Student Government workings will be a smooth
one.
They are all qualified people, he saidfirmly. If I think something
is a good idea, Im sure they will support it.
For his cabinet, Jacobs plans a firm hand.
Unlike the practice of past years, Cabinet members will have definite
working hours and will be required to check with the SG office at least
once a day.
Jacobs also expects a weekly report from each cabinet member
and plans personal conferences with each secretary.
Cabinet meetings, a sparse occurrence in past years, will be held
on a regular basis every Friday, according to Jacobs.
These meetings will be used to discuss general policy and week-to week-toweek
week week-toweek progress on the party platform, he said.
Jacobs also said policy on attendance at cabinet meetings will be
tightened. Two unexcused meetings is the quota for cabinet heads.
After that, Jacobs said he will start shopping for a replacement.

After new officers have had a
chance to settle down in their jobs,
Jacobs plans to begin work on his
platform.
Sitting in his office is a bulletin
board with the planks from his
platform booklet pasted above an
open list] In the next few days he
plans to fill in the empty lines
with names from his cabinet.
Each detail will be assigned
to a specific secretary, he said.
That way, we will know exactly
who is responsible for each job.
The big jobs taking first priority
include student parking, student
services and married student
problems.
Jacobs aims his immediate
parking relief plans at the
McCarty Hall area, Century
Tower, the Stadium Building, Nor Norman
man Norman Field and the road below
Murphree Area.
For student services, Jacobs
looks to getting laundry service
in mens dorms and a recrea recreation
tion recreation area for Murphree.
He would Jlso like to see soup
and sandwich machines in dorm
areas and feels something can be
worked out with the new Food
Service director. Food Service
in the past objected to soup and
sandwich machines for dorm
areas.
For m arried students, Jacobs
hopes to set up bus service for
Flavet children, start an investi investigation
gation investigation of the electric rates charged
in married villages and look into
the paving for Diamond village.
(See JACOBS, Page 11)

But it does mean censure by an or organization
ganization organization totaling 100,000 educators
across the U.S. -for a university ranked
as 26th largest in the nation.
It does mean added difficulty in re recruiting
cruiting recruiting qualified personnel for an
institution whose attraction is already
tarnished by a under par salary level.
It does mean added difficulty in getting
grants in a state whose school budget
problems have already made headlines
with disaccredited high schools and uni university
versity university salary raises that were never
there.
TOMORROW: Zabeehs situation was
only one case. Part VI will take a look at
other academic freedom cases in the UFs
past.

Grid Tickets
Rise To $6
Tickets for UF home foot football
ball football games will cost $6 this
season, Athletic Director Ray
Graves has announced.
The university athletic
board said the increase was
recommended by the South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference at its Jan Jani
i Jani
uary meeting in Birmingham
and was adopted by Auburn,
Alabama, Tennessee, Mis Mississippi,
sissippi, Mississippi, and Mississippi
State.
Florida tickets cost $5.15
last year.
Inside Todays
Big Alligator
World and State news
Page 2.
GI Bill applications scheduled
for June Page 3.
Editorials, Columns, Let Letters
ters Letters Pages 4, 5.
Classified Ads Page 6.
Highlights of Culpeppers Ad Administration
ministration Administration Page 7.
The face of the UF Cabinet,
1966 Pages 8, 9.
Don Federman reviews
Clerambard Page 10.
UF Students and Costa Ricas
elections Page 11.
A surrealistic view of girls
dorms Page 13.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Feb. 21, 1966

W.
International
CONG ATTACK... Communist Viet Cong, striking in darkness
early Sunday, fired small arms and 80 mortar rounds into the sprawl sprawling
ing sprawling headquarters compound of the U.S. Ist Cavalry Division. U.S.
helicopters took off during the barrage and pursued the Viet Cong
with rockets and machine guns. It was the first big attack by the
Communists against the headquarters, 260 miles northeast of Siagon.
Some of the enemy rounds struck the helicopter landing zone, which
soldiers call the golf course, and the defense position atop Hong
Kong Mountain, which looms above the area. Air Force transports
circled overhead dropping parachute flares to help the helicopters
find the mortar crews. The Americans suffered comparatively light
casualties and material damage before the raiders were driven off,
a U.S. spokesman said. The guerrillas broke off the attack after 85
minutes of fighting outside An Khe town. The area contains a hard
surfaced airfield,
insert will rap U.S.
WILL RAP U.S,...French President
Charles de Gaulle will rap U.S. policy in
Viet Nam sharply at his news conference
Monday reliable French sources said Friday.
The sources said he is expected to condemn
resumption of bombing of North Viet Nam
and firmly restate his belief that the war
cannot be won militarily but only settled
at the conference table. They said he also
will reiterate earlier demands for neutrali neutralization
zation neutralization of Viet Nam and withdrawal of all
foreign troops including American forces.
De Gaulle meets the press Monday afternoon
for one of the news conferences he holds
roughly every six months. It will be his
fourteenth since he returned to power in 1958.
National
DEAD RINGER ALIVE ... A Probate Court judge ruled Friday
that Lawrence Bader of dead ringer fame was legally alive.
Bader, 40, disappeared in 1957 following a boating accident off
Rocky River, leaving a wife and four children here. Last spring, it
was discovered that television sports announcer John Fritz Johnson
of Omaha, Neb., was really Bader. Johnson, who had married and was
the father of two children, still claims he has no recollection of having
been Bader. The ruling by Judge Nathan Koplin meant that in the eyes
of the law Bader was alive and legally married to his first wife, who
still lives here.

MENINGITIS THREAT... Physicians diagnosed two more spinal
meningitis cases at Lackland Air Force Base Friday, including the
roommate of the bases lone meningitis fatality, but Air Force
officials said Lackland will resume receiving new trainees Monday
anyway. Os the eight persons now hospitalized with the disease,
three are listed in serious condition, one in fair condition and four in
good condition.
Florida
SHEA FREE .. .Joseph Shea, 26, was a free man Sunday thanks to
a handful of men who fought 11 months to prove that he was innocent
of a murder to which he had repeatedly confessed.
A 12-man jury ended Sheas six-year stay in prison Saturday with
a verdict of innocent in his second trial for first degree murder in the
1959 shooting death of Mrs. Harry Meslemer.
OFFICERS INDICTED...Eight former officers of the bankrupt
American Bonded Mortgage Co. have been indicted by a federal grand
jury on charges of fraud. The indictments were handed down by the
jury last Tuesday. The indictments charge mail fraud, fraud in the
sale of securities and conspiracy in the four-year operation of the
multi-million dollar company and its 28 subsidiaries. About 2,000
investors reportedly lost more than $9 million in the company,
according to the indictment.
The Florlaa Alligator reserve;, the right to rcguUte the typographical tow of all advertlsein nts arx;
to revise or turn away copy which It considers ohjecttonable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will he given whewver posstble.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments ol payment for any advertisement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears
Tbe Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than on* Incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Nollies lor rone lion must hr given before next insertion.
THE FIX) KID A ALLIGATOR is the official student of Ihe Linversl'y n( Floitda and Is
published five times weekly except duilng May, June, and July when II Is published s mi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official omnium, of their authors. The Alligator is entered as second etas*
matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

Appointees Vie In 66

By BARBARA FRYE
United Press International
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI)
Florida voters get their first
chance in the 1966 elections to
express their feelings on people
selected by two governors for
important cabinet, court and other
positions.
Two top appointees of former
HHH Didnt
Ask Aid For
S. Viet Nam
s'
NEW DELHI (UPI) The United
States embassy said Sunday that
Vice President Hubert Humphrey
did not ask either Pakistan or India
to provide aid for South Viet .Nam
during his recent visit to the sub subcontinent.
continent. subcontinent.
But he did point out that the
country South Viet Nam, needed
humanitarian help, including medi medical
cal medical and technical assistance, the
embassy said in a press statement.
An embassy spokesman said the
statement was being issued for
clarification in view of divergent
reports that have appeared in the
press.
The statement said Humphrey
reported to the Indian and Pakis Pakistani
tani Pakistani leaders on the results of the
Vietnamese-United States confer conference
ence conference in Honolulu and its empha emphasis
sis emphasis on social construction.
India was reported eager for
a peaceful settlement in South
Viet Nam and willing to help ar arrange
range arrange one, the embassy state statement
ment statement said. But India feels that
Communist China at present has
much more influence in Hanoi and
that Indian connections in Hanoi
are now limited.
Regarding the SSO million and
SIOO million loans announced by
Humphrey to Pakistan and India
respectively, the statement said:
It was clearly spelled out to
the leaders of both governments
that these loans are for supplies
and spare parts for present indus industrial
trial industrial plant. -I any of which are
operating below capacity, and not
for new projects.
It said the granting of aid hinged
on Indo-Pakistan self-help poli policies
cies policies and their agreement to use
the mt economic aid in exist existing
ing existing for industrial develop development
ment development in the non-military field.

NOTICE
Applications are now being accepted for the following
positions:
MANAGING EDITOR, FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
to fill out remainder of unexpired term.
BUSINESS MANAGER, STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
for school yearr 1966-67
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: WED., FEB. 23.
PICK UP APPLICATIONS IN ROOM 9, FLORIDA
UNION BUILDING.
i> 1 ;
. IMMB

Gov. Farris Bryant are going be before
fore before the voters for the first time
in their current jobs.
They include state Supreme
Court Justice Richard W. Ervin,
who won popular approval
statewide in several campaigns
for state attorney general.
He was selected by Bryant in
January, 1964, to serve the un unexpired
expired unexpired term of the late Supreme
Court Justice Glenn Terrell.
The other is William T. (Billy)
Mayo a former mayor of Talla Tallahassee
hassee Tallahassee and member of the road
board under Bryant, who has
served as a state public service
commissioner since the death
of Wilbur King in September, 1964.
The top Burns appointees seek seeking
ing seeking the voters, stamp of approval
this year are State Comptroller
Fred O. Dickinson, Treasurer and
Insurance Commissioner Broward
Williams and School Superinten Superintendent
dent Superintendent Floyd Christian.
Os the trio, Williams is the
veteran, having served a year
and two months in the office left
vacant by the death of J. Edwin
Larson.
Dickinson and Christian suc succeeded
ceeded succeeded retiring Comptroller Ray
Green and Superintendent Thomas
D. Bailey a few months ago.
It is the first time in modern
times that a Florida governor has
had the opportunity to appoint three
members of the powerful state
cabinet.
Dickinson, a former West Palm
Beach attorney, is the only one
with statewide campaign ex experience.
perience. experience. After winning election
as both state representative and
senator in his home county, tried
twice to be governor, losing in
1960 and 1964.

808 KAREN SPEAKS OUT
ON
THE ACADEMIC COMMUNITY
AND ANTI-WAR ACTIVITIES
"TONIGHT" FLA. UNION AUD. 8 P.M.
A STUDENT PEACE UNION LECTURE T\
FILM: 'HOT DAM VIET-NAM' 'Kiy

Christian won election as Pin Pinellas
ellas Pinellas County superintendent before
the job was made appointive. Wil Williams
liams Williams has never sought elective of office.
fice. office.
Five state district appellate
court judges also are running for
election this year after being ap appointed
pointed appointed by Governor Burns.
They are Woodie A. Liles, Plant
City, T. Frank Hobson, St. Peters Petersburg,
burg, Petersburg, William C. Pierce, Tampa,
in the 2nd District, Richard H.
M. Swann, Miami, in the 3rd and
Sherman N. Smith, Vero Beach,
in the new 4th District.
A number of circuit judges anc
one state attorney, named by
Burns, also are running this year.
Traditionally, gubernatorial ap appointees
pointees appointees have won election at the
polls. The exception was former
Atty. Gen. James W. Kynes, who
was defeated by present Atty. Gen.
Earl Faircloth, after serving five
months in the office under appoint appointment
ment appointment of Bryant.
% lOZI
Xu,./
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Cl Bill Applications
Scheduled For June
By MIKE MA LAG HAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Don't apply for funds under the recently passedG.l. Bill until June 1.
Mike Brown, veteran and student on the UF campus, said this can't
be done under the current status of the Bill.
The bill will become law Tuesday. It will not be effective until June 1.
The first thing that is done with the Bill is that the Veterans Ad Administrations
ministrations Administrations lawyers will interpret the new law. As a result of this,
they will draw up the regulations and forms that are needed.
Printed forms will be availabe during the latter part of May from
Dwight Sullivan in the County Commissioners office.
The Veterans Administration will have a representative on campus
the first week in June to pass out application forms and explain the
benefits of this law for cold war veterans.
Brown outlined the probable procedure for veterans to follow.
First fill out the form. This form will then be sent to the nearest
Veterans Administration regional office in St. Petersburg. The appli application
cation application will next be forwarded to Washington.
This process will take about six weeks. If the application is approved,
the veteran will receive an award letter notifying him of his acceptance.
He can expect his first check two to four weeks after receiving his
award letter.
The check, which is sent on the first of the month, will be retro retroactive
active retroactive to June first.
Brown advised applicants to include a marriage certificate if
married, a divorce document from the county where the divorce was
granted if applicable, birth certificates of all children the veteran has)
and his DD-214 form or the information that it contains.
All veterans with at least 180 days in active service are eligible
under this new G.I. Bill.
Beauty And Beast Contest
Raises Funds For WUS

The Beauty and the Beast Contest
deadline is drawing near. Tomor Tomorrow
row Tomorrow is the last day to notify the
Department of Religion in the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union of contestants.
The contest, which features UF
students dressed up as beauties or
beasts, is to collect money for
World University Service Week
which starts next Monday.
WUS is an organization which
helps poor university students in
Food Service
Trains Personnel
The new Food Service an announces
nounces announces a training course for
University Cafeteria personnel
will take place today through Fri Friday.
day. Friday.
A safety and accident prevention
training course will be presented
to managers and supervisors of
the University Cafeteria and Snack
Bars by Mr. R. L. Adams from the
Department of Industrial Safety,
Florida Industrial Commission.
The course is tfased on the prin principles
ciples principles of good management and
supervision, with emphasis on
safety factors. It stresses the fact
that managers and supervisors are
the key people in teaching em employees
ployees employees the fundamentals of acci accident
dent accident prevention as if relates to
their job.
ISferW
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co.

