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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Religious
Debate Set
Thursday
V
Relevance of religion will be
debated Thursday night at 8:15
in University Auditorium.
The debateentitled Is Reli Religion
gion Religion Still Relevant On The Univer University
sity University Campus?will feature two
UF profs, Dr. Thomas Hanna and
Dr. Emmanuel Gitlin.
Hanna is chairman of the Philos Philosophy
ophy Philosophy Department and Gitlin is a
Humanities professor.
The debate is sponsored by the
Florida Union Forums Committee
and is the first in what Committee
Chairman Jack Zucker says will
be a series of debates.
Each debater will be allowed to
talk for 20 minutes, Zucker says,
then will be given a five-minute
rebuttal period. Questions from the
audience also will be allowed.
The debates have been started
as a regular feature of the For Forums
ums Forums Committee, Zucker says,
and they will be held three times
each trimester.
In the debate tomorrow night,
Hanna will argue that religion no
longer is relevant and Gitlin will
take the opposing view.
Zucker says the debates are
the fairest way to present any
controversial issues and will en enable
able enable us to hear prominent profes professors
sors professors from the University.
The debates also will help us
build an improved Forums pro program.
gram. program.
And Zucker points out: The
debates dont cost the Forums
Committee a thin dime.

6 Apathy Cares About
Married Students .* Litz

Apathy Party presidential can candidate
didate candidate Ernie Litz outlined a hard hardhitting,
hitting, hardhitting, five-step married housing
program last night to a group of
UF married students.
Litz emphasized that Apathy
cares about the married students,
and plans to do specific things to
help them.
Apathy cares about the roaches
in the villages, Litz said. We
care about the lack, of married
student facilities for children and
the fact that most UF married
students live on less than S3OOO a
year the baseline figure for aid
under the federal poverty program.
We intend to do something about
these problems.
Litz, a straight-A graduate stu student
dent student in counseling psychology, said
married students on the UF campus
have long been ignored and un unrepresented
represented unrepresented in UF student affairs.
They (the married students)
represent a much larger portion
of the student body than is rea realized,
lized, realized, Litz said, and no one else
has shown enough interest to care
about them.
Litz five-point program is:
Begin a regular exterminator
service in the Villages.
Go to the Board of Regents
and University officials and ask
that dependents of married stu students
dents students be given access to regular
student facilities and services by
paying a slight commensurate fee
in addition to the parts of the
present $l3O fee they now pay
individually.
Repair and upgrade grounds

The Florida Alligatir

Vol. 58, No. 84

mil v twt A itfi'ii m
pflW-..- sag &.
GATHERING STORM
Recent gatherings around the library have heard things discussed
from Viet Nam to fruit sales. Here a crowd listens to the oratorical
skill of Alan Levins stand proposing sale of the off-campus magazine,
the Charlatan, on campus.

conditions in married villages.
Revitalize the SG cabinet post
of Secretary of Married Students
Affairs.
(See LITZ, Page 3)
Chairmen Set
For EG Fair
Planning for this years Engi Engineers
neers Engineers Fair picked up momentum
with selection of committee chair chairmen.
men. chairmen.
Chairmen of committes are Bill
Harper, Industrial; Jan Moeller,
high school; Paul Repp, corres correspondence;
pondence; correspondence; Pat ODonoghue, society
exhibits; Doug Miller, judges and
awards chairman, and Dan Paliti,
curator.
The 1966 Fair will include a
model of the Cross Florida Barge
Canal made by the Army Corps
of Engineers, a digital computer
demonstration, and open house at
GENESYS television facilities.
The Fair, which is scheduled
for March 11-13, is held to give
high school and university students
an inside view of UFs engineering
studies and programs.
The Fair shows what it takes to
train and educate an engineer and
how engineers apply their skills
toward creative development. It
also shows the interrelations a among
mong among the various engineering
fields.

University of Florida

I Candidates Air I
Views Tonight
A debate between the SG candi candidates
dates candidates for president is scheduled
tonight at Graham Hall.
The debate, which will be held
at 10:45, is open to the entire cam campus.
pus. campus.
Mike Malaghan, secretary of the
inferior, urged all students to at attend
tend attend the debates.

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EG FAIR GEARS UP
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Frank Andres, Charles Daniher (Fair chairman), Jan Moeller and Pete Danaher (seated) look over
the GENESYS control facilities which will be part of the Engineers Fair to be held March 11-13.

SG Leaders
Back Tigert
Student leaders, in a Tuesday meeting with UF President J. Wayne
Reitz, indicated they will back the Administration in disciplinary action
which may be taken against student protesters.
(The main UF library has been the center of protest activity and
unauthorized sale of literature and fruit in the past week.)
On the other hand, the student leaders also indicated they favor a
spot on campus to be designated as a free speech area, a place
where protesters or just plain students can go to voice their opinions
on any subject.
Student Body President Bruce Culpepper presided over a 30-minute
session with only student leaders present. Dean of Student Affairs
Lester L. Hale was in the Tigert Hall meeting room, but Culpepper
asked him to leave so students could discuss things privately.
Dr. Hale never returned to the meeting.
Culpepper told the student leaders he was concerned about another

Berkeley* here and the bad pub publicity
licity publicity that would follow.
He also pointed out that Legis Legislative
lative Legislative Council is working on a bill
which would provide a free speech
area on campus.
Dr. Reitz then entered the room
and the meeting lasted another
hour.
Ernie Litz, presidential candi candidate
date candidate for Apathy Party, said, We
are all interested in free speech
AND in responsibility.
Litz suggested that Alan Levin
take his case to the American
Civil Liberties Union, carry it
to court and get a legal ruling
once and for all.
Levin, presidential candidate for
Freedom Party and a leader of the
protest movement, explained that
he was opposed to what he termed
ideological censoring rather
structural censoring of literature
and other saleable items.
Levin was referring to sale on
campus of Charlatan Magazine and
Viet-Report. He said the Adminis Administration
tration Administration opposed sale of these maga magazines
zines magazines because of their content,
while at the same time allowing
other infractions of the UF policy
go unnoticed.
The Administration has contend contended
ed contended all along that it is not opposed
to freedom of speech or distribu distributee
tee distributee LEADERS, Page 8)

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

Heart Fund
Kicked-Off
Sigma Phi Epsilon, the fraternity
with a heartas a symbol of
their major service projectwill
hold a kick-off dinner tonight to
begin their yearly support of the
American Heart Association's na national
tional national fund drive.
Dr. J. Russell Green, heart spe specialist
cialist specialist at the J.Hillis Miller Health
Center, will be the speaker. His
topic will be, A Result of Your
Labors.
Representatives from all cam campus
pus campus fraternities and soroities
have been invited. Ways in which
they can help SPE in the Heart
Fund Drive will be outlined.
February is designated as Heart
Month. Contributions to the Ala Alachua
chua Alachua County Heart Division go to
support research in the prevention
and cure of heart disease.
SPE chapters all over the coun country
try country embrace Heart Month as their
major service project.
Joe Thigpen, chairman of the
fraternitys drive, acknowledges
that his chapter has proudly held
the distinction for several years
of being the number one chapter
in the country in successful sup support
port support of the Heart Fund Drive.



Page 2

i, The Florida Alligator. Wednesday. Feb. 2, 1966

' JT..
International
CHARGES WAGED . Communist China officially protested to
Britain Tuesday against its collusion with the United States and
charged the Americans were trying to use Hong Kong as a spring springboard
board springboard for its future attack on Chinas mainland. The charge was
made in a note handed to British Charge dAffaires Donald Hopson in
Peking today by Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Wang Pingnan pro protesting
testing protesting an alleged British offer of Hong Kong as U. S. base for oper operations.
ations. operations.
B-52s K.O. . U. S. planes bombed Communist North Viet Nam
Tuesday for the second time since the end of the 37-day truce. In the
ground war to the South, U. S. and allied troops reported killing an
estimated 720 Viet Cong in Operation Masher. U. S. 852 bombers
from Guam struck suspected Communist strongholds in Bien Hoa
Province 20 rniles northwest of Saigon while U. S. and South Viet Vietnamese
namese Vietnamese planes lashed the Viet Cong from one end of South Viet Nam
to the other.
REDS REJECT . Communist North Viet
Nam Tuesday rejected as invalid any United
Nations Security Council action to settle the
war in Viet Nam. A Hanoi broadcast monitored
in Tokyo said the United Nations has no author authority
ity authority to discuss the Viet Nam question. It said
if the issue is to be discussed at all it should
be done by the Geneva Conference.
National
**%*
MORE SNOW ... A new winter storm rolled across the battered
Midwest and South Tuesday and headed for the snow-packed Middle
Atlantic states. New sleet and snow lashed theSouth, already stagger staggering
ing staggering under its worst storm in more than half a century. Four more
inches of snow were expected in northern Virginia, but temperatures
eased somewhat in Florida, aiding storm-damaged fruit and vegetable
crops. The death toll from the storms which first hit Thursday con continued
tinued continued to mount.
WARAID . President Johnson today submitted to Congress a
new foreign aid program calling for $3.4 billion in fiscal 1967. It was
keyed largely to the war in Southeast Asia and designed to give more
help to countries which help themselves. Johnsons request for new
funds included $2.4 billion for economic assistance and $917 million
for military aid, compared with a total this year of $3.9 billion,
including the supplemental request for S3OO million in military funds.
KEATON DIES . Famed deadpan comedi comedian
an comedian Buster Keaton died of lung cancer at his
home Tuesday. He was 70 years old. The long longtime
time longtime comedian whose career spanned the silent
era to modern television commercials, had
suffered from cancer for three months. At his
side when death came was his wife, Eleanor.
The actor is also survived by two sons of his
marriage to actress Natalia Talmadge.
Florida
CANDY CONTENDS . Defense attorneys in the murder trial of
Mrs, Candace Mossier contended Tuesday that her husband had
constantly laid himself open to reprisal and blackmail through his
ruthless business methods and insatiable homosexuality. The state
pinned the slaying of Jacques Mossier, a Texas financial wizard,
to a scorching love affair between Candy and her darkly handsome
nephew. A jury of nine white and three Negro men heard opening
statements.
APOLLO A-OK . The federal space agency said today Americas
first unmanned Apollo moonship will be launched as early as Feb. 22
with a powerful new Saturn IB rocket. It will be the first Apollo space spaceflight
flight spaceflight in Americas s2l billion drive to send three men to the moon
in a similar ship by 1969. The initial unmanned three-seater will be
hurled 280 miles into space and then rammed back into earths at atmosphere
mosphere atmosphere in a 18,750-mile an hour test of the heat shield.
_
ft* Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of an advertisements 12
to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
HO POSITION 6 GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one da? after advertisement appears.
Tike Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before rvxt insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and is
published five times weekly except during May, June, aixt July when It Is putd-shed sami-weekl). Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator is entered as second
atter at Km United States Post Office at Gainesville.

