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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
CITES UNLICENSED DOCTORS, MISMANAGED FUNDS

Litz Calls For Infirmary Investigation

(Copyright, 1966, The Florida Alligator)
Student body presidential candidate Ernie Litz
Monday called for a complete and thorough in investigation
vestigation investigation of the financial status of the UF
Infirmary.
Litz, running on the Apathy Party ticket, says he
has in his possession heretofore secretly suppressed
documents, letters and records which indicate pos possible
sible possible mismanagement of funds and poor administra administration
tion administration in the Infirmary which has cost students thou thousands
sands thousands of dollars through student fees.
Litz pointed out that more than $500,000 in student
fees annually are involved in the UF Infirmary budget.
Most of the documents, records and letters are
locked in a safety deposit box of a local bank, Litz

The Florida Alligat#r

Vol. 58, No. 88

Blue Key
To Utilize
Own Talent
By EUNICE TALL
Alligator Staff Writer
The Florida Blue Key Speakers
Bureau, which introduces incoming
junior college students to the UF,
will utilize its own leadership
wealth program this year instead
of appealing to non-member stu students.
dents. students.
President of Florida Blue Key
Bruce Starling explained that he
feels the leadership and talent of
the chapter should not be wasted.
I received very favorable com comments
ments comments from the brothers,Starling
said, and a majority have agreed
to actively participate this year.
Os the 26 junior colleges within
Florida, eight have already res responded
ponded responded affirmatively and will
schedule speakers.
The program will get underway
March 14 and continue through the
31st, according to Chip Block,
chairman.
We should have excellent re reception
ception reception at the schools this year,
Block commented, because weve
been working directly with junior
college officials who can coordi coordinate
nate coordinate their part of the program.
In limiting the number of speak speakers
ers speakers this year, the administrative
staff has increased considerably.
Block said intensive publicity and
promotion campaigns will begin
shortly.
For the first time, girls may
not be used in the speaking area
of the program. Starling said that
each speaking team will visit more
than one school, on two or three
speaking tours.
Not only will the expenses be
doubled for the girls accomoda accomodations,
tions, accomodations, Starling said, but we would
have the problem of chaperones.
Our hands are tied on this
point with the administration and
our funds are limited, he added.
He did indicate, however, that
on the short excursion trips to
the junior colleges near Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, coeds may be used as
speakers.
See Any?
jx Honor Court officials yes- jx
terday asked that any one jx
X; seeing any person distribut- X;
ing the Stop Cheese man!
X; sheets distributed early Sun- xj
iv day morning between the hours
iv of 2 and 11 a.m. please contact
:X the Honor Court at ext. 2374. |x

1 if
§9 If p
\ j§
l-,m iM -.. JK A :
Vm i A : ;j§r;
m B Jfij
BL I 4
Bi| m 9
B uplbP MKL Jl :;
Rudolph Weaver Hall Dedication
The UFs Architecture and Fine Arts building was renamed
Rudolph Weaver Hall at a dedication Saturday. Left to right are re retired
tired retired architect Guy Fulton, UF Pres. J. Wayne Reitz, Dean Leonard
J. Currie of the University of Illinois, Acting Dean Robert Bolles,
James Deen, president of the Florida Association of American In Institute
stitute Institute of Architects and Dr. Wayne McCall, vice chairman of the
Board of Regents.
Future Undecided
t
For Levins Cross

By YVETTE CARDOZO
Alligator Staff Writer
The future is still undecided for
Alan Levin and Lucien Cross.
Mondays meeting of the Student-
Faculty Discipline Committee
ended with a decision to consider
the case further.
Levin and Cross were called up
before the committee for selling
on the UF campus without a per permit.
mit. permit. Levin protests 'that the re requirement
quirement requirement for a permit is uncon unconstitutional.
stitutional. unconstitutional.
Levin feels, however, two major
points came out of the Monday
meeting.
First, he said the Committee
admitted their procedings were
very unjudicial in that they asked
irrevelant questions.
These questions, said Cross, in included
cluded included information on his personal
beliefs, and his standing in school.
He feels such subjects did not
pertain to his sales.
Levin and Cross also said Dean
of Men Frank T. Adams and As Assistant
sistant Assistant Dean of Men William Cross
agreed the present procedure for
obtaining permits is vague.
The vagueness of this procedure
is one of Levins major objections
to UF permits.
Levin also felt students do not
actually come under the permit

says.
Litz also says he has discovered that four Infirmary
doctors including Director William A. Hall and
mental health head Dr. Arthur Larson are NOT
licensed to practice medicine in the State of Florida.
These things are practically unbelievable, Litz
said. It is almost beyond comprehension how people
in high places in this University could allow the
Infirmary to get in such a sorry state of affairs
and financial disorganization.
Litz continued, It is amazing to me that, when
students pay more than a half-million dollars in fees
to the Infirmary, we have to put up with unlicensed
doctors and mismanagement of funds.
The educational psychology graduate student said

University of Florida

rule.
A 1949 memo written by former
UF Pres. J. Hillis Miller put into
effect a rule requiring permits for
on-campus sales by solicitors
and tradesmen.

By JUSTINE HARTMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The familiar blue and orange glittering Go
Gators sign, which rode around the stadium
and campus on top of a Corvair all fall, is no
more.
Carl Heishman, cheerleader and owner of the
sign, said it was stolen and probably mutilated
sometime between 11:30and 12:30 a.m. February
4.
Heishman said he parked his car in front of
the Theta Chi house* last Saturday night with
the sign resting peacefully on top. When he came
out an hour later the sign had disappeared.
It was attached with two guy wires, 120
pound test each, Heishman said. He said the
vandals must have cut the wire to remove it.
There were remnants of the sign in the road
and chips of paint on the roof of the car, attest attesting
ing attesting the struggle it took to carry out the theft.
Heishman, who doesnt expect to get the sign
back intact, offered a $lO reward to anyone who-

'Go Gator Sign Stolen;
Owner Offers Reward

Platforms Debated;
Pie-Cutting Berated
By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Party presidential candidate Buddy Jacobs called for a
new look at three-trimester housing contracts at the Sunday debate
in Jennings Hall.
We have talked to housing about this and the people are willing
to discuss it, Jacobs said. You know you can get things done by
negotiation.
Jacobs answered a question asked by Decision Party candidate
Steve Cheeseman as to what each candidates plans were for the
womens living areas.
Cheeseman said his plans include new vending machines, washing
machines and lights on the street going to the medical center.

I also plan to move legisla legislative
tive legislative council meetings to the living
areas and increase bus service,
Cheeseman said.
Apathys Mike Garcia, debating
in place of presidential candidate
Ernie Litz, had three ideas on what
could be done for the womens
living areas.
Cleaning up the bathrooms.
Installing more phones.
Keeping Leg Council meetings
in the Florida Union.
This thing about phones has
been brought up every year, but
nothing has been done, Garcia
said. We wondered why and so we
called Southern Bell and asked
them how more phones can be ob obtained.
tained. obtained. They said Just ask.
Garcia said Apathy would not
move meetings to the dorms be because
cause because it feels students should be
interested enough in Student
Government to come to the regular
(See DEBATE, Page 9)

he was unable to attend Sunday nights debate in
Jennings Hall because he was doing private research
on the Infirmary case.
Litz noted the Infirmary has a generator bought
at a cost of $2,000 sitting in its basement and
never used.
Litz also said Halls private secretary received
a $1,400 raise for no reason at all.
In the minutes of the Nov. 9 meeting, Elmore,
UF business manager, was quoted as saying the
biggest increase in expenditures was in salaries.
Litz also said he deplored the licensing situation.
Whether or not its legal or illegal, Litz said,
(See INVESTAGATION, Page 9)

Tuesday, February 8, 1966

can furnish information as to the whereabouts
of the sign or the vandals who took it.
I have a personal phobia against people
who steal, he said, and I would like to see
them arraigned before the Honor Court.
Heishman drove his car and piggy back sign
to the Miami, Georgia, Jacksonville, and Sugar
Bowl games, where he paraded it around the
field to build Gator spirit.
What I cant get over, said Heishman, is
that it survived all the hostility at away games
and then was attacked right here in Gainesville.
He said he noticed some FSU people in town
this weekend but does not particularly suspect
them.
I just hope if the sign is hanging on some someones
ones someones door somewhere, the reward will induce
a neighbor to snitch.
The sign is worth about sllO, and Heishman,
who graduated from UF in December, needed
it for display purposes since he is in that
business now.

Where
To Vote
Spots for voting machines on
campus were announced yesterday
by Director of Elections Mike
Malaghan.
There will be machines in each
of the eight dorm areas for fresh freshman
man freshman and sophomore voting. These
are: Broward, Rawlings, Yulee,
Jennings, Tolbert, Murphree,
Hume and Graham. University Col College
lege College students can vote in any
of these places. Off-campus
students in their first or second
year must vote there too.
Students in other schools will
vote at the following places:
Business Administration Ma Matherly
therly Matherly Hall
(See VOTE, Page 8)



Page 2

!, The Alligator, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 1966

International
BOMBS FALL . U. S. planes bombed historic Dien Bie Phu in
stepped-up air action over Communist North Viet Nam while American
ground troops began tightening a noose around Viet Cong units trapped
in coastal jungles 310 miles northeast of Saigon, a U. S. military
spokesman disclosed Monday. The spokesman announced that Air
Force FIOS Thunderchief fighter-bombers and F4C jets Sunday in inflicted
flicted inflicted heavy damage on the Dien Bien Phu military complex about 175
miles west of Hanoi.
CASTRO CRITIC ... A charge of economic aggression leveled
by Premier Fidel Castro against Communist China Monday brought
Havana-Peking relations to a dangerous diplomatic low. Castro used
terms he usually reserves for the United States to denounced Com Communist
munist Communist China for reportedly reneging on a big sugar-for-rice trade
pact. The text of a lengthy Castro statement on the controversial
deal was printed in Havana newspapers.
LUNAR DEMISE . Russias Luna 9 emitted
a last gasp of information and sputtered to its
death Monday, ending its historic exploration
of the moon's surface which moved man a giant
step closer to his first inter-planetary travel.
The one-and-a-half ton instrument package
radioed back pictures and scientific data about
the moon's environment for two hours early
Monday in a "bonus" broadcast before falling
silent
National
APOLLO A-OK . The first Apollo spaceship in Americas s2l
billion drive to land men on the moon by 1969 underwent a launch
rehearsal with its new Saturn IB rocket Monday in a key step toward
an unmanned suborbital flight Feb. 22. The 224-foot space machine,
a duplicate of ones that may start carrying three-man crews into
earth orbit late this year, was being put through a long countdown run
that included practically everything but the actual blastoff.
14-B TALKS . President Johnsons bill to nullify state right-to right-towork
work right-towork laws faced another Senate slapdown Tuesday. By Thursday, it
probably will be dead for this session of Congress. The Senate was
set to vote Tuesday on the first of two moves by Democratic leader
Mike Mansfield to gag a filibuster blocking action on the bill to repeal
section 14-B of the Taft-Hartley Act. Under that provision, 19 states
have enacted laws banning union shop contracts in which employers
agree to fire a worker who does not join a union.
VEHEMENT PROF . Yale professor
Staughton Lynd complained Sunday that the
U S State Department had his passport can canceled
celed canceled because it did not want citizens to go
overseas "and criticize American foreign
policy." Lynd, outspoken leftist foe of Amer American
ican American foreign policy in Viet Nam, also com complained
plained complained about the timing of the cancelation.
The passport was stamped "canceled" Satur Saturday
day Saturday night by an immigration official at Kennedy
Airport.
Florida
JET FIRST ... A sl6l million jet fleet expansion program was
approved by the board of directors of National Airlines Monday.
The board said this would make National Airlines the first all-jet
airline by mid-1968. The bulk of the new aircraft orders approved
Monday consisted of 25 Boeing 727 23510ng-body tri-jets, capable
of carrying 139 passengers. The board also declared a cash dividend
of 15 cents a share on the common stock.
BLACK GOLD? ... An accelerated search for oil in Florida,
sparked by discovery of a new field southwest of Lake Okeechobee,
has created considerable controversy in tourist oriented areas of the
state. Residents of some areas have become concerned that offshore
drilling rigs will be detrimental to the tourist business. Most of
the controversy currently is centered in the Charlotte County area,
where Socony Mobile Oil Company is seeking approval by the state
cabinet to drill a test well.
The Florida Alligator reserves 'the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisements and
to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for morethar. one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of ihe university of Florida and Is
published five times weekly except during May, June, and July when It Is published s mi-weekly. Cud;,
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator is entered as second class
latter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