STEAK NIGHT
Monday, 5 to 9 p.m.
12 oz. CHOICE
mm t-bone
Steak Served With French
2310 S.W. 13th St. Fries, Cole Slaw, Hot Rolls
and Butter.
1505 N.W. 13th St. $

Monday, Feb. 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

other countries. They build dor dormitories
mitories dormitories and send students books
and food.
Bing Michael, chairman of WUS
Week, urged all fraternities,
sororities and dorm areas to enter
the competition for three new tro trophies.
phies. trophies.
The trophies will be kept by the
individual fraternity, sorority and
dorm winners. Plaques will be
awarded to the individuals who
collect the most money.
Last year, WUS collected over
$2,000 on the UF campus. It costs
10 cents a day for a student to live
in India. The UF could sendso,ooo
students to school for one day if
this years fund drive topped
$5,000.
Watch for the beauties and the
beasts.
Young Republicans
Elect Officers
The University of Florida and
Alachua County Young Republican
Clubs sponsored a meeting of the
Executive Board of the Florida
Federation of Young Republicans
on Saturday, Feb. 19. The pros prospective
pective prospective Republican candidates for
governor spoke at a banquet Satur Saturday
day Saturday evening.
The UF Young Republicans re recently
cently recently elected new officers and are
expecting a year filled with Repub Republican
lican Republican victories, says Director Em Emmett
mett Emmett Welch.
The new officers are Kurt Lewis,
president; Dana Venrick, vice
president; Debby Ford, secretary;
Bill Van Clief, treasurer; and
Larry Lester, Patty Strickland and
Emmett Welch, directors.

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator. Monday, Feb. 21, 1966

mr. Jacobs:
lionesty first
Arthur (Buddy) Jacobs, the soft-spoken young
man from Nassau County in Northeast Florida,
is proving that action indeed does speak louder
than words.
During his successful campaign for the student
t>ody presidency, Jacobs promised hed put together
the best Student Government possible, regardless of
party ties and the fraternity-bloc system.
His cabinet choices with one possible excep exception
tion exception indicate he was not merely making idle
chatter.
You can go through his cabinet appointees (listed
elsewhere in todays Alligator) and you can see that
Jacobs has made an honest attempt to get qualified
people, people with records that prove that theyre
not afraid of hard work.
Jacobs made it clear to The Alligator the other
day that he isnt going to be tied down by the sys system,
tem, system, that the system can be damned if it stands
in the way of good government.
Im in now, he pointed out. So what have I got
to lose?
It wasnt so much what he said, but the way he
said it.
A smile, an honest smile, spread across his face.
And the words, honest words, came out in forceful,
sincere Northeast Florida tones.
Despite what his detractors say, and he DOES have
detractors, one thing that impresses you most about
Jacobs is his honesty.
Yes, honesty, plain ol simple honesty.
When he says things are going to be different,
youd better believe him.
When he says things are going to be changed
and not even reactionary forces in Tigert Hall are
going to stop him youd better believe him.
When he says no one is going to tell him how to
run his administration, youd better believe him.
He means it.
Now this is not to say Jacobs is bull-headed, or
unnecessarily stubborn. He isnt. In fact, we believe
hell listen to anyone who has concrete ideas on how
to improve things at this university.
We are even naive enough to believe that Buddy
Jacobs represents the beginning of the end of the
old era of petty politics on this campus, that this
will indeed be a year of transition.
If anyone can begin to change the old order, Mr.
Jacobs certainly is the man for the job.
Sit back and watch.
UF radical?
(Reprinted from The Florida Flambeau)
fjr he election put an end to fears of a growing
W radical movement, but it did nothing to dis dissuade
suade dissuade Freedom Party (FP) members in their acti activities,
vities, activities, read an AP report in the St Petersburg
Times yesterday on the defeat of the Freedom Party
in the U of F student body elections.
Doing the fearing, it seems, from reading his
remarks in the story, was U of F Dean of Students
Lester Hale who said, What they are asking is
a lifting of all restrictions of all the mores of our
society.
Specifically what the Freedom Party Was trying
to lift, according to the Times, were the univer university
sity university restrictions on student drinking, gambling,
sexual activity or any such private moral decision.
The FP also asked for other sweeping changes
including ending discrimination in fraternities,
ending compulsory military programs and making
available contraceptives.
While these are broad (and possibly startling for
some people) requests, not one is so horrible that
it should send a dean of students of a major uni university
versity university scurrying under a brass bed, shaking because
hes seen the bogey man.
What the FP platform is apparently aiming for
would not be classed as a fearful, wanton denial
of mores (which is etymologically impossible.any impossible.anyway),
way), impossible.anyway), but a progressive change in contemporary
mores and in most cases, chang that are very
much needed.
The section of the FP platform de. g with private
morality is no more frightening than the U.S. Bill
of Rights or to put it on a more local level, the
FSU New Party Student Bill of Rights which was
so widely applauded on this campus.
Very possible Hale was over-reacting to the FPs
bearded members since, as an educator, he should
welcome the students concern with contemporary
social problems and their desire to seek progres progressive
sive progressive solutions, rather than fear it.
A university should be producing people alive to
the problems and anachronisms of contemporary
society, people who are critical of institutions that
may have outgrown their usefulness or have been
misused, not robots that mechanically accept their
society without wondering if it needs an overhaul
now and then.
Certainly, far more dangerous than the Freedom
Party proponents are those people who blindly accept
the status quo and adamantly defend it simply be because
cause because its there.

The Florida Alligator
% A Ia CW Pc/iam. Plm Tb TuA
f He wants such
QUALIFIED ASSISTANTS,
whs o oesNT He Give us
all civil exams?
uDoy Jacobs
.RI&HT New
.tuden't Bopb
pesmeNT
Dr. Robert
Hutchins
/TT he day I got back from Moscow last summer the headline in
the New York Times said Viet Nam War Boon to Business.
This was a little embarrassing, because I had spent most of my
time in the Soviet Union defending the United States against the
charge that its military operations in Southeast Asia were being
conducted for the profit of capitalist circles.
Capitalist conspiracies in this country have always been diffi difficult
cult difficult to establish. Capitalists seem too unorganized, or even dis disorganized
organized disorganized to engage consciously in the kind of cynical plotting
against the lives of their fellow citizens that the phrase mer merchants
chants merchants of death suggests.
The capitalists and the businessmen are not guilty, I am sure,
of a deliberate effort to instigate and maintain a war for the
purpose of making money. The demands of this country for
education, health, welfare, transportation and communication, to
say nothing of the needs of the rest of the world, offer possibilities
of profit at least as attractive as those in slaughter, or, if you
prefer, in defense.
The capitalists and businessmen are not guilty. We all are.
We have allowed ourselves to be euchred into the position of
spending $65 billion a year on defense. The result is that every
family in this country has a stake in American belligerency.
Even the churches and colleges are dependent on prosperity,
and prosperity depends, as things are now, on military spending.
When the shadow of a rumor of negotiations between North
Viet Nam and India fell across the stock market, millions of paper
profits were wiped out. But we could be of good cheer. The
feeler, if it was one, came to nothing, and the market rose
buoyantly to an all-time high. The financial pages reported with
some satisfaction that the peace scare had been exorcised.
We may shudder to think what the unemployment rate would be
if the fighting in Viet Nam would suddenly stop. We cannot alter
our military policy in any significant degree without the most
serious economic repercussions.
We are not in Viet Nam to make money. But it cannot be denied
that we are making it. This may be one reason, even if we are
largely unconscious of it, for our willingness to close our eyes
to the human costs of the war.
(Copyright Los Angeles Times)
alumnus 'proud
Editor: 5
I only stopped into the Dirty Drug for some protection from
the ugly blasts of Yankee winter. Suddenly the New York Herald
Tribune was staring me in the face, featuring the University of
Florida on the front page.
Reading about the Viet Nam Appreciation program did the heart
of this recent alumnus a-bit of good. I wont bother to be suspi suspicious
cious suspicious of the political timing of the event by Culpepper. I wont
even have a lingering thought about the real level of political
awareness on the Florida campus. But I will get a good chuckle
out of the reported failure of the Federphiles to protest the event
with any success (
Coming from the University of Florida puts mein a class close
to that of foreign students here at the University of Pennsyl Pennsylvania.
vania. Pennsylvania. It is good to feel pride in Florida for something other
than an athletic team.
Rick Schuster,
Class of 65

Florida
Politics
By MIKE GARCIA
Now that campus elections are over (they really
are. Mr. Sears) most campus politicos have turned
their attention to the upcoming governors race.
The most heated conflict on campus is between
former State Senator Scott Kelly and Miami Mayor
Robert High. The pair finished 1-2 in the UF
straw ballot held last week. High received 226
votes more than Kelly. Gov. Haydon Burns was
low man with 591 out of 5,000 votes.
The Kelly camp at this time seems to be superior
to Highs in that Kelly has attracted most of the
campus leaders into his organization. High, having
the support of many Miamians, is still laggingbehind
in terms of solid organization.
Kelly has established a student headquarters
across from the Royal Castle on University Avenue.
This will serve as both the meeting place for the
Kelly committee and an information center for
students interested in Kelly.
Kelly will make a trip to Gainesville Tuesday to
officially open the headquarters. Coffee and donuts
will be served at the office throughout the campaign.
The student committee for High has begun to
organize with Marty Schwartz at the helm. It has
been rumored that Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity will
play an active role in the High organization.
The Burns committee is also beginning to function.
f Former Florida Blue Key president Stew Parsons
has assumed the chairmanship and is recruiting such
men as Charlie Mitchell, President of John Marshall
Bar Association, Don Forbes, an agricultural gra graduate
duate graduate student and George Blaha, Florida Blue Key.
Chairman Parsons informed us that the Governor
will speak at the JMBA luncheon on March 9.
Although neither High nor Burns has set up a
headquarters for the students, it is believed that
each organization will have an office in the county
headquarters.
Burns suffered a heavy loss in popularity with
students because of the political meddling issue
last fall. His low popularity rating was evidenced
by his poor showing in the straw vote.
Chairman Parsons certainly has a job on his hands.
As far as High is concerned, his main appeal to
the students lies in ideology rather than political
issues. Highs liberal stand has gained much appeal
with students and professors. The big question con concerning
cerning concerning High is: Will he be able to win? Or will
he make the runoff and lose to Burns again?
Many people would like to support High, however,
the general consensus is that he cant win.
The feeling boils down to this: If I support
High and he loses, Burns will be in for another
four years.
The thought of four more years with Burns is too
much for UF students. Thus they are rallying
behind Kelly, who has demonstrated his interest
in them and has professed some sound ideas on
education. Ideological appeal is giving way to prac practical
tical practical political facts.
On the statewide political scene some interesting
things have developed. It has been rumored that
Senator Robert Kennedy of New York is supporting
Highs bid for the governorship.
The reason behind Kennedys move was defined
as National Convention strategy.
Kennedy is hoping to capture the Democratic
presidential nomination in 1968. With Robert King
High as governor and the governor controlling the
votes of the delegates, Mr. K would be able to
swing Floridas delegation to the Kennedy camp.
With Florida having the ninth largest population in
the nation, the votes of its delegation will be actively
sought by all candidates.
The position of President Johnson will also play
an important role in the race. If Kennedy has allied
with High, the only two left for LBJ are Burns
and Kelly.
Although one cannot presuppose that the President
will take a role, either active or passive, in the
governors race, it is safe to say that the vote of
the Florida delegation will play a significant part
in choosing a man for the Democratic presidential
nomination. Its a good bet LBJ wants the nod.
POLITICAL POST MORTEM
My sincere congratulations go to Buddy Jacobs
for his recent victory in the SG elections. My grapes
are not as sour as some.
Best regards go to Mike .Hollingsworth, John
Darlson, Jeff Fuqua, Jake Dyal, Julian Casal, and
Clift Davis who proved themselves to be men
deserving of high admiration. Conceit and childish
arrogance were thankfully lacking in their character.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Editor Benny Cason
Acting managing editor Drex Dobson
Editorial director Andy Moor
Executive editor Yvette Cardozo
Assistant managing editor Fran Snider
Associate editors Bill Martinez
Kay Huftmaster. Bruce Dudley. Justine Hartman
Sports editor Hob Menaker