Americas 'Sacred Honorl
At Stake In Viet Nam I

By MICHAEL MALLOY
United Press International
SAIGON (UPI) American Gls
are fighting in Viet Nam for a
stake so big that its very name
seems to embarrass our cynical
age.
The patriots who signed the
Declaration of Independence called
this quality our sacred honor.
Today, we edge around this con concept
cept concept and dredge up words like
credibility to describe the same
thing.
But whether you call it old fash fashioned
ioned fashioned honor or new fangled cred credibility,
ibility, credibility, the American stake boils
down to proving whether the United
States will keep its promises.
President Lyndon B. Johnson
called it confidence.
We will stay because in Asia,
and around the world, are coun countries
tries countries whose course of indepen independence
dence independence rest, in large measure, on
confidence in American protec protection,
tion, protection, he" said in his State of the
Union message to Congress.
South Vietnamese Foreign Min Minister
ister Minister Tran Van Do spelled it out in
tougher terms, in an interview with
UPI.
If you back down on your com commitment
mitment commitment here, he said, then
nobody in Asia will ever believe
in America again.
If you backed down after all
your tough talk about Viet Nam,
even the Russians would think the
United States was a paper tiger,
cautioned an astude observer who
recently visited Saigon from a neu neutral
tral neutral country.

Herb Schwartz j#"lN
Honor Court iFPi
Chancellor
DECISION PARTY
. . A thorough reorganization of orientation to the Honor
System is needed. The Honor System should be a set of accepted
values rather than a penal law obeyed out of fear.
The Honor Court is the only criminal-type court in the
nation from which a conviction cannot be appealed to a higher
court of law. To insure every defendent a fair trial, a court of
appeals is needed.
\j
. Each student citizen should be informed of his protected
rights under the law. The Chancellor, as chief judicial officer of
le s u ent body, should feel a professional responsibility to
assume each citizens rights remain free from abuse and de deprecation.
precation. deprecation.
.SC HWARTZ, as Chancellor, will continue the vigorous
and dedicated service to the student body that he pursued as
Chief Investigator, Assistant Chief Defense Counsel, and Chief
Defense Counsel during the past year
. i ~ ''
: V.. ~ J .'
political advertisEMEN T)

The American commitment to
defend South \ iet Nam from com communism
munism communism is almost 12 years old.
It was voiced by the last three
American Presidents, represent representing
ing representing both major parties. It has been
backed up with billions of dollars
and more than 1,700 American
lives.

Winters Rampage I
Devastated Crops I

Winters worst storm in more
than a half-century in the South
left a probable legacy today of high
prices for produce in the nations
supermarkets for the next few
months.
The storm, which slapped Dixie
with deep snow and bitter cold
caused around 100 deaths, was a
real disaster to Floridas veg vegetable
etable vegetable crops.
Florida Agriculture Commis Commissioner
sioner Commissioner Doyle Conner said, how however,
ever, however, that a quick harvest could
save the states citrus fruit and
sugar cane.
In response to the harvest de demands,
mands, demands, U. S. Secretary of Labor
Willard Wirtz Monday "authorized
the importation of 1,200 British
West Indies workers.
He said he took the action to
help bring in the mid-season crop
so it could be used in processing
frozen concentrated juice. Much of
the fruit was reported to be

Each step further into VietiJ
has made American credit J
more and more dependentonS
tory.
To yield today, after senriiJ
190,000 men to Viet Nam, m
be even more dangerous thal
yielding in April, when therewer
only 30,000.

damaged too heavily for sale ii
the skin.
Alabama reported the most
fatalities, 28, from the weekeni
storm, including five teen-agers
found dead in their mired car at
Ozark, Ala., but Virginia bore the
brunt of the paralyzing snow.
The coupons alone are worth
I 2o !*
m pHr



Speaker Heads Set

Appointments to the top adminis administrative
trative administrative positions in the Florida
Blue Key Speakers Bureau have
been announced by Chairman Chip
Block.
Hon Peterson as headof the con contact
tact contact and dispatch division will
arrange engagements at the 26 jun junior
ior junior colleges in the state. Teams are
sent to all junior colleges express expressing
ing expressing an interest in the program.
Last year speakers went to about
20 colleges.
Uead of the finance division Jack
Harkness will manage the income
and expenses of theSpeakers Bur Bureay.
eay. Bureay.
Dan Carlton will head the selec selection
tion selection and training division. About
50 speakers are trained in a two-
Bridge Tourney
Begins Thursday
The annual Inter-Collegiate Du Duplicate
plicate Duplicate Bridge Tournament begins
Thursday, at 7 p.m., in the Florida
Union Social Room.
All interested persons must sign
up in room 315 of the Florida Union
before 5 p.m. today. Eligible are
all students except those who par participated
ticipated participated in tournaments in 1962 or
before.
Faculty and staff members,
part-time students and towns townspeople
people townspeople may play also, but their
scores will not be submitted.
Entrees in the contest should
sign up wRh partners, with whom
they will play throughout the tour tournament.
nament. tournament.
XErox Copies
1-19 Copies* luy t-a. 2U&
Over, 9 Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QU I K-SAVE
1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.

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V

week study course to give a speech
covering definite points and sup supplimented
plimented supplimented by their own background
at the UF. The speeches are de designed
signed designed to promote the university
and to encourage students to
plete their education here.
Promotion at the junior colleges
will be handled by Lee Borden.
Doris Buchanan will be the exe executive
cutive executive secretary for the Bureau.
Physical Therapy
Workshop At
Health Center
Nearly 150 physical therapy stu students
dents students from throughout the state will
attend a workshop on Exercises
Employing Neuromuscular Facil Facilitation
itation Facilitation Methods on Friday and
Saturday at the UFs J. Hillis Mil Miller
ler Miller Health Center.
The principal speaker will be
Miss Margaret Knott, registered
physical therapist and director of
physical therapy at the Kaiser
Rehabilitation Center. Vallejo,
Calif. Miss Knot is world-famed
in the field of physical therapy for
her work on exercise employing
normal patterns of movement in
an entire extremity to facilitate
a greater response in weak
muscles.
The program will include
demonstrations of resistive gait
training and mat exercises and
a review of the physiological
effects 'of cold therapy and its
clinical applications.
Other members of the workshop
faculty are Fred Rutan, R.P.T.,
assistant professor in the Depart Department
ment Department of Physical Therapy, UFs
College of Health Related Pro Professions,
fessions, Professions, and Miss Martha Wroe,
R.P.T., chief physical therapist,
Shands Teaching Hospital and
Clinics and an instructor in the
college.

: WEtm
Hint. TTeSgdK,| >' ; H Iff*
WERE LATE FOR CLASS
Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity members dug their way throught the path between Florida Field and the tennis
courts near Murphree Area the other day. They reported conditions were something like the conditions in
Viet Nam slush, tropical branches and narrow paths.
An unidentified soldier makes his way from the left of the picture to help free the poor stranded TEP's
car.

(From Page 1)
Conduct a full-scale public
investigation into areas of finan financial
cial financial aid and services available to
married students. In mind is the
singularly outstanding fact that
most married students and their
children live on less than S3OOO
a year, the figure line for those
families living in poverty condi conditions
tions conditions under U. S. Dept, of Health,
Education and Welfare figures.
Litz told the gathering no one

Litz Calls For Changes

has ever cared for taking the in initiative
itiative initiative in so many areas of student
life as Apathy Party has shown. The
married student situation is only
another specific example of how
Apathy Party cares about the UF
student body and its problems.
We have no fraternity bloc and
no large monetary support. The
campaign costs are coming right
out of our own pockets. We intend
to change the unkept promises of
the same old groups and trite,

Join recent graduates
kbhjjSjfl who are actively participating
major aerospace missions
R 9
/)iv mi Pinfessional Opportunities
Out Repiesentative
Conflict Your Placement Office
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS I
February 3 & 4, 1966
ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING OPPORTUNITIES
fEF s and ME s (BS, MS. PhD)
Telemetry & Communications Systems
Digital & Analog Systems
RF & Microwave
Automatic Tracking Antennas
Command & Control
Microelectronics
m
12]
RADIATION
Melbourne, Florida
Jmuf it tn t/le tj atari
|B- mrnrnmmmmmmm H ==

Wednesday, Feb. 2, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

hackneyed phrases weve heard
from the fraternity-bloc candi candidates
dates candidates before. We want to repre represent
sent represent ALL of the student body.
We are not striving for blue
suits or blue keys or any other
status-awards. We will DO the
things that the others have only
been promising, Litz said.
Were on the bottom of the
ballot to put UF students back on
top of Student Government, Litz
commented.

