Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
' 9 .? iJSv ft I
\ ^^*Jf^^^3|l^iiim^jui^jj^jjui^^jiJU!!!!!'^ ~''" *"*** ******
J E
K JUfti : *. aife
Si f Exclusive Management
C WILLARD ALEXANDER, INC.
660 Madison Avenue. i?
New York 21,N.Y.Plaza 1-7070
* THE COUNT ENTERTAINS
The renowned Count Basie and his band will highlight the UF Military
Ball on Saturday, March 19. The Military Ball, sponsored by Army
and Air Force ROTC is open to all cadets. Tickets are $3.00 per
couple.
Applications for the 1966 Military Ball Queen must be turned into
the Army Department office by 3 p.m. today. Sunday, a social for
queen candidates will be held in Johnson Lounge, the Florida Union at
4 p.m.
Hales Letter
'Smokescreen?

Freedom Partys Alan Levin,
who was placed on disciplinary
probation Tuesday for selling on
the UF campus without a permit,
maintained yesterday that the issue
of sales on campus has been used
as a smokescreen to hide the
issue of free distribution of liter literature.
ature. literature.
The accusation came as the re result
sult result of a letter from Dean of Stu Student
dent Student Affairs Lester Hale, Levin
said.
Dean Hale denied that the action
was a smokescreen.
The letter in question was writ written

(From UF President J. Wayne
Reitz downward the public reaction
was surprise when the UF Per Personnel
sonnel Personnel Board a year ago decided to
deny Dr. Farhang Zabeeh his ten tenure.
ure. tenure. Today the reaction from the
top takes a different tone. Reasons
are offered to back the Board de decision
cision decision and the general feeling is
that the UF is better off without
Zabeeh.)
Youd be surprised how many
and who came to me afterwards
and asked that the decision not be
reversed.
Robert B. Mautz,
UF Dean of Academic Affairs
Ip?
f | jfffw < '?PQp
M'-
ig|| jF
FARHANG~MBEEH

Reitz Launched Zabeeh Investigation

ten written to Levin by both Dean Hale
and Business Manager William
Elmore.
A policy approved by the Board
of Control and issued by UF Presi President
dent President Miller in 1949 states that
the Dean of Student Affairs and
Business Manager should be in
charge of such policies.
Levin said he was told in the
letter: this matter (the free dis distribution
tribution distribution of literature) is being
considered and you will be advised
for the ultimate decision.
(See HALE, Page 9)

Fourth in a series by Yvette Cardozo

He was a good specialist but
couldnt be expected to expand.
Dr. Thomas L. Hanna,
Present Chairmanof Philosophy
These words were spoken at the
end of last trimester, nearly one
year after the UF Personnel Board
sparked student and faculty pro protests
tests protests with its decision to deny
tenure to Dr. Farhang Zabeeh.
Zabeeh and other members of
the philosophy department had
drawn up a list of grievances a against
gainst against philosophy chairman Dr.
George Bartlett. Bartlett subse subsequently
quently subsequently resigned, but as he left
he wrote a letter denying Zabeeh
tenure.
It was the Board decision that
this letter would not be nullified.
Before the Board met, Arts and
Sciences Dean Ralph Page and
acting philosophy chairman Her Herschel
schel Herschel Elliott had recommended
Zabeeh for tenure.
After the Board met, a group
of 20 faculty members wrote a
petition asking for reevaluation of

Academic Freedom:
Fact Or Fantasy?

Tlie Florida
Alligator
\i

Vol. 58, No. 96

TOP UF ENROLLMENT

Williams Sees 20,000

By MIKE MALAGHAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Twenty thousand is the figure
state Treasurer Broward Williams
wants for top UF enrollment.
Williams, who spoke at a Holi Holiday
day Holiday Inn luncheon yesterday, told
UF law students that he felt 20,000
students is large enough for a Flor Florida
ida Florida University.
He said he couldnt explain the
figure, but that a limit had to be
set.
Williams pointed out that as a
member of the Board of Education
he would listen to the advice of the
Presidents council of the Florida
universities.
They are on top of the situation
and see education problems from a
better vantage point, he said.
Williams is presently running
for the state Treasurer pos position.
ition. position.
Williams press secretary, Doug

if||
NL|'-. Sk u w % ft
| |H 9|i Tk
f |FV' ir J|
DAVE PETERSEN DRAMATIZES
See "Clerambard" pictures page 13.

the tenure decision.
Protests from the Student Group
for Equal Rights were joined by
the voices of graduate students in
philosophy.
Within months, three members
of the five-man full-time philoso philosophy
phy philosophy department resigned in pro protest
test protest and three more from math left,
giving the philosophy situation as
a contributing factor.
The Administration, too, voiced
doubt about the wiseness of the
Board decision. Both Mautz and
UF President J. Wayne Reitz said
they had been surprised by the
decision.
In fact, Dr. Reitz had been
surprised enough to launch an in independent
dependent independent investigation of the case,
and told a committee from AAUP
he had considered overruling the
board decision.
But the passage of time seems
to have changed some minds.
A statement by Reitz to an
AAUP representative seems to
sum up current Administration

University of Florida

Starr, said Williams is running an
independent campaign.
He does not wish to ride the
coat tails of any gubernatorial
candidate, nor does he wish any
candidate to ride on his, Starr
said.
Williams explained that the
Treasurers post is technical in
nature and should not be a politi political
cal political post. According to Starr, Wil Williams
liams Williams made this clear when Burns
appointed him State Treasurer a
year ago.
Broward Williams joined the
Treasurers staff 24 years almost
by accident. At the time he was
selling business machines.
The Treasurers office was or ordering
dering ordering new accounting machines.
No one in the staff could handle the
new machines and Williams was
asked to accept a job to set up the
new procedures.
He has never left.

feeling. Reitz said, The Per Personnel
sonnel Personnel Board through dumb luck
came up with the right answer.
Present comments from the top
are an offshoot of one of the
original reasons offered by the
Board for the no tenure decision.
The two reasons were: question
about academic distinc distinction
tion distinction and a desire to leave a post
open in philosophy for the new
(but then unknown/ chairman to
fill.
Reitz has since said the second
reason was not an answer of which
(See ZABEEH, Page 11)
ROBERT MAUTZ

Friday, February 18, 1966

Just before World War 11, Edwin
J. Larson, then states treasurer
and Williams immediate pre predecessor,
decessor, predecessor, asked Williams to head
up the new Insurance department.
At the time there were five or six
(See WILLIAMS, Page 11)
.............. V
| 6 Amen 9 f
£ LINCOLN, Neb. (UPI) :j:j
:: Students at Irving Junior High £j
x School have composed a pray- £:
x er they feel will not be banned £:
x from classrooms by the UJS. £
x Supreme Court. £
£ Said after the noon lunch £
£ hour, it goes: £
£ Rub-a-dub-dub, £
:: Thanks for the grub, £
:£ Y-a-a-a-aay, God. :£:

UF Students
For High
Meet Sunday
By RAY COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
The newly formed Students for
High organization will hold its first
meeting Sunday at 7:00 in the
Florida Union Auditorium, Leon
Polhill head of the group announced
today.
Polhill said it will be an or organizational
ganizational organizational meeting designed to
get the organization rolling. Oscar
Servin, High's coordinator in Ala Alachua
chua Alachua County and other High re representatives
presentatives representatives will be there to greet
the students.
Polhill encouraged all students
interested in electing Mayor High
governor to attend.
The Students for High organ organization,
ization, organization, he said, is being for formulated
mulated formulated to articulate the feelings
of the students and to provide them
the opportunity to participate in
the election of Mayor High as the
next Governor of Florida.
Polhill said that he can use any
student interested in achieving this
goal regardless of his particular
skills or his previous political
experience.
All kinds of people have all
kinds of skills; we want all kinds
of people, Polhill added.
(See HIGH, Page 3)



Page 2

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 18, 1966

International
SOVIETS ACCUSE ... Russia Thursday accused the United States
of violating international laws and the 1963 nuclear test ban treaty
by contaminating the high seas with nuclear bombs. It cited the
incident of the lost bomb in the crash of a 852 bomber off Spain last
month. The Russians also charged the United States with blocking
a treaty to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons by planning to give
West Germany access to atomic arms. Moscow delivered its two twopronged
pronged twopronged attack at the 17-nation disarmament conference during a
highly-charged session.
SNIPERS BLAST... A sniper fired on an American sentry guarding
the residence of U.S. Ambassador William Tapley Bennett early
Thursday. An embassy spokesman said the sniper and the guard
exchanged five shots without either being hit. The sniper attack was
one of 16 shooting incidents and bomb blasts reported during the night
and early this morning. A young girl was killed by one of the bomb
explosions. The death raised to 25 the number killed in eight days of
rioting and violence.
STILL LOOKING ... The search for a
missing U.S. H-bomb continued Thursday in
the Mediterranean Sea off the southeastern
coast of Spain. On land, men in blue masks
and white suits checked for possible radio radioactivity.
activity. radioactivity. The bomb search began a month ago
when a 852 bomber collided with a KCI3S
refueling place over Spain scattering three
nuclear bombs on land and apparently dumping
a fourth into the sea.
t
National
POT INQUIRY... An investigation will be made of all universities,
colleges and high schools in Pennsylvania to determine the extent
of the use of narcotics by students, the commonwealth announced
Thursday. State Atty. Gen Walter E. Alessandroni said the principal
aim of the inquiry will be remedial. He told a seminar sponsored by
the U.S. Treasury Departments Bureau of Narcotics that reports
show at least 15 colleges have been the scenes of narcotics partes.
DEFENDS LBJ... Former U.S. Ambassador to South Viet Nam
Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor defended the Johnson administrations policies
in Viet Nam before critics of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.
Taylors appearance before the panel was the latest development in
the continuing congressional debate into the overall role of the United
States in the Vietnamese war.
APOLLO DEBUT ... In an ambitious Project
Apollo debut the United States next Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday will test the rocket that some day will
push three men to the moon, check the capsule
that will carry them, and try out the engine
that will blast them home. The federal space
agency, in disclosing details of the initial
Apollo test flight, said today that the spaceship
at launch will weigh a record 45,900 pounds.
It will be hurled 310 miles into space by a
brand new Saturn IB super rocket.
Florida
BOASTS EDUCATION ... Gov. Haydon Burns, an announced candidate
for reelection bore down heavily today on the benefits education
recieved during his two year term in office. Burns told the University
of Miami student body that review of accomplishments by the 1965
Legislature would show our concern for quality education. The
governor said, The unprecedented financial support given education
in 1965 is without a doubt the proudest achievement of my administra administration.
tion. administration.
TAX REVISION?... The tax subcommittee of the Florida
Constitutional Revision Commission discussed a wide range of taxa taxation
tion taxation issues to be placed before the full commission. Included were
homestead exemptions, state bonds, race track and gasoline tax
funds and the taxing power of the Legislature.
The subcommittee agreed to recommend that the commission
consider whether all counties should be able to adopt what is known
as The Sarasota amendment on homestead exemption.
l fflser^S^^^F
to revise or turn .way copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTIED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be respon.-Itl<- for more than one Incorrect insertion of .1 advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the oflulil student newspaper of ihc University of Floili}j and Is
published five times weekly except during May, June, and July when It Is published sctnl-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator is entered as second class
matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

Saigon Bomb Blasf
Kills 12, Injures 18

SAIGON (UPI) Twelve persons
were killed and 18 injured Thurs Thursday
day Thursday when Communist terrorists
exploded two plastic bombs in
crowded streets outside the Viet Vietnamese
namese Vietnamese Armed Forces head headquarters
quarters headquarters compound. Most of the
vicitims were civilians and no
Americans were hurt.
The blasts occurred within 30
seconds of each other in streets
jammed with lunch hour crowds.
Both bombs were in saddlebags
attached to bicycles parked on
Vo Tanh Street in the western
suburb of Phu Nhuan, which separ separates
ates separates the city limits from Tan Son
Nhut Airport.
The front wall of a house oc occupied
cupied occupied by four U.S. servicemen
was blown in, but none of the
three Americans inside at the time
was hurt. All later declined to
identify themselves, saying they
feared their families in the United
States would become concerned for
their safety.
SP4 Roger Howell of Atlanta,
Ga., was driving up the street on
his way to lunch when the first
bomb went off outside the GI villa

Playboy Bunny Visits
<*
Troops In Viet Nam
SAIGON (UPI) Pretty Jo Collins, Playboy Magazines Play Playmate
mate Playmate of the Year, flewto Viet Nam to deliver a kiss and a lifetime
subscription to the magazine to a paratroop company now in
combat against the Viet Cong.
An envious infantryman, shouldered aside by the paratroopers
who promptly took charge of the bunny, whistled from a respectful
distance as Miss Collins stepped off the plane and said:
Boy, look at that. Shes real... a real American girl, and
what a girl.
Miss Collins, 20. of Eugene. Ore., walked from a plane into
the warm tropical sun baking the airport dressed in a cream and
red wool suit. On the lapel of the suit was a solid golf bunny pin
with a ruby eye.
Pfc. Marvin Hudson of Lake View Place, Eastport, Long Island
N.Y., stepped up. put an airborne fatigue cap on her head and
handed her a bouquet of 25 red roses.
The roses were mounted on top of what appeared to be a
water buffalos skull. The unit Miss Collins is here to see is
Bravo Company, 2nd Battalion. 503rd Infantry of the 173rd
Airborne Brigade. The company is known here as the Buffalo
company.
Im happy to be here, Miss Collins said, and promptly
planted a kiss on Hudsons cheek. He blushed deeply, camou camouflaging
flaging camouflaging the lipstick.