LBJ Vows Full Support
To Viet Nam War Effort

HONOLULU (UPI) President
Johnson opened historic peace peaceand-war
and-war peaceand-war conferences with the lea leaders
ders leaders of South Viet Nam Monday
with a pledge to see this thing
through.
The chiefs of state of both go governments
vernments governments vowed their mutual
determination to prosecute the war
against Communism in Southeast
Asia while still helping the people
of South Viet Nam build a better
life.

Cold War Gl Bill
OKayed By House

The House in a tribute to U.S.
fighting men in Viet Nam today
approved unanimously a permanent
new GI bill of rights. It carries
college aid and other benefits not
only for combat veterans but for
all servicemen discharged after
Jan. 31, 1955.
The vote was 381 to 0,
The bill calls for monthly school
payments of SIOO, plus extras for
dependents. It also offers home
loan guarantees, certain hospital
rights, preference in, federal em employment,
ployment, employment, job counseling, and a
presumption of service-connection
in some cases of chronic or tro tropical
pical tropical disease.
The only complaint raised
rozr *
I Experience VOTE
I JIM HARRISON
I Honor Court Chancellor
I (Paid Political Advertisement)

Schwartz i# A
Honor Court
Chancellor
The Life of the Law is
Experience" Holmes
DECISION PARTY
. .A thorough reorganization of orientation to the Honor
System is needed. The Honor System should be a set of accepted
values rather than a penal law obeyed out of fear."
The Honor Court isJthe only criminal-type court in the
nation from which a conviction cannot be appealed to a higher
court of law. To insure every defendant a fair trial, a court of
appeals is needed.' f
. Each student citizen should be informed of his protected
rights under the law. The Chancellor, as chief judicial officer of
the student body, should feel a professional responsibility to
assure each citizen's rights remain free from abuse and de deprecation.
precation. deprecation.
HERB SCHWARTZ, as Chancellor, will continue the vigorous
and dedicated service to the student body that he pursued as
Chief Investigator Assistant Chief Defense Counsel, and Chief
Defense Counsel during the past year
V
(PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT)

Johnson declared, Gentlemen,
let me make clear our resolve and
determination to see this thing
through. We are brothers inarms.
We will not tire. We will not lag.
We intend to work with you. We
intend to help you.
We intend to fight with you
against the Communist aggres aggressor.
sor. aggressor. The President, who opened
two days of conferences in the
large, super-secret command
center of the far-flung U.S. Pacific

against the measure was that it
failed to do enough. Republicans
who sought mildly to make this an
issue were slapped down by the
bills sponsor, Rep. Olin E. Tea Teague,
gue, Teague, D-Tex., chairman of the
Veterans Committee.
Its easy to wave the flag and
ask for $200. chided Teague.
There are a dozen things you
could add to the bill. But some somewhere
where somewhere youve got to think about the
cost.
Hillel
Foundation
Announces Registration for
SE REGIONAL HILLEL
INSTITUDE, FEB 11-13.
Registration of $6.00 includes
5 meals, Sat. night dance with
band, and all activities.
Bnai Brith Hillel Foundation
16 NW 18th St.
Phone 2-2900

forces, emphasized American in intentions
tentions intentions of continuing efforts to
bring the conflict to the negoti negotiating
ating negotiating table.
The Vietnamese leaders en endorsed
dorsed endorsed this position.
More Than^&j^ m
Ability 70 TE
JIM HARRISON
Honor Court Chancellor
(Paid Political Advertisement)
SPECiXI
FREE HAIR SHAPING
With Shampoo and Set
Every Tuesday and
Wednesday Phone
372-3581
FOR APPOINTMENT
(Limited Time Only)
Fashion
Beauty Salon
1013 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
(2 BLOCKS OFF CAMPUS)



A $103,311 grantfrom the Human
Development Institute of the
National Institutes of Health has
been awarded to Dr. E. Marshall
Johnson of the UFs College of
Medicine to continue study of
chemical changes which occur in
the structural malformation of em embryos
bryos embryos of mammals.
Johnson, associate professor in
the Department of Anatomy, is
studying malformations caused by
vitamin deficiencies and drugs.
He is using a technique of phy physics
sics physics electrophoresis to se separate
parate separate the enzyme molecules in
the organs of early embryos as
they are being formed abnormally.
In one study, for example, a
Shoe Repair Shop!
I HEELS ATTACHED I
I 5 MINS. I
I SOLES ATTACHED I
I 15 MINS. I
I At 2 Locations I
I CAROLYN PLAZA I
I FR 6-0315 I
I 101 N. Main St. I
I Opp. Ist Nat'l Bank I

* *
To All Students, Faculty and Staff:
t *' ,0
k
Food Service is an integral part of the University of Florida
campus. Our mission is one of service to all. We would not
..<. : ;
be in existence if you did not permit us to serve you.
\ -v-- .... K
Therefore, we the members of Food Service pledge to you
our efforts to give each of you top quality food, lowest possible
.. v
price, as rapidly as possible, with courtesy and appreciation to
you for your patronage.
B>ma
O
j i
,

Medicine Prof Gets
$103,311 Study Grant

specific vitamin was omitted from
the diet of a female rat for two
days during gestation. Elec Electrophoresis
trophoresis Electrophoresis revealed that the brief
lack of the vitamin caused an
absence of one of the enzyme mole molecules
cules molecules in the kidney of the embryo.
From that point on, the kidney
will develop abnormally, even if
the vitamin is restored to the diet
and the enzyme reappears in the
developing kidney, Johnson said.
Johnson, an early researcher in
this field, has been studying the
structural and chemical effects of
teratology (birth defects) since
1954, while working toward a mas master's
ter's master's degree at A & M College
of Texas.

Three NSF Research Grants
Support Graduate Traineeships

The National Science Foundation
has.awarded more than $197,000 in
three grants to the UF to support
36 graduate traineeships.
The universitys Graduate
School administers the grants. The
first-year amount $93,294 wi1l
aid 18 students in the fields of
zoology, engineering, mathema mathematics,
tics, mathematics, chemistry, physics and poli political
tical political science.
The second-year grant of
$66,572 will aid 12 students, while
gV
More Than .
Dedication
j VOTE I
I JIM HARRISON I

More Than .
Dedication
VOTE
JIM HARRISON
Honor Court Chancellor

His studies in the field con continued
tinued continued at the University of Cali California,
fornia, California, where he received a PhJD.
from the Department of Anatomy.
This research series was first
supported at the University of
Florida in 1962-63 by the National
Foundation-March of Dimes, and
in 1963-65 by the National Insti Institutes
tutes Institutes of Health. The current grant
runs from Jan. 1, 1966, to Dec.
31, 1970.
Also in the Department of Ana Anatomy,
tomy, Anatomy, Dr. Ernest Kallenbach,
assistant professor, received a
$9,000, one-year grant from the
National Institute of Dental Re Research
search Research to study the structure of
the cells which produce teeth
enamel.

the third-year funding of $37,557
will assist six students.
The traineeships provide sti stipends
pends stipends of from $2,400 to $2,800 a
year, plus SSOO for each dependent
and payment of all fees.
The new traineeships, effective
next September, will be distributed
as follows: one each in zoology,
chemical engineering, civil engi engineering,
neering, engineering, metallurgical engineering
and mathematics; two each in nu nuclear
clear nuclear engineering, electrical engi engineering
neering engineering chemistry, physics and
political science. The University
will assign three grants in appro appropriate
priate appropriate departments.
The University receives an edu educational
cational educational allowance offs2,§oo per
student each year.

'MISER ON TAP FOR TONIGHT
Richard Bauer plays the penny-pinching Harpagon in Molieres
comedy, The Miser, to be presented here tonight by the National
Players under auspices of the Florida Union Fine Arts Committee,
at 8:15 in University Auditorium.
The Miser, one of the most popular of French classical comedies,
has been a delight to many generations of theater goeers. The hearti heartiness
ness heartiness of its satirical comedy and the witty conniving of its youthful
lovers are irrestible to audiences everywhere.
Tickets are available at the Florida Union's Ticket Booth on the
Unions first floor.