Page 3



I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Feb. 2, 1966

Page 4

EDITORIALS
smiths the one
ijflost candidates for Student Government positions
2JUdo not traditionally conduct their campaigns
from such places as the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center.
Yet, one candidate in the current campaign is
doing this.
The Clerk of the Honor Court is not one of the
most important positions in Student Government,
despite its position as number five. Some would
contend its importance is minimal and largely a task
fulfilling the clerical implication of the title. Many
of the duties are merely mechanical, such as oper operating
ating operating a tape recorder at Honor Court trials, et al.
,Yet it is a major governmental position in the
UF system.
The Alligator earlier this trimester announced
it would endorse candidates in the races in which
we felt a definite difference could be perceived be between
tween between the two or more candidates involved. Such
is the case here.
Smith, a 19-year-old sophomore from Tampa,
is running from his bed against Doug Gillis, also a
sophomore and a member of Kappa Alpha fraternity.
Smith, president of Interhall Council and president
of Tolbert Area Council, also is a member of Legis Legislative
lative Legislative Council.
He was undersecretary of mens affairs in 1964,
has worked in Homecoming, and is chairman of the
UF Food Service Investigating Committee at present.
Gillis, we feel, falls short of the excellence
exhibited by Smith, who is now residing in the
Health Center, a victim of bleeding ulcers.
Gillis is a member pf a fraternity and Smith
is an independent, but this does not prejudice our
choice. It seems apparent to us that Smith has
more qualifications than does his opponent. In addi addition,
tion, addition, we believe Smiths past reputation as a student
leader speaks for itself.
The clerks position is primarily an administra administrative
tive administrative one. We feel Tom Smith, running on the Decision
Party ticket, best fits the qualifications of the
position. _.......
Smith, in our eyes at least, seems as the most
likely candidate to fill the office and expand its
jurisdiction and authority to encompass a greater
area than that of the present position.
For these reasons, we heartily endorse the can candidacy
didacy candidacy of Tom Smith.
scapegoat
or mistake
*
Somebody we dont know exactly who -- has
~ been trying to place responsibility for sale of
the Charlatan on campus on the shoulders of the
Board of Student Publications.
It may have been someone in Tigert Hall or a top
Student Government official or both who first
started the rumors that the Board of Student Pub Publications
lications Publications had authority over sale on campus of non nonstudent
student nonstudent publications.
At any rate, it just aint so.
The Boards policy revisions (dated Feb. 20,1964)
do NOT include any statements concerning authority
over non-student publications.
In other words, was the Board of Student Publica Publications
tions Publications thrown into the controversy merely as a
smokescreen to make it appear students actually
were opposed to the sale of the Charlatan on campus?
Did someone in Tigert Hall want to use the Board
of Student Publications as a scapegoat in the affair?
Or was it just an honest mistake?
nil*, jacobs
/7[he Alligator cannot fail to commend Student
Party, led by its presidential candidate Buddy
Jacobs, for its stand vis-a-vis the useless littering
of the campus with circus-like banners destined to
be ripped to shreds by the goon squads. Likewise,
we cannot fail to recognize the merit of his proposal
to strengthen the campus electoral process somewhat
by demolishing the checkoff system as it now exists.
Certainly there are motives over and beyond those
of bettering the campus behind the Student Party drive
to clean up elections. However, Mr. Jacobs and
Company are taking a fantastic gamble. He has staked
the result of his electoral bid in large measures on
demolishing the checkoff system and doing without
the publicly-displayed banners.
We can only hope that students will remember,
when they step inside the voting booth on election
day, reasons why Jacobs and Company have not had
their names plastered over every nook and cranny
of the campus. Likewise, if he is serious about the
checkoff system being demolished, then we can only
commend this stand.
They were long in coming, and it takes something
akin to gutsiness to publicly go on the record
against using these traditional two vehicles when
your party is at present running behind in the cam campaign
paign campaign and when your name is less known than that
pf your opponent.

The Florida Alligator
A Mmfa h 0u Pmw PSw Tk%&'
"Cut Out That Holy Spendthrift 1 Stuff"
LETTERS:
fight for beliefs
Editor:
Many of us have watched with a great deal of interest, the emerging
protest movement on the Florida campus.
What does it mean when students begin to speak out against such
things as high prices and sub-standard conditions in the food service
branch? When did the utility rates to housing areas begin to be high
or have they always been and the students are just now beginning to
speak out against this?
One wonders why the administration tends to suppress or put
pressure on faculty members that actively back up the students in
this movement.
One begins to realize after observing this sort of thing for a time
that the Florida student is actually a living, moving and breathing
human being with feelings and a desire to be something more than
a pawn to be moved at the whim of the powers that be.
The administration claims that university life is practice in living
in our society. If this is so, then the American society is run by a
few self-appointed dictators and this I find it hard to believe.
Many of us smile casually when we see a picket marching or a
drummer from some protest movement handing out handbills on
the campus but we listen to what they have to say knowing full well
that students are emerging from an embryonic stage into a life filled
with reality and some at least are willing to make their voice known
in an attempt to make this campus a much better place to live . and
work . and study.
Keep fighting and speaking out for what you believe in. Be willing
as earlier Americans were to stand up face to face with those that
would take away what we hold dear. Right or wrong in our active
voice this is being an American and a Florida student.
William A. Tober, 3ED
just a reminder

Editor:
I should like to remind Colonel
Boaz, Dr. Hartmann. Dr. Enwall,
and Colonel Mitchell (in re. their
letter in Fridays Alligator) that
government exists to serve the
individual citizens, and that
government which considers itself
(I quote) The most patient, toler tolerant
ant tolerant and understanding government
the world has ever seen seems
dangerously inclined toward col collectively
lectively collectively egoistic paternalism.
It is not the place of govern government
ment government to be patient, tolerant and
understanding. If a government
decides that it is, it may also
decide to set limits on its
patience, tolerance and under understanding,
standing, understanding, thus paving the way to
all kinds of hell. Czarist Russia,
may I remind these gentlemen.

thought itself to be patient, toler tolerant
ant tolerant and understanding, thought
itself to be acting in the interest
of the people it ruled.
So does Communist Russia; so
do all statist systems. It is govern governments
ments governments place to serve -- it is each
individuals place to make
decisions.
Ross Ashley, 2UC
Cadet A2C, USAF ROTC
Political Science Major
saved
Editor: y;
I saved the Oklawaha! Now what
do I do with the.,32.043.G19 buckets
of swamp water in my back yard?
Chas. Harper, 7AS
Department of Speech

Florida Politic
by Mike Garc
-7 he race is on and it appears that thp turtl^H
Wgoing to be the winner. The turtle m
case being Scott Kelly.
In October of last year Senator Scott Kelly
organizing student committees on various c
around the state. Kelly had the foresight to see
education was to play a great role in the
governors race and in order to have a cood
dation upon which to build his education plank, Kefl
spent much of his time with student groups.
listened to their ideas, he took note of their
plaints, and most significant of all, was genuin^B
concerned.
Meanwhile, our incumbent Governor Haydon
was busy getting bad publicity on the Reitz
nation. Burns ignored the not-too-subtle
in the JMBA skits, he waved off the AAUCP disH
accreditation of the University of Florida, he waH
antagonistic towards The Alligator in its quest tH
bring the problem out in the open, in short, he
the political significance of the UF was of minoH
concern to a state-wide audience. He was wrong., H
Now our Governor is trying to rectify the situa-M
tion. All of a sudden the university problem is closM
to his heart. He has finally seen that road contrac*
tors and bank presidents do not deliver votes .. H
they buy them. He has lately come to realize thafl
notes on welfare checks do not win the YoungM
Vote. He has suddenly realized that The Alligator*
with a circulation just under the Gainesville Sun*
does have an influence of the voters of Florida*
Briefly ... he woke up . sadly ... a little late.l
But being an astute politician, Ole Slick decide*
he needed a student committee, too.
This weekend he sent his junior aide, Joe Chapman*
to the UF. Complete with Highway Patrol escort,l
sirens and flashing blue lights, the gubernatorial
emissary thundered to the scene of a large gath-1
ering of student supporters ... all four were there.
The meeting, held at the Holiday Inn, was attended
by two Sig Eps .. .one of which was his son Bill, and
Ellsworth Hoppe, FBK member. Another member of
the group was Bruce Culpepper, whose allegiance
to the Governor has recently been in question. He is
now neutral.
Great promises were doled out by Chapman. It is
rumored that Diamond Village might be paved in the
near future if . a certain outstanding village lead leader
er leader joins the Burns committee. It is further rumored
that a certain former president of FBK was made an
INTERESTING offer ... he is thinking about it.
All UF politicos can new be warned. Burns is on
the warpath looking for student support. There will
probably be many offers of varying interest.
Florida Politics does not condone such underhanded
actions . intimidation of college students is not
in the Constitution under duties of the Governor.
It is hard to tell if these actions are under the
direction of the Governor or if they are the brain brainchild
child brainchild of a young aide trying to please his boss.
Whoever is responsible for them should be taken
aside and put up to date on the intelligence of
college students.
The people are tired of blitzers. The voters
are not the boobs they used to be. There are not
enough patronage jobs to satisfy a million voters...
the people are looking for a genuine candidate,
armed with the truth, not with state paychecks.
The race at UF is over and the turtle won.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Editor Benny Cason
Managing editor Ron Spencer
Executive editor Drex Dobson
Assistant managing editor Fran Snider
Sports editor Andy Mo r
Associate editors Bruce Dudley
Yvette Cardozo, Kay Huffmaster
Gary Corseri, Jane Solomon
Copy editors . Bill Martinez, Sharon Robinson
Wire editor Z Steve Hull
Staff writers f. Eunice Tall
Brad Sawtell, Dick Dennis
% Bill Spates, Kathie KeTm,'Sfisar. Froemke
?; Justine Hartman, Gary Martin, NormaJHe
Agnes Fowles, John Mcrhail
Julie McClure, Jeff Denkewalter
Cartoonists Knudsen, Don Wrigh