Trial Begins For Student
Accused of Sex Slaying

AUSTIN, Tex. (UPI) The
prosecution Thursday called the
mother of one victim and the
guardians of the other as the first
witnesses in the trial of James C.
Cross Jr., a handsome college
student accused of the sex strang strangling
ling strangling of two coeds.
A jury of 11 men and one woman
was completed Wednesday. Most
of the jurors promised Cross
lawyers they would vote for the
death penalty reluctantly.
The prosecution wants Cross
sent to the electric chair.
I think its an intelligent jury,
said chief defense counsel Perry
L. Jones. I think its extremely
intelligent and, I hope, it is above
average in compassion.
Cross is accused of strangling
Susan Rigsby and Shirley Ann
Stark, both 21, at his apartment
last July 18 in a fit of sexual
agitation. But he is on trial speci specifically
fically specifically on the charge of slaying
Miss Rigsby.
Judge Mace B. Thurman agreed
to consider today two defense mo motions
tions motions to dismiss the charges

200 yards in front of him. Ob Objects
jects Objects were flying through the air
and there were clouds of smoke,
he said.
Howell stopped in front of the
house where the Americans lived
and began aiding the wounded, load loading
ing loading them aboard his three-quarter
ton truck.
A 20-year-old girl was dead in
the street but Howell picked up
eight others who were wounded.
The second blast occurred 50
yards away, spraying metal pellets
into the path of crowds running to
help at the scene of the first ex explosion.
plosion. explosion.
I was worried about a third
one. the Georgia soldier said

Hawks, Doves Feud
Brewing In Senate

WASHINGTON (UPI)-Hawks
and Doves have had their first
brief flurry of gut fighting in the
Senate debate on the war in Viet
Nam. So far the Democrats are

against Cross. The defense con contends
tends contends the grand jury that indicted
him intimidated witnesses who
might have been favorable to him.
Dist. Atty. Charles Blackwell
said he would put Mrs. Robbie
Rigsby of Dallas and Mr. and Mrs.
J. McNeill Kinard of Fort Worth
on the stand first. Mrs. Rigsby is
mother of Miss Rigsby and the Ki Kinards
nards Kinards are guardians of Miss Stark.
The state charges the girls were
strangled when they stopped at
Cross apartment to change clothes
and take showers. Cross had dated
Miss Stark.
The state contends Cross
strangled Miss Rigsby when she
resisted him and killed Miss Stark
when she came out of the shower
and saw what was happening. He is
accused of hiding the bodies in a
closet while entertaining friends
a few hours later. The bodies were
found in a field near Austin July 30.
Cross telephoned police head headquarters
quarters headquarters the night of Aug. 6. police
said, and later signed a statement
that he killed the girls.

later. His green fatigue unif 0r
was drenched with blood, as wa
the pavement. A water truck wa
called up to hose down the stree
A U.S. military policeman sa 1
it appeared the bombs were aime
at Americans and anyone who late
should try to help them. Amon
the dead were six Vietnamese ser
vicemen and a Vietnamese Wa(
The others were civilian:
including several employes at th
military headquarters comply
One of those killed was the te
room owner. A 10-year-old boy
covered with blood was found hidiii
in terror at the back of the res restaurant
taurant restaurant an hour after the explo explosions.
sions. explosions.

losing all the feathers.
Before formal debate could begin
on Presidents Johnsons request
for $4.8 billion in additional funds
to fight the war, the Senate ex exploded
ploded exploded in a 20- minute clash
between Sen. Russel B. Long, D-
La., and Democratic critics of the
administrations war policies.
Republicans, who see Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic division over the war as
an issue in next falls elections,
were content to sit by and watch
the fun.
Long took it all from his third
row seat. First he heard Sen.
Ernest L. Gruening, D- Alaska,one
of the most vociferous critics oi
Johnsons Viet Nam policies. Then
he listened as Sen. Albert Gore, a
member of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee, defended the
panels wide-ranging inquiry into
the war as a thorough examina examination
tion examination the American people were
entitled to.
Finally, Long rose and said,
The attitude of retreat, defeat,
and national surrender has been
heard well enough.
He started in even tones, but
then his gestures became more
sweeping. He began to stride back
and forth beside his desk.
I swell with pride when I see
Old Glory here on Capitol Hill,
he said. I hope no other flag
ever flies there ... may there
never be a white flag of surrender
up there.
Vietniks Plan
3-Day Fast
NEW YORK (UPI) Pledging
to fast for three days, 100 City
College students marched into the
colleges grand ballroom Thurs Thursday
day Thursday and immediately began rede redecorating
corating redecorating it to mirror their senti sentiments
ments sentiments against the war in \i e
Nam.
End your silence, Swords
into plow shares, War in the
name of peace is offensive, iea
the signs the students tacked up
around the ballroom.
The fasters 5O boys an
50 girls pledged to let nothing
more than three glasses of vater
and orange juice pass theii hP s
each day. The ad hoc student com
mittee sponsoring the protest salt
it had arranged to have a docto
on call through the planned
hour demonstration in case
sudden illness.
The sponsors are paying a ren
rate of S6O per night.
This is an educational prog' ra^
to bring to the attention of studen^
here that there is a working ) protesting the war in Viet
said 20-year-old IvonSchnun e



Free Speech Discussed at Bent Card

Walter Herbert 4r. will discuss The Free Speech
Movement at Berkeley Saturday, 10 p.m., at the Bent
Card coffee house.
Herbert is the son of Dr. and Mrs. Walter Herbert
of the UF English department.
For the past two years, he has been a member of
the Wesley Foundation at the University of California

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with specific responsibilities to graduate students.
Mr. Herbert has been involved with faculty and stu students
dents students in the California Free Speech Movement and an
Off-Beat Ministry. Lectured and written about be because
cause because of his unusual approach, he continues to counsel
with faculty, students, and administrative personnel
on the question.

The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 18, 1966,

Shepherd
Is 'A A'
Charles Shepherd has been ap appointed
pointed appointed administrative assistant
to Buddy Jacobs.
Shepherd, who ran unsuccess unsuccessfully
fully unsuccessfully for treasurers spot, re received
ceived received his appointment earlier this
week.
The administrative assistants
position is whatever the president
wants to make of the job, said
Shepherd.
He can be just a big secretary
or work on a close personal basis,
Shepherd continued. I intend to
work as closely as possible.
Shepherd said he hadnt known
Jacobs on a personal basis until
the campaign.
But weve worked closely
throughout the campaign, he said.
Shepherds first duties will be
assisting Jacobs to set up the new
cabinet.
Throughout the year, his major
duties will be to keep the cabinet
working and help take care of
Student Government paperwork.
High Meeting
(FROM PAGE 1)
The only kind of student who
will join the High organization,
Polhill said, is one who is dis dissatisfied
satisfied dissatisfied with the present exhibi exhibition
tion exhibition of power politics with ob obvious
vious obvious disregard for public opinion
and moral obligation to the elec electorate
torate electorate on the state level.
As Mayor High said in the
opening speech of his campaign,
he wants to provide an alternative
to government of the politician,
by the politician and for the poli politician.
tician. politician.
I think interested students at
the UF and I believe there are
a great number of them can
help put the people back in Florida
politics.
Commenting on Mayor Highs
recent victory in the mock elec election
tion election on campus, Polhil said, I
believe it expresses the students
dissatisfaction with the present
administration in Tallahassee.

........ ........ f t t fcj> f
Deadline For Beauties
And Beasts Is Tuesday
All individuals who intend to participate in the World Univer University
sity University Service Beauty and the Beast Contest are requested to contact ji;
the Department of Religion or 6-7362 before Tuesday, Feb. 22. x
There are three classifications in the competition. Fraternities j:j
and sororities are paired, other fraternities and girls dorms
are paired and men and womens dorms are paired. >:
Bing Michael, chairman of WUS week announced three new :
trophies to be awarded to the organizations who collect the :
: most money during the fund drive.
The money is used to build dorms and buy books and food for >;
; students in foreign countries. x
The Beauty and the Beast Contest is highlighted by the costumes
participants wear around campus while they collect money. Only
one representative is allowed from each floor or dorm section.
The campaign will be held from Feb. 28 to March 5. Last year, .
participating groups used many plans to raise money. The drive :
: collected over $2,000. Michael hopes to top that total this year. J
Vtn southern
($) Fried Chicken (fcj- 5 J
One-half chicken with French Fries/^-^^
0
Tea or Coffee, and Hot Buttered Rolls
SPECIAL $ 1 59 9 S
Child's Plate, 89<
5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m. Fridays
MANOR (ADJ. MANOR MOTEL) l i i
NW 13th # across from new Sears V*

JM I
PENNARIO
Pianist
Appears
Leonard Pennario will be the
featured artist at Cleva J. Carson
memorial music scholarship fund
concerts at the University Audi Auditorium
torium Auditorium Sunday at 4 p.m., and Mon Monday
day Monday at 8:15 p.m.
As one of Americas foremost
pianists, Mr. Pennario regularly
appears as soloist with the best
symphony orchestras in the United
States and Europe.
His appearances at the Univer University
sity University will be in conjunction with the
fund raising activities held an annually
nually annually for the Cleva J. Carson
who was director of music at the
P. K. Yonge School from 1934 to
1947.
The Carson Fund supports stu students
dents students studying music at the UF.
Thirteen students now receive as assistance
sistance assistance from the fund.
Pennario will play Rachmanin Rachmaninoffs
offs Rachmaninoffs Second Piano Concerto, Bee Beethovens
thovens Beethovens Symphony No. 5 and the
Couperin-Milhaud overture and
allegro from La Sultane. He
will be assisted by the University
Symphony Orchestra with Edward
Troupin conducting.
Students will be admitted upon
presentation of ID cards, while
others will be admitted for a $2.00
donation.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 18, 1966

lets stop
dreaming
any words have been spoken, ad hoc com comilll
illl comilll mittees have met, the Board of Student
Publications has talked (sometimes in circles)
Student Government leaders have expressed ap apprehensions,
prehensions, apprehensions, Dean of Student Affairs Lester Hale
has squirmed all because a few rather sensible,
sane individuals want The Alligator connected with
the School of Journalism and Communications.
Some have voiced fear that students might lose
control of the newspapers editorial policy, that the
journalism school might attempt some sort of
dictatorial-type say-so in editorial matters.
Some say that because student fees help support
the newspaper, students should maintain absolute
control over editorial policy.
Others point out possible personality conflicts
with certain strong-willed journalism professors.
Maybe, just maybe, there is a little merit to the
aforementioned items.
For the main part, however, we note that those
doing the most talking know the least about the
subject.
We find little reason to fear any sort of authori authoritarian-type
tarian-type authoritarian-type editorial control by the journalism
school. First of all, the students wouldnt stand
for it. Secondly, the diversity of the journalism
professors themselves would prevent it.
Gary Burke, current executive secretary of the
Board of Student Publications, has long pushed for
the move to the journalism school.
Burkes predecessor, Bill Epperheirher (see letter
on opposite page), feels the same way.
These gentlemen, friends and fellow students, know
whereof they speak. They know, just like we know,
on what a shaky foundation The Alligator rests.
It is time, we believe, to stop listening to those
who speak blindly and talk in circles and start
listening to those gentlemen who know what theyre
talking about.
Some say there are alternate solutions.
A former Board member strongly feels that a
professional journalist is the answer to The Alli Alligators
gators Alligators staff problems. Sure, hed be a help for
a while.
But the answer, friends, lies not with Superman
(whoever he may be), but with manpower. And the
manpower lies principally in one place the
journalism school.
Now this is no rash suggestion that we should take
a hop-skip-and-jump to the J-School. It is merely
to suggest that steps should begin, in good faith,
towards putting this newspaper on firm foundation,
one only which the J-School can supply.
Come, as President Johnson would say, let us
reason together.
We feel certain that J-School Director Rae O.
Weimer and student publications leaders can come
up with a plan suitable to all sides.
Perhaps September 1967 tentative beginning
of the quarter system would be a good time for
the changeover.
This means the J-School would need only one
curriculum revision for both the switch to the
quarter system,and the incorporation of The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator into the school.
This would also allow the newspaper to be com comfortably
fortably comfortably settled into its new Florida Union head headquarters,
quarters, headquarters, which are scheduled to open this fall.
The extra year also would leave plenty of time
for details of the changeover to be worked out to
almost everyones satisfaction.
This campus deserves good, hard news coverage,
which it certainly isnt getting now. There is
absolutely no reason with the manpower and faci facilities
lities facilities available on this campus that this newspaper
shouldnt be the best college daily in the nation.
It certainly isnt now, and it never will be as long
as it remains on its present shaky foundation.
Until the changeover occurs and it IS inevitable
lets use a full-time professional journalist and
call for more cooperation between the J-School and
The Alligator.
The time for talking and dreaming is past. Lets
be realistic and start taking the proper action.
Benny Cason
... and now
Now that were down from our soapbox, wed
like to emphasize that our good if not
the best student newspaper is manned by a
volunteer staff which is short-handed.
We need reporters, headline writers, copy rea readers
ders readers and assistants in the news and editorial de departments.
partments. departments. We need a photo coordinator, too. Some
of these positions even pay, if you use the term
loosely.
Workers need not be journalism students, nor must
they have journalistic experience, although ones
chances of immediately being put to work are in increased
creased increased if he (or she) has a newspaper or writing
background.
The Alligator urges interested students to drop
by the offices (basement of Florida Union) and fill
out an application blank. We need some help.

The Florida Alligator
'A Mtuvty Ij 0t Pmn Plm Tlit TuiP

"You Haven't Seen It Have You A Little
Round Nuclear Thingamajig?"
JIM MOORHEAD'S
thinking out loud
As another student Great Debate forming on the horizon?
I hope so.
I consider The Florida Alligator, and its present circumstances,
worthy of the attention of every student on this campus.
I refer to the matter discussed in todays editorial and also in
Bill Epperheimers letter on the next page.
You see, students, one of the oldest and proudest student
activities on this campus stands in danger of an erosion of sorts.

A move by the paper to the Journalism
School will take it out of the hands of the
student body at large and place it under
the ultimate control of a faculty body.
Mr. Epperheimer states that The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator has long since ceased to be astudent
activity in the strictest sense. In short, its
assembling and producing, according to Mr.
Epperheimer,, have reached such propor proportions
tions proportions as to make these tasks prohibitive for
a staff of students working independently of
any University supervision.