The Campaign Story

Jacobs in charge from start

(EDITORS NOTE: Following is the final
installment in Mike Malaghans five-part
series on the recent campus election. The
writer, former election director and Secre Secretary
tary Secretary of The Interior, is now an Alligator
staffer.)
Success is opportunities and the capacity
to take advantage of those opportunities. So
says President Buddy Jacobs.
This year Jacobs had a unusual opportunity
and no one can doubt that he took full advantage
of it.
This was not the first time that Jacobs had a
chance to seek our campus highest office. He
was offered the challenge a year ago.
Jacobs said at that time (winter trimester)
he was taking 18 hours in order to graduate and
was working at a mens store another 30 hours.
I felt I hadnt the time to devote to the effort
and quite frankly I was worried about upcoming
law school.
Speculation revolved around Jacobs all year
long. No one man ever had so many people
pulling for him during law finals.
Jacobs got back to school after the Sugar
Bowl game. That night Frank Glinn, long time
associate and friend, dropped by to tell Jacobs,
*l think its your year, Buddy. Jacobs agreed.
Student Party had enormous obstacles to over overcome
come overcome right from the start.
Because the actual decision to compete didnt
materialize until classes were about to begin,
the Cheeseman camp had already made inroads
into the fraternity houses that usually are in
the group. Ron LaFace tried to bring back the
Betas, AEPis and Theta Chis, but it was too late.
So, as of January 10, Jacobs was down 250
bloc votes, was relatively unknown, and his
supporters werent the models of confidence.
Some houses were on his side, with the idea of
controlling Homecoming rather than winning an
election.
Jacobs felt from the start that he could win.
He and Glinn realized that something dramatic
at the beginning had to be done to catch the
imagination of the electorate.
Jacobs felt that cleaning up the campaign
would be the right start. Jacobs, Glinn, Doug
Thompson, Jim Crabtree, and Party Chairman
Bill Sullivan came up with the ideas of no ban banners,
ners, banners, no checkoffs, no poop on the trees and
releasing weekly financial statements.
Jacobs overcame some objections, from old oldline
line oldline politicos, that these moves were too dan dangerous.
gerous. dangerous.
It is important to note here that the men
planning Jacobs campaign were young men,
most of whom had served in only two or three
previous campaigns. The old pros on Jacobs
side like Charlie Edwards, Ron LaFace,
Mac Melvin, Harry Shorstein had either
graduated or were studying their law books.
This new group was more imaginative, more
fluid and more enthusiastic than the generation
of planners that ran the Cheeseman campaign.
Jacobs took a most active role in steering
committee meetings, a feat few preceding presi presidential
dential presidential candidates have done.
The link between the independent organization
and the steering committee was immediate.
Jacobs close friend George Blaha doubled in
both areas.
Jacobs also had momentum. This momentum
affected his strategists the same was it did the
voters. Doug Thompsons timely and inspired
oratory motivated the group at crucial times.
This group of men had an uphill fight and
they knew it. In fact, I can say in retrospect
that they relished it.
Student Party threw its platform three full
days before Decision; not a big thing in itself,
just another little victory that enlarged the swell.
A week and a half before the election Jacobs
was still in dire difficulty. Cheeseman still had a
comfortable lead and his dorm organization was
superb. What both sides didnt know at that
moment was that Cheeseman had peaked while
Student Party was just attaining full speed for
the first time.
Then the FUI jump.
This fired up the Student Party workers like
nothing else could have. Bill Sullivan, whose
house had been jumped from underneath him,
delivered an emotional outburst that set the
tone for a steering committee meeting which
didnt break up until four in the morning!
Tireless Bill Hoppe had a sheet ready for the
printers in an hour. Two of the uncommitted
fraternity houses, Delta Sigs and Phi Psis,
joined the student ranks at one in the morning
and the political representatives went back to

their houses that night steamed up.
The FUI jump proved to be the glue that
welded a young and sluggish group into a single
force of energy.
Jacobs himself, having lost 17 of the 21 pounds
he was going to lose during the grueling contest,
gave his best performance in the debate that
night.
Next morning The Alligator gave an off-hand
endorsement to Jacobs.
That evening, the Phi Gams were back in the
fold with Sullivan and Crabtree taking leading
roles in the recovery.
The same week Litzs swell was mounting,
also, and he was eating hard into Cheesemans
cherished independent votes.
By Wednesday night it was all over but pulling
the levers on the voting machines.
Could Jacobs have won without Litz? Os course
we cant know for sure. But, it is doubtful. For
certain we can say that it would have been
tougher if Litz hadnt been there.
However, Litz was present. Both he and
Cheeseman thought he would take the most
votes from Jacobs at the outset. Jacobs adjusted
to the change, Cheeseman did not.
Alan Levin summed up the race in an in interesting
teresting interesting manner. He explained to me: We
(Freedom Party) were too radical for the cam campus,
pus, campus, Apathy was a liberal protest against the
status quo, Decision stood for the maintenance
of the status quo, and Jacobs proclaimed to be a
progressive moderate within the system. As
often happens, the latter type of strategy wins
in American politics.
Jacobs had other campaign pluses. People who
talked to him were quickly impressed with the
sincerity of the man and charmed by his con confident
fident confident manner.
Although he didnt win the debates with great
oratory, he always projected the image of a man
seeking change with courage to back that
readiness with deeds.
Now: Has Jacobs really backed his words
with deeds? On at least two accounts he has.
No one can doubt that this was the cleanest
election in anyones memory. There were no
pledge armies on the Plaza of the Americas
at three and four in the morning. The ugliness
from the usual barrage of rumors lacked its
customary potency. For the first time in years,
less money was spent on a campaign than the
year before.
The man most responsible for this was
candidate Buddy Jacobs. t
Pie cutting, the old traditions of allotting
the goodies after a campaign was so modified
that the system as we knew it may be gone.
Under the old system, the Sunday after the
election all the Blue Keys from the winning side
got together and pieced together a cabinet until
the wee hours of the morning.
The system wasnt totally bad. (I got my SG
office that way!) The system of awarding offices
was mostly predicated on how well the organi organization
zation organization (fraternity or independent) produced. Too
many times the wrong man for the job was
selected.
After the session was over the president was
notified who his cabinet officers were and he
then began his administration.
This is the new way it was done this year:
Sunday afternoon Jacobs, Thompson, Glinn,
Edwards, John Ritch and Bill Sullivan got to together
gether together and discussed the cabinet. No decisions
were made, but many people were discussed.
Jacobs told the group who was acceptable and
who he couldnt work with, then asked for advice.
After the meeting Jacobs took out a Consti Constitution
tution Constitution with the cabinet officers listed and put
names beside them*
That night he went to what last year would
have been a pie cutting session. Jacobs went
over the list with the assembled group and ex explained
plained explained that in positions such as Administrative
Assistant and Finance he would not be moved.
At the end of the two hour meeting Jacobs
emerged with the same cabinet he walked in
with, save two people who were switched around.
There had beensuggestions for other changes.
As Jacobs told me: I was the president, I
knew the men I wanted, I had watched them during
the campaign. If all the politicos dont like my
cabinet, what can they do? Im already sitting
at the helm.
Jacobs calmly told his new officers: I se selected
lected selected you for my cabinet because I know each
of you is qualified. But let me warn you, if you
dont perform, Ill fire you. I am not above
tearing up your Blue Key application if I have
to. OK?
And so ended Campaign 1966.

Monday, Feb. 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Richer hits
'mythology
Editor:
Tigert Halls mythology about the Richer case is (probably
unwittingly) perpetuated in Yvette Cardozos first article on
Academic Freedom (Feb. 15). Unless the record is set straight
every time it is distorted, lies that begin in the offices of aca academic
demic academic administrators become substitutes for truth.
(1) No tenure issues were involved in my case. I was not in a
tenurable position. I was an instructor; my contract was renewed
annually. Customarily, such renewal was available for as many
years as the instructor wanted to stay and his chairman wanted
him to teach. Constitutionally, such hangers-on were supposed to
be sent packing after their fifth year. The rule was honored in
the breach.
(2) At the close of my third year here I was suddenly termi terminated
nated terminated in a surprise move than began in Vice President Harry
Philpotts office. This was denied for months, lies were told in
public to cover Philpotts authoritarian decision, and finally, after
Philpott went to Alabama (where, at last, he became a liberal)
the truth was allowed to come out.
(3) The real lie, the one that will not go away, is the myth about
the Ph.D. rule. NOWHERE ON RECORD ANYWHERE IN THIS
UNIVERSITY IS THERE EVEN A SUGGESTION THAT A PH.D.
OR WORK TOWARDS SAME IS A CONDITION FOR THE RE RENEWAL
NEWAL RENEWAL OF AN INSTRUCTORS CONTRACT.
(4) Administrators (unlike faculty) stick together; they must be
admired for that, if nothing else. Once the Ph.D. myth was started,
a journalistic accident reported that I had once declared publicly
that I would not get a Ph.D. The fact of the matter was that I
never had a public word to say on the matter, and even privately
was undecided (so would you be undecided if you knew how mean meaningless
ingless meaningless a Ph.D. is in strictly educational terms). A few weeks
before he was compelled to dismiss me my chairman and I dis discussed
cussed discussed the possibility of my working on a Ph.D. during my fourth
and fifth years here. AFTER MY TE RMINATION BY A DEAN WHO
HAS NO PH.D., BY A CHAIRMAN WHO HAS A DOCTORATE IN
EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS, WITH THE COLLUSION OF AN
ACADEMIC DEAN WITH ONLY A LAWYERS DEGREE, THE
WHOLE AFFAIR INSTIGATED BY A TOTALLY UNDISTINGUISH UNDISTINGUISHED
ED UNDISTINGUISHED HOLDER OF A DEGREE IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION, ALL IN
THE NAME OF NON-EXISTENT RULES ABOUT PH.D.-ING,
I decided to avoid the academic life for awhile.
(5) My case can be distinguished from Zabeehs by only the
most cowardly type of liberals who think that by defending Zabeeh
and attacking me they can earn some academic freedom credits
for their bought-and-paid consciences. The same man Gov.
Wallace picked to head Auburn got me and Zabeeh. The only
difference between the two cases being that Zabeeh waited too
long to fight them, believed their lies about how they were going
to help him, and found out too late that honor and dignity and
self-respect comes from engaging the enemy when they are near nearby,
by, nearby, not far away.
Last I heard, BOTH cases are being referred to the national
AAUP. My case, at that level, will, I hope, expose the inept and
intimidated machinery on this campus for local review of cases
of suspected violence to academic freedom. Just for the fun of it,
Ill predict that this University, within two years or so, will join
the University of South Florida on the AAUPs blacklist. And
that, I hope, will be the end of the Richer-Zabeeh flap, mythology
and all.
Edward Richer
a rebuttal
Editor:
Open debate on the Viet Nam question is, of course, valuable
for its own sake. Therefore I submit a rebuttal to Mrs. MacLach MacLachlan.
lan. MacLachlan.
With respect to her source, George Kennan: A withdrawal now
from Viet Nam might be a six-months wonder. Then again,
it might prove to be a somewhat more lengthy wonder as was
the re-militeriz4jUion of the Rhineland and the annexation of the
Sudetanland by Germany; or as was the Belgian withdrawal
from the Congo and the American paralysis during the Hungarian
revolution.
With respect to General Gavin: The only Asian country to en engage
gage engage a first-class Western power in all-out modern war was
Japan. The results of that conflict seem to have been rather
traumatic for Japan. In other words, any conclusions about
American ability to achieve a military solution in Viet Nam are
premature at least.
Again with respect to Mrs. MacLachlans synopsis of General
Gavins views: Both the Laotian and Thai governments seem to
believe the domino theory or at least in enough of it to
encourage our effort in Viet Nam.
With respect to Senator Fulbright: China not only ...talks in
big, billigerent words, she acts as her genocidal operations
in Tibet prove, and as her constant subversive efforts around
the world prove. (See Fidel Castro and the governments of
Kenya, Burundi, Upper Volta et al, for reference.)
Now a question. What does Mrs. MacLachlan propose to do
with the several million anti-communist South Viet Namese
(including the Catholic refugees evacuated from North Viet Nam
in 1954) who would be left in South Viet Nam?
Certainly she has heard of the liquidation of the landlords
and the aftermath of the Hundred Flowers episode in China,
or she must have heard of the kulak purge or the Katyn Forest
massacre in Russia. To ignore this question is irresponsible.
To be irresponsible with millions of lives is a hideous perver perversion
sion perversion of intellectual objectivity.
To conclude, I submit that anyone who says he doesnt know
why we are fighting in South Viet Nam is lying. He may not
agree, but he must know. Let us hear some more useful discussion
that we have had in particular I would like some observations
on the question I posed above. Nihilistic criticism of America
and her policies is not the best use of a trained academic mind.
William R. McDill, 7BA

Page 5



IGATOR CLASSIFIEDS!