Feiffer

S; I LIE IR 60? All PAY
;i; HAI/IMS FARTASIES-
I i lie there for mors uher
:} LAORERCE OLIVIER (ME WAY HE
% looker -mm yea rs a eo
l com A LOR6. HE'S IMEARIR6
I BLACK BOOTS ARP CARRIES
| A WHIR HE STEPS OM MY HAIDPS.
J t t

20 years too late

Editor:
Regarding the picture of Dean
Stanley, Bruce Culpepper, Doug
Thompson, and Dean Cherry in
The Alligator, Friday, January
28, 1966, this group of distin distinguished
guished distinguished gentlemen were not in inspecting
specting inspecting the nearly finished hand handball

flash of courage
Editor:
With reference to the Campus Confetti column of January 31, a few
corrections seem in order. First, I never told The Alligator that I
thought Alan Levins selling Charlatan on campus would hurt our
chances of procuring the administrations authorization to sell here.
When asked about it, I told The Alligator It might. On the other
hand, Im not at all sure that Levins direct action approach isnt
the best way of handling the matter. Had Levin not sold on campus
this time and had our petition fallen on deaf ears, we very probably
would have done the same thing next issue.
I was also aware that Levin intended to sell Charlatan on campus
when he came by to purchase the magazines. Even if he had not told
me of his intentions which he did it wouldnt have been too
difficult to figure out Levins plan. After all, what else can you DO
with several hundred Charlatans?
I should add that Levin would very probably have agreed if we had
asked him to refrain from selling the magazine on campus. We could
not in good conscience do this, however, despite the possibility Levins
sales might hurt us, since we believed his actions were morally right.
Charlatan is in no way connected with Freedom Party or any
other party, for that matter. But we do subscribe to many of Free Freedoms
doms Freedoms ideas and efforts. And I, for one, will take one Alan Levin, any
day, over a hundred gutless mealymouths who readily admit that while
they subscribe to a statement of principles or to something like
Charlatans current petition, they are afraid to sign it because some
vague something might happen to them. There are too many cowards
around not to appreciate an occasional flash of courage.
Bill Killeen
I A woman is only a woman but a good
cigar is a smoke. --Rudyard Kipling
An apartment is only an apartment, but
a brand new UG apartment is a GAS! And
its dirt cheap! ANONYMOUS

I'm iajalkiho oom a
PARK STREET I M A
STRAR6E CITY. URIOVEP
AMP JOBLESS-

it. ft' ;

I 8 661 RTO 6f?Y UOALTER MY
wsmv, com Aim. he
PICKS ME UP ADO CARRIES HE
TO A CASTLE ARP WPS MV
IMURPS AMP SIRES HESOR6S
ARP 6IVES HE PRESORTS ARP
SEES THAT I WEI/EP 60 WITH WITHOUT;
OUT; WITHOUT; EVER EVER A6AIR-

ball handball and tennis courts as might be
interpreted from the article under
the picture.
These courts have been com completed
pleted completed for approximately 20 years.
The item under construction at the
present time is a lighting system
for these courts. This fact was

neatly cut from the picture and the
article. For your general informa information,
tion, information, the tennis courts and handball
courts were provided by the Col College
lege College of Physical Education and
Health. The LIGHTING SYSTEM is
now being provided by student
government funds, under the lead leadership
ership leadership of Bruce Culpepper, through
the cooperation of the Intramural
Department of the College of Phy Physical
sical Physical Education and Health.
Incidentally, Dean Cherry is the
Assistant Dean of the College of
Physical Education and Health and
also Chairman of the Intramural
Department.
Paul Varnes, 7ED

I Ms- & Winter Merchandise!
IJ| DRESSES, SUITS, COORDINATES I
j22 S9OO SPECIAL ON I
W BRAS WERE now just I
I S 4 -95 $2 91 4 /ei LQ I
$6.95 $3.88 I
WL'f CRUISE & HOLIDAY WOOLS -- SHIRTS, SLACKS & I
Wfcj. SWEATERS have just been reduced. Shop early while a good I
I B | selection of colors and sizes last.
S Sorry: No Exchanges No Refunds j
I W JUST SAY "CHARGE IT" AT I
I BEAUTY SHOPPE SPECIALITY SHOPPE I
H II AND JI3N W- 13ih STRri T H
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA I
I "IteAe Snvaxi StylUuj, and SntG/U tyaAitianl /3've C n&ated" I

(OHER A 316 BLACK UH UHOUSIRE
OUSIRE UHOUSIRE CAREERS AROOW
A CORNER AW KROCKS
HE POLOR.

[ ;

AW I INS HAPPIPY
61 16 R AFT6R.
I
iiftlih

| the bosss daughter |

Editor:
Marry the bosss daughter? Good
idea. Maryy the Presidents daugh daughter?
ter? daughter? Much better. In these times of
undeclared war, when most
males 18-35 are worrying about
the draft, LBJ writes sympathetic
letters to mothers of 19-year-old
soldiers saying We need your
son in Viet Nam.
Now take the case of Patrick
Nugent, who just happens to be
engaged to Luci Baines Johnson.

Wednesday, Feb. 2, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

I LIB 110 THE SUTTER STILL
conscious. pecPte ioalk
BY AUP ST6P OJ MY HAWS.
IT 8661 W TO SMOO3.
Ia) ALTER hIB\J6R HAS
owe&sjoop ne.
i
I
i
i

Hes just been transferred from
duty in Texas to a unit of the Air
National Guard in Washington.
Now, far be it from me to cast
aspersions on LBJs sense of fair
play, but it is just possible that
there are going to be an awful lot
of popular girls around Washing Washington,
ton, Washington, most of them daughters of
Democratic senators.
I wonder if General Hersheyhas
a daughter?
Jim Norman, 3AS

Page 5



Page 6

5, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Feb. 2, 1966

Igator classifiedsl

for sale
WILL GIVE AWAY $l9O equity in
Colliers Encyclopedia set. C-1964.
24 volumes. Cash balance of $l9O
includes 10 Junior Classics. Used
6 hours. 376-0693. (A-81-6t-c).
TWO BEDROOM, CCB, lOOxlOO
lot, S6OO equity, take over pay payments
ments payments of $66 per month. 911 NW
55th Terr. Ph. 372-5869 after 5
p.m. (A-81-st-c).
1962 ALLSTATE motor scooter.
125 cc. 3-speed. $l5O. Bryan Seip,
285 Sledd, 372-9184. (A-82-st-p).
GIBSON CUSTOM DUAL PICK UP
SOLID ELECTRIC GUITAR with
Gibson Scout amplifier. 10 speak speaker
er speaker reveb. Call Brad, 372-9435,
rm. 460, MurphreeC.(A-82-3t-p).
FARM EQUIPMENT 1 Flexo
3 point hitch Ford Harrow, $385.
1 attachment. Two 16 bottom
plows with colters and 3 point lift,
$l5O. 1-set wheel weights, front
and rear for Ford Dexter Tractor,
$l5O. Phone 376-5826 or see at
Linda Ann Court, south Hwy. 441.
(A-74-tf-nc).
1963 YAMAHA 125 cc motorcycle.
Has electric starter, turn signals,
plus other accessories. A-l con condition.
dition. condition. Must sell! S2OO. Will throw
crash helmet and face shield with
deal. Call 372-6450 after 6, p.m.
I
Home all day on weekends/(A weekends/(A---80-st-c).
--80-st-c). weekends/(A---80-st-c).
MUST SELL 1959 VW, excellent
condition, 4 new nylon tires, sun sunroof,
roof, sunroof, low mileage. 378-2226.
Afternoon only. (A-78-ts-c).