There is no question the paper needs help.
Editor Benny Cason and Publications Executive Secretary Gary
Burke both agree the problem is primarily one of manpower.
There simply arent enough hands doing the work without, possibly,
one or more persons toiling himself into deep academic trouble.
Director Rae Weimer of the School of Journalsim & Communi Communications
cations Communications says if his faculty assumes responsibility and control of
The Gator, it will become more professional, it will provide
better campus-wide communications and it will serve as an edu educational
cational educational experience for the staff.
Admirable points, no one will deny. The drawbacks: 1) It will
come under a facultys hand. 2) Work on its staff will be out of
reach, for the most part, for those students outside the J-School.
3) It will not, if Director Weimers terms are met, be housed
in its impressive new quarters in the $5 million Florida Union
scheduled to open next September.
Succinctly put, it will no longer be a student activity.
Question: Is is worth giving up The Alligators status as a
student activity in order to gain the advantages which Mr. Weimer
offers?
It may be . but one former Alligator editor told me recently
that the papers independent status was what attracted him to it in
the first place. If all that responsibility hadnt been in my hands
I wouldnt have wanted the job, he said, insisting that this, in
itself, provides more valuable learning experience thai> any
classroom ever could. And he was not a journalism student.
My point is this: A number of people are debating the question
of The Gators status just now, but the students in general have
not been heard from.
\
Its your paper, people. It deserves your opinions and support,
for you are the stockholders in this operation.
If the present problem simply boils down to one of manpower,
perhaps alternative solutions can be found. More students could
come to work on the staff, or production could cut back to less
issues per week, for instance.
Or maybe a move to the J-School would be best. If that happens,
however, another sovereign area of extra-curriculars will slip
from the students grasp.
What do you think?

MOORHEAD

GERALD JONES
- swipe
(In Which The Lunatic Fringe
Voices Petty Complaints
About The Wonderful World
In Which We Live . .)
rr hrough diligent and in-depth reporting. an
Alligator tradition, incidentally, we have
uncovered one of the most vicious hoaxes ever
unleashed on the guileless citizens of this campus.
During last Fridays noon hour, crowds gathered
at Gainesvilles Lia Guardia to welcome four Viet
Nam veterans. TV film crews, fraternities, Cul Culpeppers,
peppers, Culpeppers, Gatoi Garters, Angel Fliers and the obli obligatory
gatory obligatory Negro school children discreetly kept in
the background) were there and swarming.
, Excitement rose as an Eastern DC-6 landed, taxied
up the flight line, sputtered and gasped to a halt.
(The plane seemed to have a severe case of bron bronchitis.)
chitis.) bronchitis.) Sousa marches wandered out from a portable
tape recorder and were lost in the general tumult.
The Honor Guard formed an arch with bayoneted rifles
at the base of the steps to the plane. The plane door
opened.
Two weary businessmen descended and warily
avoided the whole contingent. Next, the pilot and
after him, the stewardess disembarked. Then no one
disembarked. Culpepper apprehensively boarded the
aircraft. Shortly, thereafter, he reappeared with a
glared look in his eyes. He gravely gestured to the
crowd that the heroes had missed the plane.
What will we do with all those Welcome Oranges?
What will we do with the four dates we had lined
up for the weekend? And after all the girls sacrificed
in order to go out with them.
Other comments abounded in the general air of
disappointment and gloom.
To think that my hand-lettered sign Bomb
Hanoi was all for nothing.
They probably got swacked at the Atlanta airport
and missed the flight.
For this I got out of bed.
It should be obvious to all by now that we were
the victims of chicanery committed by unknowns.
One is tempted to jump to the conclusion that
Freedomniks were responsible. However, the mag magnitude
nitude magnitude of it all precludes their involvement. Also,
according to reliable hearsay, they lack the imagi imagination.
nation. imagination.
For example, I know Bruce Culpepper (former
SG president); and if he is anything, it is in a word,
sincere. Bruce would never take part in any
phony patriotic demonstrations that bordered on war
hysteria. Many times, in that homey way of his,
Culpepper has said to me Only fools faces appear
in public places. So we know that he was rep represented
resented represented there by an imposter.
And you know that no fraternity man would carry
signs like the one in the photograph below. Those
men are gentlemen, and above all are known for
their impeccable taste. So they, too, were not
really there.
The only positive thing to come out of it all was
for the Negro schoolchildren. They were real, and
they got a tour of the airport and hangars after the
demonstration broke up. So it wasnt a total loss.
Granted that the men serving in Viet Nam deserve
our concern and empathy. But I know, deep in my
ventricles, that the good people of this University
would not be a part of what happened Friday.
Educated and intelligent people would never respond
to killing, brutality and slaughter, no matter how
necessary, by publicly screaming, cheering and
giving joyful shouts. They, sensitive folk that they
are, would have their sorrow seen in quiet places
and preferably alone.
Thus we have but one course of action. That is to
find those fradulent perpetrators of the glory of war
and hang them in a public square. Fight fire with
they Probably Got Swacked At The At I ant'
Airport And Missed The Flight... "



The Campaign Story

Levin and Freedom
didnt run to win

(This is the fourth in a five-part series on
political parties in the recent campus election.
The writer, Mike Malaghan, had a first-hand
glimpse of what went on from his position as
director of elections. Malaghan now is a member
of The Alligator staff.)
By MIKE MALAGHAN
Alligator Staff Writer
e really didnt expect to win, but we ac aclUfii
lUfii aclUfii complished what we set out to do bring
our issues before the campus. We wanted students
to think.
Alan Levin, who wanted to throw out all the finks
in Student Government, was not disappointed with
his 184 votes. Lets face it, Levin realistically
pointed out, anybody who voted for me had to be
a hard-core radical, and it pleased me to find out
that we had that many on campus.
Freedom Partys strategy in this campaign was
simple to affect students, to force them to think
about the issues and tactics advocated by the group.
They really didnt want to win this year. They
did want a forum to express their ideas. And what
better way than a Student Government election that
supplies greenboards for your views and sets up
eight debates through which you can air your
opinions.
Alan Levin came to Florida as a freshman four
years ago. He pledged AEP fraternity, wore gant
shirts and was only moderately liberal.
During his sophomore year he became disen disenchanted
chanted disenchanted with fraternities. He ran for vice-president
in order to change the system from within. He was
defeated.
At the same time Alan began encouraging pledges
to leave the fraternity system. This is hardly the
way to maintain brotherly ties.
He was asked to turn his pin back in after being
expelled. He returned it with a note stating, Im
expelling you from mankind, give back your heart.
Levin and Mike Bozo hitchhiked across Europe
during what would have been Levins junior year.
Last Fall, after his return from his intellectual
enlightenment, Alan dropped into the Freedom house
and declared his support for the cause.
After the Fall elections Levin became party
chairman of Freedom Party. An unassuming indi individual
vidual individual as a freshman, Levin had by now developed
an overwhelming type of personality and dominated
speculation for Freedoms choice of a presidential
candidate.
Levin was nominated for president at Freedom
Partys convention during the week of qualifica qualifications.
tions. qualifications. After acceptance he dominated the convention
that wrote Freedoms platform.

Editor:
I was disappointed to read in
your January 13th issue that the
Board of Student Publications voted
lown Mr. Weimers proposal for
moving The Alligator to the
School of Journalism and Com Comn
n Comn unications.
My disappointment stems from
everal factors. As one formerly
ssociated with the Board and The
Jligator, I am still anxious to
ee the paper imtffoved and to have
le students associated with it
ndergo a more meaningful educa educaonal
onal educaonal experience.
It has been painfully apparent
ince The Alligator began publish publishig
ig publishig daily, nearly four years ago,
lat improvement has been slow to
ome and that students are not
eceiving as meaningful an educa educaional
ional educaional experience as they might,
espite such talented editors as
Mil Curry, David Lawrence,
Valker Lundy, Steve Vaughn, David
Vest, and currently Benny Cason.
Editorially the paper has rather
consistently suffered from inac inaccurate
curate inaccurate reporting, sloppy writing,
and elementary spelling and sen sentence
tence sentence construction errors. The
primary reason for these short shortcomings
comings shortcomings is a shortage of quali qualified
fied qualified reporters and editors. The
burden of producing a paper each
day has fallen upon the shoulders

Epperheimer speaks

of a handfull. Students in general
have just not been willing to de devote
vote devote the time necessary for proper
writing and editing and the
problem will not be solved as long
as The Alligator is considered a
student activity. In the past the
immediate solution to the problem
of shortage of workers has been
to request more money for
salaries. Time has proven that
money does not solve the problem.
The real answer lies in the
concept of The Alligator as a
student activity. Editing a
college daily newspaper is not a
student activity, and the outdated
concept should be abandoned. The
paper should be a training ground
and laboratory exercise for those
majoring in journalism and for
those r.on-majors interested in
journalism working under quali qualified,
fied, qualified, responsible faculty members.
This would provide two worely
needed results: (1) improve the
quality of writing, editing, and
coverage thus enabling The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator to perform a genuine ser service
vice service to the entire campus; and
(2) provide Alligator staffers the
opportunity to perform their duties
under qualified instructors who can
make the educational exper experience
ience experience a reality.
In the report of the Boards
consideration of Mr. Weimers

Levin was the most spirited debater during the
presidential encounters. His retorts with Litz were
lively and sometimes hilarious.
However his undisciplined remarks about chicken
farmers in Tigert, walking off the drill field, and
curfew strikes by coeds were hardly the tactics
of a candidate attempting to win an election from
a mature electorate. But then, again, Levin didnt
try to win.
It is interesting to notice the difference between
Freedom Party of 1966 with Levin and Freedom
Party of 1965 with Jim Harmeling.
Harmeling ran as a liberal moderate, was a
dapper dresser, and caught the imagination of about
800 voters. Quite a contrast with the more rugged ruggedlooking
looking ruggedlooking Levin.
Pat McGann and Judi Harman, Freedom party
veterans, explained that Levin and Harmeling have
the same political beliefs, but differ in tactics.
We ran the type of campaign this year that many
of us wanted to run last year, Pat told The Alli Alligator.
gator. Alligator. Last year as the only third party Freedom
thought it had a chance to win and compromised
over the tactics to use in the campaign.
This years campaign was operated on a budget
of about SIOO. In order to cut costs, the party had
its phone disconnected.
The role of ex-humanities professor Ed Richer
in the campaign was minor compared to his lead
role last year. In this years father role he
watched the new leaders take control of the party.
He did-help out with a loan of s4l to Freedom.
Richer, incidentally, is now writing for Venture
and Liberation, both of which are Peace magazines.
Richer explained that he is disillusioned with teach teaching
ing teaching and will seek work that better fits his new
frame of mind.
While he is considering job possibilities and
writing articles he also is working on a one-act
play.
Freedom Party is now a definite part of campus
life. It will run a slate next year.
Has Freedom accomplished its election goals
affecting the campus? Yes, youd have to give them
an affirmative verdict.
As Levin pointed out, the other candidates had to
give at least- lip service to free speech, extended
curfews, unwarranted search of dorm rooms and
conditions in off-campus housing. Until last year
these issues and other like them never appeared on
campus.
And it is not unusual for a radical group to produce
an uplift in political debate.
Our student body is large enough to house such a
group and mature enough to reject it.

proposal, the old spectre of stu student
dent student control reared its head once
more. This is a semi-legitimate
argument of course; nevertheless,
I am sure Mr. Weimer has no
desire to be the editorial voice of
The Alligator, nor can I imagine
him stifling responsible student
opinion.
I am in agreement with the St.
Petersburg Times editorial which
you recently reprinted, in which
the hope was expressed that the
student control factor would not
prevent moving of the paper to the
Journalism School and that acorn acornpromise
promise acornpromise could be effected.
In summary, may I express the
hope that the Board will continue
to meet with Mr. Weimer and/or
the administration and undertake a
reconsideration of his proposal.
The Alligator and its staff sorely
need some redirection, and the
Journalism School could provide it.
Please forgive me if I seem to
be interfering from afar in what
is no longer any of my business.
My views were well known to the
students and faculty associated
with the Board and The Alligator,
and I felt that this time at least
they should be expressed publicly.
William M. Epperheimer,
Former Exec. Secy
Bd. of Stu. Publications
Carbondale, Illinois

The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 18, 1966,

GARY CORSERI
Cutouts
By the library the other day, musing on the brevity of things,
the transience of beauty, whom should I see but my old friends
Lucifer Crux and Alavan Brownspan debating it up, pondering
the question whether or not the University has a right to exist.
Alavan is folk-dancing on the table, while Lucifers debating it
with Dean Sleet.
Its a simple matter of mathematics, says the Dean. Will
you agree that two plus two, in the highest sense, of course,
does not but sometimes does?
Lucifer readily agrees to it. Alavan looks
Lucifer, uncertainly, and then he, too, nods agree- y
Then Ive won my case, says the Dean, andr
he beams triumphant, sauntering away, a bottle ofa^
Mr. Klean in his back pocket. IpY,
Alavan tells Lucifer he shouldnt have given in so
easy. Lucifer says he had no choice because the aRT
Dean, after all, was right, two plus two does not
but sometimes does. Alavan says theyll never get ML
anywhere if theyre splintered with dissension.
About this time, Jake Downs comes perigrinating
past the Library. Hey buddy, says Lucifer, Id
like to have a word with you. GvJlwtKl
No comment, says Jake.
Lucifers persistent. Its about this theory promulgated by
the Czech, Offentop whether or not politics is moral.
No Czech Offs for me, says Jake, and smiling amiably, he
proceeds on his way.
I guess we won that one, says Alavan, still folk-dancing.
Lucifer strokes his beard.
Im about to leave and be done with it all when suddenly four
soldiers start marching toward the Library with a crowd of
ardent admirers behind them. One of the soldiers is singing that
he wants to pin a purple heart on his young sons chest.
Hey buddy! says Alavan.
No comment, says Jake, returning, still smilling.
We werent talking to you, says Lucifer, condescendingly.
What do you want, kid? says one of the soldiers.
Lucifers a bit hurt by this. He starts to cry. Just cause I
wear a beard you hadnt ought to call me kid, says Lucifer.
Alavan pats him on the back, consolingly.
They ought to put you in the army, boy. Theyd make a man
of you.
The army has no right to exist, says Alavan. In fact,
says Alavan, waxing eloquent, man has no right to exist.
Now just one moment there, says the soldier.
Its quite true, says Alavan. Here we are upon this desolate,
barren planet, naked but for shoes, killing each other, getting
nowhere, thinking trivia, enveloped in a web of mediocrity, all
in the same boat and all the time the universe, the infinite
glories of creation, a miraculous canopy before us, and we here,
poor, poor fools we are, waste, waste, utterly waste all.
When Alavans quite finished Lucifer Crux starts to applaud
furiously. Brilliant! Brilliant! he says, and he starts folk folkdancing
dancing folkdancing with Alavan.
You may be right, boy, says the soldier. But let me tell
you something about life now. And I just might get to sounding a
little patriotic, boy, and Im not ashamed. The soldiers com companions
panions companions kneel down and start humming America The Beautiful
in the background...
Son, begins the soldier, proudly, take a look around you.
What do you see? A land of plenty, blessed by God. Strong, proud
men and women, united by a great ideal. Thats your country,
son. Thats our country. And the ideal is Liberty. Say it, boy!
Let the hills resound with the music of the word. Liberty. Liberty!
America! America! God shed His grace on thee...
All the admirers of the soldiers are weeping. They all want
to pin purple hearts on their young sons chests so he can be one
of Americas best. Half of them are singing America The Beauti Beautiful,
ful, Beautiful, and the other half the Hallelujah Chorus. Its sort of moving,
I think.
When its over Lucifer turns to Alavan and asks him if America
has a right to exist. Alavan says hes not sure, but hes rather
positive that God has no right to exist.
A bit dismayed by it all, I ask Alavan if this is a free speech
area. Alavan says that the domain of free speech is the human
heart. Confident, I add my two cents worth: I think God has a
right to exist if the world exist has a right to exist, say I
profoundly.
Everybody stares at me, as though I had the gout. Alavan asks
me who I am.
Im Corseri, I say humbly.
The soldiers say that theyve heard of Lincolns, Washingtons,
and Eisenhowers, but never Corseris. Alavan says the world
must unite in a single great cause. The soldiers say that commies
dont know what liberty is. Lucifer strums his beard and calls me
a crummy fink-conservative. The soldiers say Im a spy from
Red China. In a moment, they all charge me, screaming that I
should remember the Alamo and David Mitchell.
I escape by hiding myself in Alberts cage. Alberts seen it
all before, and couldnt care less. Hes contemplating turtles in
Homosassa Springs. In the cage with me are Editor Ben and
Tennessee Ted, consoling him. Editor Bens pretty nervous.
Have you seen The Lion and The Clod? asks E.B. Tennessee
says he cares. E.B. says theyre out to get him, and hes scared.
I wouldnt sweat it, E.8., say I, philosophically, tenderly.
And I quote old Fyodor Dostoyevsky: Where there is no God,
all things are permissible..!