I
f
for sale
1957 BELLA SCOOTER. Needs
some repair, will bargain. Royal Royalite
ite Royalite Typewriter, good condition.
Call 2-4750. (A-93-st-c).
FUEL INJECTION SET-UP for
Chevy V-8. Complete with dual
point distributor. $195. 372-5136.
(A-89-ts-c).
T' 1
1965 MERCURY 100 hp, less than
20 hrs., never in salt water, war warranty,
ranty, warranty, complete with controls, tank
and bronze propeller, $795. Mer Mercury
cury Mercury 80 hp and 70 hp. Both for
$495. 1964 Mercury 9.8 hp, $195.
372-5136. (A-89-ts-c).
BUY DIAMONDS from leading
firm. Strictly wholesale price.
Registered appraisals. We will
also pay highest prices for your
diamonds. Call Mr. Tessler at
372-5762. (A-94-st-c).
HONDA 50cc, 1,600 miles. Sacri Sacrifice,
fice, Sacrifice, slls. Call 372-5195 after
5 p.m. (A-95-3t-c).
ALL CHANNEL ROTATING TV
antenna & control. 35 mast, com complete
plete complete set guy wired, 60 leadins.
SSO or best offer. Call 376-7014.
(A-97-lt-p).
BENSON GYROCOPTER. 1 hour
on rotor blades. 0-hrs. Smoh on
72 hp McCollough engine. S6OO for
$2600 value. Call 378-3758. (A (A---97-2t-p).
--97-2t-p). (A---97-2t-p).
1959 CUSHMAN Eagle Scooter.
SIOO or best offer. Call 372-2383
or 378-4011. (A-97-3t-c).
EXTRA CLEAN MODERN trailer.
Air conditioned, carpeting
throughout. Awnings, excellent
home for couple or student. SISOO.
Must sell immediately. Call 376-
1350 after 5:30 p.m. (A-97-ts-c).
wanted
FEMALE GRADUATE student to
share 2 bedroom apt. downtown.
$32.50 plus half of utilities. Call
378-2219. )C-93-st-c).
ROOMMATE WANTED, Marchlst.
Share beautiful furnished new a/c
apt., pool, $41.25 per month. Last
month rent free. Ph. 378-4524.
(C-96-ts-c).
HANDY MAN to install shelf and
curtain rod. Call 372-1980. (C (C---97-ts-c).
--97-ts-c). (C---97-ts-c).
ESCORTS FOR WALKING GIRLS
FROM CAR TO DOOR. IF IN ININTERESTED,
INTERESTED, ININTERESTED, CONTACT PAUL
JACKSON, PI KAPPA ALPHA
HOUSE. (C-97-lt-p).
_
ACCOMODATIONS WANTED for
single male older student living
alone. Any quiet, private location
for trimester 3-B. Contact; Arnold
M. Kramer, P.O. Box 541, East
Palatka, Fla. 32031. Or call col collect,
lect, collect, 325-3912. (C-97-st-c).
C GATOR ADS \
V ARE DREAMY!/

GATOR ADS
ARE DREAMY!

1
autos
Must Sell. Entered Service. 1962
BUICK SKYLARK, hardtop. Low
mileage, new white sidewalls, ra radio,
dio, radio, heater, 4-speed transmission,
high performance V-8, excellent
condition. $1195. Ph. 468-1785.
(G-94-st-c).
1958 CHEVROLET. 2 door sedan,
radio, heater, 6 cyl., standard
shift, new paint and carpet. $345.
Call Michael Toskos, 378-2768.
(G-94-st-c).
1963 MGB, red, good looking, good
condition, radio and heater, ton tonneau
neau tonneau cover, seatbelts. Must sacri sacrifice.
fice. sacrifice. $1195 or best offer. Call
after 5, 378-4615. (G-87-ts-c).
1965 CHEVROLET V-8, 2 door
sedan, automatic transmission,
heater, local 2 owner car. 376-
5996. (G-96-3t-c).
1957 BUICK SPECIAL, 51,000
original miles, good condition, 1
family car. Call anytime, 376-
2350. (G-96-st-c).
1954 XK-120 JAGUAR. Good con condition.
dition. condition. SSOO. Call 378-4229 or see
at 327 NW 15th Terr. (G-96-3t-c).
1962 VW. Excellent condition. En Engine
gine Engine just rebuilt. New white side sidewall
wall sidewall tires, radio and heater. $325
equity and assume $36 per month
payments. Call 372-0755 after 5
p.m. (G-87-ts-c).
1962 MERCEDES B. 2205, 1960
MERCEDES BENZ 190 SL sports
car convertible. Bargain. Call 376-
8869. (G-90-ts-c).
1966 TRIUMP TR-4A. Wife wont
drive. Michelin X tires, wire
wheels, radio, heater. English
racing green. Call 376-1756 after
5 p.m. (G-93-ts-c).
lost-found
LOST One brown wallet. Need
identification. Reward. Call 378-
3184. (L-97-2t-nc).
p
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EXPERIENCE RAREUT,
IF EVER, SURPASSED
SIDNEY Suspcnse ANNE
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r^lPlP

Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, FeD. 21, 1966


real estate
i 1
CCB HOUSE with Florida and util utility
ity utility rooms, fenced yard and patio.
Outside city with low payments.
814 NW 55th Terr. 372-6491. (I (I---93-st-c).
--93-st-c). (I---93-st-c).
APT. HOUSE. 4 blocks from cam campus.
pus. campus. 9 furnished units. Owner can
live in one apt., rent free, manage
the others, and have monthly in income.
come. income. Present gross monthly rents
are $560. Reasonable down pay payment.
ment. payment. Call W. D. Mason, Realtor,
c/o Ernest Tew Realty Inc., 376-
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THE BEST TO YOU FROM DOB DOBSON.
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DOBSON AGENCY, 2908 NW 13th
St., 372-1473. (I-72-ts-c).
NW SECTION, central air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home.
On high wooded lot. Reasonable
down, no qualifying.Call372-5209.
(I-96-10t-c).
helpwanted
FULLER BRUSH CO. needs part parttime
time parttime sales help, male or female,
with car. Average earnings $35-
SSO for 15 hrs. work. Write to H.
Silver, 1028 Clearwater Dr., Day Daytona
tona Daytona Beach, Fla. (E-85-ts-c).
RECEPTIONIST. Residency of 2
years or more required. Typing
needed, state qualifications and
references. Write P.O. Box 12427
Univ. Sta. (E-93-ts-c).
"
NEEDED PERSON in Early Child Childhood
hood Childhood Education, music or art for
part-time employment. Contact
Dorothy Browning Play School,
372-2981. (E-96-st-c).
-V-'
i
SEMI CONNERY
'THUNDERBALLI
2ND COLOR HlT HlTfill
fill HlTfill TaKe Sweden"

for rent
GLENDALE APTS. 1 bedroom,
fully furnished, air conditioned,
suitable for couples or 2 students.
S9O monthly. Call 2-2150 after 4
p.m. (B-95-3t-c).
QUIET FOR LADY OR GENTLE GENTLEMAN,
MAN, GENTLEMAN, business or professional.
1 bedroom, air conditioned, in
Cheshire Apts., no pets, S9O per
month, lease required. Ph. 372-
3488 or 376-4360. (B-81-ts-c).
BROKEN LEASE, must rent new
unfurnished 2 BR duplex apt. Re Reduced
duced Reduced to S7B mo. for fast rental.
Student owned. 376-0342. (B-91-
ts-c).
NEED THIRD MALE ROOMMATE
for large 3 bedroom house, 2
blocks from campus, S4O per
month, older student preferred.
1414 NW 2nd Ave. 372-1508. (B (B---94-ts-c).
--94-ts-c). (B---94-ts-c).
AIR CONDITIONED 3-BR House.
April occupancy, near campus.
3 or 4 males or females. Call
Charlie Mayo, Town & Country
Realty, 376-4664. (B-95^tf-c).
MODERN SPLIT-LEVEL furnish furnished
ed furnished apt. for Spring trimester, one
bedroom, air conditioning, con conveniently
veniently conveniently located. 1824 NW 3rd
Place. Call 372-2383 or 378-4011.
(B-97-3t-c).
"* 1 1 *
COMFORTABLE and convenient
room with private bath. Available
March Ist. Across from campus.
Apply 321 SW 13th St.(B-97-lt-c).

l.. 7 I** 1 *** 10111 378,2434 I At 12:30-2:50-5:05-7:30-9:50
KIRK DOUGLAS RICHARD HARRIS
THE HERPES
OF TELEMARK
% PANAVISION* COLUMBIA COLOR
X THURSDAY ONLY
f AT 2:P.M.-5:P.M.-B:P.M. X
An event of major importanceX
# Me* ooe es the world! great opens enriches the screen for the %
Jr .. ftnt time-with ell Its bawdy, lusty excitement m
f@tl MATINEES 1
I N *>> 111!* S'- 50
Hi EVENINGS]
l sh> flints
\ li jm~
V: ofwtnfeon
ISPECIAL DISCOUnTtcTsTUDENTS & FACULTY.
1 With discount coupon you will be admitted for SI.OO at
5 p.m. performance either Wed. or Thurs.
I PICK UP COUPONS AT FLORIDA UNION INFO
DESK. TICKETS NOW ON SALE.
w.t j i im*m]} j MJ\ \ 141 W

services
NOW OPENING. Teddy Bear Nur Nursery.
sery. Nursery. 3 departments, complete in infant
fant infant department. Planned program
for children over 3. Central heating
and air conditioned. Ph. 376-0917.
1214-1/2 NW 4th St. (M-95-ts-c)!
UNITED RENT-ALLS. We rent
most anything. Roll-away beds,
trucks, all tools, party equipment.
Call us for all your needs. 376-
2835. 626 NW Bth Ave. (M-75-
ts-c).
LHWHHitt
I TONITE Q ADULT
| THRU THURS 0 HITS
F? R S T AREA SHOWING""
|||p



This
Space
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Univ.
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Ask
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8

Qian ere
ADDRESS NOTICES
E-BLUE BULLETIN
Administrative Notices To Students, Faculty & Staff

STUDENTS
CEH 131 PROGRESS TEST: Thursday, Feb. 24, 7 p.m.
All students will take the CEH 131 Progress Test in Walker
Auditorium.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION: The Graduate Record
Examination will be given Saturday, Feb. 26, by the University
Board of Examiners in Walker Auditorium.
DEADLINE FOR APRIL GRADUATES: Monday, Feb. 28,
is the deadline for removing grades of I candidates for
April, 1966, graduation.
CLASS RING ORDERS: In order for official University of
Florida class rings to arrive before April graduation, the
Campus Shop and Bookstore must have orders in before
5 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 24.
SPEECH SCREENING TESTS: All teacher education majors
are required to satisfy the speech screening requirement.
Appointments are now being made in Room 124, Norman Hall.
Students in the following courses are expected to take the
following tests. Each student must bring a No. 2 lead pencil
and will be required to use his University student number.
CHN 251 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Feb. 22, 7 p.m.
All students whose last names begin with: (A- L ) report
to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11. 12, 13, 14 or 16;
( M Z ) report to Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112, 113. 114,
115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
CHN 252 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Feb. 22, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin with: ( A ) report to Floyd
106 or 109; (B) to Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) to
Leigh 207; ( D ) to Bldg. I 101, 103, 107 or 209; ( E )to
Tigert 331 or 357; ( F ) to Matherly 213, 216 or 219; ( G )
to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; ( H ) to Peabody 201, 202,
General Notices
PLACEMENT INTER VIEWS
(Sign-up sheets are posted in Placement Office. Bldg. H. All are
available for juniors. Interviews will be held in F lorida Union
degree-level positions. Asterisk indicates sum mer employment
unless otherwise indicated.)
FEB. 21: SHE LL OIL CO. All majors interested in sales.
SHELL OIL CO. ChE, EE, CE, ME, Chem., Acctg., Fin.,
Econ. COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES CE. AMERICAN OIL
CO. -- Gen. Bus., Mktg.*
FEB. 21-22: NORTH AMERICAN AVIATION, INC. AE,
CE, ME, Ps, Met.E., App. Mech., Stat., EE.
FEB. 22: TEXACO, INC. -- Bus. Admin., Law, ChE, EE,
CE, ME,, Geol., Chem., ChE. NALCO CHEMICAL CO. --
Mktg., Lib. Arts, Org. Chem., Phys. Chem., ChE. PARKE,
DAVIS & CO. Chem., Math, Stat., Biol., Zoo., Pharm.,
Accrg., Gen. Bus., Mktg., ChE, ME. WESTINGHOUSE ELEC ELECTRIC
TRIC ELECTRIC CORP. ChE, CE, EE, IE, ME, NE, Eng. Sci., Met.
Eng., Eng. Mech.
FEB. 22-23: UNION BAG-CAMP PAPER CORP. ChE,
ME, IE, Chem., Forestory, Acctg. R. J. REYNOLDS TO TOBACCO
BACCO TOBACCO CO. Chem., ME ChE, Bact., Food Tech., Biochem.,
Plant & Animal Physiology.
FEB. 22-23-24: PROCTER & GAMBLE BUCKEYE/
CELLULOSE -- ME, EE, CE, ChE, Chem.*
FEB. 23: THE CECO CORP. CE. Arch., Bldg. Const.,
ME, IE. MARION LABORATORIES, INC. Lib. Arts, Ed.,
Mktg. NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO.
Bus., Econ., Arts & Sic., Educ., Acctg., Law, Mktg. SMITH,
RYAN, CARLISLE & NOLAN (CPA) Acctg. MILLIGAN &
BURKE (CPA) Acctg.
FEB. 23-24: PROCTER & GAMBLE DISTRIBUTION CO.
All majors interested in Sales, Mgmt.
FEB. 24: JEFFERSON CHEMICAL CO. INC.Org. Chem.,
ChE, ME, lE.* HONEYWELL, INC. EE, ME, Math, IE.
AIR REDUCTION CO. Chem., ChE., Met. E., ME, EE, IE.
KOPPERS CO., INC. -- Chem., ChE., ME, E, Met. E. MEL MELPAR,
PAR, MELPAR, INC. Math, EE.
FEB. 24-25; ATLANTA GAS & LIGHT CO. CE, ME, EE,
Acctg. COLGATE PALMOLIVE CO. All majors interested
in Sales, Mktg.