Tuesday, Feb. 8, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 1966

ALLIGATOR
EDITORIAL
heres why
we like Litz
T£ rnie Litz has no big, clever ads in The
s^Alligator. Ernie Litz has no banners on
campus. No window sheets. No fraternity fraternitysorority
sorority fraternitysorority monster blocs.
Ernie Litz has none of these things because
he has no money or very little. Because he
has almost no money and no all-powerful bloc
vote behind him, Ernie Litz has NO commit commitments
ments commitments except one:
His only commitment is to serve ALL the
students on this campus to the best of his
ability, which is considerable.
Litz, a REAL independent, is not, as is the
custom, a law school student or soon-to-be
law school student.
He is not a long-time political hack who
hangs around Student Government, forever ask asking,
ing, asking, Whats in it for me?
He most definitely is not a product of Madison
Avenue vintage.
He does not have commitments to any frater fraternity
nity fraternity or sorority -- or to any privileged minority
bloc.
But Ernie Litz DOES have commitments to
you, the average UF student. He has committed
himself to serve you to the best of his ability.
Litz stands for ideas and issues.
If you have read The Alligator during the
past two weeks, you may remember some of
Litz plans, such as:
An off-campus housing investigating and
grievance committee.
A multi-level parking facility (to be fi financed
nanced financed under the U. S. Higher Education Fa Facilities
cilities Facilities Act of 1963). This has been done at
Southern Cal and other major universities.
The placing of Food Service on continuing
bids (like it is done at Florida State, where
Morrisons had the contract).
To install more telephones in the girls
dormitories, where it is now almost impossible
to get a call through during the peak hours.
To initiate regular exterminator service
in ALL the married villages.
To repair and upgrade grounds conditions
in the'married villages.
To initiate a student booklet on courses
and professors (similar to those published at
Harvard, Yale and California).
Revitalization of the Student Government
cabinet post of Secretary of Married Students
Affairs.
Establishment of a separate fee for de dependents
pendents dependents of married students so they can use
University facilities and services (such as the
UF Infirmary).
Investigation of new areas of financial aid
for married students who currently live on less
than the base level of the War on Poverty pro program.
gram. program.
An International Student Center and cul cultural
tural cultural exchange program.
Student Government delegations to the
Florida Legislature and Board of Regents.
Water fountains in Murphree Area dorms.
To begin funding for an indoor UF swim swimming
ming swimming pool.
Open public rotation of football bloc seating.
Removal of The Florida Alligator from
directly under the financial control of Student
Government (such as was done at Michigan
State University).
Establishment of a student-faculty-admin student-faculty-administration
istration student-faculty-administration Advisory Council for UF President
J. Wayne Reitz and the University Senate.
Putting in picnic grounds around Lake
Alice.
More liberal extension of late passes in
the girls dorms.
Supporting of small bloc classes, such
as is being done successfully at FSU.
Opening of the main library stacks to
undergraduates when the new graduate library
opens.
Initiation of an underclass men-upperclass men-upperclassmen
men men-upperclassmen counseling program and the expansion of
existing university counseling.
Some of the aforementioned items are small
things, some are big things.
Ernie Litz believes in these things. If you
believe in them, too, go to the polls Thursday
and pull the Apathy lever for Litz.
We are.

The Florida Alligator
'A h Ou Vuwl PCms Tint 'Tki&L
"Right In The Jello !"
LETTERS:
the Cuban situation
Editor:
With the double purpose of keeping alive the problem of my
country in the minds of my fellow students, and to modestly
contribute to honour the memory of one of the greatest thinkers
of our times, I wish to bring out again the Cuban situation on the
113th Anniversary of Jose Marti (Jan. 28, 1853), Cubas leading
figure of all times.
Marti, as many Cubans today, preferred to go into exile instead
of bending his head to the tyrannical Spanish regime then in power.
The ideal of a free and better Cuba kept pounding in his mind
during those long years of suffering, and he fought hard and ef effectively
fectively effectively for our liberty.
Even though he couldnt see it free, because he died on the
battlefield on the 19th of May, 1895. his ideals of liberty and
social justice have long outlived him, in Cuba and all over the
world.
Today, this situation has changed; the few of us who are outside
of Cuba trying to get material and diplomatic support for her
liberty, are being stopped and even imprisoned almost everywhere,
for only the crime of not submitting our country to Castros
dictatorship. Or, is it that we are transgressing any secret in international
ternational international agreement by attacking Castros regime from inter international
national international waters?
On the other hand, stopping our armed efforts against Castro
will only discourage Cubas faith in their future, and hence they
will nave little choice; either let their children become Communist
in order for them to have a happier future in the apparently
eternal regime, and fully cooperate themselves with the actual
police state in order to live a little better within their many
limitations; or try to leave the country (which, by the way, is not
as easy as it might seem).
Would you help it happen? Have you been told what is inside the
American policy toward Castro? Have you lost your respect for
liberty? Well, I wouldnt and I havent; and I am willing to insist
on the different aspects of this matter whenever an opportunity
arises, until we can again see America free from Alaska to
Patagonia.
Raul Patterson, 4AS
The Alligator supports
the following candidates:
President Ernie Litz (Apathy Party)
Treasurer Charles Shepherd (Student Party)
Honor Court Chancellor Herb Schwartz (Decision Party)
or Jim Harrison (Student Party)
Honor Court Clerk Tom Smith (Decision Party)
Board of Student Publications (vote for any three)
, I Drex Dobson and Yvette Cardozo (Student Party)
Andy Moor and Fran Snider (Decision Party)
MM* (Clip And Save)

Earl Barkers
International
Politics
any attacks have been launched against United
States policy in Viet Nam. Everyone, itseems,
iias a criticism.
The doves argue that the U. S. is involved in
the wrong war, in the wrong place, at the wrong
time, against the wrong enemy, employing the
wrong weapons. The war hawks state that it is
the right war, but is not enough of a war. They
think more weapons, more powerful weapons and
more men should be sent to the beleaguered coun country.
try. country. Both sides in the controversy predict the
direst sort of consequences if their advice is not
heeded.
As it was necessary several weeks ago to place
the Lyndon Johnson peace offensive in some
sort of perspective, it is necessary to place the
conflict over Viet Nam in some measure of pers perspective
pective perspective today. In the first place, the United States
is in Viet Nam today because she committed her herself
self herself there after the Geneva Conference of 1954.
There was a power vaccum in the area at that time
in the judgment of the U. S. government. If the
United States did not fill the gap, she feared Red
China would do so. The vaccum would be there
today just as it would have been then if the United
States were not present. Since the South Viet Vietnamese
namese Vietnamese are not equipped to fill it and since neither
France nor Britain nor any other of our allies
will, the U. S. presence continues.
In the second place, the United States has
placed its prestige on the line. The government
has vowed to protect freedom, wherever it exists,
from the encroachments of aggressors, whoever
they may be. It would be embarrassing to with withdraw
draw withdraw under the present circumstances because
of the resulting loss of face. To be forced into
the sea by a minor power would bring into serious
question the strength and resolve of the nation
which is supposed to be the strongest in the world.
The United States is not prepared to accept that
consequence.
Solutions have been proposed. Secretary of State
Dean Rusk sees solution by the withdrawal of the
North Vietnamese. If people will just leave their
neighbors alone, everything will be fine. General
James Gavin suggests that the United States defend
only the main enclaves of South Viet Nam the
big cities, U. S. bases and seaports. Certainly
fewer men would be required than are necessary
for the hunt-and-kill operations that are used now.
When the United States referred the entire
problem of Viet Nam to the Security Council of
the United Nations last week, the country departed
drastically its previous policy toward that body,
as has been pointed out by Drew Pearson. The
referral was tantamount to inviting the Council
to arbitrate. If the Security Council were to adopt
a resolution calling for the withdrawal of both
sides and the entrance of U. N. forces, the problem
would be completely out of United States hands, not
only in terms of fighting the war, but also in terms
of the final solution for it. To veto a resolution
proposing such would be politically unfeasible.
North Viet Nam refused to consider any judgment
the Security Council might make. In doing so she
has made it unnecessary for the United States to
worry about the question, What would happen
if . . (Substitute in the blank all the possible
solutions the Council could devise.) Very con convenient
venient convenient for the U. S. But it still has not gotten
the United States out of Viet Nam the urgent
desire of almost everyone as long as no one is
embarrassed.
Hopefull, as the debate in the Security Council
continues, the fates will engineer a change in the
attitude of North Viet Nam. If they do not, look
forward to a long, expanding war in Asia; a war
continuing until both sides realize their current
objectives are unrealistic. The United States can cannot
not cannot expect to run the guerrillas out of South Viet
Nam without attacking North Viet Nam. The North
Vietnamese cannot expect to run the United States
out of South Viet Nam.
The solution to the situation lies in finding a
truly neutral government perhaps along the
lines of Switzerland or Austria acceptable to
both sides and guaranteed in all of Southeast Asia.
Only in this way will it be possible to insure all
the principles that their interests will be protected.
000
A word
to our readers
The Alligator accepts all letters
to the editor. Due to space limit limitations,
ations, limitations, however, we are unable to
print letters exceeding 250 words.



says Welborn treated unfairly

Editor:
Due to the recent removal of
Mr. Gay Welborn, Director of
Food Services, I feel it is time
someone brought a few points
to the attention of the student
body. Mr. Welborn has tried
during six years as Director of
Food Service to improve faci facilities
lities facilities for the students. Most of
his efforts have been in vain.
Students ask why Food Ser Service
vice Service prices are high. Do they
know that Food Service must
subsidize the Department of
Agriculture dairy operation and

can we loose the albatross?

Editor:
In the past, student elections
have merely amounted to
another side show in the Uni University
versity University Circus.
This particular campaign,
however, is, through sheer in internal
ternal internal momentum, bringing
forth a conflict which has
hitherto remained securely
submerged.
Is the status quo college stu student
dent student capable of releasing the
albatross from his neck can
he climb up from under the
rotting shell of social pressures
and self-identification to assert
those convictions which he
meekly conceals within him himself?
self? himself? Or are these subconscious
fears these truths too
crude and unpalatable to reflect
openly?
The issue here is not one of
candidates and platforms; but,
rather, can an individual ex express
press express his own sincere belief,
or will he disregard even ques questioning
tioning questioning his belief to satisfy
either his obligations to frater fraternity,
nity, fraternity, his association amongst
sheepish friends, or the se security
curity security he may find by simply
identifying with a popular
image?
For the first time, a rele relevant
vant relevant and coordinated third party
has upset the simple political
workings, whereby two dupli duplicate
cate duplicate candidates oppose one an another
other another on a mock battlefield,
the winner being determined by
sheer unquestioned loyalty.
f
The major candidates must
concede that their respective
blocs are, for the most part,
nothing more than blind follow followers;
ers; followers; for what choice does a
brother have once his fraternity
aligns itself with a particular
party? When he choses the fra fraternity,
ternity, fraternity, did he also accept its
political affiliations?
On election day, the student
body will unwillingly assume a
great responsibility; for they
will not only decide who will
reside in the various govern governmental
mental governmental offices, but also, whether
they can locate the real source
of infection the self-deceit,
of the students themselves who
serve as both parasite and host,
not the vulnerable and conven-
EUROPE
Escorted Al Expense NCL JET air
CARAVAN ECONOMY TOURS
Engl., Holl., Belg., Germany, Switz.,
Liecht., Aust., Italy, Monaco, France.
PtPAHTUIIES WEEKLY AH. to MOV.
tor FrM llliitr*H Unv*.
WORLD
(( ( Hi TRAVEL
SERVICE
tot w UNIVERSITY AVENUE
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA

pay more per carton of milk
than if the purchase was made
from off-campus dairy firms?
Also, whenever Food Service
wishes to expand or improve a
kitchen or dining room facility,
or have any maintenance done,
they must have it done by UF
Plants and Grounds. The cost
is much higher than were the
job opened to bidding by off offcampus
campus offcampus firms. But. after all,
someone has to pay for all those
little blue trucks.
Furthermore, the vending