[free free free;
I
Bill's Barber Shopg
js 228 W. UNIV. AVE. (ACROSS FROM FLORIDA THEATER) h
£ G#£ a FREE SHOESHINE with each Haircut 55
(Tuesday's ad should've also said SHINE, not SHAVE)
i Al Maxwell is the Best in Town i
Good Haircuts Also i
[_BRING THIS AD OFFER GOOD THROUGH FEBRUARY Bth_J
BIG WEEK V
* AU:10-3:20-5:25-7:30-9:40
TECHNIc|bR
hilarious SBKmjk j

v
DB3-=OIJIIiEP 1
Clsf ; B V "I ~bv I
2 S7/0 WAS DA! I. Y 1 H|| P| I|| K rete actor
2 /A/ 8 PM K) Jl|| HPI 1 II <>r <,, I, e
TICKETS NOW 1 B Sl Wlii EjT a
ON SALE TECHNICOLOR-PANAVISION FROM WARNER BROS. (.El C&IS'Z,
*l~, g *. 'I HI r : '; ->-

for sale
ONE NEW TONNEAU COVER and
one workshop manual for Austin
Healey Sprite Mark I. 376-4126.
(A-83-3t-c).
2 BEDROOM 1958 Hinslee 10x47
trailer and tool shed. $1,995. Lo Located
cated Located at Town and Country Park,
lot W-l. Ph. 378-2768. (A-76-
lOt-c).
1962 ALLSTATE motor scooter,
125 cc, 3-speed, good condition.
$125. 372-7648. (A-84-3t-c).
1964 HONDA SUPER HAWK3OScc.
Good condition; electric starter.
Best offer. Call Don, 376-0006,
119 NW 11th Ave. (A-84-3t-c).
}
services
OUR MAID NOW AVAILABLE to
care for one baby, age from 2-1/2.
Excellent care by the week at the
regular rate. Flavet 3. 372-3788.
(M-82-3t-c).
NEED HELP IN MSC-160 or 390?
Dont despair! I used to teach the
piano labs and I can help you learn
those chords. Call 376-0445. (M (M---83-3t-c).
--83-3t-c). (M---83-3t-c).
UNITED RENT-ALLS. We rent
most anything. Roll-away beds,
trucks, all tools, party equipment.
Call us for all your needs. 376-
2835, 625 NW Bth Ave. (M-75-
ts-c).
WHITE HOUSEWIFE will help
clean house, iron, and do mending.
Either 1/2 day or whole day. Call
372-5269, not after 9.(M-84-3t-c).

autos
1962 VOLKSWAGEN, real clean,
radio, whitewalls, luggage rack.
Drop by and have a look. Rm. 406
Simpson Hall, or call 376-9124.
(G-81-ts-c).
1957 CHEVY 2 dr. Sedan, 6 cyl.
stick. Good transportation. See at
1331 NW 6th Ave. or call 376-
1329 after 5. (G-83-3t-p).
1958 FIAT, good condition. Buying
new car. Contact Dave Peeples,
372-9454. Best offer. (G-83-st-c).
1962 CORVAIR 500, clean and in
excellent condition, 30,000 miles,
standard transmission, good
clutch, recently tuned. Call 376-
0891 after 5 p.m. (G-83-st-p).
1964 OLDSMOBILE 4 do All extras including factory air
conditioning. Superb condition.
Priced for quick sale. 376-8398.
(G-84-st-c).
1965 DODGE DART. AC, all power,
270 V-8. $250 down and take over
payments at 4-1/2%. Call 378-
2931 after 5 p.m. (G-84-st-c).
64 MG MIDGET. All extras, low
mileage. Student must sell. $1350.
372-3251. 1045 NE 13th Place.
(G-78-ts-c).
62 DELUXE VW Station Wagon.
Good tires, radio, heater. Will
reduce price $lO per day until
sold. 215-D, Flavet 3, after 5.
(G-75-10t-c).
f L L- ;
WANT CYCLE, 200cc or more.
Will trade or sell 1959 PEUGEOT,
in good condition, recent overhaul,
4 new tires. $450. Call 2-1076 or
leave number and address at 602
NW 13th St., above Teds Tavern.
(G-82-3t-c).

An uncommon and fascinating film...a piercing and powerful
contemplation of the passage of man upon this earth.
plus Ist Showing This Generation
The Grandaddy Os All SERIALS
t h e" IRONCL AWCH APTERS V 2-3
7th 1:45 4:15 6;45 9:15 CLAW 3:30 6:40 8:30

wanted
MALE ROOMMATE. Have lost
roommate. One months rent free.
Pool, air conditioning. 1405 NW
10th Terr., apt. 17. Ph. 378-4457.
(C-82-st-p).
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
1/3 of 2 bedroom apt. 1 block
from campus. $33.33 monthly plus
utilities, and air conditioning. Call
372-6229 after 7 p.m. (C-82-
st-nc).
STUDENT HUSTLER as exclusive
campus distributor of hot selling
item. Commission average S3O
weekly, for one hours work. Write
Party Pix, 425 South Blvd., 2 C,
Evanston, Illinois. (C-83-3t-p).
STUDENT EATERS. Our famous
complete dinner, 97?. Served noon
and night. Longs Cafeteria, down downtown.
town. downtown. (C-81-ts-c).
REGISTERED NURSE for pedia pediatricians
tricians pediatricians office. State experience,
references, and permanence.
Write Box 12427, Univ. Station.
(C-74-ts-c).
RIDERS WANTED TO COCOA and
points between. Leave Fri 5 p.m.,
return Sun. afternoon.s6.oo round roundtrip;
trip; roundtrip; $3.50 one way. Call 372-6450,
Mon.-Thurs. after 6 p.m. (C-84-
lt-c).
DESPERATE. Need the Meats
Judging Handbook for AL 423. Will
buy, rent or borrow. Call Sara
Rosenberg, 372-3621, Rm. 1027,
Rawlings. (C-84-3t-p).
ONE BABY KITTEN to love with
or without a mitten. Call SOS at
378-3767. Hi Mark. (C-84-lt-c).

helpwanted
GRADUATE STUDENT, student
wives, or men and women with
college degree to participate in
research project. $1.25 per hour.
Phone Mrs. Williams, 2-2955.
Evenings or weekends. (E-80-
st-c).
GIRL FRIDAY, approx. 20 hrs.
per week, for light office duties
in Gainesvilles newest auto ser service
vice service center. Call 2-3010. 8-6.
(E-80-ts-c).
YOUNG LADIES to work from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m., weekdays.
Good hourly pay plus food half
price. Also other hours available.
Apply Kings Food Host, 1430 SW
13th St. (E-82-3t-c).
MODELS. Part-time for fashion
and advertising, some experience
helpful, sizes 8-10-12. Call 372-
1226. (E-82-3t-c).
MALE HELP to work hours 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Arranged week days
good hourly pay plus food half
price. Also have a couple openings
on 5 p.m. to 12 p.m. shift. Apply
Kings Food Host, 1430 SW 13th
St. (E-82-3t-c).
GIRLS. Sell Holiday Magic, make
$l5O S2OO per month. Work aver average
age average 2 hrs. per day. Call 376-5407,
between 6-8 p.m. (E-84-ts-c).
Visit The 1/2 Price
Table At The U
Shop: 1620 W. Univ.
Ave. Carolyn Plaza.
jtiei/br ....
tiSMOU(

: : SDQOH;
gWy SgTjTECHNICOLOg
I FHR V THimC r ,r
FIRgMJJEAS^WIN^
bars than brains!
IrSmungN
II HOPELESS:
I wmoTgiwg
I c h ma5USM ff #3 ?
I Hayward lk- \



real estate
BEDROOM, 1 bath CCB house.
Jarport and large storage area,
lot with shurbs and
rees. 1706 NE 7th Terr., 376*
096. (1-75-1 Ot-c).
rHE BEST TO YOU FROM DOB DOBiON.
iON. DOBiON. Personal and complete real
[state and insurance service. TOM
)OBSON AGENCY, 2908 NW 13th
3t., 372-1473. (I-72-ts-c).

CniDcrsmcs of America
£l' all tn \nijitm tlji'sc presents sljali mme. (Hirer tina: V
Ijatnitg fulfilled all % reaJpr % imposfb im tljc aatlumtifs of
| tips institution.tfjr 'nt < Am*rica%ritt?r9tto.
.% ' .it | UriUf all the Inmors.apprrfcmtm#.

I mm Hr
P m m V Bf **
fe. fl W m
~; r BmBB

Where will you go from here?
i i i _i?r? i ti a

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in the number and scope of training and educational

V 111 II IC I IUI IIUw I VII IM rfVW w
TO ARRANGE AN INTERVIEW, PLEASE SEE YOUR PLACEMENT OFFICE. IF INTERVIEW L? #
CONVENIENT AT THIS TIME, SEND CONFIDENTIAL RESUME TO MR. T. H. DUDLEY, DEPT* C-26 #
MATERIALS I I I
: J >ns'\ Texas Instruments r ;
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SERVICES /
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| CLASSIFIEDS |

for rent
3 BEDROOM DUPLEX, unfur unfurnished
nished unfurnished apt. Kitchen unfurnished.
Quiet location in SE section. Kin Kincaid
caid Kincaid Road. Rent $75 monthly. Ph.
372-2648. (B-82-st-c).

for rent
SINGLE ROOM for male upper upperclassman
classman upperclassman or graduate student.
Well-furnished in boarding house.
Private entrance. Call 376-9247.
1319 NW 2nd Ave. (B-81-st-c).

assistance programs available to quahtied llers.

Currently, Texas Instruments has a broad spectrum
of openings for BS, MS, BBA, MBA and Ph.D
graduates. Typical starting assignments are in #
such areas as:

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING/ENGINEERING
MECHANICS/ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING/ l
PHYSICS/INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING/MAN- J
AGEMENT SCIENCES. I
Representatives from Texas Instruments will be
on your campus #
FEBRUARY 7TH AND BTH
m

for rent
LIVING ROOM AND BEDROOM,
furnished, ground floor, refrig,
only, near all student require requirements,
ments, requirements, comfortably heated, men
only. 376-6494. (B-84-st-c).