Monday, Feb. 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

205, 208 or 209; ( I J ) to Flint 110 or 112; ( K ) to
Walker 301, 303, 307 or 308; (L) to Anderson, 2,4, 5, 18
or 20; ( M ) to McCarty 2 or 44; ( N ) to Leigh 142;
( O) to Leigh 154; ( P Q ) to Flint 101 or 102; ( R ) to
Floyd 108; ( S ) to Walker Aud.; ( T V ) to Anderson
112, 113 or 115; ( W Z ) to Walker Aud.
FACULTY & STAFF
COMPUTER DEMONSTRATION: Smith-Corona Marchant
Corp. will present a free demonstration of a new electronic
computer on March 16 at 8:30 a.m. in Florida Union. Interested
persons are invited to see correlation and other problems
represented.
MEDICARE REMINDER: Medicare is available to virtually
all individuals age 65 or over, reminds the Personnel De Department.
partment. Department. Persons do not have to be retired or covered by
Social Security. Enrollment deadline is March 31; benefits
become effective July 1. Details may be obtained from the
Social Security Office, 411 SW 2 Ave.
SUMMER RESEARCH APPOINTMENTS: Monday, Feb. 28,
is the deadline for submitting applications to the Graduate
School for faculty summer research appointments, Term 111-B.
Awards will be announced after March 15.
PHOTO COPIER DEMONSTRATION: The new Dennison
Photo Copier will be demonstrated on the campus next week by
Brandons Inc. All campus personnel are invited to the free
demonstrations in Shands Teaching Hospital Store Room #l,
Thursday, Feb. 24, 1-4 p.m., and Friday, Feb. 25, 9 a.m.-
4 p.m.
CAMPUS CALENDAR See Page 14
FEB 24-25: ATLANTA GAS & LIGHT CO. CE, ME, EE,
Acctg. COLGATE-PALMOLIVE CO. All majors interested
in Sales, Mktg.
FEB. 25: FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
EE. B. F. GOODRICH CO. ChE, ME, Chem, Bldg. Const.,
Ps, Math. SPERRY MICROWAVE ELECTRONICS CO. EE,
Ps. SPERRY ELECTRONIC TUBE DIVISION--EE. SPERRY
RAND CORP. EE, ME, Ps. THE RUST ENGINEERING CO.
-- ChE, CE, EE, Eng. Mech. McGRAW-HILL BOOK CO.
All majors. COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY CE, San.
Eng., Phys. Therapist, Occup. Therapist, Psych. METHODIST
BOARD OF EDUCATION Lib. Arts, Educ., Gen. Bus.
BENDIX FIELD ENGINEERING CORP. EE, ME. U. S.
PATENT OFFICE Chem., Ps, all Engin. CHICAGO BRIDGE
& IRON CO. CE, ME. VETERANS ADMINISTRATION
Arch., ME, EE, Safety Eng.
GENERAL NOTICES
SUMMER SWIMMING PROGRAM Membership applications
for the University Golf Club Pool are now being accepted in
Room 201, Florida Gym. Membership fee is $51.50 (including
sales tax), which includes lessons. University married students,
faculty, staff, their wives and husbands and their children are
eligible. The pool will open May 1 and remain open through
Labor Day. The swimming lesson program will be divided into
two sessions May 1- June 16, adults and pre-school child children;
ren; children; June 16 Aug. 31, school age children only. Membership
is limited; applications will be accepted on a first come, first
served basis.
ENGINEERING FAIR EXHIBITS: Engineering societies and
individuals planning to have exhibits in the 1966 Engineers
Fair scheduled March 11-13, should submit a brief outline of
plans, along with space requirements, no later than 5 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 28.
MENSA MEETING: MENSA meets every day, including
Saturday, in the West Wing of the Main Cafeteria from 11 a.m.
to 1 p.m. For further information, contact Mike Sipe, tele telephone
phone telephone 8-4950.
AEROSPACE BRIEFING TEAM: The Air Force ROTC
Department is sponsoring a team of professional briefers
who will present to the public an illustrated lecture on the
cooperative efforts of NASA and the Department of Defense
in the National Space Program. The briefing will be 8-9:15 p.m.,
Wednesday, Feb. 23, in McCarty Hall.

TIRES?
WHICH SIZE?
WHICH GRADE?
WHICH PLY?
is required for your
driving needs? Dont
be under or over
sold. See the experts
GAINESVILLE'S
INDEPENDENT
ALACHUA
FIRESTONE
SERVICE
CENTER
615 N. MAIN ST.
Ph. 2-3010
NOW OPEN
SEVEN DAYS
A WEEK
SERVING
Lasagna
Pizza
Spaghetti
Ravioli
Filet Mignon
(£&
/J ITALIAN
AMERICAN
CUISINE
2204 S.W. 13th St.
Phone 376-1867
FREE
HAIR SHAPING
With Shampoo and Set
Every Tuesday and
Wednesday for a
limited time only.
Phone 372-3581
For Appointment
CLOSED MONDAYS
Fashion
Beauty
Salon
1013 W. University
(2 blocks off campus)
'

Page 7



Page 8

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Feb. 21, 1966

Editor's note: Student Body Pre President
sident President Buddy Jacobs announced the
cabinet he will put up for Legis Legislative
lative Legislative approval tomorrow night.
All appointments except Se Secretary
cretary Secretary of Traditions and Se Secretary
cretary Secretary of Women's Affairs have
been made.
Jacobs told his new cabinet Fri Friday,
day, Friday, (< I selected you because I
thought you were most qualified."
But he added that he wouldn't
hestitate to fire anyone who did
not measure up to expectations.
Along with the 18 constitutional
cabinet officers there are six
more major appointments filling
spots such as off campus housing
inspector general and administra administrative
tive administrative assistant to the president.
The Alligator presents a n
analysis of the Jacobs cabinet to
you, the students and faculty of the
UF.
*Administrative Assistant
Charles Shepherd is Administrative Assistant to
Student Body President Buddy Jacobs. Shepherd,
recently defeated by 45 votes in the treasurers
race, brings a wealth of experience into his office.
He has just completed a full term in the Legisla Legislative
tive Legislative council. He has served as the Financial Direc Director
tor Director of Gator Gras. He headed-up the independents
in the Dollars for Scholars Drive. Shepherd also
worked on the Murphree Area Council as well as
on the Florida Union board.
This energetic campaigner will coordinate the
activities of the cabinet. He will insist that weekly
cabinet reports requested by Jacobs be submitted
on time. There will be times this task will test the
dry humor of Charles Shepherd.
Currently Shepherd is working very close wdththe
president concerning the job of assigning platform
projects to cabinet officers.
Shepherd is not an official member of the cabinet
and doesnt have to run the Legislative council
garnet Tuesday night. However, there is no other
member of the administration who will be as close
to Jacobs.
Finance
The only undersecretary in the history of Student
Government to receive the presidents award is the
new Secretary of Finance.
Bruce Rogow member of Tau Epsilon Phi, held
the Labor office together last year. This is no under understatement.
statement. understatement. The Secretary of Labors post changed
hands three times last year. Three switches would
disrupt any office. Rogows presence, according to
Bruce Culpepper, prevented that.
Rogow has a 4.0 average in his accounting and
business related courses.
Over the past two years Rogow has spoken for
Florida Blue Key, worked on Gator Growl and this
past month and a half, was treasurer of Student
Party. jj
Rogow will need this background. More than any
other person he will set financial policy for Student
Government. Tommy Backmeyer, out going secre secretary
tary secretary of Finance, explained that the secretary sets
policy by virtue of his command position on six
committees dealing with student money.
The Secretary of Finance is the Business manager
of Student Government.
Public Relations
Beau Smyth, an independent, is in charge of sell sellof
of sellof Public Relations.
Next fall he will have the enviable job of planning
and organizing the Miss University of Florida
contest.
Smyth explained, My first task is to build a
working relationship between The Alligator and
Student Government.
At the same time he will ask for permanent
Green Boards on campus. These would be used
to give organizations more space to publicize
their events.
Smyth handled the poop during the campaign
for Student party and sat in most of the steering
committee meetings. It was Smyth who helped
develop the concept of student autonomy. 1

i^TheFaceOffhe

Charles Shepherd Beau Smyth
PI |k
I v m
Larry Tyree Irene Minkoff
w j| Bk. M JH| *.
M I 'v
Wayne Thomas Jay Scheck Student Body President
Bill Gregg Bob Imholte
/ Cabinet members included in thi
/ Finance, Bruce Rogow; Traffic and
/ Ira Liebesfeld; Inspector General, 1
/ Assistants to the Vice President.
/ Legislative Affairs, Bob Harper

Traffic and Safety
Bill Sullivan, key mastermind behind the Jacobs
victory, is now preparing himself to tackle the
position as secretary of Traffic and Safety.
Sullivan is a freshman law student and a member
of the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. During the
campaign, he served as party chairman for Student
party.
The Traffic and Safety department collects fines
students receive for violating parking regulations
on campus.
Coping with campus parking problems will be the
task to test the true ability of Sullivan. Jacobs
has asked Sullivan to start work now on getting
extra parking facilities on campus. These areas
include part of the upper drill field, behind McCarty
Drive, and near Norman Hall.
Sullivan explained that he is also investigating
the feasibility of mini buses for quick on campus
transportation.
Inter-University Affairs
Larry Tyree, independent, is a Student Party can candidate
didate candidate who got a break in losing an election.
He missed being re-elected to Leg. Council by
less than 10 votes. This left him free to serve as
Secretary of Inter-University Affairs.

Tyree explained that he will use his office as an
idea hunting ground. Through correspondence he
will be able to find out what other student govern governments
ments governments across the U.S. are doing and help apply
these new ideas to our campus.
Tyree is also interested in researching the De Decision
cision Decision Party platform which called for a statewide
student government.
A statewide student government could tackle
problems common to all schools, such as parking,
food service and compulsory ROTC, he said.
Tyree accompanied Student Body President Buddy
Jacobs through many dorms during the past election.
* Inspector General
Inspector General, a post created by the Cul Culpepper
pepper Culpepper administration, will be manned by Ken
Mingledorff this year.
Mingledorff was a Legislative aid to Governor
Burns during the 1965 legislative session in Talla Tallahassee
hassee Tallahassee last year.
On campus, Mingledorff has served on the Florida
Union Board, Graham Area Council, Circle K and
worked with Homecoming. All this time he main maintained
tained maintained a 3.5 average.
Inspector General is the systems control manager
for Student Government. It is his responsibility to
insure that all cabinet officers have adequate physi-



e Cqb?net-I96§\
ET"
X,
.£.... Sr
v W .- Bkj
Pat Kelley Lewis Miles
" g&|
Cary Martin Ernie Lilt
:lent Buddy Jacobs Mjilou Koch Dan Meserve
a ~~t***"^^"^
Ed Koren Bill Chiara
this article but not pictured are: \w
and Safety, Bill Sullivan; Athletics,
al, Ken Mingledorff; Administrative (Alligator Art by Joe Voron) \
I nt Marfe G/icfe and Jerry Pilcher;

cal facilities for their respective departments.
Student Body President Buddy Jacobs will also
have Mingledorff available to research areas such
as the infirmary, food service, and campus lighting.
Mingledorff is a Sigma Chi pledge.
* President Women's
Interhall Council
Irene Minkoff, President of Womens Interhall
Council and floor coordinator for Steve Cheeseman
in Rawlings, will sit in the cabinet this year,
only this time she will have status as a full member.
Last year, Bruce Culpepper asked the president
of Womens Interhall to sit in on cabinet meetings
and advise. Jacobs took the next step and gave Miss
Minkoff full membership.
This is part of a program that has been develop developing
ing developing for the past two years to bring Student Govern Government
ment Government in closer contact with the dorms.
Miss Minkoff told The Alligator one of the first
things she will ask for is more vending machines
in the womens dorms.
There is no food service in Mallory, and limited
hours of food service in the other womens dorms,
she said.
Miss Minkoff went on to explain that vending
machines would give the girls access to foods during
all hours of the day.

Student Activities
Pat Kelley is following his fraternity brother Tom
Lang into the job of Secretary of Student Activities.
Kelleys primary task will be to operate the
Student Government book sale. Kelley told The
Alligator he plans to revitalize and enlarge the
book sale.
At the current time, Kelley pointed out, the book
sale must operate from a closet in the Florida
Union. He hopes the new Florida Union will provide
better facilities.
Kelley will also serve on two committees, the
Student-Faculty Insurance Board and the commit committee
tee committee on Camp Wa-burg.
The Student Activities post is not new to Kelley.
He was acting Secretary of Student Activities dur during
ing during the summej* trimester when fellow Kappa Sig,
Tom Lang left for summer vacation.
Kelley also served a term on the Legislative
Council during the 1964-1965 session. During that
time he was chairman of the Rules and Calendar
Committee and president pro-tern of the Legislative
Council. >
Kelley planned and organized the Independent
Womens Socials during the past campaign for Buddy
Jacobs.