ient victim, Student Govern Government.
ment. Government.
Humanities students may now
recall the significance of Dur Durenmatts

in our churches--
'nothing happening

Editor:
It is tremendously ironic that such a bold state statement
ment statement as: It hurts so much to love and not be
loved at all; Id rather loan you out than let you go
should proceed from the door of an outhouse
(The Methodist Student Center). And its highly sig significant
nificant significant at this point that at least one of these cen centers
ters centers is still able to grasp the utter anxiety of a
Christ who is still on the cross suffering for His
children in the world. However, Loving on the part
of the Church is no excuse for irrelevancy; it only
makes the failure a worse injustice.
These outmoded denominational institutions are
still predicated on a sweet as you please platform
of fun, fellowship, and study. What they fail
to see is that theres a lot more fun, fellowship, and
dialogue going on where the action is r out where
the people are Sams. Teds, frat parties, than
there is at their student centers. What has happened,
as a result of attendant circumstance, is that the
few who remain loyal to God, Country, and Mother
Love have formed a quaint little community faintly
resembling the Greek set-ups so many of them
despise.
Sunday morning is different. Sunday morning (for

can I move
ahead at IBM?
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I progress is tied to your own individual interests. I
1 Technical management, professional achievement, 1
I educational advancement all are possibilities 1
I for you at IBM. An example of your potential for 1
I growth lies in the fact that IBM is planning on |
1 promoting 6,000 new managers from within, in the I
I next five years. I
I As a new graduate considering IBM, you have i
I your choice of Development, Programming, Mar- I
I keting or Manufacturing. You'll need a degree I
lin the sciences, engineering, mathematics or bus- 1
1 iness administration. 1
I On-campus interviews are scheduled for Oct. 20 1
1 and 21 Contact your placement director for an ap- I
I pointment or, if this is not convenient, contact: I
I E.W. McGuinness, Branch Manager I
I IBM Corporation 1107 Myra St. |
I Jacksonville, Fla. 1
I Interviews FEB. 9-10 I
I On UF Campus I
Applied Mathematics. Applied Mechanics, Data Communica- I
Itions, Digital Computers, Guidance Systems, Human Factors; I
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Manufacturing Research. Microwaves, Optics, Reliability En- I
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I Simulation, and related areas 1

machine syndicate on this
campus is operated by an off-' 5
campus, private, profit-making
concern. Does someone on this
campus receive a sum in the
neighborhood of $85,000 a year
for granting this privilege? Mr.
Welborn has tried on numerous
occasions to have the vending
machines placed under the con control
trol control of Food Service.
Each year during campus
elections various politicos vow
to make immense improve improvements
ments improvements on campus. Food Service

enmatts Durenmatts need for a public trial
in The Visit, for it was truly
the accusers who were to be
judged. In any case, the dogs of

those centers which have chapels) Glory Be! is when
the others come across the street to worship in
their church, (the church of the campus center
clique). Did I say worship?
Im very sorry, but we used to have a Bible Biblereading,
reading, Biblereading, choir, and speaker every Friday when I
was in elementary school, and frankly, I think Ive
outgrown the need to get out from under my electric
blanket after a very short Saturday night sleep and
crawl to church to hear the same thing (with a
slightly better message) than I heard back then.
If something happened in the service (and I dont
mean students should get to wear visitors rib ribbons)
bons) ribbons) then I could see it; at this point nothing is
happening though, and the prospects arent exactly
the kind youd like to bet your life on.
What all this is saying, tl}en,- is that the Church
must be The Church it it is to Be at all. Right now,
the campus centers are meeting needs that (apart
from counseling) do nut need to be met. They are
performing tasks that do not need to be performed.
They are trying to be everything and succeeding
in nothing because . their house is on the sand.
Ron Lanier,
Chairman, Religion-In-Life

is on the list. They climb all
over Mr. Welborns back. They
dont attempt to help Mr. Wel Welborn
born Welborn wage the war to acquire a
solution, however. Foodservice
is just used year after year to
obtain votes. The difficulties
are blamed on Mr. Welborn and
the politicians vow is forgotten.
Who is at fault for these
atrocities?
/This problem is left to the
Student Body, or perhaps one
of our illustrious campus po politicians
liticians politicians will see the light be before
fore before it is too late.

war have been released, and
time will begin its gnawing
process.
Alan Lithman, 3AS

I "'! HB
LISTEN TO THE I
TRUTH
* I presently have a 2.3 average. Ihave I
been informed by the Uof F Law School I
that upon passage of the entrance exami- I
nation I will be eligible to enter the 1
College of Law in April
* I have been informed by my draft I
board that as long as lam in school I I
will not be inducted into the armed forces. I
Those are the facts. 1
Steve Cheeseman I
CHEESEMAN |

Tuesday, Feb. 8, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Mr. Welborn was a man who
was wholly for the students.
Hurry!! The next Director of
Food Service may not be. We
wish to express our thanks to
Mr. Welborn for what he has
done and has tried to do for
the Student Body.
William L. Hardy, 4AS
(EDITORS NOTE: Mr.
Hardys letter, a carbon copy
of which was sent by him to
Gov. Haydon Burns, was addi additionally
tionally additionally signed by 24 other UF
students.)
We Even Sell Aardvarks
ALLIGATOR ADS J|
Always Attract TB
-
Looking fOR
A RGAII V
QOOO pLACC
to hAve
dinnep
This Very Week Try...
QLarmantllas
706 W. University Ave.
Continuous service 11:30 o.m. to
9 p m. daily
|fi) like the quiet, un unhurried
hurried unhurried atmosphere,
gourmet food and j
prompt service.

Page 5



IGATOR CLASSIFIEDS

autos
1963 MGB, red, good looking, good
condiion, radio and heater,
tonneau covers, seat belts. Must
sacrifice. $2,950 or best offer.
Call after 5. 378-4615. (G-87-ts-c).
1962 VW. Excellent condition, en engine
gine engine just rebuilt. New white side sidewall
wall sidewall tires, radio and heater. $325
equity and assume $36 per month
payments. Call 372-0755 after 5
p.m. (G-87-ts-c).
1963 CHEVROLET BE LAIR auto automatic,
matic, automatic, V-8, factory AC, radio and
heater. Excellent condition. 378-
3085. (G-85-st-c).
1961 FORD GALAXY convertible.
V-8, power stering, radio and
heater. $950 cash. Ph. 372-1912.
(G-85-st-c).
1962 VOLKSWAGEN, real clean,
radio, whitewalls, luggage rack.
Drop by and have a look. Rm. 406
Simpson Hall, or call 376-9124.
(G-81-ts-c).
1964 OLDSMOBILE 4 door Sedan.
All extras including factor air
conditioning. Superb condition.
Priced for quick sale. 376-8398.
(G-84-st-c).
-
1965 DODGE DART. A.C., all
power, 270 V-8, excellent con condition.
dition. condition. SIOO down and take over
payments at 4-1/2 per cent. Call
378-2931 after 5 p.m. (G-84-10t (G-84-10tc).
c). (G-84-10tc).
1961 FALCON 4-Dr. Radio, heater,
air conditioning, good tires, good
condition throughout. $550. 372-
0295. (G-86-6t-nc).
1960 CORVETTE. Sacrifice, must
sell within two weeks, 283 with
two 4-bbl, 4-speed, positraction,
solid lifters, custom interior, two
tops, superb condition, silver mist.
See Bob at 1642 W. Univ. Ave.
(G-86-2t-c).
1958 CORVETTE 283, 3-speed,
hardtop, clean, runs good. Must
sell. 3224 NW 13th St., 378-1523
after 3 p.m. (G-86-3t-p).
1962 FORD FAIRLANE. V-8, AT,
PS, excellent condition. $895.1964
FORD ANGLIA. Deluxe, very good
condition, $795. Will sell one or
both. See at 1007 NW 35th Ave. or
call 376-3968 after 5 p.m. or
weekends. (G-86-3t-p).
1965 LEMANNS covertible. Auto Automatic,
matic, Automatic, console, air, heater, radio.
Like new. $2600 or trade for VW
plus cash. Call Ted Wilisch at
378-2485. (G-88-3t-c).
1958 TR-3, fast, excellent
mechanical condition, 43,000
miles, 0.D., heater, tonneau, new
top, tires, many new parts. $650.
Call 372-9888. (G-88-st-p).
1963 CHEVY 11, Nova Delux station
wagon. Powerglide, air con conditioned,
ditioned, conditioned, tinted glass, luggage
rack, new whitewall tires. Owner
selling due to size of family. May
be possible to finance total sales
price. Call 2994 or 376-0282 after
6 p.m. for details or inspection.
(G-88-st-c).
MUST SACRIFICE. 1965 BUICK
Skylark. Full power, factory war warranty.
ranty. warranty. Call 372-5312 after 7 p.m.
(G-88-st-c).

wrnmMlgi&mmmmmmmmmmmmwmmmmi

for sale
RCA 21 TV SET, second hand.
SSO. Call Mr. Mason, 372-5940.
Anytime after 6 p.m. (A-87-st-c).
1964 HONDA SUPER HAWK. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. $450. Ph. 376-
1444. (A-87-st-c).
GIBSON, 12-string GUITAR, B-25
body. 5 months old. Perfect con condition.
dition. condition. Guitar andcasesl7oorbest
offer. Call Jerry or Bob, rm. 424,
Simpson Hall, 376-9124.(A-87-st 376-9124.(A-87-stc).
c). 376-9124.(A-87-stc).
100xl 34 LOT. 3308 NW 10th St.
City water and sewage. $2,000.
372-0481. v Mr. Kaplan. 75x185
LAKE LOT. Lake Grandin Shores,
lot 340, 17 miles from Palatka.
Lake privileges, SSOO. Terms are
available. 372-0481. Mr. Kaplan.
(A-85-ts-c).
2 BEDROOM 1958 Hinslee 10x47
trailer and tool shed. $1,995. Lo Located
cated Located at Town and Country Park,
lot W-l. Ph. 378-2768. (A-76-
lOt-c).
SNARE DRUM: Slingerland 14
with hard carrying case, stand,
and practice book. $45. Ph. 376-
5826. (A-88-tf-nc).
28x8 HOUSE TRAILER. Perfect
for student or single person, and
1956 FORD. Both for $575 cash.
Or trailer, $475; car $l3O. Call
378-4976 after 5 p.m. All day
Sat. and Sun. (A-88-3t-c).
MUST SACRIFICE. 1962 West Westinghouse
inghouse Westinghouse console 21 TV. SSO.
Walnut cabinet. Call 372-5312 after
7 p.m. (A-88-st-c).
HARMONY TWIN PICK-UP GUI GUITAR,
TAR, GUITAR, includes shoulder strap and
carrying case. Flat wound strings
are close to neck. Very good con condition.
dition. condition. Call Bill Luecking, 372-
9345. (A-86-3t-p).
DOUBLE BED AND MATTRESS.
$35. 372-3601 after 6. (A-86-st (A-86-stc).
c). (A-86-stc).
help wanted
WAITER WANTED. Must be 21,
no experience necessary. Ph. 376-
9335 between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
(E-87-ts-c).
IMMEDIATE OPENING FOR
TYPIST with on the job training
in light laboratory work. Must like
animals. Call 376-3211, ext. 5193.
(E-87-3t-c).
MODELS NEEDED for life-draw life-drawing
ing life-drawing classes. Please contact the Art
Dept, office, ext. 2304. (E-85-
st-c).
FULLER BRUSH CO. needs part parttime
time parttime sales help, male or female,
with car. Average earnings $35-
SSO for 15 hrs. work. Write to H.
Silver, 1028 Clearwater Dr., Day Daytona
tona Daytona Beach, Fla. (E-86-ts-c).
PART-TIME SANDWICH MAKER.
Start sl.lO. Call Univ. Sandwich
Shop after 4 p.m. 378-1486. (E (E---88-lt-c).
--88-lt-c). (E---88-lt-c).
PART-TIME DELIVERY HELP
with car. Must be courteous, clean,
quick. Start sl.lO plus gas. Call
Univ. Sandwich Shop, after 4 p.m.
378-1486. (E-88-lt-c).