Wednesday, Feb. 2, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

for rent
NEED 3rd MALE ROOMMATE for
2 bedroom A.C. apartment. Large,
close to campus. 921 SW 6th Ave.,
Ph. 378-4176. (B-79-10t-c).
2 BEDROOM BRICK DUPLEX.
New, very clean. Immediate oc occupancy.
cupancy. occupancy. Unfurnished. Quiet neigh neighborly
borly neighborly atmosphere. SBS mo. 376-
0342. 4142 NW 9th St. (B-79-ts-c).
QUIET FOR LADY OR GENTLE GENTLEMAN,
MAN, GENTLEMAN, business or professional.
1 bedroom, air conditioned, in
Cheshire Apts. No pets. S9O per
month, lease required. Ph. 372-
3488 or 376-4360. (B-81-ts-c).
COMFORTABLE ROOM. Lavatory,
2 closets, private entrance. 2
blocks Cl campus. Day, week,
month. A very special rate. 378-
4645. (B-83-ts-c).
NICE ROOM in quiet private home
to mature student. Good mattress,
small heater, refrig, privileges.
376-6046. (B-83-3t-c).
SPARKLING MODERN 2 bedroom
furnished apt. immediately avail available.
able. available. SIOO, no lease. Air condition conditioning;
ing; conditioning; carport. 3316 NW 21st St.,
376-0894. (B-83-ts-c).
MALE TO SHARE 1 bedroom apt.
1- blocks from campus. $32.50
per month. 1113 SW Ist Ave., apt.
2. 378-1939. (B-83-4t-p).
MALE TO SHARE 1 bedroom apt.
A.C. and heat, 2 pools, enclosed
patio, privacy. New, large and
beautiful. 503 NW 21st Lane, apt.
7. $45 per month. (B-83-4t-p).
NEED MALE ROOMMATE. Apt.
301 in plush Univ. Gardens. Call
372-3731 or Jerry, 372-9252, rm.
264; $41.25 per month. (B-83-
st-c).
NEW 4 BEDROOM furnished apt.
1 block from campus. Corner of
SW 12th St. and SW- 3rd Ave.
Central heat and air conditioning.
$2lO monthly. Ideal study set-up.
372-3576 day, 372-4692 home. (B (B---76-ts-c).
--76-ts-c). (B---76-ts-c).
FRONT CORNER SINGLE ROOM.
Also double to share. Male stu students,
dents, students, UF employees. Kitchen,
study room. 231 SE 2nd St. (B (B---80-ts-c).
--80-ts-c). (B---80-ts-c).
NICE FURNISHED 2 room garage
apartment. Suitable for 1 or 2.
Quiet neighborhood. Call 376-1730.
After 1 p.m. (B-72-ts-c).
TWO BEDROOM furnished apt. 319
NW Ist St., downtown. SSO for one.
$65 for two or more. Mr. Kaplan,
372-0481. (B-69-ts-c).
LARGE DIVIDED ROOM, 12x22,
private entrance and shower, utili utilities
ties utilities and linens included. Ph. 372-
3191 or 372-8903. (B-77-st-c).
2- ROOM SUITE, linens and
utilities furnished, quiet, private
entrance, 3 blocks N. Baptist Stu Student
dent Student Center. 376-2072. (B-84-
lt-c).
ATTRACTIVE one bedroom apt.
Furn., AC, heat, backyard and
BBQ. Perfect for 1 or 2. S9O/
month. Call Viki at 378-1320 after
6 p.m. (B-84-3t-p).
' lost-found
LOST Black Wallet between Hub
and North Hall. Keep money, but I
need contents. Call Barry, rm. 775.
376-9289. (L-84-2t-p).
LOST Black Star Sapphire mens
ring, 14 carat, white grid. Im Immeasurable
measurable Immeasurable .sentimental v 1 Ut. Re Reward.
ward. Reward. Call Gordon at 7o-1345.
U -84-2 t-c).

Page 7



, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Feb. 2, 1966

Page 8

UFs TV Program
Emphasizes SG

UF students and their self selfgoverning
governing selfgoverning system will be empha emphasized
sized emphasized on the universitys promo promotional
tional promotional television program, The
Second 100, during February on
Station WUFT-TV (Channel 5)
here.
In 15-minute interviews, Student
Affairs Dean Lester L. Hale and
Student Body President Bruce Cul Culpepper
pepper Culpepper appear on the programs,
which will be shown later in Or Orlando
lando Orlando (WFTV), Palm Beach
(WPTV), Pensacola (WEAR) and
Jacksonville (WJXT) as part of
weekly schedules arranged for
those cities by the Universitys
Alumni Association and Florida
Blue Key, co-sponsors of The
Second 100.
Dean Hale will discuss the role
Leaders
(From Page I)
tion of free literature, but that it
must enforce the campus rule
concerning unauthorized sales.
Weve had a long-standing rule
on campus about selling things,
Reitz said. We must always be
concerned with the orderliness of
the campus whether its the sale
of peanuts or ploughshares.
Reitz said he was proud of the
UFs record of academic free freedom
dom freedom and indicated he was in
general agreement with the Amer American
ican American Association of University
Professors stand on academic
freedom.
The UF president said he did not,
however, think the AAUP view on
academic freedom included what he
called the sale of immoral or
debasing literature.
Places mentioned as possibili possibilities
ties possibilities for the free speech area
included the information booth a across
cross across from the Hub, in front of
University Auditorium and in front
of the main library present site
of protest activities.
In the main, the meeting was held
in a friendly atmosphere.
At one point, however, underly underlying
ing underlying hostility crept through in an
exchange between University Re Religious
ligious Religious Association President
George Blaha and Levin.
Blaha first called Levin a gen gentle
tle gentle man, and I use the term loose loosely.
ly. loosely.
Levin countered by calling Blaha
a student, and I use the term
loosely.
In addition to Culpepper, Litz,
Blaha and Levin, other student
leaders present included Bruce
Starling, president of Florida Blue
Key; Jake Dyal, chancellor of the
Honor Court; Steve Cheeseman,
Buddy Jacobs, and Peter Boylboll,
presidential candidates.
Also, David West, Board of Stu Student
dent Student Publications member; Larry
Tyree, Florida Union leader;
Benny Cason, Alligator editor;
Clive Taylor, chairman of the In Interfraternity
terfraternity Interfraternity Council; Miss Lynn
Wolly, Mortar Board president;
Miss Susan Bartley, Panhellenic
chairman; and Sid Stubbs, former
Honor Court chancellor.
Air Force ROTC
Cadets Travel
Fourteen Air Force ROTC ca cadets
dets cadets toured Eglin Air Force Base,
Friday, where they visited the Cli Climatic
matic Climatic Laboratory and the Flight
Line and watched a demonstration
of static firing. The cadets had
lunch at the Officers Club.
Dale Mabry Squadron of the Ar Arnold
nold Arnold Air Society set up the base
visitation.

his office plays in combatting the
impersonalization of a large uni university
versity university and Culpepper describes
student self-government in higher
education.
The program is tied to the con concept
cept concept that the university is now in
its second century of progress
producing definite contributions t
Floridas greatness. Faculty an
administrative guests have ap
peared each week, beginning las
September and continuing throug'
next May, discussing differer
topics of interest.
Other programs scheduled for
February and early March include
Dr. M. S. Heidingsfield, directo directoof
of directoof the University of Floridas Ir
ternational Marketing Resource
Center; noted Southern historian
Dr. R. W. Patrick; Assistant Dea
of Academic Affairs FranklinDotv
and world famous philosopher Dr.
Charles Morris.
Angel Flight
Elects Officers
The Dale Mabry Squadron of An Angel
gel Angel Flight, sponsored by Arnold Air
Society, held elections Thursday.
Those elected were: Commands.
Joye Schwartz, Executive Com Commander-Nancy
mander-Nancy Commander-Nancy Calhoun, Comp Comptroller-Sue
troller-Sue Comptroller-Sue Nichols, Administra Administrative
tive Administrative Officer-ConnieOgle, Informa Informations
tions Informations Officer-Marsha Gilbert,
Operations Officer-Casey Jack Jackson,
son, Jackson, Historian-Kitty Golnek,
Pledge Trainer-Jennifer McKin McKinnon
non McKinnon and Supply Officer-Sharon
Lawler.
Eleven proud cherubs became
angels last Sunday. The pledges
were initiated during a formal in initiation
itiation initiation ceremony conducted by
Commander Joye Schwartz.
Pledge trainer Jennifer McKin McKinnon
non McKinnon presented each girl her
wings, the symbol of Angel
Flight, and the rank of second
lieutenant. After the ceremony the
new angels presented the flight
with a gift from their pledge class
and a song they had written.
Those initiated were: Jill Be Bebout,
bout, Bebout, Blythe Bunnebell, Carol Bay Bayer,
er, Bayer, Penny Cannan, Guinilla Emp Empten,
ten, Empten, Kethy Heatherton, Jackie
Modesett, Susie Owens, Carol
Samuel, Pat Streitman, Lin White Whiteman.
man. Whiteman.