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 18, 1966

LETTERS

quarter judgment
v a bit too hasty?
Editor:
I think that The Alligator performed a disservice to the student
body by asserting that the quarter system offers a less hectic
pace than does the trimester plan. (Editorial,
Alligator, February 14).
We have an obligation to try to make the quarter system work,
and this will be, at best, a big task. Realism and not wishful think thinking
ing thinking is called for. The promise of a less strenuous pace is not
only a poor basis upon which to evaluate a system, but if my
experience with the quarter system in other universities is any
guide to what we may expect here, the promise is as false as it
is shallow.
As a student I studied under both quarter and semester plans,
and as a professor I have taught under all three systems. The
quarter system offers certain advantages over the trimester,
especially to the faculty, but I can assure you that I have never
found it to reduce the rat race or to lower academic pressures.
On the contrary; some of its advocates recommend it precisely
because they see it as a system which intensifies the learning
process.
The Alligator based its ill-advised conclusion upon the assump assumption
tion assumption that students would take only three or four courses per
quarter. Many universities on the quarter system do use four
and five quarter-hour courses, particularly in University College
and in introductory courses, but retain the three-hour principle
for most upper division and graduate offerings. If this is done
here, University College students may find themselves taking
only three or four courses, but advanced students may end up
taking as many different courses as at present. This is but idle
speculation, since the curriculum under the quarter system is
yet to be worked out. It was most decidely premature of The
Alligator to announce the number of courses that students will be
taking simultaneously.
In any event, if one earns 15 quarter credits, this implies that
one spends 15 hours a week in lectures or lecture equivalents.
This principle is identical with that of the semester system.
Thus, it is risky to hold out the hope of reduced pressure when
the result is likely to be just the opposite. A major problem in our
trimester experience in Florida arose from an initial and unreal unrealistic
istic unrealistic overselling of the plan. False expectations created disillu disillusionment.
sionment. disillusionment. Let us not repeat the process, please.
Joseph S. Vandiver, Professor
'i'
"free speech area
--battle continues
Dear Editor:
The recent actions of the Administration towards the free
speech activists on campus has thrown a new light on a subject
that has been in the shadow of bureaucratic committees and un unwritten
written unwritten policies ever since the controversy over a free speech
area began early this trimester.
In the past few days two major steps have been taken by Tigert
to commit the University ot a policy which backs a quasi-free
speech area such as the one proposed by Dean Hale and student
government leaders: 1) Lucien Cross and Alan Levin have been
placed on disciplinary probation and 2) all students and non nonstudents
students nonstudents who have petitioned for permission to partake in the free
speech arpa have received letters denying their requests.
In the first case, the Administrations claim is that Cross and
Levin refused to comply with a reasonable request by the Dean
of Men to petition for permission to sell their literature on cam campus.
pus. campus. For the second action a new policy has appeared which
according to Dean Hale ...only allows for the sale of Florida
daily newspapers through vending racks and fruit through the stu student
dent student honor apple boxes. All the rules concerning these decisions
are now under consideration and orders have been issued in
the meantime to discontinue all activities involving the selling or
free distribution of literature or the soliciting of funds or members
by organizations.
The activists in the free speech area are pround that they have
spurred the Administration to reviewing its restrictive policies.
But they fear the dead ends of slow moving committees designed
to placate liberal reformists and take no positive action. They also
fear that well-meaning students will accept the lip service com commitments
mitments commitments of Dean Hale and student leaders to a free speech area
which in effect prohibits their substantive demands.
Support must now come from the students and faculty who recog recognize,
nize, recognize, that the function of a university is to stimulate an exchange
of ideas and to encourage individuals to plan and activate those
ideas. The minimum requirements for bringing this about would
necessitate the application of the first amendment to the campus
as in the community. It is clear that current Administration pol policy
icy policy censors literature according to content and restricts the ad advocacy
vocacy advocacy of political and social action.
Students and faculty who are concerned with this violation of
free speech and press are encouraged to sign the petition now
being circulated. This petition will be presented to the Faculty-
Senate.
Lucien A. Cross

try to bo nice, please

Editor:
Dear Mr. Horton:
Your giant fruit stand letter
merits some comment. I shall not,
now, enter into a debate with you
of the merit of fruit and vegetable
or idea vendors on campus. Ameri Americans
cans Americans fought a revolution to assert
their independence in thought and
in action. They guaranteed this
characteristic of a free society
in the Federal Constitution, so that
just such stifling and absurd con confrontations,
frontations, confrontations, as the present anti antiidealism
idealism antiidealism expressed by elements of
the UF Administration might not
occur.
Instead, I address myself to your
rather high handed and ad hominum
analysis of active AND...pas AND...passive...,
sive..., AND...passive..., protest groups, including
those obviously weird, crazy,
lox...and rebellious souls, among
whom Freedom Partys Alan Levin
should certainly be included if we
are to give any credence to your
remarks.
trimester;
it served
Editor: xj
The trimester is dead for xj
all intents and purposes, and :j:j
there is no further need to x xargue
argue xargue its merits or draw- xj
backs. Before we spit on the xj
corpse, however, there is a jjjjj
point we must remember. >jjj
Many of us will graduate xj:
under the trimester system.
Will our future employers say,
Ive heard from students and :j:j
professors that the trimester :j:j
was a total failure. You jjij
couldnt really get much of an jjjj
education under it, could jx
you? : x
There are those of us who jx
DID receive a meaningful edu- j:j:
cation under the trimester, j:j:
and generalizing about its jjjj
shortcomings can do nothing X;
but take away from the signi- xj
ficance of our degrees.
There has in the past been :j:j
j:j a tendency to use the trimes- :j:j
j:j ter as a scapegoat for our ;j:j
x personal shortcomings. Now jx
jjj is the time to stop the belated jx
x complaining before we un- jx
x knowingly invoke a type of jjjj
x self-disaccreditation.
x Rejoice if you must at the jj:j
x death rattle of the trimester, xj
X; but remember that it is a re- :j:j
x- ference for us all. jjjj
X; Bill Robinson, 4JM xj
xj A1 Heiman, 4JM jjjj
do we reallv
1 7
love peace?
Editor:
This letter is directed at those
people who consider the U.S. a
peace-loving nation. They cite as
examples of the U.S.s intentions
for peace the recent bombing lull
over North Vietnam and the peace
feelers sent out by the President.
They feel totally secure in the be belief
lief belief that the U.S. is doing all that
is possible to obtain a peaceful
solution to the war in Vietnam.
It is true that the President sent
out peace feelers, but what did they
ask for? In effect these peace feel feelers
ers feelers proposed that the Viet Cong
surrender at the conference table
that which the U.S. cannot win on
the battlefield.
Maybe some day the United
States will realize that we are liv living
ing living in an age of compromise. No
longer an age where the six sixshooter
shooter sixshooter is the great equalizer, but,
instead, the atomic bomb.
Douglas Cary, 2UC

Since we all present to society
our beings which might be char characterized
acterized characterized by remembering that
we are indeed animals, rather
intricately evolved anthropoids to
be accurate, and further, since we,
as a group of naked animals, have
found it expedient to insulate our
nudity against the effects of
weather and social chastisement,
some of us now feel justified to
use this last factor in our nar narcississistic
cississistic narcississistic natures as a criterion
for limiting the freedom of thought
and action of those in society who
would disagree and/or differ in
appearance.
Mr. Horton, I have neither seen
you or Mr. Levin and Co., in the

proud alum writes
Editor:
The Associated Press account of Opera Operation
tion Operation Appreciation printed on page 1 of THE
EVENING BULLETIN of this date makes me
doubly proud of being an alumnus of the Univer University
sity University of Florida.
With every good wish to all of you, F remain.
Faithfully yours,
The Rev. Fr. Walter G. Martin
Class of 1948
f
real apathy
r
was the vietor
Editor:
The election is over and apathy has won--not Apathy. Again, the
apathetic attitude of the student has not been shaken and has been
the decisive aspect of an election. The non-voters have created
another winner.
It was, however, an interesting campaign: Birthday added some
humor, Freedom added some admirably high idealism. Apathy
added some sound, dynamic ideas and Student-Decision added...
well, they added the bloc votes--up! The power structure has,
once again, a chance to prove its worth. Once again because
it cannot truly be said that Progress, Decision, Action, and Stu Student,
dent, Student, etc., are not really from the same tree. And Pll be damned
if I know how the clubbies gravitate toward one party or another.
Could it be that the Greek names are thrown into a hat and shaken
three times: once for the Founder, once for the Brothers and
Sisters, and once for the Holy House? One for you, one for me...
But perhaps this is too complicated.
Though the results were the same as always, the campaigns
were different. Mr. Litz and Apathy party led the campaign! Much
of the literature distributed by the two major parties was in
direct response to Apathy ideas. A real party was, for once, in the
election and the Group was running scared. Is the position Presi President
dent President of the Student Body still vacant? We will, in time, find
out.
One can only congratulate Apathy Party, Ernie Litz and Robert
Sturm for a fine, mature campaign and hope that at least some of
their ideas are incorporated into the platform of the duly elected...
for the Florida Student!
Charles Wendell, 3AS
The Alligator accepts all letters to the
editor. Due to space limitations, how however,
ever, however, we are unable to print letters ex exceeding
ceeding exceeding 250 words. Letters are request requested
ed requested to be typewritten and double-spaced
a plaque for vets

Editor:
1n... The Florida Alligator
on the front page I read that
Viet Nam Veterans Honored
Tomorrow. I am fully in
accord with respecting these
veterans and giving them the
Keys of the City.. .but...
I do believe that the parents
of the dead heroes of this cold
war ... police action ...
you name it... should also be
honored.
I recall not too long ago a
coffin bringing up a Negro
boy by the name of Carter.
I am sure that even if he

flesh or clothed. Further, Im
interested in the color of eye
shirts, ties, shapes of noses, co
fures, beards, or any other hanc
for social discrimination of m
into dirty as opposed to clea
ed up. Any other spurious desi
nation would be similarly reject*
It is easy to sully an ideologi<
opponent through social meai
Weve all seen this done on
zoological level at the zoo. We n
seem to delight in it in our wa:
elections and pressure campaigi
How about trying to be nice,
a change.
Very truly yoU i
Marshall Rosenthal, 6,

wasnt a former student, that
none will dispute he made the
supreme sacrifice. As I am not
a native of Gainesville, I can cannot
not cannot say if there have been
others, but the ones that will
never come back should not be
quietly forgotten.
I would go even further..
Why not have a plaque with
the names inscribed and
placed in our city's midst. 1
And one final thought for the
day: Make this a non-segre non-segregated
gated non-segregated plaque....
Harriet J. Hamerl)



This
Space
A
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a
i
1
a v
bTo e
1 r
t
i
s
e
r
s
Call
Univ.
Ext
2832
Ask
For
D
i A
s d
P v
1 e
a r
y t
i
i
n
g
_

LOANS
SHORT TILL PAYDAY
BUYING SECOND CAR
$25-S6OO
Marion Finance C ompany Inc.
FH G-5333

Urancre

ADDRESS NOTICES
TO ORANGE AND
BLUE, INFORMATIONAL
SERVICES OFFICE

Campus Calendar
FLORIDA PLAYERS CLEREMBARD: Today and Sat.,
Feb. 19, 8 p.m. Norman Hall. Ticket sales at Norman Hall.
FLORIDA UNION DANCE: Today. 8 p.m., FU Social Room.
NEWMAN CLUB: Today. 8 p.m., Catholic Student Center.
Mardi Gras dance featuring The Playboys. Free.
MOVIE: Today, 2 p.m., MSB Aud., Safe at Home.
PAINTING FOR FUN. MIXED MEDIA: Begins Feb. 24. FU.
Sign up in Room 315, FU.
ANNUAL STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST: March 1-
March 31. Deadline for entering photos, Feb. 28. Apply FU,
Rm. 315, Students only.
TABLE TENNIS TOURNAMENT: Singles and Doubles set
for Feb. 22 and 23, 7 p.m., FU Rendezvous Room. Winners go
to ACU Tournament. Sign up in FU Room 315 by Feb. 18. Stu Students
dents Students only.