Monday, Feb. 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Labor
Lewis Miles will be secretary of the largest
organization in the cabinet, the Labor Office. He
will be in charge of forty people who handle every everything
thing everything from summer student employment to baby
sitting.
Miles demonstrated his ability to control and
organize during the past campaign. He served on the
steering committee as party whip. The party whip
makes sure everyone is at the right place at the
right time, says Miles.
Miles is a Lambda Chi and is earning a degree
in the College of Business Administration.
He plans to ask Tigert administrators to give
him a geographic distribution of students. This way,
explained Miles, if many students come to the UF
from a particular area of the state, he can con concentrate
centrate concentrate on getting jobs for them from that area.
* Administrative
Assistants to Veep
Mark Glick and Jerry Pilcher will be Adminis Administrative
trative Administrative Assistants to Fred Breeze.
Glick resides in the same dorm area as Breeze
(Hume) and coordinated Hume Hall for the Jacobs
organization.
Pilcher, a Kappa Alpha, and campaign manager
for Doug Gillis, will represent the Greek philosophy
in the vice-presidents office.
The two will be in charge of distributing the new
directories next Fall.
Breeze also is looking into the possibility of having
these two men take charge df Spirit Hats when they
are made available to students in the Fall.
Legislative Affairs
Bob Harper comes to assume the responsibilities
of Secretary of Legislative Affairs qualified in a
manner unrivaled by many of his predessors.
Bob served the Legislative Council as majority
floor leader last year. This year he was in command
of the lower slate of Student Party and so coordinated
the efforts of all candidates running for Legislative
Council from Student Party.
Harper is an ATO and has shown an interest in
serving since he came to Florida three years ago.
The Secretary of Le b islative Affairs assists the
vice president in controlling the efforts of Legislative
Council. The agenda is prepared through his office.
All members of Legislative Council keep their files
in his office and the Secretary of Legislative Affairs
helps members draft legislation.
Students wish to have legislation introduced by
their representative should contact Harper to help
them draft the legislation. They should also contact
the right member of the council to introduce it for
them.
Housing
Gary Martin is the new Secretary of Housing.
Martin spent the campaign organizing the efforts
of Sigma Chi for Buddy Jacobs.
This is Mar ls isecond position in student govern government.
ment. government. Last yec* he served as under-secretary of
athletics.
Although a Greek, Martin has maintained close
ties with the dorms. He still lives in South Hall
and so feels he knows the problems of the dorms.
One c 'irst items on his work agepda is getting
more a into the dorms.
Martin is not sure what he will do with off offcampus
campus offcampus housing. Buddy Jacobs hopes to have Ernie
Litz tackle the job of Secretary of Off-campus Hous Housing*
ing- Housing*
* Off-Campus Housing
Apathy presidential candidate Ernie Litz has been
asked by Buddy Jacobs to assume the position of
Secretary ot Off-Campus Housing.
Jacobs explained this cabinet-level position would
enable Litz to carry out many of the reforms in
off-campus housing advocated by Apathy Party dur during
ing during the campaign.
Litz has tentatively accepted the post.
Organizations
Wayne Thomas will be a real organization man
this year as Secretary of Organizations.
Thomas a Sigma Phi Epsilon is past president
of Mens interhall and has been involved in number
of organizations in his two-and-a-half years on
campus. He explained that he believes he has a
feel for the office.
(MORE PROFILES, Page 10)
* These posts are not listed in
the S.G. Constitution

Page 9



Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Feb. 21, 1966

By DON FEDERMAN
/|T lerambard might be termed a
w simple comedy of humanity,
sanctioned by the grace of heaven.
It contains the real and the miraculous.
Indeed, it is a play of visions and a
visionary man.
Clerambard is an impoverished French
aristocrat, dehumanized by an economic
and social ethic to the point of imprison imprisoning*
ing* imprisoning* the other three members of his
family by it. He is an outright sadist to
all creatures. But his family offers little
In the way of contrast; rather, the son
Octave's spinelessness and repressed
sexuality, the wife Louises vacuous pride
in heritages, the mother-in-law de Leres
vanity and pomp, and all of they lying
underscore, illuminate, and in fact justify
all the more Clerambards monstrous
actions.
But Clerambard has a vision of St.
Francis of Assisi, the saint noted for his
charity and love of animals. And so Cler Clerambard
ambard Clerambard undergoes a radical metamorpho metamorphosis
sis metamorphosis of character and preaches love to a
world he formerly found so convenient to
hate. But his ethic of love seems alien
(nay, mad) in a world which cannot see
his reasoning in making a prostitute named
Poppy a saint or refusing a large dowry
so that his son can supposedly marry
Poppy for love and humility.
Furthermore, Clermabard's blind blindness
ness blindness to reality further amplifies the petty
foibles of those he futilely tries to con convince
vince convince of the blessings of poverty.
In the last act, this entire hodge-podge
of humanity (all except a priest) sees a
vision of heaven and realizes that poverty
and love shall bless a world in spite of
itself. The madness and apparent unreal

(From Page 9)
Thomas served in the legislative council during
he 1963-1964 term. He was a member of the
Excuse Committee during his time in office. Two
ears ago he also served as Under-secretary of
legislative Affairs.
* Secretary
The new cabinet secretary is Marlou Koch, an
ndependent from Mallory. This is the only salaried
position in the cabinet.
Miss Koch will assist the full time Student Govern Government
ment Government secretary, Mrs. Eudine McLeod with typing
and shorthand. She will work closely with Jacobs,
Shepherd and Breeze and on occasion will assist
the cabinet in tight spots.
During this past campaign she worked with Ed
Koren in coordinating the womens dorms for Student
Party.
She will attend all cabinet meetings and be the
official recording secretary of these Friday after afternoon
noon afternoon sessions.
Interior
Jay Scheck tackles the challenging job of Secre Secretary
tary Secretary of Interior. He will be taking charge of the
new Student Government Tutorial program for under underpriveledged
priveledged underpriveledged children, the elections, and the Student
Government insurance program.
Like Larry Tyree, Scheck is moving from the
Legislative Council into the executive branch of
Student Government. He has also served the students
as a Traffic Court justice.
Scheck is a Phi Tau and has been recognized
by the [feople who know him best by being elected
to the executive council in his fraternity.
Scheck has been the political representative of
the Phi Taus for two years now. He was the cam campaign
paign campaign manager of Charles Shepherd during the past
campaign.
Scheck feels his most important duties this year
will be coordinating future elections and helping
develop the Camp Wauburg area.
Married Affairs
Dan Meserve, a resident of Diamond Village,
will be the new Secretary of Married Affairs.
During the past campaign, Meserve coordinated
the married villages for Jacobs and student party.
Meserve is a 30- year-old law student. Both he
and his wife spent their undergraduate days at the
UF.
Meserve is interested in the investigation of
married village electrical rates.

Clerambard Proves Interesting

actions of Clerambards conflict with his
expedient peers is now sublimely resolved
as the curtain falls.
This production of Clerambard utilizes
a translation of Norman Denny restraining
much of the plays earthiness, which is
rather sad in light of the plays frank
admission in action of lust in all manner
of men and women. Don Borchardt, direc director,
tor, director, takes further liberties with the play
with selective editing, which for the most
part, maintains unity of action in a rea reasonable
sonable reasonable period of time (I feel Act IV is
an exception with some lines deleted be between
tween between Poppy and Clerambard which result
in some confusion).
It seems the dominant idea pervading
Borchardts conception of the play is that
action speaks louder than words, for there
seems to be lacking a certain contrast in
key characters, like Clermabard and Pop Poppy
py Poppy and real variety, made up for by a
variety of movements that nearly ap approaches
proaches approaches a level of over-blocking.
For example, Clermabards bitterness
and inhumanity in Act I (the entire act
weakened by insufficient contrast) is un undermined
dermined undermined by a corresponding lack of
sadism which is readily apparent in sev several
eral several lines. Later, it seems he rages too
much for a gentle man, Likewise, Poppys
lack of hardness seems out of character
in Act HI. Furthermore, several brilliant
satiric effects are lost as many lines are
given a rather bland and indifferent treat treatment
ment treatment (this feeling partially reflects the
audience's lack of sophistication). Com Compensating

More UF Cabinet Profiles

Alligator Review

However, his first priority will be a bid to
provide bus service to J.J. Finley Elementary
School for children living in the Flavets. Cory
ViUage already has such a service.
Next on his job list is roads for Diamond Village.
Now when it rains, Diamond turns into a mud
hole, said Meserve.
Athletics
Ira Liebesfeld, hard-working member of last
years cabinet, is the new Secretary of Athletics.
Liebesfelds plans for the office include getting
two new softball diamonds with lighting facilities
across from the Sigma Alpha Epsilon house.
He is already working on plans to bargain with
Gainesville bowling lanes for special UF student
rates.
Liebesfeld also said he will publish a booklet
with a map and a list telling when athletic facilities
are open on campus.
Any student who wants to talk about athletics
can see me at my office in 310 at the Florida Union.
Ill be there every day, he promised.
International Affairs
The new Secretary of International Affairs is Bill
Chiara.
In past years, this post has been held by an
international student, but Chiara is a real interna internationalist
tionalist internationalist even though he was born in New Jersey.
Chiara moved to Cuba at the age of four and lived
there for 12 years.
During the past year in the Legislative Council
Chiara represented the international students with
excellence. He personally took charge of a bill
requesting $1,300.00 for the international student
organization. He managed the bill through committee
and Legislative Council without a descenting vote.
Chiara spent the better part of January and early
February building an organization of international
students to support Buddy Jacobs.
Chiara's first priority is to improve the facili facilities
ties facilities of the international student building. This in includes
cludes includes firing up the old Flavet building to be added
as a new wing to the present international center
and pressing for a brand new building.
Alumni Affairs
Bill Gregg is the new Secretary of Alumni Affairs.
This is not exactly a new experience for Gregg.
He has served a similar position for Kappa Alpha.
Last Fall, while working on Gator Growl, he developed

pensating Compensating for this are the brash movements
of Clerambard and Octave in Act 111 and
Octaves mincing actions throughout the
play. This kind of blocking lends a visual
excitement not always (and unfortunately
so) engendered vocally, though Cleram Clerambards
bards Clerambards well-meaning and stentorian de denunciations
nunciations denunciations of his son are an exception. In
short, the production is good and effective
enough, but it still needs considerable re refinement
finement refinement in delivery and more careful
delineation of character.
The acting was mixed. The most diffi difficult
cult difficult role, of course, was Clerambard. I
think Dave Petersen gave it a great try,
and he just missed excellence. It seems
bitterness alone could not suffice for his
lines of sadism in Act I, and it was not too
surprising to see Petersen a trifle ner nervous
vous nervous and stiff in delivery. From the vision
onward, his acting improved steadily as if
truly possessed by God, although at times
he was a bit too righteous and not gentle
enough befitting a disciple of St. Fran Francis.
cis. Francis.
The same problem (a lines meaning vs.
plays intent) affected Ruth Ann Hellwig's
Poppy. She did not seem at ease in the
opening of Act in. I think she made the
most of her eye-appealing costume and
body movement, but quite honestly, I would
have preferred a bit more flamboyance.
The most consistent performer was Don
Thomas (Octave). His lack of aggressive aggressiveness
ness aggressiveness in earlier acts and his awakening to
the ways of the flesh later on were a sheer
delight to watch. His voice is marvelously

atuned to the role.
Almost a$ effective was Sherry Penn as
de Lere. She tended to swallow a few
lines with her deep-set voice in Act I,
but generally she played a pomp and
meddlesomeness befitting a bitchy
mother-in-law.
The two other major roles of Louise
and Galuchon, played by Carol Perley
and Carl Strano, were much weaker.
There is a quality of voice in Miss Perley
which makes every one of her lines sound
the same. Mr. Strano seemed terribly
affected and stilted as to be lifeless at
times, particularly in Act n.
Madame Galuchon and her three daugh daughters,
ters, daughters, respectively portrayed by Beverly
Thomas, Kathy Taccolini, Andi Aperstein,
and Holly Howard, were competent as were
Charles Harper as St. Francis and Jerry
Greenfield in the very short role of the
Doctor.
David Hutchinson as the Priest seemed
better in Act I than in Act IV. William
Perley as the Dragoon was all right so
long as he wasnt displaying his embar embarrasing
rasing embarrasing French accent.
Donald Creasons set was sufficient,
and in the final vision of Act I, was un uncanningly
canningly uncanningly effective with St. Francis seen
through a now-transparent chimney, the
stage bathed in an orange-brown light
with darkness all around. In fact, all the
vision scenes made good use of lighting.
Mary Stephenson and her crew did their
usual outstanding job of costuming.
Thus, in short, Clerambard is recom recommended
mended recommended with the prior- mentioned reser reservations.
vations. reservations. The play has much appeal to the
college audience with its abundant humor
and is an interesting if not outstanding
production.