Page 6

, The Florida Alligator. Tuesday. Feb. 8, 1966

for rent
LARGE FURNISHED ROOM for
female. Private entrance, bath.
Call 378-1078 after 6 p.m. 1204
NW 3rd Ave. Walk to class.
(B-87-3t-c).
NICE AND CLEAN SMALL APT.
Available now, for single student.
Water furnished. $55 per month.
376-8819, 17 SW 24th St. (B-87-
3t-c).
LIVING ROOM AND BEDROOM,
furnished, ground floor, refrig,
only, near all student require requirements,
ments, requirements, comfortably heated, men
only. 376-6494. (B-84-st-c).
VILLAGE 34, SECOND EDITION.
Located near Univ. Golf Course.
328 SW 34th St. 24 new 1 bedroom
apt. units, furnished and air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Available April Ist. Rent
SIOO per month. See Resident Man Managers
agers Managers apt. on premises after 5
p.m. Lou Schilling, apt. 10. Man Managed
aged Managed Ernest Tew Reality, Inc., 376-
6461. (B-87-1 Ot-c).
NEED 3rd MALE ROOMMATE for
2 bedroom A.C. apartment. Large,
close to campus. 921 SW 6th Ave.,
Ph. 378-4176. (B-79-1 Ot-c).
NICE F"URNISHED 2 room garage
apartment. Suitable for 1 or 2.
Quiet neighborhood. Call 376-1730.
After 1 p.m. (B-72-ts-c).
2 BEDROOM BRICK DUPLEX.
New, very clean. Immediate oc occupancy.
cupancy. occupancy. Unfurnished. Quiet neigh neighborly
borly neighborly atmosphere. SBS mo. 376-
0342. 4142 NW 9th St. (B-79-ts-c).
QUIET FOR LADY OR GENTLE GENTLEMAN,
MAN, GENTLEMAN, business or professional.
1 bedroom, air conditioned, in
Cheshire Apts., no pets. S9O per
month, lease required. Ph. 372-
3488 or 376-4360. (B-81-ts-c).
TWO BEDROOM furnished apt. 319
NW Ist St. downtown. SSO for one.
$65 for two or more. Mr. Kaplan,
372-0481. (B-69-ts-c).
NEED MALE STUDENT to share
apt. 1/2 block off Univ. on NW 7th
Terr. For $35 per month. You get
private bedroom and all utilities
furnished. Ph. 468-1874. (B-86-
lOt-c).
STUDENTS ONLY. Air condition conditioned
ed conditioned efficiency apt. or one
bedroom trailer. Water and gar garbage.
bage. garbage. No children. $75 per month.
372-5182. (B-88-4t-c).
FURNISHED HOUSE FOR RENT.
S9O a month. 2 or 3 bedrooms.
739 NE 10th Place. Call 372-5688.
(B-86-2t-c).
MALE TO SHARE 1 bedroom apt.
A.C. and heat, 2 pools, enclosed
patio, privacy. New, large and
beautiful. 372-3124. $45 per month.
(B-88-4t-c).
FURNISHED HOUSE TRAILER.
S6O monthly. Near Univ. Ph. 376-
8063. (B-85-st-c).
. TUES^^J
Wr BERGMANS
rSMILESOra
Pa summer!
1-3-5-7-9 tm
-plus -plus

wanted
i
MALE ROOMMATE. Have lost
roommate, one months rent free.
Pool, air conditioning. 1405 SW
10th Terr. Apt. 17. Coy Thomas
Apts. Ph. 378-4457. (C-87-st-c).
NEED 3rd MALE ROOMMATE for
large 2 bedroom house. $33. Write
or come see at 822 NW 39th Ave.
(C-87-st-p).
STUDENT EATERS. Our famous
complete dinner, 97?. Served noon
and night. Longs Cafeteria, down downtown.
town. downtown. (C-81-ts-c).
REGISTERED NURSE for pedia pediatricians
tricians pediatricians office. State experience,
references, and permanence.
Write Box 12427, Univ. Station.
(C-74-ts-c).
GOOD USED PIANO. Preferably
baby grand, or spinet. 372-0328
after 5 p.m. (C-88-st-c).
NICE 2 BEDROOM furnished air
conditioned apt. 1716 NW 3rd Ave.
sllO a month. Also furnished 1
bedroom apt. 372-9569. (C-88-
4t-c).
RIDERS WANTED TO MIAMI.
Leave late Feb. 9, Wed. or early
Feb. 10, Thurs. Return Sun. even evening.
ing. evening. 1965 Pontiac. Call Frank at
372-3306. (C-88-1 t-c).
real estate
THE BEST TO YOU FROM DOB DOBSON.
SON. DOBSON. Personal and complete real
estate and insurance service. TOM
DOBSON AGENCY, 2908 NWl3th
St., 372-1473. (I-72-ts-c).
1 i ... .i i,.. 1.,
lost-found
LOST Small orange kitten lost in
NW or SW area. Reward. Call any anytime,
time, anytime, 376-7173. (L-88-2t-c).
AMERICA'S ANSWER

riajjujiwow SHOWING
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I JEAN SEBERG Mervyn Leoysflh
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services
WANTED experienced, qualified
Honor Court Chancellor. Found
Herb Schwartz, Decision Party.
Paid Political Ad. (M-87-3t-p).
UNITED RENT-ALLS. We rent
most anything. Roll-away beds,
trucks, all tools, party equipment.
Call us for all your needs. 376-
2835, 625 NW Bth Ave. (M-75-
ts-c).
TYPING TERM PAPERS, etc.
Call Carol Parker at 372-6353.
or 372-2783. (M-88-lt-c).
WANTED: Cobs and Catalogs.
Bring yours to any student relig religiious
iious religiious center. Come and set a spell.
Everyone invited to participate.
(M-88-2t-p).
RAME HAIR STYLIST. 319 W.
Univ. Ave. Due to request we will
for limited time give our $35 fac factory
tory factory price body wave for sls.
Call 372-5549. Free parking in
Longs Cafeteria lot. (M-88-4t-c).
INTERN, APPLICATION, PASS PASSPORT,
PORT, PASSPORT, identification pictures,
portraits. Student rates. SNEER SNEERINGER
INGER SNEERINGER PHOTOGRAPHY, 1013-1/2
W. Univ. Ave. 378-1170. (M-87-
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More
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VOTE
JIM HARRISON
n 11
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'DOCTOR GOLDFOOT &
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AND
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'How To Stuff
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I FIRST AREA SHOWING
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WZI W#K HICK n | U)I; |
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I WE DARE YOU TO SEE... I
|^JgccjJ



U.S. Not Land Os Plenty ;
But Still Plenty Os Help

.By JUSTINE HARTMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
When Sami Shaya, 4AS from Tel
\viv, Israel first came to the
Jnited States, he thought he had
definitely arrived in the prover proverbial
bial proverbial land of plenty.
I thought America was a place
I More Than .
j Maturity VOTE I
! JIM HARRISON I
Honor Court Chancellor 1
(Paid Political Advertisement) |
HULLS
Brake Service
& Supply
* Complete Brake
Service on All
American And
Foreign Cars.
* 10,000-Mile or
1-Yr. Guaranty
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Brake Jobs.
* Wheel Balancing
* Rebuilt Genera Generators
tors Generators & Starters.
* Expertly Trained
Mechanics Here
To Serve You.
Member of
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1314 S. Main St.
PH. 372-1497

Well be on campus I
I
I soon to talk about a new I
I breed of engineering you I
8h BHHH
I cant get a degree in. I
"RANGE PROFESSIONAL." It's a new discipline of our own creation... a blend of the I
B many technologies required to support our nation's space and missile launches.
8 When a new grad joins Pan Am at the Eastern Test Range with a degree in electronic, B
8 electrical, mechanical, chemical, civil or industrial engineering, physics, or math ... or even B
I if he's an experienced specialist in telemetry, optics, hydraulics, radar, statistics, infrared, fl
8 orbital mechanics, data handling, communications or what have you ... he soon becomes 8
I proficient in many disciplines.
8 The multiple striking power of this all around engineer goes a long way in explaining
B our success with planning, engineering, and directing operation of the Air force s > I
8 million dollar instrumentation complex stretching from Cape Kennedy to the Indian Ocean I
B ...and why were working ahead confidently for launches of MOL, Apollo. Voyaer and a
8 host of other soohisticated programs. H
8 Find out more about your potential as a Range Professional when our team visits
8 your campus.
I INTERVIEWS I
8 for BSEE's 8
B Tuesday & Wednesday February lb, 16 8
8 Arrange an appointment *ith your 'Placement O'ector now. 8
8 Or write for information to Manager if College Relations H
I guided missiles I
I RANGE DIVISION I
8 pan am&rican world AIRWA s. INC B
8 750 S ORLANDO AVENUE. COCOA BEACH FLORIDA 8
8 An Equal Opportunity Employer jyj p 8

where you could go and sit on a
chair and money would come to
you, remarked Sami. I didnt
even think there were any slums.
He attended the TabeeghaSchool
in Jaffa through high school. It
is the only school in Israel run
by English professors which also
has some Hebrew courses. Sami
always wanted to come to the United
States and his desire was intensi intensified
fied intensified after fraternizing with the
many American children mostly
from the American diplomatic ser service
vice service who attended the same school.
I came here a bachelor,

JIM
COTTON
STUDENT PARTY
CANDIDATE
Legislative Counci I
School of Journalism
& Communications
U'AID PO I ITle A I ADY.