Administrative Notices To Students, Faculty 8c Staff

STUDENTS
CLASS RING ORDERS: In order for official University of
Florida class rings to arrive before April graduation, the
Campus Shop and Bookstore must have orders in before
5 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 24.
SPEECH SCREENING TESTS: All teacher education majors
are required to satisfy the speech screening requirement.
Appointments are now being made in Room 124, Norman Hall.
Students in the following courses are expected to take the
following tests. Each student must bring a No. 2 lead pencil
and will be required to use his University student number.
CHN 251 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday. Feb. 22, 7 p.m.
All students whose last names begin with: (A- L ) report
to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8, 9. 10. 11. 12, 13. 14 or 16;
( M Z ) report to Matherly 102, 105, 108, 112, 113, 114,
115, 116, 117, 118 or 119.
CHN 252 PROGRESS TEST: Tuesday, Feb. 22, 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin with: ( A ) report to Floyd
106 or 109; (B) to Peabody 1,2, 4,5, 7, 10 or 11; (C) to
Leigh 207; ( D ) to Bldg. I 101, 103, 107 or 209; ( E )to
General Notices
PLACEMENT INTER VIEWS
(Sign-up sheets are posted in Placement Office, Bldg. H. All are
available for juniors. Interviews will be held in Florida Union
degree-level positions. Asterisk indicates summer employment
unless otherwise indicated.)
FEB. 21: SHE LL OIL CO. All majors interested in sales.
SHELL OIL CO. -- ChE, EE, CE, ME, Chem., Acctg., Fin.,
Econ. COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES -- CE. AMERICAN OIL
CO. -- Gen. Bus., Mktg.*
FEB. 21-22: NORTH AMERICAN AVIATION, INC. -- AE,
CE, ME. Ps, Met.E., App. Mech., Stat., EE.
FEB. 22: TEXACO, INC. -- Bus. Admin., Law, ChE, EE,
CE, ME. Geol., Chem.. ChE. NALCO CHEMICAL CO. --
Mktg., Lib. Arts, Org. Chem., Phys. Chem.. ChE. PARKE,
DAVIS & CO. -- Chem., Math, Stat., Biol., Zoo., Pharm.,
Accrg., Gen. Bus., Mktg., ChE, ME. WESTINGHOUSE ELEC ELECTRIC
TRIC ELECTRIC CORP. ChE, CE, EE, IE, ME, NE, Eng. Sci., Met.
Eng., Eng. Mech.
FEB. 22-23: UNION BAG-CAMP PAPER CORP. ChE,
ME, IE, Chem., Forestory. Acctg. R. J. REYNOLDS TO TOBACCO
BACCO TOBACCO CO. Chem., ME, ChE, Bact., Food Tech., Biochem.,
Plant & Animal Physiology.
FEB. 22-23-24: PROCTER & GAMBLE BUCKEYE/
CELLULOSE ME, EE, CE. ChE, Chem.*
FEB. 23: THE CECO CORP. CE. Arch., Bldg. Const.,
ME, IE. MARION LABORATORIES, INC. Lib. Arts, Ed.,
Mktg. NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. --
Bus., Econ., Arts & Sic., Educ., Acctg., Law. Mktg. SMITH,
RYAN, CARLISLE & NOLAN (CPA) -- Acctg. MILLIGAN &
BURKE (CPA) Acctg.
FEB. 23-24: PROCTER & GAMBLE DISTRIBUTION CO.
All majors interested in Sales. Mgmt.
FEB. 24: JEFFERSON CHEMICAL CO. INC. Org. Chem.,
ChE, ME, lE.* HONEYWELL, INC. EE, ME, Math, IE.
AIR REDUCTION CO. -- Chem.. ChE., Met. E., ME, EE, IE.
KOPPERS CO., INC. -- Chem.. ChE., ME. E, Met. MEL MELPAR,
PAR, MELPAR, INC. Math, EE.
FEB. 24-25; ATLANTA GAS & LIGHT CO. CE, ME. EE,
Acctg. COLGATE PALMOLIVE CO. All majors interested
in Sales, Mktg.

BLUE BULLETIN

A CREDIT PLAN FOR ALL TIME PURCHASES
When you are buying furniture, equipment, appliances, auto tires,
repairs or other items and services requiring; time payments, advise
the merchant to call us, 376-5333 for approval, and we will honor lus
contract which will give you our recognized last, efficient, one stop
service.
MARION BUDGET PLAN
A Division of Marion Finance Co.

The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 18, 1966,

MOVIE: Today, none. Sat., Feb. 19. MSB Aud., 6 & 9:40 p.m.
Double Feature: Come September and Father Brown,
Detective.
INTERNATIONAL WEEK TALENT SHOW: Today, 8 p.m.,
University Auditorium.
BILLIARDS TOURNAMENT: Pocket billiards, three cushion
billiards, and coed pocket billiards, to be held on Feb. 22, 23,
24; 7 p.m., FU Game Room. Winners go to ACU Tournament.
Sign up in FU 315 by Feb. 18, Students only.
TAX CLINIC: Mon., Feb. 21, 3:40-5 p.m., Rm. 13, Mather Matherly.
ly. Matherly. Tax Clinic to assist students in preparing their income
tax forms.
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: Sun., Feb. 20,
4 p.m., Univ. Aud., Conducted by Edeard Troupinwith Leonard
Pennario, piano soloist.

Tigert 331 or 357; ( F ) to Matherly 213, 216 or 219: ( G )
to Peabody 101, 102, 112 or 114; ( H ) to Peabody 201, 202,
205, 208 or 209; ( I J ) to Flint 110 or 112; ( K ) to
Walker 301, 303, 307 or 308; (L) to Anderson, 2,4, 5, 18
or 20; ( M ) to McCarty 2 or 44; ( N ) to Leigh 142;
( O ) to Leigh 154; ( P Q ) to Flint 101 or 102; ( R ) to
Floyd 108; ( S ) to Walker Aud.; ( T V ) to Anderson
112, 113 or 115; ( W Z ) to Walker Aud.
FACULTY & STAFF
SUMMER RESEARCH APPOINTMENTS: Monday, Feb. 28,
is the deadline for submitting applications to the Graduate
School for faculty summer research appointments, Term 111-B.
Awards will be announced after March 15.
PHOTO COPIER DEMONSTRATION: The new Dennison
Photo Copier will be demonstrated on the campus next week by
Brandons Inc. All campus personnel are invited to the free
demonstrations in Shands Teaching Hospital Store Room #l,
Thursday, Feb. 24. 1-4 p.m., and Friday, Feb. 25, 9 a.m.-
4 p.m.
GENERAL NOTICES
SUMMER SWIMMING PROGRAM: Membership applications
for the University Golf Club Pool are now being accepted in
Room 201, Florida Gym. Membership fee is $51.50 (including
sales tax), which includes lessons. University married students,
faculty, staff, their wives and husbands and their children are
eligible. The pool will open May 1 and remain open through
Labor Day. The swimming lesson program will be divided into
two sessions May 1- June 16. adults and pre-school child children;
ren; children; June 16 Aug. 31, school age children only. Membership
is limited; applications will be accepted on a first come, first
served basis.
ENGINEERING FAIR EXHIBITS: Engineering societies and
individuals planning to have exhibits in the 1966 Engineers
Fair scheduled March 11-13, should submit a brief outline of
plans, along with space requirements, no later than 5 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 28.
MENSA MEETING: MENSA meets every day, including
Saturday, in the West Wing of the Main Cafeteria from 11 a.m.
to 1 p.m. For further information, contact Mike Sipe, tele telephone
phone telephone 8-4950.
AEROSPACE BRIEFING TEAM: The Air Force ROTC
Department is sponsoring a team of professional briefers
who will present to the public an illustrated lecture on the
cooperative efforts of NASA and the-Department of Defense
in the National Space Program. The briefing will be 8-9:15 p.m.,
Wednesday, Feb. 23, in McCarty Hall.
SPEECH SCREENING TESTS: Appointments are now being
made in Room 124, Norman Hall. All teacher education majors.
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA AND UNIVERSITY SYM SYMPHONY
PHONY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: General ticket sales at Central Box
Office, Student Service Booth. Noon to 4:30 p.m., today and
Mon., Feb. 20.
CLEREMBARD: Tickets on sale at Norman Hall, today,
noon to performance. Sat., Feb. 18, 6 p.m. to performance;
Mon., Feb. 21. noon to 7 p.m.
MILITARY BALL-: Tickets on sale at Army ROTC Hq.
Cadet and Spectator tickets on sale at Central Box Office,
Student Service Booth, noon to 4:30 p.m., today and Mon.,
Feb. 20.

Page 7

TIRES?
WHICH SIZE?
WHICH GRADE?
WHICH PLY?
is required Tor your
driving needs? Dont
be under or over
sold. See the experts
GAINESVILLE'S
INDEPENDENT'
FIRESTONE
SERVICE
CENTER
615 N. MAIN ST.
Ph. 2-3010
NOW OPEN
SEVEN DAYS
A WEEK
SERVING
Lasagna
Pizza
Spaghetti
Ravioli
Filet Mignon
ft ITALIAN
AMERICAN
CUISINE
2204 S.W. 13th St.
Phone 376-1867
f >
WE GOT
SO DIG
'CAUSE WE
CHARGE SO LITTLE
f I Ml 111.1
rent a car from a
ffCOMO-CMJ
lfom Q99 H I
We feature Valiants & other 1
K CHRYSLER built cere. Gas- 9
oilinsuranceall includedl !i
PHONE 376-3644
637 NW 13th St.

CASH
CONSOLIDATE BILLS
TRAVEL EXPENSE
$25 S6OO
Marion Finance Company Inc.
222 W. University Ave.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
1957 BELLA SCOOTER. Needs
some repair, will bargain. Royal Royalite
ite Royalite Typewriter, good condition.
Call 2-4750. (A-93-st-c).
1964 DUCATI, 125 cc, almost new.
$295. Call 376-2619 after 5 p.m.
(A-92-ts-c).
FUEL INJECTION SET-UP for
Chevy V-8. Complete with dual
point distributor. $195. 372-5136.
(A-89-ts-c).
1965 MERCURY 100 hp, less than
20 hrs., never in salt water, war warranty,
ranty, warranty, complete with controls, tank
and bronze propeller, $795. Mer Mercury
cury Mercury 80 hp and 70 hp. Both for
$495. 1964 Mercury 9.8 hp, $195.
372-5136. (A-89-ts-c).
SELLING beautiful Argylesweater
and hip skirt by Wipppette. Size
9-11. Brand new, selling for half
price. Call 372-6034. (A-94-3t-c).
MARTIN FOLK GUITAR. Excellent
condition, beautiful tone. Contact
John Howard. 376-6884. (A-94-
3t-c).
2 BEDROOM HOME. 3129 NWl2th
Terr. Behind Hil-Top Motor Court.
SSOO equity, $55 per month. Ph.
495-2255. (A-94-3t-c).
QUARTER ROUND 12 BAR. $45
or will trade what you have. 372-
3096. (A-94-3t-c).
YAMAHA 125,1965. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Must sell. Make offer. Call
Larry at 372-3091 after 4:30. (A (A---94-3t-p).
--94-3t-p). (A---94-3t-p).
BUY DIAMONDS from leading
firm. Strictly wholesale price.
Registered appraisals. We will
also pay highest prices for your
diamonds. Call Mr. Tessler at
372-5762. (A-94-st-c).
YAMAHA Trailmaster, 80cc. Like
new, step-through design. Only 125
miles. $250. 378-2032. (A-95-
2t-c).
1961 NORTON 500 cc. New paint,
runs good, can be seen in front
of Cl through Sunday. (A-95-2t-c).
HONDA 50cc, 1,600 miles. Sacri Sacrifice,
fice, Sacrifice, slls. Call 372-5195 after
5 p.m. (A-95-3t-c).
' I 1
FINEST QUALITY COMPONENT
stereo sound system. Dynaco Em Empire,
pire, Empire, Garrard lab 80, Acoustic
Research. Call Brooks, 378-4671,
6-7 p.m. (A-96-lt-p).

. r
RQ3831 WAIT DISNEYS R a u Disney^)
/ j-UGiy \sksa
JuS 0 ij DACHSHUND! *; eC hSsn
vjflu TECHNICOLOR*
SIDNEY POmERANDANNE BANCRftn
ARE GIVING THE PERFORMANCES OF THEIR LIVES IN
yHH 11
w^j|-

for rent
GLENDALE APTS. 1 bedroom,
fully furnished, air conditioned,
suitable for couples or 2 students.
S9O monthly. Call 2-2150 after 4
p.m. (B-95-3t-c).
QUIET FOR LADY OR GENTLE GENTLEMAN,
MAN, GENTLEMAN, business or professional.
1 bedroom, air conditioned, in
Cheshire Apts., no pets, S9O per
month, lease required. Ph* 372-
3488 or 376-4360. (B-81-ts-c).
BROKEN LEASE, must rent new
unfurnished 2 BR duplex apt. Re Reduced
duced Reduced to S7B mo. for fast rental.
Student owned. 376-0342. (B-91-
ts-c).
NEED THIRD MALE ROOMMATE
for large 3 bedroom house, 2
blocks from campus, S4O per
month, older student preferred.
1414 NW 2nd Ave. 372-1508. (B (B---94-ts-c).
--94-ts-c). (B---94-ts-c).
STUDENTS ONLY. Furnished air
conditioned efficiency apt., near
Univ. $75 per month includes water
and garbage. No children. Ph. 372-
5182. (B-94-3t-c).
VILLAGE 34, SECOND EDITION.
Located near Univ. Golf Course.
328 SW 34th St. 24 new 1 bedroom
apt. units, furnished and air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Available April Ist. Rent
"SIOO per month, See Resident Man Managers
agers Managers apt. on premises after 5
p.m. Lou Schilling, apt. 10. Man Managed
aged Managed Ernest Tew Realty, Inc., 376-
6461. (B-87-10t-c).
AIR CONDITIONED 3-BR House.
April occupancy, near campus.
3 or 4 males or females. Call
Charlie Mayo, Town & Country
Realty, 376-4664. (B-95-ts-c).
wanted
FEMALE GRADUATE student to
share 2 bedroom apt. downtown.
$32.50 plus half of utilities. Call
378-2219. (C-93-st-c).
STUDENT EATERS. Our famous
complete dinner, 97 and night. Longs Cafeteria, down downtown.
town. downtown. (C-81-ts-c).
ROOMMATE WANTED, March Ist.
Share beautiful, furnished new a/c
apt., pool, $41.25 per month. Last
month rent free. Ph. 378-4524.
(C-96-ts-c).