a relationship with Justice Stephen OConnell of the
State Supreme Court. OcConnell is also an active
member of the Florida Alumni Association.
This summer Gregg will be the student host for
incoming freshman during the showing of the movie,
Floridas Second 100.
Gregg will also publish a newsletter for alumni
telling them of important student activities, such as
Operation Appreciation.**
Gregg plans to reinstitute alumni luncheons, a
program developed by past alumni Secretary Charlie
Plum a year ago.
Academic Affairs
Bob Imholte is another example of Buddy Jacobs
cabinet who has had previous experience in his
newly appointed area. Imholte, past chairman of
academic affairs for Hume Hall, is the new Secre Secretary
tary Secretary of Academic Affairs.
Imholte, an independent and a close associate of
Fred Breeze is now serving as president of Hume
Hall and vice-president of Mens Interhall Council.
Imholte also lends his administrative abilities to the
University Religious Association on special projects.
Imholte was one of the chief architects of Buddy
Jacobs dorm organization.
Trying to get early registration for all students
will probably be the biggest job confronting Bob
Imholte.
Men's Affairs
Ed Koren will be wearing two hats on the third
floor of Florida Union this year. Already Director
of the Florida Union Board, he has been asked to
serve as Secretary of Mens Affairs.
This past year while working hard on the Union
Board, Koren found time to work on the Food Service
report that Eric Smith, recent past secretary, pre prepared.
pared. prepared.
Korens most immediate task will be to follow
up the Food Service report. He will be working
with the new Food Service director to the very end.
An active personality on Student Partys steering
committee, Koren who is an independent, had the
pleasure of organizing the womens dorm on behalf
of Buddy Jacobs.
Koren will work with Irene Minkoff in order to
obtain more and better vending machines in the
dorms.
Koren will also be researching the possibility
of ending compulsory ROTC. He would like to give
students a choice of choosing either physical educa education
tion education or ROTC. He has had a successful reaction
from Tigert on this matter.



lo SAY UF STUDENTS WHO WERE THERE

Costa Ricas Elections Are Mild

By JUSTINE HARTMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Did you know that San Jose Costa Rica has more paved
Streets and more sidewalks on them than Gainesville. It
Klso has more beautiful women per square inch than any
jther country in the world.
These are observations made by the Latin American
Ktudies group which returned last week from a nine-day
Rojourn in Costa Rica, where they were studying Latin
American election procedures on the spot.
The peaceful nature of the elections in Costa Rica,
Bis compared to those in the rest of Latin America,
Bvas striking, said Wayne Selcher, one of five students
Lt a group interview with The Alligator.
The two main parties are the Liberation National,
Bvhich held office before the election, and Unification Na National,
tional, National, which sponsored Trejos, the candidate who won
he elections. The Costa Rican elections are reputed to
Be among the fairest existing in Latin America, since,
In the last three elections, the opposing party has won
peacefully, with no coup detat. ~
The first night the group was in San Jose it heard
fcaniel Oduber, the incumbent candidate, speak. They
Interviewed him and other political leaders of both parties.
Interviews were also held with three leaders of the Cuban
levolution and the OAS three-man observation team
here.
| The voting procedure described by the group is far
Inore complicated than that used in United States elections,
here is a 75-cent fine for not voting. Each person has
I registered ID card and is assigned to a precinct where
Be must vote the assignment is alphabetical with no
|onsideration as to the distance a person might have to

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I Ecuminical Work Camps, National Parks, Voluntary Service
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MEET
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travel to reach his precinct to vote. IBM Cards are used
to match ID cards with names on the voting register at
each precinct.
To vote a person must press his thumb on a stamp
pad and then stamp his fingerprint on the ballot after
the candidate of his choice. The ballot is then signed by
a political representative of a party at the precinct. His
finger is dipped in indelible ink to show he has voted.
For a week after the election, everyone goes around
with purple fingers, commented Ed Dennison, one of
the trip-makers.
During the election period, every one in San Jose wore
badges supporting his candidate, sang party songs and
decorated houses with party flags. There was little vio violence
lence violence on the whole. However, the group did mingle in a
few street riots the night before the election and witnessed
a bombing.
The night before the election people were roaming
in the streets en masse attacking cars of the opposition
parties and throwing rocks. The police used tear gas to
disperse the crowds, said Irwin Flashman.
The students were impressed by the calm effective effectiveness
ness effectiveness of the police forces in San Jose. They never witnessed
one instance of police brutality.
Costa Rica has no armed forces, but maintains a very
active police force of about 2,700. The population of the
country approaches one-and-a-half million.
Their police are as good, or better, than the riot
control forces in the U. 5., said one observer.
The elections in Costa Rica are held every four years.
The President cannot succeed himself and must wait 8
years to run again. He must remain neutral by law and
cannot be involved in any way in the election.

Jacobs Slates Reform

(From Page 1)
The other priority areas
pasted to Jacobs bulletin board
included general improvements,
international student activities and
student involvement in Student Go Government.
vernment. Government.
Lake Wauburg is top on the list
of general improvements. Work
on Wauburg would involve putting
presently unused land at the lake
to use.
For international students, Ja Jacobs
cobs Jacobs is presently working on a
student union. He now has an archi architecture
tecture architecture student designing possible

Jim
Larec*
says...
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your life insurance dollars from I
College Lifes famous policy,!
THE BENEFACTOR, because!
College Life insures only college|
men and college men are preferred*
risks. Let me tell you more.?? 1
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Tel. 378-2476 I
representing 1
THE COLLEGE LIES j
INSURANCE COMPANY I
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All he can really do is sit and the crowds go
by, said Rick Cueto.
The students saw little carousing around the streets
resulting from intoxication, since the doors of bars are
sealed and no liquor is sold on election day, the day
before or the day after.
The campaign was really interesting, said Flashman,
especially since there were no real issues.
Tremendous false, allegations were levied against Manuel
Oduber, running with the incumbent party. He was accused
of being financially supported by Castro and of being a
Communist by the Unification.
The students believe the Communist propaganda used
against Oduber had a lot to do with his losing, although
he and the Liberation party refuted everything on television.
The majority of the people we talked to said the'y
didnt know what Communism was, said Wayne Selcher.
They just knew that they were afraid of it.
Oduber was in support of social reform, and public
welfare, so they linked him to Castros movement in
Cuba. The opposing party also referred to Oduber as a
Communist because he opened foreign relations with
Poland the U.S. had done this many years before Costa
Rica did.
There was much sensationalism on the part of Trejos
and the opposition party, according to Flashman.
The way Liberation fought this was to print pictures
of Oduber with Kennedy and with the Pope, he said.
They seem to want to prove their worth by showing
they are pro-American, he continued.
One reason for this attitude could be that the U.S. has
never run the government in Costa Rica and hasnt inter intervened
vened intervened there in the last century, according to Professor
Henry Kantor, who engineered and supervised the trip.

additions for the buildings recently
purchased for a temporary center.
Jacobs said he would like to see
plans started for permanent build buildings.
ings. buildings.
And to improve student contact
with SG, Jacobs unofficially added
the Mens and Womens Interhall
Council presidents to his cabinet.
Last year the Mens and Womens
Interhall presidents could sit in
on cabinet meetings but could not
vote as cabinet members.
In addition to the new cabinet
representation, Student Body Vice-
President Fred Breeze will attend
dorm council meetings, and Jac'-*'
plans to have the other ca. jt
members meet with dorm coun councils.
cils. councils.
Channels have been blocked in
the past between Student Govern Government
ment Government and the dorms, said Jacobs.
These are some steps to open
the channels.
Since the election, Jacobs has
talked with the other student party
leaders. He will be working closely
with Decision Party, since Deci Decision
sion Decision holds a majority of Legisla Legislative
tive Legislative Council seats.
Jacobs has discussed off offcampus
campus offcampus housing with Apathy Party
leader Ernie Litz. He plans to
appoint Litz to his cabinet as head
of off-campus housing affairs.
Jacobs also said Jack Kay Myers
of Birthday Party has been to the
SG offices looking to work with
this years student government.
And there are places for the
Freedom Party people, said Ja Jacobs.
cobs. Jacobs.
Alan Levin, who was Freedoms
presidential candidate, may work
on a tutorial project and other
affairs concerning the Gainesville
area, he said.

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Monday, Feb. 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Matthews:
Escalate
(From Page 1)
Matthews also discussed the
concept of freedom of speech and
the various groups on campus.
Os course we are all for free
speech. But when groups give aid
and comfort to the enemy, I per personally
sonally personally feel that this is treason.
At the current time the Supreme
Court defines this as treason only
during declared war. I an working
on an amendment to make aid and
comfort to the enemy treason at
certain times when we are not in involved
volved involved in a declared war, such as
in Viet Nam, he said.
Matthews has served in Con Congress
gress Congress continuously since 1952. He
currently serves on the appro appropriations
priations appropriations committee and also a
subcommittee for Health, Educa Education
tion Education and Welfare.
Matthews pointed out that both
these committees concern univer universities.
sities. universities. The congressman explain explained
ed explained that both Gainesville and Talla Tallahassee
hassee Tallahassee are now in his district and
he feels that he can represent both
FSU and UF well in these two
committees.
Matthews came to UF in 1924
when the university had only 2,500
students. During his stay as a
student, he served as president of
Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity,
president of the study body, pres president
ident president of Florida Blue Key, and
president of the University Glee
Club. Besides serving as SGpres SGpresident,
ident, SGpresident, he also spent a year as vice
president, and another in the Chan Chancellor
cellor Chancellor of the Honor Courts seat.
Matthews also was Director of
the Florida Union from 1936 until
he enlisted in the armed forces
during World War 11.

Page 11



Page 12

*, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Feb. 21, 1966

Toanykid
who'd like to go somewhere:
Well pay half your fare.
r r

DOES NOT APPLY IN CANADA AND MEXICO.

The ideas not as crazy as it may seem.
Anytime we take a jet up, there are almost
always leftover seats.
So it occurred to us that we might be able
to, fill a few of them, if we gave the young
people a break on the fare, and a chance to
see the country.
The American Youth Plan*
We call the idea the American Youth Plan,
and what it means is this:
American will pay half the jet coach fare
for anybody 12 through 21.
Its that simple.
All you have to do is prove your age (a birth
certificate or any other legal document will do)
and buy a S 3 identification card.
We date and stamp the card, and this en entitles
titles entitles you to a half-fare ticket at any American
Airlines counter.
The only catch is that you might have to
wait before you get aboard; the fare is on a
standby basis.
Standby simply means that the pas passengers
sengers passengers with reservations and the servicemen
get on before you do.
Then the planes yours.
The American Youth Plan is good year

American Airlines

round except for a few days before and after
the Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas
rushes.
If you cant think of any places youd like
to go offhand, you might see a travel agent
for a few suggestions.
We cant add anything else.
Other than its a marvelous opportunity
to just take off.
r -<
i
Complete this couponinclude your $3.
(Do not send proof of ageit is not needed
until you have your ID validated.)
In addition to your ID card, well also send
you a free copy of AAs Go Go American |
with SSO worth of discount coupons.
American Airlines Youth Plan
633 Third Avenue
New York, N. Y. 10017
j I
Name j
Address
I
City State Zip
I J
Birth date Signature _____
j
Color of hair Color of eyes.
CN
L J



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Stolen Moments On The Inside

T/z/s /s a girls world
-- inside the brick
dorm walls away from
the hectic run of class classes,
es, classes, books and even frat
parties. Heres where
a moment can be stolen
for dreaming or for
\ whipping up a meal
without the conven conveniences
iences conveniences of stoves and
I refrigerators.

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Monday, Feb. 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 13



Page 14

1, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Feb. 21, 1966

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Infirmary Switch Is Culpeppers Highlight

By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Bruce Culpepper bid goodbye to Student Government last Tuesday
and to become a father, but the outgoing president has ac accomplishments
complishments accomplishments to remember.
Culpepper feels the highlight of his administration was the change changeover
over changeover of the UF Infirmary from the College of Physical Education and
Health to the J. Hillis Miller Health Center.
This is the first instance Ive ever been aware of where SG played
a vital part in the re-organization and change of UF policy.
The long range benefit to student health services will be greatly
magnified because of this administrative change, Culpepper said.
He explained the change came about because of the tremendous
growth in the number of students needing medical attention. It was not
because of any inadequacy in the administration of the College of
Physical Education.
Weve established a student health advisory board composed of
Dr. Samuel Martin, provost of the health center; Dean Lester Hale,
dean of student affairs; Dr. William Hall, director of the infirmary;
William Elmore, UF business manager; Buddy Jacobs, SG president,
and myself. f
The committee will work on a continuing emphasis of better student
health on campus. One of the first things Im interested in exploring
are the possibilities of administering medical aid to student depen dependents.
dents. dependents.
A big problem, of course, is space and facilities. But help for
dependents is an area that cannot be ignored.
A significant result of this current student health setup has been
the establishment of an available physician 24 hours a day in the
infirmary. This service has been needed and asked for during the last
few years, Culpepper recalled.
The most time-consuming duty of the SG President is representing
the student body. Culpepper spent many weekends away from the UP on
trips and also attended many activities here.
The constitution doesnt mention any specific duties for the SG
President. This is left to the individual elected.
There are many things you dont know as a candidate. We say the
things that should be done and then we try our hardest to do them.
The minute I got into office, I took the platform and alloted out,
plank by plank, everything that was on the platform. Various secre secretaries
taries secretaries were placed in charge of that activity.
From then on we attempted to put major emphasis on the planks
of our platform. Three or four of these campaign planks led immedi immediately
ately immediately to a blind alloy, Culpepper said.
One of the platform promised to change the design of the graduation
diploma of the UF. George Blaha, secretary of legislative affairs, and
Culpepper worked on this project and found that changes would involve
tremendous cost.
We made the diploma one of the dorm stomping topics and found the
vast majority of the students did not object to the present diploma in
lieu of the expense necessary to change it.
Culpepper said he figured it would be advisable to forget the project
rather than spend the money involved.
I think the SG administration should be molded by the need that
arises during the year, Culpepper said.
He found there was a need for the SG President to work closer with
the Legislative Council and he thinks Jacobs should try to vitalize
the council during the next year.
In the past, there has been a tendency for the executive department
to completely dominate all projects and leave Leg Council with nothing
to do but budget the allocations.
If Leg Council would instigate more projects of its own, then I think
SG would increase its effectiveness.
Culpepper said the president does not have any overt influence with
the council. He spoke before the council several times during his
administration.
During the campaign, Ernie Litz, Apathy Party presidential can candidate,
didate, candidate, charged that Culpeppers administration only completed 18 out
of 118 platform planks.
I dont understand that charge, Culpepper said. I invite Litz to
go over the platform with me. We completed over 85 per cent by the
end of the summer and completed 90 per cent by the end of my ad administration.
ministration. administration.
This included raising the minimum salary of working students to
one dollar, establishing a booking system for better entertainment on
campus and placing new emphasis on the state of foreign students.
We were unable to create an International Center, but have spent
more time and money in this area than in the past several years
combined.
Im proud of the work weve done that wasnt on our platform,
Culpepper said.
He mentioned the SG blood drive as one example of a project which
didnt work.