ROBBIES |
Best In
Q ^Sandwiches!
T.V & BILLIARDS^
11718 W. University Ave. I
I^^OnTheGoldCoast^J

mused Sami. Now Im going back
with a wife, a baby, and a degree*,
he smiled. He has been the cap captain
tain captain of the soccer team at the UF
for the three years hes been here
(he began playing the game at age
of 8). In 1965 Sami won the hand handball
ball handball championship.
The abundance of scholarships
and financial assistance for low lowincome
income lowincome students here in America
is the thing which impresses Sami
most about the American education
system.
A student here who wants to
study can find the money in go government
vernment government subsidies. This is very
encouraging.
Sami is very appreciative of help
he has received from fellow stu students
dents students on this campus.
I still have difficulty with
English, and many students have
volunteered to help me, especially
in speech courses, he said.
Sami will return to Israel in
June and hopes to enter dental
school. During his stay at UF he
has majored in foreign languages.

jif 'lll
\ttMi "VMF m' M V 1
JMHMfIv II
J|
i v K
4 ftCj|K
jtU
H \'s* 4 /v|: V|^c4>'lf Hf V 4\?tA"'. v
. ft '
,44t4,.w.. f ''
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"w PV**** --^r^rrrr^rasrsssr 3 ke:
Peace Corps representative Harold H. Rosen looks on as UK
President J. Wayne Reitz signs a proclamation designating this week
(Feb. 8-12) Peace Corps Week on campus.
Recruiting group of Peace Corps volunteers from Washington will
be on campus to answer questions, provide information through liter literature,
ature, literature, film and informal talks and to accept applications from students
for Peace Corps service. Representatives will be at the information
booth across from the Hub.
EG Fair To Hold
Beauty Contest

A beauty contest is being spon sponsored
sored sponsored in conjunction with the En Engineers
gineers Engineers Fair March 11, 12 and
13, according to Fair Chairman
Charles E. Daniher.
More Than
Sincerity VOTE
JIM HARRISON
Honor Court Chancellor
(Paid Political Advertisement)

n l
See Whats New hi
The Browse Shop
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT DIRECTORY
THE BIRTH OF A NEW PHYSICS Cohen
GODS AND HEROES ._ Schwab
I2THE KING LEAR PERPLEX
PSYCHOANALYTIC EXPLORATIONS IN ART..Kris
PICASSO: HIS LIFE AND WORK Penrose
#> k>
THE STORY OF MY LIFE Darrow
TECH. AND REF.
THERMODYNAMICS Sears
GROUPS AND FIELDS Earl
LINEAR SYSTEM THEORY Zadek
Campus Shop & Bookstore

Tuesday, Feb. 8, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Each engineering society will
sponsor a contestant. Engineering
students will vote for five finalists
from the candidates. A group of
faculty members from the college
of engineering will select the queen
from the five finalists.
Any girl wishing to be sponsored
or any engineering society looking
for a girl to sponsor should sub submit
mit submit their name to the Engineers
Fair Office, Room 311, E. & I.
Building.

Page 7



, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Feb. 8, 1966

Page 8

FLORIDA UNION ON JHC WAY UP
Work has been going along on the New Florida Union and it is expected to open late this fall, according
to William E. Rion, Union director.
I New Union To Be
'Finest l in the Country

The new Florida Union may be
the finest in the country, William
J. Osborne, assistant director of
the present Florida Union, be believes.
lieves. believes.
I have visited many unions
across the country, including Sta Stanford,
nford, Stanford, Berkeley, Massachusetts,
and Cincinnati, asserts Osborne,
and none of them can compare
with our new Union.
The new Union, expected to open
in September 1966, costing
$5,249,711.00, consists of eight
floors, six stories high.
Each of the first five floors will
be about the size of Florida
Field.
William E. Rion, presently di director
rector director of the old Union, will also
direct the new Union.
The basement floor will contain
the maintenance equipment and
much of the power source of the
building.
On the ground floor will be a
split-level recreation area, con consisting
sisting consisting of a 16-lane bowling alley,
17 multi-colored billiard tables,
table tennis and other table games.
This floor will also be used for
the Arts and Crafts Shop, alumni
offices, University Placement
Center, barber shop and a union
store, operated by the Campus
Shop and Bookstore.
On the first floor will be a
lounge, a lobby, information desks,
kitchen, and a 650-seat cafeteria cafeteriasnack

SOMETHING NEW
AT
IARRTS
WOMERHOUSE
EVERY SATURDAY FROM 11:00 TO 3:00 PM
LONDON BROIL
STEAK SPECIAL JJ | V
And You Get All This: Potato, Large Bowl
of Solid, Hot Rolls & Butter, Tea or Coffee
14 S.W. Ist ST. PHONE 2-2405
WE DELIVER |

snack cafeteriasnack bar. Small dining rooms will
be available for group luncheons.
A notable attraction on the se second
cond second floor will be a two-story-high
ballroom, capable of seating 1,000
persons for a banquet and nearly
2,000 persons for dances.
It has a folding wall that will
divide it into nine smaller areas
for group use.
Along with the ballroom, will be
a 350-seat auditorium, a music
listening room with individual
stereo booths and a browsing li library.
brary. library.
The third floor will consist of
meeting rooms, the Honor Court,
the publications department, De Department
partment Department of Religion, Student
Government offices and student
organization offices. ~ ~
On the fourth floor will be a
formal dining room, private dining
rooms and a VIP lounge.
The fifth and sixth floors will
be made up of 36 guest rooms as
opposed to the present 15 found
in the old Union.
IXEhox Copies
1-19 Copies, loy ea. 2U&
Over, 9 Copies Made While You Wait <
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.

The new Union will be equipped
with central air-conditioning and
vacuum outlets and four elevators.
A collonnade, open on two sides,
will connect the 470-seat dramatic
theatre to the main building.
The managerial staff will be ex expanding
panding expanding upon moving to the new
Union and more students will be
employed there.
The interior, contracted by At Atrium
rium Atrium Inc., has yet to install the
interior walls, ceilings, plumbing
and wiring.
The old Union will serve as
classrooms and office space for
the College of Arts and Sciences. 1

THE HONOR SYSTEM jSfy
REAUV IS MORE THAN ...
IT IS YOU
.
IT IS VOU ...AS AN EXPRESSION OF A SINCERE BELIEF IN YOUR
MATURITY AND INTEGREITY.
IT IS YOU ...WHOSE VESTED INTEREST IS PROTECTED BY THE
HONOR COURT.
ONLY YOU ...WHO CAN INSURE, BY A VOTE FOR JIM HARRISON HARRISONHONOR
HONOR HARRISONHONOR COURT CHANCELLOR, THAT THIS PROTECTION
IS MAINTAINED.
JIM HARRISON ELIEVES IN TKE HONOR SYSTEM AND WILL
DEDICATE HIS ABILITY, EXPERIENCE, AND INTELLIGENCE
TO YOUR HONOR COURT.
* Phi Beta Kappa National Chairman Professional
* Honor Court Chief Defense Counsel Responsibility Comm. American
(Appointee) Law Student Assoclation
* Honor Court Chief Investigator Secretary, John Marshall Bar
* Honor Court Bar Association Association
* Honor Court SDeakers Bureau Editorial Board Law Review
* Representative Bth Judicial Circuit Finalist, Moot Court Competition
Bar Association
JIMJARRJSON
STUDENT
(PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT)

WHERE TO VOTE
(From Page 1)

Law School Law School
Journalism, Physical Educa Education,
tion, Education, Forestry Florida Union
Arts and Sciences Hub
Engineering Building En Engineering
gineering Engineering Building
Nursing, Pharmacy, Health Re Related
lated Related Services, Medicine Health
Center
Agriculture McCarty
Education Norman
Architecture Architecture
Building
Malaghan said that a crackdown
on double votes is being worked
out.

!
We now have a
left-wing, right wing
and middle wing
to accomodate
every taste.
| FOR INFORMATION, CALL 376-6720 |

Were going to make sure all
ID cards are punched and were
going to make spot checks on signa signatures
tures signatures of the IDs so that no one
can use somebody elses, Mala Malaghan
ghan Malaghan said.
The Secretary of the Interior
said any violation in this direc direction
tion direction not only violates election re regulations,
gulations, regulations, but criminal law.
Integrity VOTE I
JIM HARRISON I
Honor Court Chancellor I
(Paid Political Advertisement) |



meetings.
This is one thing were trying
to do, Garcia maintained. We
wajjt each student to take an active
interest in his government.
Garcia shocked the audience with
his opening statement.
The campaign manager said the
reason he was speaking was
because Litz was busy with re research
search research on a problem that involves
the mismanagement of more than
$750000 in student funds annually.
He waved a sealed envelope to the
audience saying the evidence for
what Im saying is inside this
envelope and it will be made public
the week after the election.
Also in his opening statement,
Garcia charged that the bloc
parties never keep their pro promises.
mises. promises.
Only 18 of 118 planks in the

JIM I
COTTON I
STUDENT PARTY I
CANDIDATE
Legislative Counci I H
School of Journal ism H
& Communications H
! \ll' l'i 'I nI ( A i a I > \- I

SPECIAL! MONDAY & TUESDAY ONLY!
Req. sl.lO Box Dinner
COMPLETE DINNER
CLUDES: 3 pieces of Fricd^^B
Chicken, French Fries, ifirwi
Slow or Grovy and
NO SUBSTITUTIONS. iKjOr
col. san^ rs available at
fried ki^ken
214 N.W. 13th St. 207 N.E. 16th Ave.
Phone 376-6472 Phone 378-2959

LET'S TALK ISSUES
tgggSSl^
our campus social problems?
More attention and money need to be given to the social life of
all the student body. Independent dance after every football game,
once a month campus dances, interhall socials, all these are
possible with proper spending of your activity fee.
Buddy Jacobs feels every student has a right to a full social
life. If Student Party is elected, THEY WILL.
Student Government doesnt have
to take NO for an answer.
JACOBS
VOTE VOTE
- (PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT)

DEBATE

(From Page 1)

old Progress platform were kept,
Garcia contended.
Jacobs opening statement called
for more research on the part of
Student Government.
Many of the promises made in
the past werent completed because
the people didnt know how to do
it, Jacobs said. Student Party
is already doing research.
Cheesemans opening statement
emphasized that his platform got
out late, but it was a good one.
We not only know what were
going to do, but how were going
to do it, Cheeseman said.
Garcias question brought
some interesting answers. It was:
If youre the best candidate, why
dont you disband your fraternity
blocs?
Answering his own question
first, Garcia said that his party
would have no pie-cutting after the
election, because we dont owe
anything to anybody.
Garcia asked if bloc voting was
any way to run a democracy.
Jacobs countered by saying that
his party wasnt having checkoffs
and therefore had no way of making
sure of his bloc vote.
Cheeseman said his party was
keeping checkoffs because they are
a good reminder to vote.
We want all students to vote
as they want to, the Decision
candidate said.