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 18, 1966

Page 8

helpwanted
$$ NEEDSEVERAL RELIABLE but
impoverished students who want
SSO SIOO or more per week for
15 20 hrs. work. Call today,
372-5594. (E-94-3t-c).
FULLER BRUSH CO. needs part parttime
time parttime sales help, male;, or female,
with car. Average earnings $35-
SSO for 15 hrs. work. Write to H.
Silver, 1028 Clearwater Dr., Day Daytona
tona Daytona Beach, Fla. (E-86-ts-c).
WAITER WANTED. Must be 21.
No experience necessary. Ph. 376-
9335 between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
(E-87-ts-c).
RECEPTIONIST. Residency of 2
years or more required. Typing
needed, state qualifications and
references. Write P. O. Box 12427
Univ. Sta. (E-93-ts-c). V
NEEDED PERSON in Early Child Childhood
hood Childhood Education, music or art for
part-time employment. Contact
Dorothy Browning Play Scoool,
372-2981. (E-96-st-c).

NOWS*
|N!w!l3thSLt23rtMd| AT 12:30 2;s(^^^
{ Tatophoro 378-2434 | 5:10 7:30 9:50
KIRK DOUGLAS RICHARD HARRIS
THEHE^i^OF^UMfIRK^

[B3IBIBBHyirsn Biel
I Tonic j hits I
I 2400 Hawthorne Road Rt. 20 Phone FR 6-SOll l n* KJ
I I
I I IMW < w W" titoi mcfiH.wt me
**YOU RE NOT **l WON T MAKE **THE ARMY S *l WONDER IF
THE ONLY YOU MARRY GONNA GRAB I M THE LAST
f 1>* V 7 GIRL AROUND** ME** ME SO LETS 'HOLD OUT'IN ari |
I I 1 PETER n [-1 SHAHON /-\ NICK nn n DEBORAH **M<*it.|t usir. HCOutIO WO 0ltU01
| Goiowwjr

lost-found
LOST Siamese Cat, 7 mos. old.
Answers to name of Sinbad. Lost
in NW section near 15th St. Reward.
376-0674. (L-95-2t-c).
in chi ijTTnnTuTlii I
vMM I
! :Nmai : aim -- I
SEAN CONNERY I
THUNDERBALLI
2ND COLOR HITI
fTUTaKe Sweden" |

ALLIGATOR ADS
ALWAYS ATTRACT
YOU'RE READING
ONE RIGHT NOW
ENDS SAT
ACADEMY AWARD
WINNER!
\"BMt Foreign
AT 2:15-4:35-6:55-9:10
pl 1
IRON CLAW"
CHPTS 6-7-8
AT 1:30-3:50-6:05-8:25
s SUNDAY s
Peter Peter
Sellers O'Toole l
Romu Schneider 3
Capucine 5
Paula Prentiss 7
Woody Allen 9
and guest star
Andres^
Released thru
UNITED ARTISTS JSSESSi, ?c |
TECHNICOLOR* *pul*y_J
[swrct



autos
Must Sell. Filtered Service. 1962
BUICK SKYLARK hardtop. Low
mileage, new white sidewalls, ra radio.
dio. radio. heater, 4-speed transmission,
high performance V-8, excellent
condition. $1195. Ph. 468-1785.
(G-94-st-c).
1958 CHEVROLET. 2 door sedan,
radio, heater, 6 cyl., standard
shift, new paint and carpet. $345.
Call Michael Toskos, 378-2768.
(G-94-st-c).
1961 FALCON. 6 cyl. stick, good
condition. $395 or take over pay payments.
ments. payments. Call Fred Goldsmith, 372-
9406. (G-94-3t-c).
1960 AUSTIN-HEALEY. Must sell
this week. $895 or best offer. Wire
wheels, new top, excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Call Tony, ext. 2281 or
372-4973. (G-94-3t-c).
1963 MGB, red, good looking, good
condition, radio and heater, ton tonneau
neau tonneau covers seatbelts. Must sacri sacrifice.
fice. sacrifice. $1,195 or best offer. Call
after 5, 378-4615. (G-87-ts-c).

DONT MISS
BELL, H
BOOK JL
ANDL^J-LIJ
CANDLE^
STARRING The UF's Own
1
Bernadette Caetro
WITH
JIM MOORHEAD FRANCES DE VORE
MIKE HALL JIM 808 TINSLEY
A Most Bewitching Comedy
PRESENTED BY
THE MARION PLAYERS
Fri. & Sat., Feb. 18-19 Thurs. & Fri., Feb. 24-25
AT 8:15 P.M. IN
Ocala Little Theatre
(40 Minutes away, between Ocala
and Silver Springs, on State Rd. 40)
Gen. Admission $1.75 UF Students $1

CLASSIFIEDS

Page 9

autos
1955 CHEVROLET V-8, 2 door
sedan, automatic transmissioir,
heater, local 2 owner car. 376-
5996. (G-96-3t-c).
1957 BUICK SPECIAL, 51,000
original miles, good condition, 1
family car. Call anytime, 376-
2350. (G-96-st-c).
1954 XK-120 JAGUAR. Good con condition.
dition. condition. SSOO. Call 378-4229 or see
at 327 NW 15th Terr. (G-96-3t-c).
1962 VW. Excellent condition, en engine
gine engine just rebuilt. New white side sidewall
wall sidewall tires, radio and heater. $325
equity and assume $36 per month
payments. Call 372-0755 after 5
p.m. (G-87-ts-c).
1962 MERCEDES B. 2205, 1960
MERCEDES BENZ 190 SL sports
car convertible. Bargain. Call 376-
8869. (G-90-ts-c).
1966 TRIUMPH, TR-4A. Wife wont
drive. Michelin X tires, wire
wheels, radio, heater, English rac racing
ing racing green. Call 376-1756 after
5 p.m. (G-93-ts-c).

', The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 18, 1966

real estate
AIR CONDITIONED furnished new
1 bedroom, one story, landscaped
lot, paved parking. Will sublet,
SIOO. 1628-B NW 4th Ave., 376-
8783. (1-94-3 t-p).
CCB HOUSE with Florida and util utility
ity utility rooms, fenced yard and patio.
Outside city with low payments.
814 NW 55th Terr. 372-6491. (I (I---93-st-c).
--93-st-c). (I---93-st-c).
APT. HOUSE. 4 blocks from cam campus.
pus. campus. 9 furnished units. Owner can
live in one apt., rent free, manage
the others, and have monthly in income.
come. income. Present gross monthly rents
are $560. Reasonable down pay payment.
ment. payment. Call W. D. Mason, Realtor,
c/o Ernest Tew Realty Inc. 376-
6461. (I-93-ts-c).
T*HE BEST TO YOU FROM DOB DOBSON.
SON. DOBSON. Personal and complete real
estate and insurance service. TOM
DOBSON AGENCY, 2908 NW 13th
St., 372-1473. (1-72-ts-c).
NW SECTION, central air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, 3 bedroom, 2 bath home.
On high wooded lot. Reasonable
down, no qualifying. Call 372-5209.
(1-96-1 Ot-c).
personal
INTERNATIONAL FOLK DAN DANCERS,
CERS, DANCERS, Good Luck. Miss Friedman.
(J-96-lt-c).
GREETINGS, Thomas Heyward
Webb! Isnt this more original
than a sign in the window?
L and L, 1119 Jennings. (J-95-
2t-p).
C 6740. DO ELEPHANTS ALWAYS
save the skippers first mate?
(J-96-lt-p).
DEAR SIGMA KAPPAS: Have fun
on the hay ride, but dont forget
Derby. Love George. (J-96-lt-p).

FREE HONDA
L
NOTHING TO BUY! COME IN AND REGISTER
TODAY FOR THE BEAUTIFUL HONDA SPORT 50
715 NW
I 13th ST
I \ \ Ij ffJACtliltd Mlwimid* br Bb(W I
I\\

services
i i
NOW OPENING. Teddy Bear Nur Nursery.
sery. Nursery. 3 departments, complete in infant
fant infant department. Planned program
for children over 3. Central heating
and air conditioned. Ph. 376-0917.
1214-1/2 NW 4th St. (M-95-ts-c).
UNITED RENT-ALLS. We rent
most anything. Roll-away beds,
trucks, all tools, party equipment.
Call us for all your needs. 376-
2835, 626 NW Bth Ave. (M-75-
ts-c).
DUE TO POPULAR DEMAND,
Tena is extending her specialty,
FROSTING for average length hair.
$lO. Call Tena at Milady's Beauty
Salon, 376-3802. (M-96-2tf-c).
NEED CASH
IN YOUR POUCH?
SELL THOSE THINGS
YOU DON'T NEED
WITH
gator
classifieds

Letter
(From Page 1)
He was asked temporarily not
to distribute literature and re reminded
minded reminded that in the meantime any
precedents established to date will
still be followed until new needs
can be examined in formulating
policy, according to Hale.
Distribution of literature on
campus has never been a problem
prior to now, Hale pointed out.
But Hale clarified his position,
which Levin labeled a step back backward,
ward, backward, regression."
"The statement in the letter
was made so there would be no
misunderstandings until a deci decision
sion decision can be reached," he said.
If anything, probing into the
question of free distribution of
literature on campus is a step
forward, Hale said.
Up until now there have been no
particular rules governing the free
distribution of literature on
campus, he added.
"In the absence of precendent,
we have said we will consider the
extent to which such free literature
should be distributed," Hale said.
The letter from Elmore and Hale
stated that a faculty committee
would be asked to consider the
question of whether the policy
should be changed.
Hale said a committee of fa faculty
culty faculty members would be utilized
as would other means for obtain obtaining
ing obtaining information and sound advice
that would lead to a wise decision
with respect to the free distribu distribution
tion distribution of literature.
REACH...
.. .for the telephone
call for GATOR AOS
University ext. 2832



Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 18, 1966

IT'S BERNADETTE'S
DRAMATIC DEBUT

Remember the pretty, dark darkhaired
haired darkhaired little girl who used to roll
out the couches on the old Castro
Convertible television commer commercials?
cials? commercials?
She grew up to be Bernadette
Castro night club chanteuse,
recording artist, and now little
theatre ingenue. The UF junior
shes in the School of Journalism
and Communications public re relations
lations relations sequence opened last
night as the leading lady in Bell,
Book And Candle, presented by
Ocalas Marion Players.
Its a dramatic debut of sorts
for this outgoing coed, whos been
appearing before cameras and the
public since she was hardly higher
than those couches she demon demonstrated
strated demonstrated for her manufacturer
father back when most UFers
were pre-schoolers themselves.
Although she appeared in several
plays while in high school in Fort
Lauderdale, this is her first
serious dramatic appearance in
front of the paying general public.
She portrays Gillian Holroyd, the
modern-day young witch who wants
to fall in love, and the part is
imposingly long and difficult for an
acting newcomer.
BC has handled it with her
usual determination and thorough thoroughness,
ness, thoroughness, however: She had her part,
far longer than any of the four
others in the show, practically
memorized before rehearsals even
began.
This stems from the profes professional
sional professional standards she learned to
adhere to a few years back when
she recorded for Colpix Records
His Lips Get In The Way was
her big hit and later when she
appeared in a lengthy engagement
at The Living Room, a svelte
Manhattan supper club.
The five -* times-weekly re rehearsals
hearsals rehearsals in Ocala might have posed
no problem for Bernadette since

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Now A UF Coed...
... Between trips to Ocala.

her family now makes its home
there however, she has sand sandwiched
wiched sandwiched the demanding play
schedule in with 15 hours of aca academic
demic academic load, Chi Omega sorority
activities and her customary role
of junior hostess for the Castro
household, a home where enter entertaining
taining entertaining almost reaches White
House frequency.
It may tell in her grades later,
but its thus far had no effect on
her energy or enthusiasm. Her
fellow cast members would all
agree shes maintained as much
vigor as anybody.
Bernadette finds herself with
plenty of UF company in the cast
of five.
Bob Tinsley graduated here in
journalism in 1956, now teaches
junior high school in Ocala, and
one year ago proudly saw his first
book, The Sailfish: Swashbuckler
of The Seven Seas, reach publi publication
cation publication through the University of
Florida Press.
Mike Hall, a drama graduate
from Carnegie Tech in Pittsburgh,
later worked toward a masters
degree here in communications.
Jim Moorhead graduated herein
1961 in journalism, served as edi editor
tor editor of The Alligator and is'now
full-time production manager for
Student Publications, serving this
trimester as editorial advisor for
The Gator.
Only wild card in the bunch is
Frances Sheppard DeVore and she
claims unofficial membership in
the club by virtue of the fact
husband Elbert matriculated here
a short generation ago.
Although Bernadette has tackled
her stage debut with gusto, she
decided sometime ago to forsake
the entertainment world as a
career, instead plans to assist
her father in the far-flung Castro
enterprises which encompass fur furniture
niture furniture manufacturing, real estate

*

Only One Prop To Work With Then ...

and horse farming, plus a host of
other sidelines.
Like any trouper, she is nervous
as each opening curtain ap approaches.
proaches. approaches. She still flusters at the
thought of doing love scenes, par particularly
ticularly particularly in front of sorority sis sisters
ters sisters who plan the 40-minute drive
down to see BC in action. I
dont mind kissing, she says, but
in front of a houseful of people?
Bernadette will doubtlessly en endure
dure endure her embarrassment during
the five-night run (last night,
tonight and Saturday of this week,
Thursday and Friday of next week),
even though more than just Chi
Omega schoolmates may be in the
audience.
UFers are, in fact, encouraged
to attend through a special student
rate of $1 per person, to see how
the little couch girl has
developed into a bewitchingly
pretty young woman. Ocala Little
Theatre is three miles east of town
on Silver Springs Boulevard (State
Road 40).
Curtain for the show, along
runner on Broadway and later a
movie, is at 8:15.