Radical To Speak
Against Viet Nam
Bob Karen will lecture tonight
on The Academic Community and
Anti-War Activities at 8 p.m. in
Florida Union Auditorium.
Karen, a member of the National
Council of the Student Peace Union
and War Resistors League Nation National
al National Advisory Council, will also
make several appearances in the
Florida Free Speech Area today
and tomorrow.
A Viet Nam Day Committee
film, Hot Dam Viet Nam, will
also be shown. The film deals
with anti-Viet Nam war activities
that have occurred throughout the
United States.

It was a learning experience. Im confident its failure wasnt
because of a lack of interest on the part of the student body. It was
our failure for moving too quickly. This is a project which should
have been thoroughly investigated before we went into it.
The biggest disappointment to Culpepper was the inability of SG
to find adequate space for the student book sale.
Weve explored possibilities from Building I to the Hub to the old
Florida Union and the only alternative I can now see is to find a
vacant room in the new Florida Union.
The book sale is a tremendous idea and would save the students
a lot of money, but it cant be run without a permanent distributing
location.
if Ik
mBSSm
*- 'v ../-v: \v£ m '* : h ;
' GOODBYE
Bruce Culpepper left Student Government last week after what
he feels was a successful administration. He considers the highlight
of his administration the changeover of the UF Infirmary from the
College of Physical Education to the Medical Center.
Campus Calendar
(From Page 7)
PAINTING FOR FUN, MIXED MEDIA: Begins Feb. 24, FU.
Sign up in Room 315, FU.
ANNUAL STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST: March 1-
March 31. Deadline for entering photos, Feb. 28. Apply FU,
Rm. 315, Students only.
HILLEL FOUNDATION: Saturday, Feb. 26, 8:15 p.m. Bowling
Party, followed by social. $1.20 covers three games, shoes, and
transportation. Reservations required by Thursday. Phone
2-2900 or 6-4823.
PRE-LAW SOCIETY: Tues., Feb. 22, 8:30 p.m., Room-201,
Law Bldg. Tour of Law Library.
BASKETBALL: Today, Florida Gym, 8 p.m. Florida vs.
Tennessee.
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: Today, Univ. Aud.,
8:15 p.m. Edward Troupin, Conductor.
SWIMMING: Today, Univ. Pool. Freshman 1:00 p.m.
Varsity 4 p.m. Florida vs. Miami.
DELTA SIGMA PI: Today, 6 p.m. i:6FU.
FLORIDA BOARD OF PHARMACY EXAM: Today, Tues.,
and Wed., MSB Aud., 9 a.m. 5 p.m.
TAX CLINIC: Today, 3:40 5 p.m., Room 13 Matherly.
Tax Clinic to assist students in preparing their income tax
forms.
BRAZILIAN-PORTUGUESE CLUB: Today, Johnson Lounge,
FU, 7:30 p.m. Dr. Saito: Immigration and Agrarian De Development
velopment Development in Sao Paulo State.
MURPHREE AREA COUNCIL: Today, 8:45 p.m., FU 118.
r AIIE: Today, 7:30 p.m., Eng. Bldg. Rm. 270.
STUDENT PEACE UNION: Today, 8 p.m., FUAud. Speaker:
Robert Karen, Field Secretary, War Resistors League.
GATOR SAILING CLUB: Tues., Feb. 22, 7 p.m., FU 121.
No sailing experience necessary.
ALPHA ZETA BANQUET: Tues., Feb. 22, 8 p.m., Hub.
Dr. George Davis, Dept, of Biological Science, will be guest.
FLORIDA UNION BOARD FOR STUDENT ACTIVITIES:
Tues., Feb. 22, 4:30 p.m., FU 215.
LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL: Tues., Feb. 22, 7:30 p.m., FU
Aud.
TABLE TENNIS TOURNAMENT: Singles and Doubles set for
Feb. 22 and 23, 7 p.m., FU Rendezvous Room. Winners go to
ACU Tournament. Students only.



Commodores Scuttle Comeback

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Staff Writer
UF cagers, trailing by 15 points
with less than 12 minutes to play,
came within two field goals of
sinking fifth- ranked Vanderbilt

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LIKE WILLIE MAYS

Vandys Jerry Southwood looks like Willie Mays
about to make his famous basket catch as he
goes after a stray ball. Teammate Clyde Lee looks

Gators, Vols Vie Tonight

DOUG WOOLFOLK
Alligator Staff Writer
The rip-roaring Gator basket basketball
ball basketball team, trying to avenge a
near miss against VandySatur VandySaturday,
day, VandySaturday, will step into action tonight
to face the Tennessee Volspower Volspowerful
ful Volspowerful defense.
Looking for a much-needed vie vietory,

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NICE SHOT, BUT WHERES THE BALL
Jerry Southwood makes a nice shot, except for one important
thing he doesnt have the ball. Gator Skip Higley deflected the shot
and came up with the ball. Higley scored 12 points for the Gators,
most of them coming in the second half.

Saturday.
A near capacity crowd at Florida
Gym and a regional television
audience witnessed the Gators
spirited comeback fall short, 89-
86.

tory, vietory, Coach Norm Sloan probably
will start Jeff Ramsey, Gary Kel Keller,
ler, Keller, Paul Morton, Skip Higley and
Harry Winkler the quintet that
played so well Saturday in spite
of the loss.
Tennessee, 16-6 over-all and
7-4 in the SEC, will invade Florida
Gym with the same rough and tough

on, surrounded by Gators. Southwood hit for 12
points and Lee for 18 as Vandy narrowlyslippedby
the Gators, 89-86. (Photos by Ron Sherman)

Led by forwards Paul Morton and
Gary Keller, the UF cagemen
steadily whittled away at the Com Commodore
modore Commodore lead. Keller hit for 14
points in the second half and Morton
added nine in the same stanza.

team that literally stomped the
Gators 76-47 in Knoxville earlier
this season. That was during the
big Gator slump and the game
tonight should be much more
interesting for Florida fans.
Against Vandy Saturday, the
Gators hit 86% from the foul line
and 41.6% from the floor. Impres Impressive
sive Impressive statistics, but it must be re remembered
membered remembered that the Vols have been
victorious in their last 10 starts
and are out to make Florida number
11.
Top guns for Tennessee are Ron
Widby and Red Robbins, averag averaging
ing averaging 17.0 and 16.5 points respec respectively.
tively. respectively. Widby is among the SECs
top scorers, and Robbins leads the
team in rebounds.
Other probable starters for the
Vols are Larry Mclntosh, 6-1
playmaker-guard, averaging 9.2
points a game, and 5-8 Jim Corn Cornwall
wall Cornwall with a 9.1 average. Tom Hen Hendrix
drix Hendrix will be the other starter for
Tennessee.
The Gators big problem will be
to break the nations number one
defense and put a lot of points on
the scoreboard. If Florida can
score 80 points, they should win
the game.
Keller, the SECs number three
rebounder, and Ramsey, 6-10
Gator center, will be counted on
for rebounds while hustling Morton
and sharpshooting Winkler should
be big point men for the Gators.
Stopping the redhot Vols will be
a tough challenge for Florida, but
anyone who saw the Vandy game
knows it can be done. The hard hardluck,
luck, hardluck, next-year Gators can have
a nice record THIS year, but they
have to start with Tennessee.
Tennessee can go into their
game with Kentucky undefeated,
confident and ready to upset the
Wildcats, but they must have a
victory over Florida.

With two minutes remaining,
Keller pumped in two straight jump
shots to bring the Gators within
three points, 88-85. After Van Vanderbilts
derbilts Vanderbilts Keith Thomas put in a
free throw, Keller was fouled under
the Florida basket with 14 seconds
remaining.
The 6-9 junior from St. Peters Petersburg
burg Petersburg put his first shot through the
hoop to run the score to 89-86. His
second fould shot missed but Van Vanderbilts
derbilts Vanderbilts All-America center
Clyde Lee knocked the ball out outof-bounds,
of-bounds, outof-bounds, giving the Gators pos possession
session possession with 11 seconds left.
A pass from Gator center Jeff
Ramsey went off-target and Vandy
picked it off to run out the clock.
The opening minutes of the first
half witnessed see-saw action as
Keller and Lee traded opening
baskets. Thomass two free tosses
with three minutes gone gave the
Commodores a 6-4 lead, one they
never relinquished.
Vanderbilt ran its lead to 15
markers at the 10:30 mark in the
first half when sophomore guard
Bo Wyenandt converted on a three threepoint
point threepoint play. This was the Commo Commodores
dores Commodores biggest margin in the open opening
ing opening stanza. The Gators managed
to narrow the edge to four, 41-37,
and went to the locker room trail trailing
ing trailing 46-39 at intermission.
Coach Roy Skinners Commo Commodores
dores Commodores opened the second half with
blazing accuracy from the floor.
At one point in the opening minutes,

WSSfSSII&^ISIMn

Monday, Feb. 21, 1966

Page 15

<
Menaker- JjHjS
SPORTS EDITOR mMmr
What are you gonna do?
You shoot 41 per cent from the field, pretty respectable.
So your opponent shoots 55 per cent, including 11 straight
field goals at the start of the second half.
You hit 11 out of 11 from the foul line in the first half and end
up hitting 22 out of 27 for 81 per cent, the best youve done all
year.
So your opponent hits 19 out of 22 for a hot 86 per cent.
You have two men hitting better than 20 points each.
So your opponent has all five starters hitting for double figures.
You played a great game against Vandy, Gators, one of the best
Ive ever seen you play. Judging from the screaming, wild crowd
that gave you a standing ovation after you LOST, Im not the only
one who thinks so.
You were down seven points at the half, and at one time you
were more than 17 points behind.
But you never game up. You kept coming back, better and strong stronger
er stronger than before. You were there to play, and everybody knew it.
For a few magic moments, you were the team that might have
been, the great team that you can be. You showed a never give-up
attitude, fighting to the very last second.
You lost to Vanderbilt, Gators, but theres no disgrace in losing
to the number five team in the country, a team with a 19-3 record.
Yes, you lost, but the game might have been either way. You
made a great comeback, and some might say the clock beat you
as much as the Commodores did.
Youre 13-9 now, Gators, 6-6 in the SEC. Not a bad record,
but you and I know youre better than that. The fans, the frenzied
crowd, they know youre better than that. They shook the rafters
in Florida Gym for a losing team.
TONIGHT IS THE NIGHT
Tonight youre going to face one of the roughest teams in the
SEC, a team which has already beaten you this season. The Ten Tennessee
nessee Tennessee Volunteers are a tough, talented crew, and youre going to
have your hands full winning this one.
I think you can do it. Gators.
The fans think you can do it.
Youve got four more chances this season to play the kind of
ball youve shown you can play.
You can end the season at 17-9, a darn good record in anyones
book. You have to win four straight games, a tough chore for any
team.
I think you can do it, Gators.
Steve, I still like cream and sugar in my coffee.

Vandy hit nine straight field goals.
Bo Wyenandt and Thomas were
the big guns in steering to a 17-
point spread, 69-52, with 14 min minutes
utes minutes to play. The Gators were not
to be denied their moment of
basketball glory, however, as Kel Keller
ler Keller and Morton led the late surge.
Keller topped all Gator scorers
with 26 points in the contest.
Morton, in possibly the finest game
of his career, netted 25 markers
and was nine for nine at the charity
lane. Guard Skip Higley was the
only other Gator to break into
double figures, with 12 points.
Thomas tied Keller for scoring
honors, also hitting for 26. Lee
contributed 18, five below his sea season
son season average, Wyenandt added 13,
and Jerry Southwood and Ronnie
Green each netted 12 for Vandy.
The Gators dominated the back backboards,
boards, backboards, snaring 42 rebounds to
the Commodores 29. Keller
picked-off 16 rebounds for top spot,
while Morton was second with 10.
Lee, the Southeastern Confer Conferences
ences Conferences leading rebounder, could
only grab eight for Vandy the en entire
tire entire game.
The big difference was from the
field, where the Commodores con connected
nected connected on over half their shots
while the Gators managed a re respectable
spectable respectable .416 percentage.
The UF roundballers now sport
a 13-9 overall mark and a 6-6
conference slate. Vanderbilt
stands second in the SEC with a
10-2 record and is 19-3 against
all opponents.

SP RTS



Page 16

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Feb. 21, 1966

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