CALLS FOR INFIRMARY INVESTIGATION

(From
r I think it is very questionable that we should have
doctors practicing in the Infirmary without state
licenses.
Florida must be the only state in the country
which would allow something like this. It is not fair
to the students especially when more than a half halfmillion
million halfmillion dollars in student fees are involved.
Litz cited the minutes of a Student Health Evalu Evaluation
ation Evaluation Committee meeting which was held Nov. 9,
1965, at 4 p.m. in Florida Gym.
Present at the meeting were the following persons:
Dr. Sam Martin, Dean Lester L. Hale, William
Elmore, Dr. Ben Barger, Dr. W. A. Hall. Dr.
Arthur Larson, Dean Spurgeon Cherry and Dean
O. K. (Dutch) Stanley, chairman.
Student Body President Bruce Culpepper, the other
committee member, was absent.
Stanley pointed out that Culpepper had been unable
to attend any committee meeting to date.
Litz also hit out at depletion of the reserve fund.
Stanley, Dean of the College of Physical Educa Education
tion Education and Health, was quoted in the minutes as saying
that the Infirmary had $54,000 to begin the 1965-66
fiscal year.
But, he said, financial projection indicated that
even with an additional $2 student fee the department
would end up with barely S3OO to begin the 1966-67
fiscal year.
Martin, Medical Center provost, was quoted in the
minutes as saying he was disturbed to the Reserve

More Gooning
Widespread gooning of Decision
Party banners in the past week was
reported by Party Chairman Cliff
Davis yesterday.
Weve lost more banners than
you can count in the past few days,
Davis said. This has got to stop.
The independent girls working
for Decision in Jennings painted
most of these banners and they
want to know what happened to
them.
Davis said party workers hoisted
five banners late Sunday and only
one remained up Monday morning.
This isnt the only thing that
bothers me, Davis said. Another
worker reports to me that all our
green boards are being gooned.
while Student Partys poop is re remaining
maining remaining up.

(From

SBOBBBBB
SSSBDSH
YOUNG REPUBLICANS: Today, 8:30 p.m., 121 FU. Election
of Officers; Information and Discussion on William Cramer
Banquet.
AGRICULTURE ECONOMIC CLUB: Today, 7:30 p.m., 155
McCarty.
CERAMICS CLASS: Today, 9:30 a.m., FU Craft Shop.
IEEE: Today, 7:30 p.m., McCarty Aud. Speakers: Represen Representatives
tatives Representatives of IBM Federal Systems Division.
ASME: Today, 7:30 p.m., 328 Engineering Bldg. Speaker Mr.
R.A. Stokes, Newport News Shipbuilding: Polaris Submarine.
MEN'S INTERHALL COUNCIL: Today, 6:30 p.m., 114 FU.
FU BOARD FOR STUDENT ACTIVITIES: Today, 4:3C p.m.,
215 FU. *
PEACE CORPS WEEK: Today, Bryan Lounge and Service
Booth 9-5; Movie-FU Aud. 11-1.
MENS A: Daily, including Saturday, 11 a.m.-l p.m., Main
Cafeteria, Reserved Area. Call Mike Sipe at 8-4950f0r additional
information.
BRIDGE LESSONS: Today, 7 p.m., FU Social Room.
MOLIERES THE MISER: Presented by the National Players
will be held Feb. 8 at 8:15 p.m., Univ. Aud., Tickets may be
purchased at FU Public Functions, and are SI.OO.
FILM CLASSICS SERIES: Today, 8:15 p.m. MSB Aud. Sous
Les Taits de Paris.
AMERICAN SOCIETY of Mechanical Engineers: Tonight, second
meeting of trimester, 328 Engineering Building at 7:30 p.m.
FRESHMAN WOMEN: With 3.5 or better average may sign up
for Alpha Lambda Delta, Freshmen Womens Honorary Scholastic
Society, 123 Tigert, thru Wed., Feb. 9. Transfers may elegible.

I. More
Integrity VOTE 1
JIM HARRISON I
Honor Court Chancellor I
(Paid Political Advertisement) |

NEW...
SELF-
I) cJ PIERCING
EARRINGS
K DO-IT-YOURSELF
I J PAINLESS SAFE
I FOR THOSE WHO CARE. .1

Phone 372-2655 103 W. University Ave.

Tuesday, Feb. 8, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Page 1)
Account being wiped out.
Stanley told committee members, according to the
minutes, the Infirmarys financial statement in indicated
dicated indicated the need for a complete review of the struc structure
ture structure and function of the Infirmary if it was to remain
in operation effectively and financially.
Coming four months after the fiscal year began,
Litz said, this was an unprecedented request.
Litz has called for an investigation by a non-UF
hospital management survey team, so that we can
be sure the survey results will be unbiased.
Hall, the Infirmary director, said Monday night,
As far as Im concerned, the money has been spent
wisely.
We did have financial discussion of the Infirmary
at that time (Nov. 9), Hall said. But he said he
doesnt think financial conclusions reached then were
based on solid evidence.
Concerning the unlicensed doctors, Hall said, yes,
he and three others do not have Florida licenses.
This is because we havent had time to take the
exams and havent had time to study for them, he
said. Florida does not require doctors practicing
in state institutions to have Florida licenses. This
is common all around the country.
About the alleged never-been-used generator, Hall
said, I dont know anything about this.
The Infirmary director said he knows there are
dissident factions in the department, some of which
he said have personal axes to grind.

|| PATRONIZE Ig
|| GATOR ||
|! ADVERTISERS ||
.. .v/XvX !v!vXvXvX'!vX !v!v!vX '*' , ..'/
Z".

Page 9



Unitas Stars In Viet 'Rice Bowl

By MILT RICHMAN
UPI Sports Writer
NEW YORK (UPI) Fresh back
rom Viet Nam f Johnny Unitas re report's
port's report's this war is almost exactly
like the last one in that all the boys
keep saying, Send mail.
The star quarterback of the
Baltimore Colts, home only a few
days from a two-week tour of 21
military camps in Viet Nam, said
he found the morale and general
attitude of our troops to be tre tremendous
mendous tremendous and far better than youd
expect.
Everywhere Unitas went, though,
along with such other National

< y 'k'
A SJLI Mfc
,%gm w***
CASEY ALL-ACADEMIC
Charles Casey headed the list of the 1965 Academic All-America
football team, chosen by the College Sports Information Directors
of America.
He was previously named .to the All-SEC Academic first team
with a 3.16 overall average.
Gator tackle John Whatley was also named to the All-SEC Academic
first team. Tackle Mike Waxman also received SEC mention for his
3.4 overall average.

BARBEQUE PORK BASKET
O WITH FRENCH FRIES GO
)
TODAY ONLY ((](
2 IM

Football League figures as Sam
Ruff, Frank Gifford and Willis
Davis, they heard appeals for more
mail from home.
Mail call is still one of the
biggest things over there, ex explained
plained explained Unitas on the telephone
from Lutherville, Md.
Charlton Heston, the movie
actor, was over there before us
and we were told about this one
particular soldier who was intro introduced
duced introduced to him. The officer who in introduced
troduced introduced them tried to impress
the soldier that he was meeting
one of the top movie stars in the
world.

TSlilf

Thats fine, said the soldier,
but wheres the mail?
Since returning from Viet Nam,
Unitas has been busy on the phone
relaying messages to the parents
and relatives of boys he met on
the tour.
Huff, Gifford and Davis all have
been doing the same thing.
I just finished making one of
those calls here in the Maryland
area, said Unitas.
You have no idea what a kick
it is for me to speak to the parents
of these boys. Mostly, the fellows
wanted me to tell their mothers
and fathers that theyre all right

TTlieFlorida AlligataJ

Tuesday, Feb. 8, 1966 SPORTS

9 Bama Breaks Rules
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (UPI) The Southeastern Conference said
Monday the University of Alabama went over the scholarship limit
last year and reduced the number of grants-in-aid the Crimson Tide
may give for next season to 38.
An investigation by this office has determined that the University
of Alabama, is in violation of Article 14, Section 4-E,.... in 1965
by permitting a total of 42 new football players on financial aid to
participate in freshman football games, Commissioner Bernie Moore
said at a news conference. The SEC limit for football grants per year
is 40.
Moore, who said Alabama exceeded conference rules by two scholar scholarships,
ships, scholarships, added the university did not violate a rule permitting 140
grants-in-aid for the entire Alabama athletic program.
Moore, outgoing SEC commissioner, said the fourth-ranked Crim Crimson
son Crimson Tide did not violate any NCAA law in awarding the extra scholar scholarships.
ships. scholarships.
Im glad we caught it when we did, Moore said. Its a good thing
we got it squared-away. Moore said he would include a clearer
interpretation of the 40-rule in the conference by-laws.
Dr. Frank A. Rose, president of the University of Alabama, said
in a statement shortly after Moores ruling the university would
abide by the penalty.
Rose said the university deeply regreted the misunderstanding
which resulted in the penalty.

LETS TALK ISSUES
Si*
iou Guaranteed a Seat Here
* -fop*
I, . *.
Even with the addition of new stadium seats many students
wont have seats for the football season. Independent seating must
be expanded and a fair rotation system established for the bloc.
Buddy Jacobs feels athletics are for the students - all the
students. If Student Party is elected THEY WILL BE.
Student Government doesnt have
to take NO for an answer.
- JACOBS
VOTE VOTE
(PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT)

and not to worry. Once in a while
the boys would ask me to deliver
a personal message, too.
Unitas said it was very warm
when he was in Viet Nam with the
temperature in one of the places
he was at reaching 120 degrees.
Despite the heat, the troops still
showed a lively interest in foot football.
ball. football. They asked a lot of ques questions,
tions, questions, said the Colt quarterback.
Some of them still hadnt found
out who won the Greenay-Cleve Greenay-Cleveland
land Greenay-Cleveland title game and they wanted
to know that. They also asked
whether Don Chandlers field goal
in the Green Bay-Baltimore play-

off game really was good. And
they wanted to know which teams
we expected to be the strongest in
the league next year.
Unitas also visited some army
hospitals during his Vietnamese
tour and he had something in com common
mon common with the patients he talked to
because it wasnt so long ago that
he was one himself.
He wound up finished for the
season and required surgery on
his right knee when a pair of
Bears linemen hit him
during a game on Dec. 5.
The leg is coming along real
well and I have the full use of it
again, he said. Ive been taking
whirlpool and massage treatments
and Im going to start on a weight weightlifting
lifting weightlifting program in a few weeks.
It was the kind of season Unitas
isnt likely to forget.
That also goes for his visit to
Viet Nam.
Gonzalez Takes
Pro Tourney
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) San Fran Francisco
cisco Francisco tennis pro Pancho Gonzalez
won the second annual Pro-Chal Pro-Challenge
lenge Pro-Challenge Tennis Cup Sunday, easily
defeating an unseeded opponent,
6-2, 6-0.
Gonzalez won $1,675 first prize
when he won the games over
Warren Woodcock of Pompano
Beach.
Woodcock came from behind to
meet Gonzalez. He beat second secondseeded
seeded secondseeded Pancho Segura and third
seeded Mike Davis in the semi semifinals.
finals. semifinals.
More
Experience VOTE
JIM HARRISON
Honor Court Chancellor
(Paid Political Advertisement)

Page 10



Cats Bag Gators, 85-75

By BROWNIE JOHNSTON
Alligator Staff Writer
Wild Kentucky let all its cats out of the bag to lap
up the spilled milk of the Florida Gators last night
iri Lexington.
Before a capacity crowd of 12.000-plus, the
number-one-ranked Wildcats handed the Gatprs a
85-75 defeat.
Coach Norman Sloans team feasted on a rare
delicacy these days Wildcat meat for
the first ten minutes of the game by staying within
six points of the highly respected Cats. After that,
however, it was all Kentucky.
By closing the gap to 11 points the fired-up
Gators forced Kentucky to freeze the ball in the
final three minutes of play.
Harry Winklers two free throws narrowed the
lead to nine points with only 53 seconds remaining.
A free throw by Jeff Ramsey and a tip-in by
Winkler made it 85-75 as the whistle sounded.
Leading the Wildcats to their 18th consecutive
win this season were Pat Riley with 24 points.
Louis Dampier with 18 and Thad Jaracz with 17.
Larry Conley and Tommy Kron netted 14 and 10
points respectively.
Ramsey played possibly the finest game of his
college career, scoring 17 points and grabbing 21
rebounds, 15 of them in the first half.