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*
l

...There's plenty more play.
-Jill
''^K
~
>J||l Ji %'.' /,
New York Had Its Moments ...
...With Beatles McCartney (left) and Starr



Zabeeh Became 'Nervous and Irritable

(From Page 1)
to be proud. It was written in
haste, he told the AAUP.
It is the first reason, doubt
about Zabeehs academic distinc distinction,
tion, distinction, that serves as backbone for
the Administration argument
against Zabeeh.
AGAINST argument include:
The Administration says it
received unfavorable information
about Zabeeh which it could not
reveal because the material was
confidential. As late as last tri trimester
mester trimester (several months after the
Board decision) the Administration

IfeitiMi' ** ml
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; & lIV.
* ski
BROWARD WILLIAMS
...speaks to Sam Ashdown, campus chairman of the students for
Williams; Stew Parsons and Fred Thomas at a dinner at the Holiday
Inn.
Williams For Treasurer
(From Page 1 )

insurance laws and a staff of five.
In the past twenty years the In Insurance
surance Insurance sector of the Treasurers
office has grown.
In order to help local communi communities,
ties, communities, Williams has set up 22 field
offices throughout the state. These
offices make help available to all
citizens when problems with their
insurance arise.
During the last session of legis legislation,
lation, legislation, there was a bill on the floor

Talent Show Caps
Internationl Week

Latin American Fiestas,
Persian dances, Chinese
chorus songs and Indian Folk
dances are a few of the acts

IFC Expects 400 Pints By March

C.D. Hobbs, Service Chairmen of
the IFC and director of the current
blood drive, stated, "As of Febru February
ary February 15 we have 187 pints donated,
which puts us 150 ahead of last
years pace.
The blood donated will help
satisfy J. Hillis Miller Health Cen Centers
ters Centers requirements of 10.000 pints
per year.
F raternity men are allowed to
draw on the bank for themselves
and their immediate families.
Last week the IFC donated 25
pints of blood to each of the com combat
bat combat units represented by the four

would not tell the AAUP whether
the information related to Zabeehs
academic abilities or to his moral
conduct.
The Administration says
several persons asked that the
Board decision not be reversed.
Youd be surprised at how many
and who came to me... said
Mautz. Exactly who these persons
were, Mautz will not say.
During the months following
the Board decision Zabeeh became
nervous and irritable. He lost

to separate the Insurance office
from the Treasurers office. It
failed.
Williams was pleased with the
move although he had stated he
would support the will of the people
and the legislative body.
This is Williamsfirst campaign
experience. He told the Alligator
he enjoys the opportunity to travel
through the state and talk to people.

that will be presented in the
International Talent Show to tonight.
night. tonight.
The show begins at 8:00 p.m.
in the University Auditorium.
Director Azia Shiralipour
said that show is dedicated to
presenting "an assortment of
entertainment from varied
backgrounds to promote cul cultural
tural cultural exchange and under understanding.
standing. understanding.
International Clubs repre represented
sented represented in tonights perform performance
ance performance are the Arabian Club,
Persian Club, Chinese Club,
Latin American Club, India
Club and International folk
Dancing Club. Two trophies
will be given for talent win winners.
ners. winners. One for the best group
performance and one for the
best single act.
Independent acts by groups
and individuals will also com compete
pete compete for trophies. The winners
will be chosen by a group
of seven judges from various
campus departments.

Hobbs expects 400 pints to be
donated by the end of the month.
All men donating will receive re reserve
serve reserve tickets-for the Johnny Rivers
show March 4th.
Viet Nam vets that were honored
by SG over the past weekend in
"Operation Appreciation.
Hobbs pointed out that the hos hospital
pital hospital staff has been exemplary in
their cooperation with the IFC.
They have set up mobile units in
all four fraternity districts and
have worked in appointments
almost on the spur of the moment.

his temper easily and sometimes
goaded students to tears.
After reviewing Zabeehs
work, the Board decided Zabeeh
was not the kind of scholar who
would bring eminence to the in institution
stitution institution that he was goodbut
not the best.
FOR arguments include:
Only months before the tenure
controversy broke out Zabeeh was
promoted from assistant to asso associate
ciate associate professor.
Dr. John A Harrison, former
head of theUF History department,
recommended Zabeeh to replace
him as head of the High Honors
Seminar. Harrison left the UF to
become dean of the University of
Miami Graduate School.
Zabeehs honors include a re research
search research grant from the American
Council of Learned Societies and
appointment as North American
representative of the journal Ra Ratio.
tio. Ratio.

His publications include a
book on philosopher David Hume.
Dr. Herschel Elliott, who served
several months as acting chairman
of the UP" Philosophy DeparHnent,
described the book as a 1 very
thorough, careful bit of scholarly
work.
There was another book. Prob Problem
lem Problem of Universals, which has been
accepted for publication and 17
articles for internationally-pub internationally-published
lished internationally-published scholar journals.
Upon leaving the UF, Zabeeh
accepted a position at Roosevelt
University in Chicago. He teaches
there today as a full professor
with a salary increase of 25 per
cent.
In addition to the Administra Administrations
tions Administrations publicized reasons for the
Board decision, there are views
on campus offering other theories
for the no tenure vote.
These theories include:
As an athiest Zabeeh might
have offended the more religion religionminded
minded religionminded members of the Adminis Administration.
tration. Administration.
Supporters of this view point to
ex-UP" Vice President Harry M.
Philpotts past position as a
minister. They also note that, while
the new department head is no more
religious than Zabeeh was, he does
sport an impressive string of de degrees
grees degrees in divinity.
(Mautz has denied the Board de decision
cision decision had anything to do with

I NOTICE
I Applications are now being accepted for the following
positions:
I MANAGING EDITOR, FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
1 to fill out remainder of unexpired term.
I BUSINESS MANAGER, STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
1 t- for school year 1966-67
I 4
I All Applicants Must Be Available For Interview Weds.,
IFeb 23.
I PICK UP APPLICATIONS IN ROOM 9, FLORIDA
I UNION BUILDING.
r
I

The Florida Feb. 18, 1966

Zabeehs religious views or his
personality.)
The process of getting rid
of a department head creates
waves in the organizational struc structure.
ture. structure. Zabeehs role as boat
rocker might have been a sub substantial
stantial substantial factor in the Boards de decision.
cision. decision.
In addition to this, there is the
matter of exactly WHO decided
Zabeehs. works were not of dis distinction.
tinction. distinction.
Hanna says Mautz told him phil philosophers
osophers philosophers were called in from out outside
side outside the UF to review Zabeehs
work.
He told me it was on that basis
(the philosophers report) that the
final decision was made, said
Hanna.
But Mautz has made no mention
of outside philosophers to either
The Alligator or to the AAUP.
When asked several times by
The Alligator how a Personnel
Board composed of non-philoso non-philosophers
phers non-philosophers could judge the competence
of a philosopher, Mautz talked
about the difficulty of establishing

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uniform judging standards.
His final comment on the subject
was, Maybe we make mistakes
in judgment, maybe not.
AAUP members, when informed
of Hannas information about out outside
side outside philosophers, said it Was the
first they had heard about it.
After the Board decision we
asked Reitz who had the expertise
to judge Zabeehs work. He
admitted no one had, said one
AAUP member.
* *
Late last trimester Mautz was
asked whether he thought academic
freedom had been upheld in
Zabeehs case.
1 How can denial of tenure on
these' grounds be denial of acade academic
mic academic freedom? he replied. Youd
have to be saying the Personnel
Board acted on reasons other than
those stated, and I dont believe
it.
Tomorrow: Possible conse consequences
quences consequences of the Zabeeh case.

Page 11



Page 12

;, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 18, 1966

Its Off To Mardi Gras

Many people think basic ROTC is dull and time timeconsuming.
consuming. timeconsuming. And this it may be for those who dont
put any effort into the program. But for those who
do, there is much to be gained.
One of the easiest ways to put the effort in is by
joining one of the extra-curricular activities. One
of these activities for basic Army ROTC cadets is
the Gator Guard. The Guard is the precision drill
team which represents UF various parades and drill
performances throughout the year.
The extra effort required to be in the Guard is
attendance at Tuesday drills in addition to Thursday
drills. The rewards are many.
First, the individual Guardsman get the privilege
of going to New Orleans for Mardi Gras. In addition
to at least two other parades in Florida.
Second, the individual gets to wear the cords of
the Guard. The cords symbolize leadership, industry
and outstanding performance.

Main Airn
Os Guard
The mission of Gator Guard is
to increase interest in the basic
military program, to set the
example for other basic military
students, to represent the Army
ROTC in University and civic func functions,
tions, functions, and more fully to develop
the traits of character desired in
future military leaders.
That is how the Guards book booklet
let booklet of Standard Operating Pro Procedure
cedure Procedure begins. It relays to the rea reader
der reader the organizational structure of
the team.' It explains the merit
and demerit systems. It does not
however tell of the history of the
team and give their record of vic victories.
tories. victories. It doesnt have to the
Guard speaks for itself each year.
There is no written record of
the Guard prior to 1954, but Cap Captain
tain Captain Billy Wood, the Guard Advi Advisor,
sor, Advisor, is sure there must have been
an Army ROTC drill team here.
However, no one remembers for
sure who they were or what they
did.
But in the past 10 years the
Guard has amassed quite a record
of performances. They have ap appeared
peared appeared in the Cherry Blossom Fes Festival
tival Festival i n Washington, and Mardi
Gras Festival in New Orleans.
It has been invited to perform in
numerous parades including
Homecoming, the Ocala and
Orlando Christmas Parades, Sara Sarasotas"
sotas" Sarasotas" King Neptune Parade,
Cocoas Indian River Citrus
Parade, and Tampas gasparilla
Parade., They also performed at
the dedication of Sarasotas Post
Office.

JmSfc
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rf. vJF^B Hi i
Company Commander Stuart Watkins with
the Gator Guards two new sponsors.
GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS
ELL! SELL! SELL! SELL! SELL! SELL! SELL! SELL! SEL

jU^maiaaif*: 'Uj

Mail S
b 1 ks I r,- I
One of the many precision movements of
the Drill team. This movement was used
effectively at last year's Mardi Gras helping
the Guard the national drill team champion championship.
ship. championship.

GATOR GUARD MAKES ANNUAL TRIP

For this years initiation 2 men became pledges for
a week. This meant that for a week, each man carried
gum, candy, and cigarettes on his person. He saluted
all corded members and afforded them the greeting
and rank of an officer. In addition he attended five
morning drills, and wore his uniform to all classes.
The pledge also carved and painted a wooden rifle.
At dress drill, those pledges who passed initia initiation
tion initiation and had been deemed worthy of the cords, re received
ceived received them. The president of the pledge class was
Keith Aldridge, and the commander of pledge raiders
was Vinson Bailey. Other members of the Guard to
receive their cords were: Paul Neitzel, Harold
Schadow, Robert Barton, John Davis, Richard Moul Mouldin,Bob
din,Bob Mouldin,Bob Baker, Halley Sanchez, Wilkie Gilbert,
Stephen Rice, Raymond Christ, Howard Rosenblatt,
Ronald Hackman, Richard Fargo, Tom Ball, Louis
Pucci, Charles Drosin, Ernest Williams, Steve
Rosslow and Charles Massey.

SPRING SPORTS HEADQUARTERS
Baseball-Softball-T rack
Shop Early and Choose from a Wide Selection on Stock
/Vi£i
BASEBALL & SOFTBALL S&§ TRACK
Gloves by: MacGregor, Rawlings & Nok' x _* Shoes-Spikes
Mitts: Basemans & Catchers j Shoes -Cross Country.,
Bats & Balls Sweat Clothes
Shoes & Socks - X Shots
Caps /.Discus
Undershirts -Vaulting Poles

WE ARE COMPLETE TEAM OUTFITTERS
I FAST SERVICE ON LETTERED JERSEYS I
VM || || | || a|||| || |||||| a| || | MMag Ba^^^HH^BH^Baaaa|Baa J|
COMPLETE LINE OF ACCESSORIES FOR ALL SPRING SPORTS
JIMMIE HUGHS SPORTING GOODS
North Central Florida's Most Complete Sporting Goods Store
One Block East of Campus 1113 W. Univ. Ave.

> Mk
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f&Jitk- ffltaMahx i ..i,. ri fit^ i^^^Kli-'
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Guard Commander Watkins marches between
two columns of Gator Guardsman spinning
their rifles and flashing their bayonets before
and after him. Watkins says he has missed
being hit by the bayonets many times by an
inch or less/'
Photos By Gerald Jones
What will you do with your summer?
Want some ideas? Information?
Ecuminical Work Camps, National Parks, Voluntary Service
Projects, Study-through-participation Projects?
MEET
Bill Miller, Board of National Missions of the United Presby Presbyterian
terian Presbyterian Church U.S.A.
MONDAY FEB. 21st. 8-9:30 P.M.
COFFEE AND DONUTS
The Presbyterian University Center 1402 W. University Ave.



Prl jk 1
''s%BSr' I J? If
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Dave Hutchinson speaks out as Dave Petersen
helps Ruth Ann Helwig onto the caravan in
Florida Players' production of Clemmbard.
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Don Thomas sits with his true love Ruth
Ann Hellwig as they talk to Dave Petersen.

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Carol Perley, Dave Petersen, wig gather at Poppys house for
Don Thomas, and Ruth Ann Hell- a discussion

Cl era mbard Opens
With A Flourish

The lights dimmed
and the curtain went
up on the Florida
Players' production of
Cleramhard last
night. The French
comedy starring Dave
Petersen, Don Tho Thomas,
mas, Thomas, and Ruth Ann
Hellwig opened at the
Norman Hall Auditor Auditorium
ium Auditorium where it will run
through Saturday.
Set in the early
twentieth century, the
play concerns the
switch of Monsieur
H ector Cleramhard
from tyrant to human humanitarian,
itarian, humanitarian, and his son's
involvement with the
vUllage hussey.
Cleramhard will re reopen
open reopen next Wednesday
and run through Satur Saturday.
day. Saturday. Showtimes art at
7:30 weekdays and 8:00
on Fridays Saturdays.
Tickets are available
at the Norman Hall Au Auditorium
ditorium Auditorium ticket window
from noon until 6 p.m.
Monday through Satur Saturday.
day. Saturday. The box office will
be open prior to show showtime.
time. showtime. Tickets may be
obtained with the pre presentation
sentation presentation of the blue
student I.D. cards.
'
§ Photos By §
* ****
'* ****
** ***
1 Gerald JonesS
jf 1

The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 18, 1966

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Carol Perley and Sherry Penn look on as
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Bill Perley acts very persuasively towards
Andi Alperstein as Kathy Tacolinni frowns
on in the play's final act.