Uniquely
Entertaining .
1 Bt/umlQlm'i I I
J Joan W I
f as developed especially forJ
presentation in the f I
sanctuary / I
f by The Bishop's Company I
I of California ... I I
I Thursday, February 3 I }
I 8:00 p.m. I I
University §r J
V J Methodist Church 1 J
UNIVERSITY AVENUE

*
" Kr
- MBI; .I^^-
V \ \
, A.. \ m vl
1 j m |p\ \ m v
*** t. -Qjm r,. mk- \ \ \
St* 1 \
m I I H&l tll
ANYBODY FOR FRUIT?
have come out in favor of health and this is my way of showing it,
says Holly Howard, 2UC. I feel that I have just as much right to sell
fruit as they do to sell Charlatans. You cant eat a Charlatan and as a
mattler of fact, some of the Charlatan is pretty hard to stomach.
Miss Howard sold pears, apples, oranges, bananas and grapefruit.
Actually Im not protesting anything, she said. Whoever buys the
fruit can use it to protest whatever they like.
Delta Chi Slates Region Meet
TA 11 /-I 1 r A A_ _ -1 11! /- 'll 1* Al_ 1

Delta Chi fraternity, celebrating
its fortieth anniversary atUF, will
be host to a regional convention
of nine southern chapters of the
national fraternity this weekend.
The three-day convention will
begin with registration Friday and
lead into various discussions Sat Saturday.
urday. Saturday. Deans Frank T. Adams and
William G. Cross will be present
to contribute to the discussions.
Delta Chi National President
'laude B. Layfield, region nine
executive, Dr. William P. Dome
and executive secretary Harold E.
Buchanan will make the trip to

Gainesville for the convention.
Over fifty Delta Chis from Uni University
versity University of Alabama, Rollins Col College,
lege, College, Auburn University, Florida
State University, Mississippi State
University, University of Georgia,
Troy State College, and Livingston
State College are expected to at at
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FOR GATOR ADS Ms~U
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Suite 4
Gainesville, Fla.
Tel. 378-2476
representing
THE COLLEGE LIFE
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exclusively to College Men



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UF will be represented on the
lademoiselle College Board this
ear by Loueen Dee Henderson,
ud? Huggins, Pat Keuning,Sharon
: obi ns on, and Carol Lynn
chwartz.
Eiach College Board member
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Dave joined Ford Motor Company in July, 1961. II
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Dave has been impressed by the extent to which management encourages I
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idea is accepted for development, the initiator is frequently given the B
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The experience of Dave Tenniswood is not unusual. Ford Motor Company B
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Mademoiselle fashion editors se select
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The Board is composed of some
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Competition, a contest designed
to recognize young women with
talent in art, writing, editing,
photography, layout, fashion de design,
sign, design, merchandising, retail pro promotion
motion promotion or advertising. Board
members are selected on the basis
of entries they submit showing a ability
bility ability in one of these fields.
Each girl will remain on the
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During this time she will accumu accumulate
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Once a girl has been selected
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pKSMapg v-X 6 >. Xlap. < >;. ~ --
fI ml a J Br j I
WERE GETTING READY
Is religion still relevant on the university campus? is the subject of the first debate of the Forums
Committee to be held Thurs. 8:15 p.m. at university Auditorium.
The debate follows a recent attack on the religious atmosphere at the UF by Ron Lanier chairman of the
Religion in Life Committee, who pointed up aBible Belt attitude of most of the religious organizations.
Debators are Dr. Emmanuel Git lin of the humanities department who will debate the affirmative and
Dr. Thomas L. Hanna of the philosophy department who will take the negative side.

Wednesday, Feb. 2, 19GG, The Florida Alligator.

Concert Set
A joint concert and student re recital
cital recital will be presented by Phi Mu
Alpha Sinfonia mens music fra fraternity
ternity fraternity and Sigma Alpha iota
womens music sorority tonight,
at 8:15 p.m. in University Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium.
Works by Mozart, Houhaness,
Menotti and other comtemporary
and baroque composers will be
presented by two organizations.
A#
v J sr |9Hr %
:ok
NEW JEANIE ?
\
Julianne Belger (2UC) will be a
participant in the 15th annual
Jeanie With the Light Brown
Hair auditions to be held at
Stephen Foster Memorial Feb. 12.
The winner will receive a cash
scholarship of SI,OOO, along with
the coveted Jeanie title, to as assist
sist assist in her musical education.
Entries are restricted to those
in tne '. n to 21 year age group
and whose families are legal
residents of Florida.
Miss Belger has selected
Beautiful Dreamer as her Ste Stephen
phen Stephen Foster number, and will also
sing Monicas Aria by Gian-
Carlo Menotti.
Visit The 1/2 Price
Table At The "U
Shop: 1620 W. Uniu.
Ave. Carolyn Plaza.
L
1C GATOR ADS \ (
y ARE DREAMY J>

Page 9



Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Feb. 2, 1966

Film notebook

That Darn Cat, at the Plaza Theatre, is so darn cute because that
darn Disney is so completely out of touch with that darn American
teenager. Why is it that the teen set are depicted in films as either
wild, sex-crazed hoodlums or as noble savages in the Never-Never
land of the Bikini Beach Party-style pictures?
The story is, in short, about Hayley Mills and her cat who, through
accomplished editing, help lead an FBI agent to the lair of two kidnap kidnappers.
pers. kidnappers.
Predictably enough even the criminals are cute. The only interesting
character is Roddy McDowell as a prissy and willing victim of Mother
love. But hes only in a subplot.
Briefly mentioned is the fact that Hayley Mills and her older sister,
Dorothy Provine, have the house to themselves while the parents are
away on a summer long vacation.
Now imagine, Miss Mills and boyfriend, supposedly two healthy teen teenagers,
agers, teenagers, left alone for long hours at the beach and the house. What would
normally happen under such circumstances? In this picture she goes
to bed early and the boyfriend watches TV and raids the refrigerator.
Are they kidding us?
This is not to suggest that what was lacking was a good, juicy bed bedroom
room bedroom scene. Merely that something, no matter how innocent, would
have happened and should have been dealt with.
The implication may arise that only films made in some grimy,
harshly realistic style are acceptable to this critic. Actually any form,
be it fantasy, surrealism, dark comedy or whatever, is appropriate
as long as it is based on reality. The denizens of Disneys world are
merely hoked-up hulks suited to the tastex of pablum-fed adults and
unimaginative children.

PHI SIGMA: Today, 8 p.m., 204 McCarty. Dr. S. Shank, Agronomy
Dept.: Chromosomes, Genomes, and Interspecific Hybridization.
Everyone is invited; refreshments served.
PSI CHI: Today, 3:30 p.m., FU Aud.Dr. Charles Eriksen: Person Personality
ality Personality and Perception.
LATIN AMERICAN COLLOGUIUM: Today, 8 p.m., 215 FU. Dr.
Richard Sheridan, Dept, of Economics, Univ. of Kansas: In Search of
the Plantation History of the British West Indies.
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS: Today, 7:30
p.m., 334 Engineering Bldg.
BETA ALPHA PSI: Today, 3:40 5 p.m., 13 Matherly. Tutoring
sessions for Accounting 211 and 212.
GAMMA BETA PHI: Today, 7 p.m., 116 FU.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: Thurs.. Feb. 3, 5 p.rn.,
4th floor of Library. Prayer meeting.
BOWLING TOURNAMENT: Winning mens and womens teams will
go to ACU tournament. Local tournament set for Feb. 15, 16. 17, Palm
Lanes, 4 p.m. each day. Sign up in 315 FU by Feb. 11. Students will pay
for games.
PRE-LAW SOCIETY: Thurs., Feb. 3, 8 p.rn.. Law School Aud. Dean
Latty of Duke Law School: The Study of Law.
PHI CHI THETA: Thurs., Feb. 3, 7:30 p.m., 208 FU. Prof. G. R.
Simms:. Your Major and Your Career.
PROPELLER CLUB: Thurs., Feb. 3, 7:30 p.m., 324 FU. Dr. Mc-
Pherson: International Trade: Commodity Agreements and Economic
Division.
ANNUAL INTERCOLLEGIATE DUPLICATE BRIDGE TOURNA TOURNAMENT:
MENT: TOURNAMENT: Thurs., Feb. 3,7 p.m., FU Social Rm. Tournament Director
is Dr. John E. Crops. Sign up in 315 FU.
Charcoal Broiled
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Never! cause we know o good thing when
we see it- So do our advertisers.

by Gerald Jones

Veteran Group Organizes
In Support Os Gl Bill

More than 1000 students will be
affected by the GI Bill now being
considered by Congress, stated
Bart Kimball, president of UFs
Veterans Committee for the GI
Bill.
Kimball, an Air Force veteran
and UF sophomore, was elected
president of the organization at
its first meeting, held last Thurs Thursday
day Thursday night.
In addition to the veterans at attending
tending attending the UF. Kimball stated,
There are approximately 7,000
veterans living in the Gainesville
area who will be affected by this
legislation.
It is our belief that most of
these veterans are deeply con concerned
cerned concerned about the new GI Bill, and
are seeking an organization such
as the one we have formed to pro provide
vide provide an outlet for their feelings on
this subject.
When asked, to whom the newGl
Bill was aimed, Kimball referred
to the statement made by Con Congressman
gressman Congressman Dante B. Fascell, repre representative
sentative representative from the 4th district.
Fascell states the bill isaimedat
the young man that had to interrupt
his education to serve his country
in the armed forces.
Kimball elaborated on the aims
of the GI Bill, Basically it will
mean groceries on the table and
new clothes for the kids to married
veteans. To the single veteran it
will mean he can cut down on his
off campus job and hit the books
harder than he has been able with
the job.
The VCGIB, said Kimball,
will work toward the goal of
acquainting the veteran with the

Why So I
Excited?

details, pointing out the benefits
and deficiencies of the bill pre presently
sently presently being proposed. Kimball
was quick to point out that there
was more than one version of the
GI Bill before Congress and that
its each individuals choice as to
the version and the manner in which
he informs his congressman of his
choice of the best bill. The VCGIB
is merely a clearing house for in infoiynation
foiynation infoiynation concerning the GIBill.
The VCGIB is planning to esta establish
blish establish a booth at the entrance to the
main library to solicit names of
other veterans interested in this
bill.
Kimball suggested all those in interested
terested interested in this bill should write
their congressman seeking his
support of one of the versions
of this bill.
The VCGIB president plans to
continue with a UF veterans club
after Congress acts on the bill.
He indicated the club would be of
a service nature, seeking to help
the veteran returning to univer university
sity university life.