'lt Sure Gets Cold Out There;
Dioguardi Wants Indoor Pool

7f

By BILL MCGRAW
Alligator Staff Writer
It sure gets cold out there.
We could really use an indoor
pool. Tom Dioguardi, All-Amer All-America
ica All-America freestyle r, made these
I Intelligence VOTE
I JIM HARRISON
I Honor Court Chancellor
| (Paid Political Advertisement)

' V
Mens And j
Womens irBH
wa
Gainesville H H
Stockman H H
j
At the Gainesville Livestock Market
5001 N.W. 13th St.
l

HATS

SHIRTS

remarks after an extremely cold
workout at the uni \ 'i -ity pool.
Our competith n c i;t believe
that we really practic outsids.
Sometimes I have trouble believing
it myself, he added.
Dioguardi had many oilers to
swim at other schools, but turned
them down because he was
impressed by die uaiver- itys
College of Physical Education and
Health and by Coach Bill Harlan.
He pointed out. though, that many
excellent swimmers leave Florida

He missed the Tennessee contest because of two
badly sprained ankles. Last night he played with one
ankle swollen to almost twice its normal size.
Cincinatis George Smith, coach of such all-time
greats as Oscar Robertson, said, I am very im impressed
pressed impressed with this Ramsey boy.
Also scoring in double figures for the Gators
were Gary Keller with 13 points, Dave Miller with
12 points and Paul Morton with 10 points.
Florida out-rebounded Kentucky 66-49, but floor
mistakes and poor shooting gave the Cats the narrow
win. The Gators hit only 33.7 per cent of their shots
while Kentucky ripped at a 44.7 per cent clip.
There can this year that the Gators
choked before the packed house in Lexington.
There can be no talk the Gators didnt come to
play.
All that has to be said is the Gators lost by only
10 points to one of the best, if not the best teams
in the nation.
The loss ran the Gators record to 12-7 overall
and 5-4 in the SEC. Kentucky has run away with
the conference and is now 9-0 in league play.
Im not ashamed of this team at all, said Sloan.
They gave it a real good effort against a very
fine basketball team. Ive said for a long time that
Kentucky should be rated number one.

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every y sir because they are'Unim are'Unimpressed
pressed are'Unimpressed with tlic facilities here.
Coach Harlan has done an ex ex"c>
"c> ex"c> 1 lent iub of recruiting, but it
would help if he had an indoor
pool to show prospective scholar scholarship
ship scholarship swimmers. Dioguardi said.
Dioguardi added many of the
swimming teams come from areas
tliat have extremely cold weather.
As examples, lie' pointed to Yale.
Michigan and Indiana.
Dioguardi receivedAll-America
honors last year when he placed
fifth in the fifty-yard frees tyle
and seventh m the hundred-yard,
butterfly at the National Collegi Collegiate
ate Collegiate Athletic Association champion championships.
ships. championships. He is being counted on to
help give the Gators their eleventh
straight SEC championship this
year.
1 think that we will take the
championship again this year.
Things are also looking good for
next year. Weve got a great fresh freshman
man freshman team. Dioguardi said.
Dioguardi added he thought the
Gators could win the SEC cham championship
pionship championship every year if they could
get a new pool.
< We have had winning teams for
rpapy years, but I hope we dont
lose in the future just because
somebody else has better facili facilities.
ties. facilities. concluded Dioguardi.

808
Menaker
ASSISTANT SPURTS EDITOR
GATORS NEED AN ASTRODOME
Rain. rain, go away ....
This could be the motto of Floridas hard luck baseball
team. For the past two years, Coach Dave Fullers team has
been rained out of reigning as the SEC champion.
In 19G4, the Gators had the same amount of losses as league leagueleading
leading leagueleading Auburn, but had one less win. The team was. rained out
of a game with Georgia Tech and couldnt reschedule it.
The Gators lost the title to Auburn by the margin of that one
rained-out game with Tech.
Last year the Gators were rained out both days against Vander Vanderbilt.
bilt. Vanderbilt. a team sporting a 1-7 record at the time. The games couldnt
be rescheduled.
The Gators lost the title to Auburn by the slim margin of those
rained out games.
WHAT ABOUT 66?
The Gators strong spot should lie in its corps of moundsmen.
All are back from last year with the exception of Danny Fggart,
who inked a contract with the Minnesota Twins.
Seniors Ray Rollyson, Adrian Zabala and Dan Griffin are back
as are juniors Kelly Prior, Danny Orr and Ned Wolfolk.
All are right-handers except Wolfolk. This over abundance of
starboard hurlers could give Gator Dave trouble unless he finds
some southpaws from last years freshman team.
Jack Kenworthy and Ed Gross are battling it out for the catching
spot. At this point its hard to see who has the edge.
The situation around first base changed complexion recently
when Tommy Shannon sufferred an appendectomy. Shannons big
bat and nifty glove will be out of the lineup at least for the first
few weeks of the season.
Battling it out for Shannons spot are Bob Hawkins and Skip
Lujack. a defensive end on the Gator football team. Lujack,
incidentally, is the nephew of Johnny Lujack, Notre Dames famed
quarterback during the 4os.
Senior Bruce Moore returns to the keystone corner for the
Gators. Steve Spurrier may come out for the team, but he could
help the team more in the outfield than at second.
Fuller- probably will move slick gloveman Don Pendley from
third to short, leaving Danny Cushman to handle the hot corner.
Senior Bill Blorngren is back in right field. An All-SEC'
selection as a sophomore, he slumped last year, but should
come back with another fine season.
The Gators will sorely miss outfielder Brownie Johnston,
ineligible because of scholastic difficulties. Johnston, who batted
around the .300 mark last year, may play in G7 if the pros dont
sign him first.
Davies Booed For Winning
John Davies, New Zealand Olympian, said Sunday the mile race
he won with a time of 4:10.1 may have drawn boos from fans because
it was so slow but he considered it an exciting race.
I get more enjoyment from a race against men rather than a time
trial. he said in commenting on the slowest mile since 1956 at the
Philadelphia Inquirer games Saturday night.
After all, isnt the essence of sports winning, not breaking
records? he said.
Pole vaulter John Pennel of Los Angeles, Calif., went 16 feet,
6-1/4 inches, wiping out the previous mark of 16 feet, 1 inch. Pennel,
who holds the indoor record of 16 feet. 9-1/2 inches tried three
times for 17 feet plus, but failed.
George Young of Casa Grande, Ariz., clipped 2.6 seconds from
the two-mile meet mark with his time of 8:50.

Tuesday, Feb. 8. 1966 The Florida Alligator.

Page 11



Page 12

. The Florida Alligator. Tuesday. Feb. 8. 1966

** MEET THE GATORS ***
V* Cm Si,., l.tt.r With^Wo.dwM^
HlV,Y*u'rThe SarsT"
V Perform once Guoranreed
Store You
ANDY OWENS
* * _ \\ f : : : of the successful recruiting program instituted at UP by Coach j:|: I THAT'S THE ONLY WORD FOR IT,
Basketball contest gNormsioan. %
:* The 6-6 eager was sought by a reported 55 schools after being *: M&.. S .-. _., '^
x named a High School All-America. He averaged close to 25 points X; Ty
per game in leading Tampa Hillsborough to the state finals his ::
JC kA i ii. iw n :> Sparked by Owens 22 points per game average, the Baby :* Th Superb Lines And Form Os ALAN S
,n nsor ai s r ... Gators have ro y e( j to a 12-1 mark. His tremendous leg spring Famous Cubana Is Purely Classical.
I and artful moves crater the basket have helped the freshmen | The Beauty And Symmetry Has Been Ad-
Place an X inside the parenthesis next to the team v dominate the backboards in nearly every contest. *: 77 7
you think will win this Saturday, February 12th. Then With six games remaining on the yearlings slate, Freshman £ mired And Studied By Art Students From
pick the total points scored in the Miami-Jacksonville :: Coach Brooks Henderson is relying heavily on Owens in making £ The World Over.
game. Thats the tie breaker. v this the best freshman season in UF history. V
( ) Miami vs. Jacksonville ( ) ( ) Auburn vs. Kentucky ( ) SM
( ) Alabama vs. Vanderbilt ( ) ( ) vs. Tulane () 5 But The reat Thing About ALAN S CUBANA,
::: Like His HAMMA, ITALIAN SUPER SUC, FULL
, ~ xr r c/ 4- / /i t qtj o i\/r /i £ OF BALONEY &AII His Others, Is Its Great
() Georgia Tech vs. N.C. State ( ) () LSU vs. Ole Miss ( ) Arntx^Hm
( ) Georgia vs. Mississippi State ( ) ( ) Duke vs. Virginia () | 1
Miami vs. Jacksonville And Gourmets From All Over The World Have
(Total pts.) Come To ALAN'S To Study That...So Do A SKif
entries MUST be depositeu in the U shop by FRi., feb. lith. in case of a £ Few Thousand UF Students That Happen To Drop vB
TIE, PRIZE WILL BE DIVIDED EQUALLY AMONG THE WINNERS. | n
WINNERS NAMES TO BE POSTED IN: 'JBK j|.
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lowest umverslty Avenue Cro.yn P.aza AUITS MIStSI SaXldWlCh SllOf
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£NTRIES UMITED, TWO PER J^EfiSON^