Page 13



Page 14

The Florida Alligator. Friday. Feb. 18, 1966

Gators Face Dandy Vandy

By HARVEY SLAVIN
Ailigatoi Staff Writer
Five may be a very unlucky
number for the Florida Gators.
Saturday at 3:10p.m., the Gators
square off against the Vanderbilt
Commodores, the number five fiveranked
ranked fiveranked team in the nation, a team
the Gators have beaten only once in
the last five years.
Since Sloan took over UF basket basketball
ball basketball fortunes in 1960. the Gators
have managed only one win over
Vandy. That was in 1962 when
the Gators were ten better with
a 78-68 win.
The Commodores boosted their

mm ffjf mmwm
. pr BBSIK
kfcEl ,JM
I jjr W:Z
(Above) TEP's Ricky Perillo battles with Sigma Chi*s
Jim Morgan for the ball. (Below) Mike Waxman goes
up to snare a TEP shot. He got the shot but the Sigs
the
t: -&** \

BLUE LEAGUE
STANDINGS
LXA 640
TKE 564
PGD 504
PKP . 429
DU 424
DX 389
XP 363
PEP 319
AGR . 285
PKPsi 275
DSP 227
BE A SPORT! I
PATRONIZE I
GATOR ADS I

season record to 18-3 and their
SEC mark to 9-2 with victories
against Alabama and Auburn on
their last road trip. Neither game
came easy to Vandy, which found
itself behind in each game, but
came up with what some call
character and won both games.
Clyde Lee, Vandys All-America
center and the top rebounder in
the SEC, will be put to the acid
test under the boards. The Gators
maintain the best rebounding
record in the SEC, and Gary Kel Keller
ler Keller is just behind Lee in the
league rebounding race.

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Vandy Coach Roy Skinner will
have other offensive guns to use
against the Gators in Keith
Thomas, the leagues ninth leading
scorer, and Wayne Calvert, a
streak shooter. Veteran Ronnie
Green, a Miami Beach High pro product,
duct, product, compounds the Gators pro problems.
blems. problems.
Vanderbilt will certainly be one
of the best all-around teams we
will face this season, said Sloan.
And thats why it would be en enjoyable
joyable enjoyable if we could beat them on
our home court this week.
The Gators recent 78-74 win
over Mississippi State left Sloan a
little dubious about the prepared preparedness
ness preparedness of his charges. The team had
State by 20 points mid-way in the
second period and in six short
minutes the Bulldogs narrowed
the lead to three points.
We must not dream of playing
that poorly against Vanderbilt re regardless
gardless regardless of what the score is,
commented Sloan. If we let up
for one instant Vandy will pounce
on us in short order.
The Gators currently have an
overall record of 13-8 and an
SEC record of 6-5.
Champ Clay
Is Now 1-A
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (UPI) The
Selective Service was expected to
confer a new title on heavyweight
champion Cassius Clay today, 1-A.
Draft Board No. 47 was to strike
from the record Clays two tech technical
nical technical knockouts on the intelligence
portions of his pre-induction test.
The Army lowered its IQ require requirements
ments requirements last November.
Until today, Clay was in the 1-Y
classification, a catch-all for phy physically
sically physically able draft prospects who
failed to make the grade in other
categories.
There are other boys in this
1-Y classification who will also
be reclassified 1-A just like Clay,
draft board chairman J. Allen
Sherman said.
If the boards manpower quota
is the same next month as it was
two weeks ago, Sherman said,
Cassius will get his greetings early
in March.
That would put Cassius at war
with the Army before he ever gets
into the ring with Ernie Terrell.
A match for the heavyweight title
is scheduled for March 29 in Chi Chicago.
cago. Chicago. He can appeal the reclassi reclassification
fication reclassification and if the Kentucky Selec Selective
tive Selective Service appeal board splits
its decision, he can take the mat matter
ter matter to Washington.
Sherman, an attorney, has said
the title fight would not constitute
any sort of grounds for deferment.
If the appeal boards findings ran
unanimously against Clays argu argument
ment argument for deferment, the champ
would have no further recourse.

fu^\
Alligator Staff Writer 1
Friends and faithful supporters. It is with deep regret that
I inform you of the tragic fate that my column and The Alligator
sports pages have met.
Poor old Sports Editor Bob Menaker was informed yesterday
the Alligator sports pages are being squelched.
You see, a movement is underway to run a full color foldout
of Ernie Litz and a fig leaf every day until the end of the trimester.
The sports pages stood in the way of the big A and had to
be dropped. (For those of you who are not on the inside, the A
stands for Apathy not Apple or Appendicitis.)
But the sports staff has decided on a comeback. Menaker is
buying up space in the classified ad section so sports news
CAN and WILL be printed each day.
However, theres one slight problem. The classified ad section
may be dropped so Mike Malaghan can complete his brilliant
sixteen volume book in 432 installments in The Alligator on
the inside, behind the scene, scoop on dirty nasty ole politics.
But, since this is a sports column, perhaps there should be
a little sport in it.
So, whats on the sports scene?
For one thing some team called Vanderbilt plays the basketball
team tomorrow afternoon in Florida gym. Chuckle.
And theres a couple of nice ping pong matches going on in
the basement of the Florida Union.
Oh, yes. How could I forget!
Monday night is THE night. Howard Bayne and his Tennessee
Mountain boys are barnSTOMPing through the South for several
limited engagements.
Florida will be lucky enough to see the greatest combination
boxing-judo-wrestling match this side of China in the gym Monday
night.
Bayne, who has the greatest right cross in basketball, drops
by every year long enough to throw a couple of thousand punches.
Hes possibly the only player in history who wears knee pads
on his elbows.
* *
To close out on a political note (so I wont be fired), I would like
to announce the formation of a new party for next years election.
We call it Cocktail Party.
Our platform includes:
Negotiation of a peace treaty with Fidel Castro.
Destroying Red China.
Puting a man on the moon by September, 1967.
Taking the fig leaf off Ernie Litzs picture.
Think big man * its the only. way.
Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship
OF GAI NESVILLE
SPEAKER: DR. KENNETH BYRON
PROF. OF ENGLISH
TOPIC: "PESSIMISM IN PERSPECTIVE"
11 a.m., Sunday, Feb. 20, Room 324, Florida Union
EVERYONE INVITED
We've a special rate for you during your
first month of occupancy. Take advantage
of it --SAVE THOSE COINS!!
' 4 J
}



NFL Falcons Snare Lewis, Claridge

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
PALM BEACH, Fla. (UPI)
The brand-new Atlanta Falcons
landed promising young Green Bay
Packer quarterback Dennis
Claridge and verteran Washington
Redskin runner Don Lewis in their
National Football League grabbag.
The Falcons got 42 players from
the other 14 NFL teams and wound
up with 22 who have been starters
at one time or another in the
professional league.

Woolfolk Gators Only Lefty

Ned Woolfolk has a problem.
It seems the Gator baseball
'team, hoping to take this years
SEC crown because of its strong
pitching staff, has overlooked one

The Florida Alligator

Friday, Feb. 18, 1966

Sanders SPECIAL
ff SHRIMP DINNER n
jr INCLUDES FRENCH 9 II I I i,
FRIES, COLE SLAW nc
HOT SAUCE & HUSH
puppies mm
/I -AVAILABLE AT"
JLrKwWif Tod CMdm
Tncfx/ 214 NW 13th St. 376-6472
y 207 NE 16th Ave. 378-2959
OFFER GOOD FRIDAY ONLY
THE VETERANS ADMINISTRATION
Will Conduct Interviews at The
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
February 25, 1966
for
CIVIL- ELECTRICAL- MECHANICAL
ENGINEERS
and
ARCHITECTS
PLANNING and DESIGN POSITIONS ln
Washington, D. C.
CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISION AND HOSPITAL
MAINTENANCE POSITIONS
At Numerous Locations Throughout the United States.
The Veterans Administrations $90,000,000 annual program of
hospital construction and modernization is typified by the new
| Gainesville Veterans Hospital now being erected adjacent to
the Gator campus across Archer Road.
For advance information, consult literature in the Placeme
Office, Building H Equality in employment for all, in
these Federal Civil Service career positions.
was hbbbpwbbbb*****

The big surprise appeared to
be Claridge, the former Nebraska
star who was being groomed as a
possible successor to Bart Starr,
the Packers 10-year veteran
quarterback. Falcons coach Norb
Hecker, a Packer assistant until
just a couple of weeks ago, said
he was elated that Claridge was
available.
Claridge, a 6-foot-3 225-pound
two-year veteran, only got to throw
one pass last year, playing third

important fact Ned is its only
southpaw pitcher.
Unless coach Dave Fuller can
find some promising left-handers
from last years freshman squad,

SPORTS

string behind Starr and another
veteran, Zeke Bratkowski, but the
Packers thought enough of him
in 1963 to pick him as a future
on the third round of the college
draft.
Hecker said Claridge definitely
would be one of the leading candi candidates
dates candidates as first quarterback of the
Falcons, but he indicated he might
go into the trade mart in search
of a quarterback with more actual
playing experience.

Woolfolk will have a lot of respon responsibility.
sibility. responsibility.
I dont really think the lack
of lefties will hurt us much, he
commented. I think we have the
best bunch of right handers in the
league. Ill probably have to do a
lot of throwing in batting practice
so our batters can get used to
hitting a southpaw.
Practices thus far have been
very successful. Concerned pri primarily
marily primarily with getting players in
shape, Coach Fuller has empha emphasized
sized emphasized running and fast pepper
games, but several intra-squad
scrimmage games have been
played.
In the scrim mage games pitching
has been the highlight. Senior Ray
Rollyson has been throwing with
blazing speed, and Adrian Zabala,
Dan Griffin, Kelly Prior and Danny
Orr should also be ready for the
season. Ned Woolfolk HAS to be
ready.
Ive really been working to get
in shape, he said, Running sta stadiums
diums stadiums and doing isometrics have
helped me a lot.
My main trouble is my speed.
People have trouble telling my
fast ball from a change-of-pace
pitch, but I am getting a little
faster.
Because of his problem with the
fastball, Woolfolk often resorts to
trash pitching. He has a good
knuckleball, curve ball and slider.
On a given day he can pitch a
beautiful ball game.
When hes throwing the ball
well, I think hes the toughest
lefthander Iver ever faced, says
Brownie Johnston, former Gator
ce nterfielder.
Thus far in practice he has been
throwing the ball well. But in spite
of his efforts, Woolfolk cannot be
expected to pitch in every situation
where a lefty should be used.
The UF nine will undoubtedly face
many left-handed hitting teams
where a host of left-handed
pitchers would be a great asset.
The team has no host of left lefthanders.
handers. lefthanders.
Ned Woolfolk has a problem.

Page 15

FOREST PARK
BAPTIST
CHURCH
1624 NW sth AVE
9
r V- <*>-- r - 1 -------- :
SUNDAY SCHOOL =*s, AM
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 AM
TRAINING UNION 6:30 PM
EVENING WORSHIP 7:45 PM

Claridge, at his home in Lincoln,
Neb., said he understands he will
have to fight for a starting job
with the Falcons.
I assume Ill be in the same
boat as all the other players on
the club, Claridge said. Every Everyone
one Everyone will most likely be making an
all-out effort to win a spot on the
starting lineup... I know I will.
To win the quarterback post,
Claridge will have to beat out two
top-ranked rookies, Texas A. & T.
quarterback Randy Johnson, who
was a sensation in several post postseason
season postseason all-star games, and
Alabama quarterback Steve Sloan,
star of the Orange Bowl, who broke
many of the passing records of his
old teammate, Joe Namath.
Johnson and Sloan were obtained
by the Falcons in the college draft.
The 3 0-year-old Lewis, an
eight-year veteran of the NFL,
was the leading rusher for the
Detroit Lions in 1962 and 1963
and second leading rusher for the
Lions in 64 and the Redskins
when traded there just before the
1965 season.
In fact, of all the players se selected
lected selected by the Faisons, the 200-
pound Lewis led last year in rush rushing,
ing, rushing, passing and pass receiving.
Another well-known pro selected
by the Falcons was flanker back
Alex Hawkins of the Baltimore
Colts. Hawkins, a seven-year ve veteran,
teran, veteran, was one of the Colts top
runners when Lennie Moore was
playing at the flanker post and

*Ji Ha
BKIf flnlk JBf V 4
: \ "tBSt y
SAE's Will Rogers drives with the ball on the way to
a 50-41 victory for the lionmen. The win was a big
one for SAE as they closed the gap between them and
the TEPmen for the Orange League lead.

Auto Racing Booms
NEW YORK LUPI) A
survey indicates auto racing is
the fastest growing major sport
in America.

became a star of the Colts kick kickoff
off kickoff and punt treams in the past
several seasons. 6
Hecker pointed out that the Fal Falcons
cons Falcons were able to pick up men for
every position on both the offen offensive
sive offensive and defensive units and thus
could field an all-veteran starting
team next fall.
The selections were made public
Wednesday during the Nationa
Football League meeting whicl
has been in session here since
Monday.
The league gave- the Falcons ;
list of 154 players from which the}
were allowed to select 14, om
from each team. Then, after each
team took back two more players,
the Falcons got their remaining
28, two from each team, from the
smaller list.
The list handed to the Falcons
included 11 men from each team,
with the other 29 players who were
on the active rosters at the begin beginning
ning beginning of the 1965 season being
frozen or made unavailable to
the new team.
NFL Commissioner Pete
Rozelle lifted the embargo on
intra-league trading as soon as
the Falcons had completed their
charges and almost immediately,
the Baltimore Colts traded de defensive
fensive defensive back Wendell Harris to the
New York Giants for defensive
end Andy Stynchula, whom the
Giants had gotten from the Red Redskins
skins Redskins several years ago when they
traded off linebacker Sam Huff.

Dubious
Distinction
Os The Week
This week's du dubious
bious dubious distinction
goes to the play players
ers players on the Mid Midwestern
western Midwestern and Le-
Torneau Tech
basketball teams.
The two basket basketball
ball basketball behemoths
played a real of offensive
fensive offensive game, as
Midwestern pull pulled
ed pulled it out 9-8. This
was the lowest
score recorded in
a college basket basketball
ball basketball game this
year.



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 11, 1966

PLAYER OF THE WEEK
, />,. /iflltw VINYL REED
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*k Y Player of the week honors go this week to 6-4 forward Paul Morton.
.|j While most of the Gator team was on and off against Mississippi ip WBkg&g (
'm!?- State.. Morton was hot as a pistol throughout the game, hitting for 15 :; | jrSmj |HE^H
y points to lead Gator scoring and playing an outstanding brand of
'i \Rj|. V ? \ A senior, Morton led the Baby Gators in scoring despite shooting JB|
. W k \ lert-handed because of a broken wrist. He gained valuable experience vg|HHf; ISM
U\ \ 'Mw\. playing service ball at Ft. Dix before resuming his varsity career. vOypHHHP- -B|
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