UNIVERSITY CITY BRIDGE CLUB
NOW LOCATED NEAR U. of F.
AT 1921 N.W. 2nd. AVENUE
GAMES EVERY WEDNESDAY
AND FRIDAY EVENINGS AT 7:30 P.M.
EVERYONE WELCOME

Kimball said, The purpose of
this committee is to organize the
veterans attending the UF and the
veterans in the Gainesville area.
Our goal is to inform the Florida
delegation in Congress of our de desire
sire desire for the passage of the new GI
Bill.
Kimball opened the floor to sug suggestions
gestions suggestions on how they might work
effectively for the Bills passage.
Suggestions accepted were: a pub publicity
licity publicity chairman is to be appointed
to prepare news releases concern concerning
ing concerning the formation of the group and
their goals; individual members
are to contact other veterans at
the U of F that did not attend;
letters are to be written to the
veterans congressmen asking
their support for the GI Bill; sup support
port support is sought from the local chap chapter
ter chapter of the American Legion; and
an invitation is to be rendered to
Rep. Billy Matthews to speak to
the committee at the next meeting.
The next scheduled meeting will
be held February 11 at 7:00 p.m.
in the Florida Union.



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BOTH WIN MONDAY GAMES

Cats, Vandy Ready For Big One

By UPI Wires
Kentucky and Vanderbilt are both ready for
their showdown tonight which may possibly
decide the eventual national and NCAA basket basketball
ball basketball champion.
The second-ranked Wildcats stretched their
perfect record to 15-0 Monday night by trounc trouncing
ing trouncing Alabama 82-62 while the Commoddores,
ranked No. 3 in the nation, rallied well in the
final minutes to overcome Auburn 68-63.
The two Southeastern Conference powers
clash for the second time this season at Nash Nashville
ville Nashville on Wednesday. The winner will be favored
to go on to capture the conference title and an

HSI W1 TTT-TVI a

Wednesday, Feb. 2, 1966 SPORTS
i -- 6

1
UF Baseball Team
Prepares For Season
UFs baseball team, headed by Coach Dave Fuller, began
practice yesterday in preparation for its 1966 season. Facing the
Gators this year is a schedule of thirty-five games, the first
being against Florida Southern on March 1.
The first home game is March 10, also against the Lakeland
Mocs.
Returning to this years squade are 14 lettermen from last
years team which posted a 9-3 conference record finishing second
to Auburn in the Eastern Division of the SEC.
Ray Rollyson, Dan Griffin. Kelly Prior and southpaw Ned Wool Woolfolk
folk Woolfolk will probably see most of the action on the mound for the
Gators while Bill Blomgren. Bob Hawkins, Tom Shannon and Jack
Kenworthy should be the big sticks at the plate. One of the teams
better hitters, Brownie Johnston, is scholastically ineligible.
Intersectional foes playing at Gainesville this year are Yale on
March 21 and 22, and William and Mary on March 29 and 30.
The Gators will also face traditional SEC foes Auburn, Georgia,
Kentucky, Tennessee and Vanderbilt.
Once again, Auburn should be the team to beat if the Gators are
to win the Southeastern Conference.
Iftobs jfle f
jSatne obs
itle >[ TO)at Wtytb
jtot Cnnctjes Him,
fllalies jilt :Poor
Sntieeii. ..&#aeg>sae
Um m lirnd tk tot m. uloout Clmi/im.?
Its Time For DECISION
Its Time For CFIEESEMAN
(PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT)

automatic berth in the NCAA championships.
In their previous meeting this season at Lex Lexington,
ington, Lexington, Kentucky beat the Commodores.
Alabama surged to a 37-36 lead over Ken Kentucky
tucky Kentucky early in the second half when Robert
Hickey poured in six straight points after in intermission.
termission. intermission.
But the Wildcats ended all doubt by retali retaliating
ating retaliating with 17 straight points in a four-minute
span.
Pat Riley of Kentucky led all scorers with
25 points. Tom Kron added 18, Larry Conley
had 14 and Louis Dampier 13. Hickey sparked
the Alabama offensive with 15 points.

Page 11

gg^SSM
%.
COBRAS PRIMED
Several Cobras participated in the 1965 Daytona Continental. More
will be in action this weekend for the 1966 renewal of what many be believe
lieve believe to be the biggest sports car race in North America.
-^Moor-Cl
SPORTS EDITOR P^fly^H
The luck of the Irish certainly couldnt be equated with that of
the Florida basketball team.
Heres a team that looked like (and still could be for that
matter) the darkhorse in the SEC race. Along comes another
darkhorse and, just like that, the Gators look like also rans.
Students have been moaning and groaning ever since Monday
nights game, where they heard the Gators take it squarely on the
chin from the Mississippi State Bulldogs.
Most of the people Ive talked to have given the opinion that the
Gators choked. This possibility cannot be ignored, but I dont
believe it myself.
It is very hard for a team to play one good road game after
another, after another, after another. Somewhere, there has got
to be a letdown. For Florida, it was Monday night.
Let us not discount Mississippi State. Here is the most un unpredictable
predictable unpredictable team in the whole Southland. The Bulldogs have now
beaten Auburn, Tennessee, and Florida, losing to Alabama and
Tulane along the way. They are a young team, and have on occas occasion
ion occasion shown flashes of brilliance. Monday is a good example.
Floridas loss to them wont look so bad if, later in the season,
the Bulldogs knock off Kentucky or Vandy in Starkville.
Hard To Swallow
The loss is a hard thing for the young Gators to swallow, but
this is what they will have to do. Just around the bend (this
weekend to be exact) are Kentucky and Tennessee, two of the
nations better teams. Both are extremely tough at home.
It may be asking too much of the Gators to go in and defeat
either of the two. But, if they are to finish high in the conference
this year, it is almost essential.
But, even if they arent able to pull off upsets in the North,
they still have a lot to be proud of. No one was predicting big
things fo# the team earlier this year. It was supposed to be a
rebuilding season. But, it has already turned into more than that.
On the bright side, the Gators can still lose both road games
and come out with a 19-7 log. This isnt inconceivable since they
meet all other opponents at home except Tulane and LSU. As a
reminder, the 1965 team, rated best in UF history, only finished
18-7.

Clyde Lee, held to only two field goals and
15 points, converted six foul shots in the final
two minutes to provide Vanderbilt with its
margin of victory, which left Vanderbilt with a
16-2 record.
UCLA, the defending NCAA titlist which has
fallen upon hard times this season, defeated
Arizona University 84-67 Monday night to boost
its record to 11 5.
Ohio State overcame a 17-point deficit in the
second half to trip Wisconsin 87-81 in over overtime,
time, overtime, while Butler handed Notre Dame its 12th
consecutive setback by a 90-67 count.



Page 12

5, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday. Feb. 2, 1966

DUKE STILL NO. 1
, t
Loyola Surges In UPI Cage Ratings

NEW YORK (UPI) Loyolas
racehorse Ramblers continued
their surge to the top in the weekly
United Press International Board
of Coaches basketball ratings to today
day today and Michigan marched back
into the top 10 after a five week
absence.
The Ramblers from Chicago,
who captured the NCAA champion championship
ship championship three seasons ago, thundered
from seventh to fifth in the ratings
on the strength of three victories
last week, including a 102-96 win
over defending NCAA champion
UCLA.
Michigan, the pre-season choice
as the second best team in the
land, plunged from the select group
after the fourth week of the season
as the result of a series of inter intersectional
sectional intersectional upsets. But the Wolver Wolverines
ines Wolverines have regrouped in Big Ten
play, and their perfect conference

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record of 5-0 earned them ninth
place in the ratings.
Duke continued to lead all the
major colleges in voting by the
35-man UPI Board. The Blue De Devils,
vils, Devils, who whipped tough Atlantic
Coast Conference foe North Car Carolina
olina Carolina State 84-77 last Saturday
night in their first game in two
weeks, drew 28 first place votes,
two more than a week ago, and
338 points.
Second-ranked Kentucky, which
has been gaining ground on Duke
in recent weeks, received the other
seven nominations for the top spot
and 317 points to fall farther be behind
hind behind the leader.
Os more immediate importance
to the Wildcats, however, is a
Wednesday game at Vanderbilt,
which slipped past Providence into
the No. 3 slot after thrashing Lou Louisiana
isiana Louisiana State 98-66 in its only con contest

test contest last week. Kentucky handed
Vandy one of its two defeats ear earlier
lier earlier in the campaign at Lexington.
The ratings are based on games
played through Saturday, Jan. 29.
Texas Western, which like Ken Kentucky
tucky Kentucky won its first 14 games, re remained
mained remained sixth and Kansas pushed up
to seventh as St. Josephs and
Bradley each took a tumble. St.
Joes fell three spots to eighth
after dropping a 79-67 decision to
Dayton and Bradley dipped from
eighth to a tie for 13th with St.
Johns after taking a 103-71 beat beating
ing beating from Louisville.
Cincinnati, although a loser to
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Utah and Nebraska each moved
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pectively, respectively, and Dayton used its
upset of St. Joes as a spring springboard

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board springboard to 15th place.
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week ago, while New Mexico re returned
turned returned to the top 20 in 13th. Ok Oklahoma
lahoma Oklahoma City, the only team to defeat
Loyola, tied Tulsa, the Missoui i
Valley Conference leader, for 10th.